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Thread: Coaches from yesteryears ?

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  1. #1

    Coaches from yesteryears ?

    Does anybody recognized the following names? Where they involved in sports at one time? as coaches perhaps? or maybe in another field ? Thanks

    Eduardo Mesina
    Rafael Roco
    Angelino Sunga
    Oscar Tañedo

  2. #2

    Coaches from yesteryears ?

    not sure but i think rafael roco played/coached mapua
    he is the father of bembol roco

  3. #3

    Coaches

    As I was reviewing the threads for Bounce Past, I think we pretty much covered the different leagues that made up Philippine basketball. NCAA, UAAP, MICAA, PBA, MBA, PBL, UCAA, BAA . Some other topics might come up in the near future but one thing I like to add for now is : who are our Coaches? Iam sure they have also stories to tell. So in between checking old files, we must also look for articles on our great coaches. There are many I am sure. To name a few:
    Pedro Villanueva
    Alfredo del Rosario
    Dionisio Calvo
    Felicisimo Fajardo
    Herminio Silva
    Leo Prieto
    Valentin Eduque
    Arturo Rius
    Enrique Crame
    Carlos Loyzaga
    Lauro Mumar
    Ignacio Ramos
    Nicanor Jorge
    Ron Jacobs
    Joe Lipa
    Robert Jaworski
    Norman Black
    Tim Cone
    Jong Uichico
    Vincent Reyes
    Arturo Valenzona
    Chito Narvasa
    Pilo Pumaren
    Tommy Manotoc
    Narciso Bernardo
    Vincent Reyes
    Yeng Guiao
    Fort Acuna
    there are others that escape my mind right now, and I'll add more. You might notice some are still active, so stories on how they started is a must read for the new fans. Hope we can generate interest on our coaches thread. Thanks, Toto.

  4. #4

    Re: Coaches

    Great Idea Mods Toto, We can also posted Coaches profile too.

  5. #5

    Re: Coaches

    You forgot Baby Dalupan, Dante Silverio, Franz Pumaren, Derrick Pumaren, Joel Banal, Aric Del Rosario, Jimmy Mariano, Leo Isaac, Alfrancis Chua, and Roehl Nadurata. May I contribute for some profiles? First 5 muna. Here's my take:

    1. Virgilio "Baby" Dalupan- The greatest Philippine basketball coach, if not, maybe one of the greatest we have ever seen. He has coached teams such as Crispa, Great Taste, and Purefoods, and schools such as UE and Ateneo. He steered all of his teams en route to several titles with the leagues he has competed. He has mentored players such as Robert Jaworski, Johnny Revilla, Atoy Co, Bogs Adornado, Alvin Patrimonio, Joy Carpio, Steve Watson, Jerry Codinera, Ricardo Brown, Ritchie Ticzon, and other players to tell.

    2. Arturo Valenzona- Next to Dalupan, maybe, is also a great coach. But prior to being a player, he became a court general for the Yco Paints before briefly playing in the Utex during the early years of the PBA and retired after 1976. Has has coached many teams in every league, for 32 years of existence. It all started from APOCOR to Tanduay to Alaska/Hills Bros. to Pop Cola to Ginebra and to Montana, and he also coached schools such as FEU, SSC-R, and Olivarez College.

    3. Joe Lipa- Ever wondered of a "real" coach and a discipinarian? That's him, from the first hime you will look at him, from his face (which actually had a moustache, he shaved it prior to being Ateneo's coach), you'll really feel pressured. And his strategy and perfect dealing with players made him a winner, by having titles with UP and Philips Sardines. He also coached Shell, FedEx, Ateneo, Ateneo-Pioneer, Wilkins, Oriental Battery, and A&W Rootbeer.

    4. Aric Del Rosario- Like Lipa, he is also a "real" coach and a diciplinarian. 4 straight UAAP titles, you got it. He also coached the Pampanga Dragons, Smart-Pampanga Buddies, and AMA-UST.

    5. Earl Timothy "Tim" Cone- Next to Dalupan, he's one of the greatest PBA coaches ever seen, and has never wondered to be successful, but his players' hardwork and his determination, and he became a winner, you got it, 12 championships, plus a grandslam. And he has mentored players to many generatons, which started from Frankie Lim to Paul Alvarez to Jojo Lastimosa to Johnny Abbarientos to John Arigo to Ali Peek to Nic Belasco to Sonny Thoss and to Willie Miller.

  6. #6

    Re: Coaches

    Pepman....yes, how can I forget Baby Dalupan and Dante Silverio two coaches whose great minds led to the Crispa-Toyota rivalry. And Aric del Rosario architect of UST's unbeaten squad in the 90's. Like I said there are many more coaches we need to ackowledge.
    Emon74...coaches profiles is good. Thanks.

  7. #7

    Re: Coaches

    Another great coach is Ed Ocampo. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think his Royal Tru Orange team was the one that broke Crispa and Toyota's strangle-hold of championships in the early years of the PBA. He also coached the last Toyota team that beat Crispa in a championship series in the 1981 Open Conference. And I believe that this was the last Crispa-Toyota finals series.

  8. #8

    Re: Coaches

    Manila Standard, Thursday, April 23, 1987
    Turo Valenzona
    The coach who has come a long way

    By Raffy Japa

    The bench seemed to be the natural destination of former Yco ace sentinel Arturo Valenzona, the man who calls the shots for Tanduay in the Philippine Basketball Association.

    Even as a player of the late Peping Yee at Far Eastern in the late 50's, Valenzona would find himself analyzing game situations, spotting weaknesses and mismatches, and suggesting strategies for easy baskets.

    When he was taken by Yco in the next decade, Valenzona was wooed by the Reyes brothers of FEU to train the Tamaraws while he was reviewing at the school for the CPA examinations.

    In 1972, he agreed to take on the bench chores for FEU although it was short lived since active players are not allowed to call the shots for university teams. He was banned by former Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation president Ambrosio Padilla from coaching in the UAAP, because of a protest from other coaches, but somehow he tried to find ways and means to reach the bench without being called "coach".

    First, he was appointed as consultant to regular FEU coach Che Poblete, then he was elevated to team manager. From behind the bench he would pass out instuctions. As team manager he had the liberty to sit on the Tamaraw bench without being thumbed out.

    "Wala silang makitang rule book na nagsasabing hindi puwedeng maging manager ang active na player at lalong hindi nila puwedeng paalisin sa bench ang team manager," said Valenzona the other day of his "remote control coaching" to steer the Tamaraws to several UAAP titles.

    Even as a member of the U-Tex Wranglers in the PBA in 1977 and 1978, Valenzona would find himself kibitzing on game strategies and situations. Under coach Tommy Manotoc, he gained valuable insights on defense and motivation.

    He read several books, among them, Hank Iba's On Defense. Then he talked with many noted coaches who encouraged him to taste the life on the bench.

    Lauro Mumar, Baby Dalupan, Fely Fajardo, Tito Eduque, Nilo Verona. All of them gave him their two cents worth of advice in between gulfs of beer at various watering holes near the Rizal Coliseum or Araneta.

    He listened intently and plotted imaginary X's and O's. Things he put to good use when he finally plunged into active coaching after he retired in 1978. And like Midas touch, most of his teams in the amateur leagues turned out to be champions, Solid Mills, APCOR, The 1978 Philippine Youth team.

    In 1982 after the Herdis owned APCOR team was disbanded, Valenzona was elevated to the bench chores of the PBA, calling the shots for Gilbey's Gin which despite having no superstar in its line up managed to finish as runner up thrice to Toyota and Crispa in two years.

    Valenzona claims he never had any problem with superstar players, saying "kahit naman si Robert Jaworski (Gilbey's) o Ramon Fernandez (Tanduay) ay sumusunod kung ano ang ipagawa ko sa court."

    "My being a former player helped me a lot to understand how these players feel I know how to handle even those superstars since I had been a star player myself," he added.

    It was when he moved over to Tanduay in 1985 third conference that Valenzona found a team loaded with promise. A promise which he fulfilled the next year with two straight titles in the Reinforced and All-Filipino conferences.

    Valenzona, had his humble beginnings in the seamy side of that dreaded street called Leveriza in the heart of Malate, where he grew up along with neighbourhood toughies, picking up fights as often as his then frail frame would allow.

    The need to survive forced the young boy from Baybay, Leyte, to support himself by working as a "ball boy" at the nearby tennis courts of the Rizal sports complex, oftentimes finding himself selling frozen goodies on the side to augment his income.

    Whatever he earned from this entrepreneurship, Valenzona used for his studies at the Aurora elementary school and in taking up karate lessons to defend himself against the street bullies.

    Plain dedication and hard worked allowed Valenzona to finish his elementary schooling six years later and move on to Far Eastern U where another phase of his colorful career was to start.

    "The first title of Tanduay and my first championship as a national coach for the 1978 Youth team were my sweetest triumphs as a coach," said the 44-year old Valenzona.

    In the PBA where players are (usually) equipped with fundamentals, the even tougher chore of molding individual skills together is the biggest challenge of a coach.

    Valenzona is liberal yet he commands respect from his players, no matter what level of stature they are. He shapes their individuality into the team concept, transforms selfishness into sacrifice, weaknesses into strength, divergence to unity.

    "Simple lang ang rules ko. Huwag ma-le-late at seryoso sa practice. I place much emphasis on attitude. I try to give everybody a chance to show their worth on the team, although sometimes, sumasama rin, katulad noong matalo kami sa Philippine team," Valenzona said.

    This early, Valenzona's Rhum Makers are eyeing one of two outright semi-finals berths in the 1987 PBA Open Conference. Only Great Taste Coffee and Magnolia appear to be theiir chief rivals for the top two slots after the double round eliminations.

    "Ang trend namin ngayon ay running game, pero kung talagang hindi makuha ay nag-i-slow down kami," said Valenzona, who is drilling the Rhum Makers on the fastbreak patterns with the help of trainer Gigi Sanchez for their endurance and quickness.

    Just the same the coach's bench is the most sensitive spot in the game. Coaches are the shock absorbers of team defeats, yet in moments of triumph, they are half-seen, half-forgotten heroes while the players savor the applause of the crowd.

    "Talagang ganoon kapag panalo, player ang panalo. Kapag talo coach ang sinisisi," said Valenzona.

  9. #9

    Re: Coaches

    Valenzona claims he never had any problem with superstar players, saying "kahit naman si Robert Jaworski (Gilbey's) o Ramon Fernandez (Tanduay) ay sumusunod kung ano ang ipagawa ko sa court."

    "My being a former player helped me a lot to understand how these players feel I know how to handle even those superstars since I had been a star player myself," he added.

    It was when he moved over to Tanduay in 1985 third conference that Valenzona found a team loaded with promise. A promise which he fulfilled the next year with two straight titles in the Reinforced and All-Filipino conferences.

    Valenzona, had his humble beginnings in the seamy side of that dreaded street called Leveriza in the heart of Malate, where he grew up along with neighbourhood toughies, picking up fights as often as his then frail frame would allow.

    The need to survive forced the young boy from Baybay, Leyte, to support himself by working as a "ball boy" at the nearby tennis courts of the Rizal sports complex, oftentimes finding himself selling frozen goodies on the side to augment his income.

    Whatever he earned from this entrepreneurship, Valenzona used for his studies at the Aurora elementary school and in taking up karate lessons to defend himself against the street bullies.

    Plain dedication and hard worked allowed Valenzona to finish his elementary schooling six years later and move on to Far Eastern U where another phase of his colorful career was to start.

    "The first title of Tanduay and my first championship as a national coach for the 1978 Youth team were my sweetest triumphs as a coach," said the 44-year old Valenzona.

    In the PBA where players are (usually) equipped with fundamentals, the even tougher chore of molding individual skills together is the biggest challenge of a coach.

    Valenzona is liberal yet he commands respect from his players, no matter what level of stature they are. He shapes their individuality into the team concept, transforms selfishness into sacrifice, weaknesses into strength, divergence to unity.

    "Simple lang ang rules ko. Huwag ma-le-late at seryoso sa practice. I place much emphasis on attitude. I try to give everybody a chance to show their worth on the team, although sometimes, sumasama rin, katulad noong matalo kami sa Philippine team," Valenzona said.

    This early, Valenzona's Rhum Makers are eyeing one of two outright semi-finals berths in the 1987 PBA Open Conference. Only Great Taste Coffee and Magnolia appear to be theiir chief rivals for the top two slots after the double round eliminations.
    I remember that game when the RP Team upsets Tanduay, A young Alvin Patrimonio scored 31 points, one of the highlights was his 3-point play off prolific import David Thirdkill around the 2nd period, it brought the crowd to its feet, I cant forget as well the "color" between Turing Valenzona and Ginebra playing coach Robert Jaworski in one of those classic Tanduay-Ginebra rivalries that same conference that year.

    Agreed that Tanduay's first title has to be the most memorable kay turing, not only because its the first championship but they beat a team that almost won a grandslam the previous year, Great Taste, dalawang beses din tinalo ni Valenzona sa finals ang dean of Philippine coaches, none other than Baby D. the maestro.

  10. #10

    Re: Coaches

    This Coach is a Winner
    March 1989
    By Nene Dela Rama

    Newly-Crowned national collegiate champions San Sebastian College Stags coach Francis Rodriguez may want to keep a low-profile in basketball, but his record as a cage mentor in the last four years is more than most coaches can boast of. In only four years of coaching, Rodriguez has given his school six championships, two in the NCAA (1985 and 1988 season), two National Collegiate titles (1987 and 1989), two MMBL crowns (1985 and 1986) and on the side, steered the Gold Gee Acryllic team to its first championship in the Filipino-Chinese Basketball league last year.
    Coach Rodriguez's latest triumph, the 1989 National Inter-Collegiate Championship held at the ULTRA and hosted by Pasig, may yet be his best accomplishment as a coach to date. For in crowning his school team as the best collegiate team in the country, he defeated such respected teams as the Ateneo Blue Eagles, the reigning UAAP and National UAAP champion, the De la Salle Green Archers, the defending national champions and runner-up in the 1988 UAAP tournament coached by no less than the present national coach Derek Pumaren, and the Western Visayas champions, the Southwestern University Cobras. With this triumph and his past accomplishments in winning titles, Rodriguez, takes his rightful place as one of the country's top court tacticians. With these records speaking for themselves, the BAP should make good use of Francis Rodriguez in national and international competitions.
    Francis Rodriguez started his basketball career as a member of San Sebastian College senior varsity team in 1973 which won the school's first NCAA crown together with Boy Mora, the late Jimmy Otazu, Benjie Cleofas and Marte Samson. Twelve years later in 1985, Francis, as his school's coach, steered his alma mater team to its second NCAA title on his first year as head coach. After playing for his school team, Francis, standing at 6-3, played center with the Crown Motors team, a sister team of Toyota in the PBA under coach Nat Canson and later the Solid Mills team in the defunct MICAA. His first coaching stint was with the Romualdez Group of Companies where he mentored the Program team to the championship.
    He served as assistant to his brother-in-law, Orly Castelo, in the San Sebastian College in 1983 and 1984 before assuming the position of head coach of the Stags after Orly Castelo resigned to devote full time to his job at Elizalde y Cia. Francis is also presently a member of the regular coaching staff of the BEST (Basketball Efficiency Scientific Training). Francis Rodriguez is definitely a national coach material and the BAP should do well in looking over the records and potential of this young, winner of a coach.
    Last edited by Emon74; 11-23-2016 at 02:36 PM.


 
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