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Thread: COPS and ROBBERS: The Law Enforcement and Crime Thread

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  1. #1

    Exclamation COPS and ROBBERS: The Law Enforcement and Crime Thread

    I think it is time we devoted a separate thread already for cops and robbers, and other law enforcement, separate from the general legal-legalan thread.

  2. #2
    Murder raps set vs Marantan et al.

    NBI findings to be sent to Aquino today

    By Nancy C. Carvajal

    Philippine Daily Inquirer

    12:05 am | Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    Murder.

    The National Bureau of Investigation has completed its inquiry into the killing of 13 people in Atimonan, Quezon province, and is recommending the filing of murder charges against policemen and soldiers at the checkpoint where the incident happened on Jan. 6, the Inquirer learned Tuesday.

    Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said she expected the NBI to submit to her the report on its monthlong inquiry and that she would turn it over to President Aquino on Wednesday.

    “The President has asked me about the report and I told him I would give it to him (Wednesday),” De Lima told reporters. She earlier said that the NBI report had gone beyond 300 pages.

    “The recommendation was the filing of murder charges,” said a source who has knowledge of the NBI report. The source requested anonymity for lack of authority to speak to reporters.

    The source said that the main report of at least 70 pages contains the findings and the names of persons recommended by the NBI for prosecution. Enclosed with the report were annexes at least six inches thick. It includes the technical findings of the scene of the crime operatives, the accounts of three eyewitnesses and testimonies of more than 60 people.

    NBI Director Nonnatus Rojas submitted the report to De Lima Tuesday afternoon, according to the source, who said that the agency’s chief was the sole signatory to the document.

    On Jan. 6, alleged southern Luzon “jueteng” operator Victor “Vic” Siman and 12 others, including three policemen and three soldiers, were killed in what the Quezon police reported as a shootout between police and soldiers and a group of alleged guns for hire at a security checkpoint on Maharlika Highway in Atimonan.

    There were 15 policemen at the checkpoint, supported by 10 soldiers from the Army’s First Special Forces Battalion.

    Siman’s group was wiped out, but on the government’s side only the police team leader, Supt. Hansel Marantan, was wounded—in the hands and knee.

    Relatives cry ‘rubout’

    The officers said the firefight erupted after two sports utility vehicles carrying the alleged gang members tried to smash through the checkpoint. The exchange of gunfire supposedly lasted for 18 minutes.

    Relatives of the victims denied that the fatalities were gang members and doubted the initial reports of a shootout. Instead, they claimed what happened was a “rubout.”

    On Jan. 8, President Aquino ordered the NBI to investigate the incident. He directed the Philippine National Police to continue its fact-finding inquiry with respect to the firearms and vehicles, and submit its findings to the NBI.

    On Jan. 9, PNP Director General Alan Purisima ordered the suspension of the Quezon police chief, Senior Supt. Valeriano de Leon, and Marantan.

    Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said Marantan’s team violated procedures as an initial PNP investigation found that the policemen at the checkpoint were not in uniform. He said that while uniformed officers were stationed 500 meters from the checkpoint, the area was not marked with police signs.

    Anticrime superbody

    On Jan. 11, the NBI said it would expand its investigation and look into the role in the incident of the Presidential Anti-Organized Crime Commission (PAOCC), following a report that the anticrime superbody had approved the operation.

    Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., who chairs the PAOCC, denied approving the operation.

    Supt. Glenn Dumlao, commander of the Calabarzon Public Safety Battalion, said the regional police went ahead with the mission even without PAOCC approval on the presumption of regularity because it was their job to go after organized crime groups.

    On Jan. 15, the PNP fact-finding committee submitted its report to the NBI, and indicated that there was no shootout. It also said there was a deliberate effort to make the crime scene look like the site of a gun battle.

    The committee found that excessive force was used, indicated by their gunshot wounds and the number of bullet holes on their vehicles: Vehicle 1 with 174 entry bullet holes; vehicle 2 with 45 entry bullet holes. Eleven victims were shot in the head.

    Criminal, admin charges

    The PNP panel recommended the filing of criminal charges against the policemen and Army special forces that took part in the supposed shootout. They also recommended administrative charges against the policemen involved.

    The policemen included James Melad, former Calabarzon police chief; Marantan; Senior Supt. Valeriano de Leon, Quezon police director; Supt. Ramon Balauag, chief of intelligence of the Quezon police; Dumlao; Chief Insp. Grant Gollod, Atimonan police chief; Senior Insp. Ferdinand Aguilar, leader of the police team at the first of three checkpoints in Atimonan at the time of the supposed shootout; and Insp. Evaristo San Juan, team leader at the third checkpoint.

    On Jan. 24, Purisima approved the recommendation of the PNP Internal Affairs Service to bring administrative charges against 22 policemen involved in the incident for violation of the police operational procedures.

    As of last week, 20 policemen were under the custody of the police in Camp Crame while 15 soldiers of the Army’s Special Forces, who were part of an augmentation team, were restricted to quarters at the Army Headquarters in Fort Bonifacio.—With reports from Christine O. Avendaño and Inquirer Research

  3. #3
    Murder raps set vs Marantan et al.

    NBI findings to be sent to Aquino today

    By Nancy C. Carvajal

    Philippine Daily Inquirer

    12:05 am | Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    Murder.

    The National Bureau of Investigation has completed its inquiry into the killing of 13 people in Atimonan, Quezon province, and is recommending the filing of murder charges against policemen and soldiers at the checkpoint where the incident happened on Jan. 6, the Inquirer learned Tuesday.

    Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said she expected the NBI to submit to her the report on its monthlong inquiry and that she would turn it over to President Aquino on Wednesday.

    “The President has asked me about the report and I told him I would give it to him (Wednesday),” De Lima told reporters. She earlier said that the NBI report had gone beyond 300 pages.

    “The recommendation was the filing of murder charges,” said a source who has knowledge of the NBI report. The source requested anonymity for lack of authority to speak to reporters.

    The source said that the main report of at least 70 pages contains the findings and the names of persons recommended by the NBI for prosecution. Enclosed with the report were annexes at least six inches thick. It includes the technical findings of the scene of the crime operatives, the accounts of three eyewitnesses and testimonies of more than 60 people.

    NBI Director Nonnatus Rojas submitted the report to De Lima Tuesday afternoon, according to the source, who said that the agency’s chief was the sole signatory to the document.

    On Jan. 6, alleged southern Luzon “jueteng” operator Victor “Vic” Siman and 12 others, including three policemen and three soldiers, were killed in what the Quezon police reported as a shootout between police and soldiers and a group of alleged guns for hire at a security checkpoint on Maharlika Highway in Atimonan.

    There were 15 policemen at the checkpoint, supported by 10 soldiers from the Army’s First Special Forces Battalion.

    Siman’s group was wiped out, but on the government’s side only the police team leader, Supt. Hansel Marantan, was wounded—in the hands and knee.

    Relatives cry ‘rubout’

    The officers said the firefight erupted after two sports utility vehicles carrying the alleged gang members tried to smash through the checkpoint. The exchange of gunfire supposedly lasted for 18 minutes.

    Relatives of the victims denied that the fatalities were gang members and doubted the initial reports of a shootout. Instead, they claimed what happened was a “rubout.”

    On Jan. 8, President Aquino ordered the NBI to investigate the incident. He directed the Philippine National Police to continue its fact-finding inquiry with respect to the firearms and vehicles, and submit its findings to the NBI.

    On Jan. 9, PNP Director General Alan Purisima ordered the suspension of the Quezon police chief, Senior Supt. Valeriano de Leon, and Marantan.

    Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said Marantan’s team violated procedures as an initial PNP investigation found that the policemen at the checkpoint were not in uniform. He said that while uniformed officers were stationed 500 meters from the checkpoint, the area was not marked with police signs.

    Anticrime superbody

    On Jan. 11, the NBI said it would expand its investigation and look into the role in the incident of the Presidential Anti-Organized Crime Commission (PAOCC), following a report that the anticrime superbody had approved the operation.

    Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., who chairs the PAOCC, denied approving the operation.

    Supt. Glenn Dumlao, commander of the Calabarzon Public Safety Battalion, said the regional police went ahead with the mission even without PAOCC approval on the presumption of regularity because it was their job to go after organized crime groups.

    On Jan. 15, the PNP fact-finding committee submitted its report to the NBI, and indicated that there was no shootout. It also said there was a deliberate effort to make the crime scene look like the site of a gun battle.

    The committee found that excessive force was used, indicated by their gunshot wounds and the number of bullet holes on their vehicles: Vehicle 1 with 174 entry bullet holes; vehicle 2 with 45 entry bullet holes. Eleven victims were shot in the head.

    Criminal, admin charges

    The PNP panel recommended the filing of criminal charges against the policemen and Army special forces that took part in the supposed shootout. They also recommended administrative charges against the policemen involved.

    The policemen included James Melad, former Calabarzon police chief; Marantan; Senior Supt. Valeriano de Leon, Quezon police director; Supt. Ramon Balauag, chief of intelligence of the Quezon police; Dumlao; Chief Insp. Grant Gollod, Atimonan police chief; Senior Insp. Ferdinand Aguilar, leader of the police team at the first of three checkpoints in Atimonan at the time of the supposed shootout; and Insp. Evaristo San Juan, team leader at the third checkpoint.

    On Jan. 24, Purisima approved the recommendation of the PNP Internal Affairs Service to bring administrative charges against 22 policemen involved in the incident for violation of the police operational procedures.

    As of last week, 20 policemen were under the custody of the police in Camp Crame while 15 soldiers of the Army’s Special Forces, who were part of an augmentation team, were restricted to quarters at the Army Headquarters in Fort Bonifacio.—With reports from Christine O. Avendaño and Inquirer Research

  4. #4
    11 police officers get sanctions over P131M rubber-boat scandal

    By Cynthia D. Balana

    Philippine Daily Inquirer

    12:56 am | Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    Ombudsman Conchita Carpio Morales has imposed administrative sanctions ranging from dismissal from service and forfeiture of retirement benefits against 11 high-ranking Philippine National Police officials over the PNP’s irregular purchase of 75 defective rubber boats worth P131.5 million in 2008.

    In a decision dated Jan. 22, Morales declared Police Chief Supt. Herold Ubalde and Deputy Director General Benjamin Belarmino Jr. liable for gross neglect of duty and grave misconduct. The two were meted the penalty of dismissal from the service.

    In addition, the Ombudsman imposed the accessory penalties of forfeiture of retirement benefits and perpetual disqualification to hold public office. If the penalty can no longer be served by reason of resignation or retirement, the alternative penalty of fine equivalent to one-year salary is to be imposed, in addition to the accessory penalties, the Ombudsman said.

    Morales also found Police Director George Piano, Chief Supt. Luis Saligumba, Senior Supt. Job Nolan Antonio and Senior Supt. Edgar Paatan, who are all members of the PNP’s inspection and acceptance committee, liable for simple neglect of duty. They were meted the penalty of six months’ suspension without pay.

    Joel CL Garcia aka Joel Crisostomo de Leon Garcia, Ronald Lee, Ma. Linda Padojinog, and NUP Ruben Gongona, all members of the PNP national headquarters’ bids and awards committee and technical working group, were also ordered suspended for one month without pay.

    For his failure to take a “more proactive” stance as a member of the oversight committee and acting service chief of the Installations and Logistic Service, National Police Commission Director Conrado Sumanga Jr. was given a stern warning by Morales to be more circumspect in the performance of his duties.

    Records showed that the PNP in 2008 bought through a negotiated procurement plan 75 rubber boats and 18 spare engines or outboard motors for the PNP Maritime Group under the Capability Enhancement Program Funds.

    The purchase was made following the devastation brought by Tropical Storm “Ondoy” and Typhoon “Pepeng” in 2008.

    Deficiencies in equipment

    According to the Ombudsman, the PNP Maritime Group’s technical inspection committee on watercraft found that there were deficiencies in the equipment and that they were dangerous to use.

    Investigation also revealed that the boats and engines were not actually compatible and were not functional, the Ombudsman said.

    The Ombudsman spared from prosecution former PNP Police Chief Director General Jesus Verzosa, along with 18 others, for lack of jurisdiction in view of their retirement before the complaint was filed in 2011. Verzosa retired in September 2010.

    17 others exonerated

    Also exonerated for lack of sufficient evidence were 17 other respondents.

    In September 2012, the Ombudsman ordered the filing of graft charges against Verzosa and several other PNP officers before the Sandiganbayan for the same acts.

    Aside from Verzosa, also charged for violation of the Anti-Graft and Corrupt Practices Act were Police Deputy Director General Jefferson Soriano, Belarmino Jr., Police Directors Luizo Ticman, Ronald Roderos, Romeo Hilomen, Ubalde and Chief Supt. Villamor Bumanglag.

  5. #5
    No one is safe, who is in charge?

    By Amando Doronila

    Philippine Daily Inquirer

    10:05 pm | Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

    Since the killing of 13 people at a police-military checkpoint in Atimonan, Quezon, on Jan. 6, not a single day has passed without the media reporting a rising tide of robberies and break-ins into shops and homes in Metro Manila. In the Atimonan carnage, the National Bureau of Investigation has determined that the victims died not as a result of a shootout between the police-military team and a criminal group, but, rather, an extralegal execution by state law enforcement authorities.

    The NBI has decided to bring criminal charges against the soldiers and police supposedly involved in a “conspiracy” to tamper with the evidence to make the killings look like the results of a shootout. The Atimonan episode is just a high-profile demonstration of the general breakdown of law and order involving criminal law-breakers and also breaches in discipline of law enforcers. This breakdown of law and order has generated a crime spike in the past two months that has alarmed the Aquino administration. The crime wave has also caused concern among the general public that the country is not a safe place to live in, and not the economic paradise painted by the government in its claims of incandescent economic growth

    Late in January, Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas reported that the President was so alarmed by the spate of robberies in shopping malls and other high-profile crimes in Metro Manila despite a nationwide gun ban. Roxas said this had prompted him to meet with Philippine National Police Director General Alan Purisima and other senior police officials to discuss armed robberies in Metro Manila in recent days. “The President himself is alarmed and he is monitoring all these incidents,” Roxas told the PNP authorities. He cited robberies at a jewelry store in SM Megamall in Mandaluyong City and at a Western Union remittance center in Parañaque City last week. In the Megamall heist, six men, one of them armed with a .45 cal. pistol, smashed glass display cases and made off with at least 200 pieces of jewelry. Unarmed security guards failed to stop the robbers. Roxas said there was public concern that the gun ban and police checkpoints did not appear to deter criminals, who seem to be “taunting the government.”

    Roxas blamed the personnel shortage of the PNP for its failure to stop crimes. The Department of Interior and Local Government is considering a security plan involving the deployment of 8,000 to 10,000 security guards in Makati’s commercial district, and requiring the installation in shopping malls, stores, banks and financial institutions of closed-circuit television cameras as part of security arrangements.

    The rash of robberies and break-ins has triggered questions from the people on how safe they are from holdups and muggings. Many ask, “Who is in charge?” and “Who will protect us from criminals?” The breakdown of law and order has become a big political issue in the face of the midterm elections, in which the administration is seeking a fresh vote of confidence. The issue of law and order, more potent than the administration’s economic performance, is undermining the electoral chances of its candidates for the Senate, which it seeks to control. The Catholic Church hierarchy has also taken the administration to task for the law and order deterioration, claiming that the government was ruling “from a vacuum,” and was virtually nonexistent.

    In response to the criticism over the crime surge, the PNP fell back on a Social Weather Stations survey last December showing a high public approval rating of its performance. The survey, commissioned by the PNP, showed it “posting an all-time record of +50 (rating) since May 1998.” But this finding is dated and absolutely useless, and does not reflect public opinion on security events since the Jan. 6 Atimonan killings.

    Purisima said in a briefing for Inquirer editors and staff last week that only 29 percent of respondents said they had reported incidents to the police, indicating there was not much confidence in reporting matters to the police. “We still haven’t captured 71 percent, especially those who have experienced incidents like snatching or some break-ins into their house. We ask our countrymen to report crimes no matter how small they are so that these data will be used in studying crimes, in analyzing crime trends, so that we will know where we will deploy our policemen,” Purisima said.

    He also said that the crime rate remained low and that it was merely “perception” that there had been a rise in criminality. In fact, he claimed, criminals now are not as brazen as before, when they were armed with high-powered firearms. “There have not been much bank robberies lately,” he said. “The criminals are now after soft targets like pawnshops.”

    The SWS survey also found 16 percent of respondents dissatisfied with the police, and 18 percent undecided. It found that 6.4 percent of the respondents, representing 3.5 million people, had been robbed or had their pockets picked, and 3.2 percent, representing 1.7 million, had their homes broken into. On the other hand, 2.1 percent, representing 321,000 persons, were car theft victims, and 0.5 percent, or 291,000 persons, were victims of violence. Despite the high satisfaction rating, the survey also showed that only 20 percent of robberies and only 36 percent of house break-ins were actually reported to authorities.

    The survey further found that 31 percent of respondents said they did not report crimes because these were “too small a thing to bother” authorities with, while 10 percent said they expected no action on their complaints.

  6. #6
    2 Senators Oppose Bill Punishing Kids Aged 12 for Heinous Crimes

    By Mario B. Casayuran

    February 5, 2013, 10:21pm

    MANILA, Philippines — The possibility of passing a bill that lowers the age of criminal liability for heinous crimes to as low as 12 years old just got dimmer as two of the three members of the Senate panel in the bicameral conference committee are against it.

    Senators Francis Panglinan and Pia S. Cayetano have stonewalled any agreement between the Senate and House of Representatives panels to pass the bill amending the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act of 2006, authored by Senate Majority Leader Vicente Sotto III.

    Sotto, former chairman of the Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB), said that crimes committed by youngsters from the age of 12 to 15 has risen 1,400 percent “and we are giving the wrong signals that they are not being punished.’’

    Of the five Senate members in the bicameral conference committee, Panglinan and Cayetano want the age of discernment from 15 years old and up.

    Sotto is joined by Senators Francis Escudero and Teofisto Guingona III in lobbying for 12 years old as the age of discernment.

    Sotto said failure of the committee members to a compromise means that the bicameral conference committee members have to meet during the upcoming three-month break starting tomorrow leading to the May 2013 mid-term elections.

    In such a case, a conference committee report on the bill would have to be ratified, it at all, by the two legislative chambers when they resume regular session for at least three or four days starting June 3 after which they terminate the 15th Congress and adjourn sine die.

    “It is not the Senate that is stonewalling. Only members of the bicameral conference committee who do not want to accept the House version on one provision,” said Sotto.

    He said there have been calls from justices, judges, law enforcers and narcotics enforcers that the age when youngsters should be held criminally liable for heinous crimes and crimes with a jail term of 12 years or more should be from 12 years old to 18 years, not 15 years old onwards.

    Sotto the bill he filed sought to decrease the age to 11, an age that they acted with discernment to be able to be held criminally but the Lower House opted for 12 years old.

    “The House has stonewalled. Tama sila (they are right). They know it is the clamor being asked by judges, justices, prosecutors, and the Executive Department. Tapos ma-hohostage kami dito, kakampi ng CHR?’’ Sotto asked.

    Sotto did not mince words when he stated that Senators Pangilinan and Cayetano “look to, hear from or consult with” the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) rather than see his and the Lower House’s versions.

    If Congress fails to pass the measure today, Sotto said citizens should brace for the commission of “rape, murder, stabbing” by youngsters of ages 13 upwards “because we cannot detain or jail them.”

  7. #7
    De Lima upset, angry over leakages on Atimonan incident report

    By Tetch Torres

    INQUIRER.net

    8:22 pm | Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    MANILA, Philippines—Irked by the leakage of the Atimonan incident report, Justice Secretary Leila De Lima said she will order an investigation to identify “defiant agents” who disregarded their order not to prematurely disclose information.

    The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) has been tasked to investigate the circumstances surrounding the Atimonan shooting incident that led to the death of 13 people.

    The NBI report has yet to be submitted to the President due to minor glitches in binding the more than two inch thick report.

    However, reports came out quoting sources that the police and soldiers involved in the shooting incident will be charged with murder.

    “Alam nyo bilin kasi ng Pangulo na wag dapat i-leak o i-release yung report. Kaya nga nalulungkot ako, nagagalit ako sa mga leakages na yan (The President said there shouldn’t be any leakage. That’s why I am sad, I am furious over these leakages). I specifically and repeatedly gave that instructions to the NBI team working on that report through [NBI] Director [Nonnatus] Rojas and he also said that he also repeatedly gave that instructions to the NBI team that there should be no premature disclosure of any of the content of the report,” she said.

    “So, yung nababasa natin, sasabihin nila (So what we are reading, they will reveal) from an NBI source or requested anonymity obviously they would do so because he or she is not authorized to speak. Dun kami nababanas ni Director Rojas (It’s because of that that’s why Director Rojas and I are upset),” De Lima told reporters.

    After the release of the report, De Lima said she will order Rojas to conduct an investigation to identify the NBI agents who leaked the report and impose sanctions.

    “That is defiance of a direct order from a superior. Tingin ko may ilang element dyan sa (I think there are some people in the) NBI who are undermining the leadership of Director Rojas or the Secretary of Justice,” she said.

  8. #8
    PNP unlikely to give legal aid to cops tagged in Quezon shooting

    By Marlon Ramos

    Philippine Daily Inquirer

    7:58 pm | Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    MANILA, Philippines—Policemen who might be indicted for murder in connection with the Atimonan, Quezon, shooting that left 13 persons dead, should face the consequences of their actions, the Philippine National Police (PNP) said on Wednesday.

    And they may have to do it on their own.

    Chief Supt. Generoso Cerbo Jr., PNP spokesperson, said members of the police team involved in the Jan. 6 incident, which left 13 people dead, should not expect immediate legal assistance from the PNP due to questions over the legitimacy of the checkpoint operation.

    He reiterated the position of PNP Director General Alan Purisima that the PNP would stand by the findings and recommendations of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI), which had been tasked by President Aquino to look into the case.

    “That’s the call of the NBI. If (the filing of murder charges) would be the recommendation, then our personnel should face that,” Cerbo said in a news briefing at Camp Crame.

    “Whatever would be the findings of the NBI, the PNP will respect that. We will support the NBI’s investigation,” he continued.

    A source, who has been familiar with the NBI probe into the Atimonan shooting, had told the Philippine Daily Inquirer that the NBI investigators had recommended the filing of murder charges against the policemen who carried out the bloody operation.

    Asked if the PNP would provide any legal assistance to its embattled personnel, Cerbo said the police organization, having only a few lawyers, could not guarantee legal aid.

    Like regular policemen, he said police-lawyers were also assigned to specific tasks, which would make them unavailable for regular court duties.

    “Anyway, there is still the issue of whether or not the incident was in line with the performance of their duty. There is also a question of abuse of authority. So if providing legal assistance is proper or not, that should be decided by the top leadership,” he said.

    “At this point, there is no immediate legal assistance. But if they want the help of our legal service, they have to put their request in writing. They have to make a formal request.”

    Cerbo advised the PNP personnel to just hire the services of private lawyers like what Supt. Hansel Marantan, the ground commander of the Atimonan operation, did.

  9. #9
    Cops to face 13 counts of murder

    By Edu Punay

    (The Philippine Star) | Updated February 7, 2013 - 12:00am

    MANILA, Philippines - The killing was premeditated, and members of a police-military team will face 13 counts of murder.

    This is the gist of the report submitted yesterday by the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) to Justice Secretary Lilia de Lima on the deaths of 13 men in Atimonan, Quezon last Jan. 6.

    The team was led by police Superintendent Hansel Marantan, who is still recuperating from a wound in a hospital.

    It was not clear if murder charges were also recommended against Chief Superintendent James Melad, who was sacked as regional police commander of the Calabarzon after the shooting. Malacañang has said Melad gave the green light for the operation that ostensibly targeted one of the 13 fatalities, alleged jueteng lord Vic Siman.

    De Lima returned the report to the NBI yesterday for additional attachments. NBI Director Nonnatus Rojas submitted the report to the justice chief behind closed doors.

    Around 30 minutes later, Rojas stepped out of De Lima’s office still carrying the five-inch-thick report.

    He clarified De Lima did not return the report for revisions.

    “The main report is already completed. We just need to attach some more annexes,” he said as he refused to discuss their findings with reporters.

    De Lima said she expects the President to discuss the NBI findings with her for clarifications or clearance before making the report public.

    Meanwhile, doctors at the PNP-General Hospital observed that Marantan’s recovery from the wound he sustained during the incident was slow.

    Dr. Martin Sison recommended that Marantan undergo electromyogram nerve conduction velocity to determine if he has suffered nerve damage.

    Rojas said they would resubmit the report this morning before it is forwarded to the Palace for official announcement.

    A source privy to the investigation, however, confirmed to The STAR that there was ample basis to file 13 counts of murder against Marantan and his team.

    The source said the probers were able to establish that the killing was premeditated.

    However, the insider refused to confirm whether the level of liability would reach the Presidential Anti-Organized Crime Commission (PAOCC).

    “The report is just recommendatory. The Palace has discretion to accept or reject it,” the source said.

    The NBI has summoned 12 ranking police and military officials, including Melad.

    However, it was not confirmed if Melad is among those recommended charged for the incident.

    Chief Superintendent Ma. Angela Vidal, director of the PNP Health Service, said Marantan underwent debridement and closure of his wound on the left arm on Tuesday.

    Vidal said that Marantan’s electromyogram would be undertaken at the St. Luke’s Medical Center, with his private physician. She said the process would only take a few hours.

    In the absence of any court case, the official said they would still seek approval from PNP chief Director General Alan Purisima before Marantan could be taken out of the PNP General Hospital.

    Vidal said the police officer could not also walk on his own and is always assisted by his father due to his wounds in both legs.

    She said Marantan continues to undergo therapy and needs to stay in the hospital for another two weeks. - with Cecille Suerte Felipe, Sandy Araneta
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI

  10. #10
    Gross neglect of duty

    (The Philippine Star) | Updated February 7, 2013 - 12:00am

    Two police generals have retired, but they will still feel their dismissal from the service in the forfeiture of all their retirement benefits. Deputy Director General Benjamin Belarmino Jr. and Chief Superintendent Herold Ubalde were ordered dismissed by the Office of the Ombudsman for grave misconduct and gross neglect of duty in connection with the purchase of 75 rubber boats and 18 spare engines by the Philippine National Police in 2008. Eight other PNP officials and personnel were also suspended in connection with the deal.

    Belarmino, Ubalde and the others still face graft charges filed last year by the ombudsman with the Sandiganbayan for the P131.5-million negotiated procurement of the boats and outboard motors. Also facing charges in court is retired PNP chief Jesus Verzosa.

    Other PNP officials are facing administrative and criminal charges for questionable supply procurement deals including the acquisition of second-hand helicopters at brand-new prices. Some of the officials have argued that their roles in the deals were largely ministerial. Even if this is true, a law enforcer’s silence in the face of a questionable transaction is seen as acquiescence and therefore complicity. At the very least, such officials will find themselves sanctioned for gross neglect of duty.

    The legal woes of these PNP officials, several of whom are supposed to be enjoying their retirement, should bring home to cops the importance of ensuring that all transactions they enter into are aboveboard. Technology is leaving little room for excuses in blocking transparency in government procurement. These days, where there is opaqueness in utilization of public funds, state auditors or anti-graft investigators tend to nose around.

    The legal problems of some of the PNP’s ranking officials should spur the organization to implement long-overdue measures to promote transparency and accountability. If cops don’t care much about their organization, perhaps they will want to keep in mind that anomalous deals can ruin careers and permanently tarnish a police officer’s name.
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI


 
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