twitterfacebookgoogle+register
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 103

Thread: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

Share/Bookmark
  1. #11

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    Quote Originally Posted by danny
    Quote Originally Posted by salsa caballero
    bistek ='s "beef steak"

    analogous to "tambay" which is a filipinization of "stand-by"

    at any rate, it works both ways as the Americans' "boondocks" is a direct adaptation of our "bundok" :-)
    Pero bakit ganun ang naging luto? Soy Sauce, onions and pepper. That's it.
    Danny, beef steak is a generic recipe of the Americans that involved shallow-frying a thin or pounded-out slab of skirt steak or flank steak and then slathering it with a dark gravy with onion bits. I believe it is a Yankee version of the country fried steak of the Southerners. This was served with fried large red tomatoes that they now call beefsteak tomatoes.

    My best guess is that when the Americans came to the Philippines and began cooking this dish and showing the natives how to cook it, the Filipinos as usual adapted. Eventually I suppose the Filipinos didn't just fry the beef steaks and slather sauce / gravy on it, but just plain cooked the beef with the sauce and onions all in, and they dispensed with the tomatoes.
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI

  2. #12

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    ^^^

    Possible.

    One "myth" that stuck with me until recently was the use of ketchup in some Pinoy food. Eventually I realized that this too was taken from the American south. Also , our sweet tooth is not distinctly Pinoy after all. The American southerners like putting sugar in some of the food they cook. Wow!

    I'm betting that hotdog as an extender in our sweet style Spaghetti has an American origin too.

    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?

  3. #13

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy


    Who invented the "balot"? Us or the vietnamese?

  4. #14

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    What do they call it back in Vietnam?
    what do you call cheese that isn't yours? NACHO CHEESE

  5. #15

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    ^^ Neither, I believe it was the Japanese. That is, if the Araling Panlipunan I had in grade school was of any value.
    In Season 74, it was all about a phenomenal Salva-tion that brought about a Slaughter.

  6. #16

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas Palaka
    What do they call it back in Vietnam?
    Hot vit lon.

  7. #17

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy



    I prefer Vietnamese balut.
    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?

  8. #18

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy


    Chicken feet, head, and all those internal organs we eat have been part of the Cantonese cuisine for hundreds of years. They say that the Cantonese will cook and eat everything that has four legs and has it's back against the sun.

    Addidas, helmet at bituka? Not originally Pinoy.
    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?

  9. #19

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    Does "pinikpikan" really taste different from meat slaughtered the traditional way?

  10. #20

    Re: Kasaysayan ng pagkaing Pinoy

    ^^^

    No idea.

    From what I understand, the flavor of the meat, in this case chicken, depend more on how the poultry was fed and raised. Free range vs the "factory" way. The kind of poultry will also determine the taste. The French Blue Leg chicken vs. the White Leghorn for example.

    The cooking technique and the spices will also make wonders.

    As to how they were butchered, I surmise that tortured meat is less attractive from an emotional point of view. ;D


    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?


 
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

 
Visitor count:
Copyright © 2005 - 2013. Gameface.ph