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Thread: Radio GAGA. Where radiostars don't get killed by videos.

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  1. #1

    Radio GAGA. Where radiostars don't get killed by videos.

    Radio station keeps Spanish language alive

    Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    Despite 400 years as a colony of Spain, the Philippines has retained little trace of the language but producers of the country’s only Spanish-language radio program say that’s about to change.

    “Filipinas Ahora Mismo” – which loosely translated means “Philippines Right Now” – features book and movie reviews, information on the Spanish influence in different parts of the country and music by modern stars such as Enrique Iglesias and Ricky Martin, all in Spanish.

    It is just a small step but its producers hope the show can help lead a revival in a language that has withered away in most of the Southeast Asian archipelago nation.

    “It is not a question of making Filipinos speak Spanish again,” says Spanish Ambassador Luis Arias Romero. “It is a question of making Filipinos aware of the importance of Spanish in culture and world affairs.”

    The radio show, sponsored by the Cadiz Press Association, is part of this effort although the project’s manager Chaco Molina concedes they still have a long way to go.

    Molina said when the Cadiz association first proposed the plan, they suggested an eight-hour radio show. “I told them that was too ambitious. This isn’t Guatemala where everyone speaks Spanish,” he said.

    The show, hosted by veteran Filipino broadcaster Bon Vivar, airs from 7-8 p.m. Monday to Friday on government-owned dzRM radio at 1278 kHz in Manila, and in simulcast to several major cities.

    “I see a renaissance of the Spanish language in the Philippines,” says Molina, adding the show is aiming at a young audience who will be more receptive to the language.

    What surprises Spaniards who come to the Philippines is the fact that their language has virtually disappeared.

    The archipelago was first colonized by the Spanish in the early 16th century shortly after Ferdinand Magellan arrived in the islands and later died here in 1521.

    Spanish culture permeates the country where 80 percent of the population are followers of a Spanish-styled Roman Catholicism and where 20,000 Spanish words have been absorbed into most of the local dialects.

    Even today, Filipinos eat paella, menudo and chorizo, have brazo de Mercedes and turrones for dessert and drink Fundador Brandy.

    But when the Philippines passed from Spanish to American control after the Spanish-American war of 1898, English completely supplanted Spanish.

    Today, most Filipinos speak and read English.

    The most serious blow came in 1987 when the government removed Spanish as one of the official national languages of the country and did away with a requirement that college students take courses in Spanish.

    Jose Rodriguez, local director of Instituto Cervantes, the Spanish cultural center, notes that ironically, only one Philippine university now offers a doctoral course in Spanish compared to 12 universities in South Korea and 10 in Japan.

    Rodriguez says there is no updated figure on how many Filipinos can actually speak Spanish although Molina says a study in the 1990s found one out of eight Filipinos could understand some Spanish.

    Molina says the Spanish language was never as widespread in the Philippines as in Latin America.* * * * * * * * * * * *

    Christian missionaries who came to the Philippines found it easier to learn the local dialects to preach to the natives rather than teaching them Spanish.* * * – AFP


  2. #2

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    Quote Originally Posted by pachador
    Despite 400 years as a colony of Spain, the Philippines has retained little trace of the language but producers of the country’s only Spanish-language radio program say that’s about to change...

    What surprises Spaniards who come to the Philippines is the fact that their language has virtually disappeared.

    The archipelago was first colonized by the Spanish in the early 16th century shortly after Ferdinand Magellan arrived in the islands and later died here in 1521.

    Spanish culture permeates the country where 80 percent of the population are followers of a Spanish-styled Roman Catholicism and where 20,000 Spanish words have been absorbed into most of the local dialects.

    Even today, Filipinos eat paella, menudo and chorizo, have brazo de Mercedes and turrones for dessert and drink Fundador Brandy.

    But when the Philippines passed from Spanish to American control after the Spanish-American war of 1898, English completely supplanted Spanish.
    eh kung itinuro ba nila sa mga pampublikong paaralan ang wikang kastila nung panahon nila, di sana kastila nga talaga ang wika natin, hindi ingles. yan ang di alam ng mga mangmang na kastila na nagtataka kung bakit ingles ang lingua franca sa pilipinas ;D
    "Of all the books I read, Facebook is the greatest"
    --sign on a T-shirt I saw on the way to work the other day

  3. #3

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    e senor Cubao,

    do you drink Fundador, Vino o Cerveza ?* *
    sabi kasi sa article tumotoma daw mga pinoy ng fundador o baka naman Matador brandy?* ;D
    sa mga tomador diyan paki-explica kung ano ang mas malasa.... :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Cubao
    Quote Originally Posted by pachador
    Despite 400 years as a colony of Spain, the Philippines has retained little trace of the language but producers of the country’s only Spanish-language radio program say that’s about to change...

    What surprises Spaniards who come to the Philippines is the fact that their language has virtually disappeared.

    The archipelago was first colonized by the Spanish in the early 16th century shortly after Ferdinand Magellan arrived in the islands and later died here in 1521.

    Spanish culture permeates the country where 80 percent of the population are followers of a Spanish-styled Roman Catholicism and where 20,000 Spanish words have been absorbed into most of the local dialects.

    Even today, Filipinos eat paella, menudo and chorizo, have brazo de Mercedes and turrones for dessert and drink Fundador Brandy.

    But when the Philippines passed from Spanish to American control after the Spanish-American war of 1898, English completely supplanted Spanish.
    eh kung itinuro ba nila sa mga pampublikong paaralan ang wikang kastila nung panahon nila, di sana kastila nga talaga ang wika natin, hindi ingles. yan ang di alam ng mga mangmang na kastila na nagtataka kung bakit ingles ang lingua franca sa pilipinas ;D

  4. #4

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    Quote Originally Posted by pachador
    e senor Cubao,

    do you drink Fundador, Vino o Cerveza ?* *
    sabi kasi sa article tumotoma daw mga pinoy ng fundador o baka naman Matador brandy?* ;D
    sa mga tomador diyan paki-explica kung ano ang mas malasa.... :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Cubao
    Quote Originally Posted by pachador
    Despite 400 years as a colony of Spain, the Philippines has retained little trace of the language but producers of the country’s only Spanish-language radio program say that’s about to change...

    What surprises Spaniards who come to the Philippines is the fact that their language has virtually disappeared.

    The archipelago was first colonized by the Spanish in the early 16th century shortly after Ferdinand Magellan arrived in the islands and later died here in 1521.

    Spanish culture permeates the country where 80 percent of the population are followers of a Spanish-styled Roman Catholicism and where 20,000 Spanish words have been absorbed into most of the local dialects.

    Even today, Filipinos eat paella, menudo and chorizo, have brazo de Mercedes and turrones for dessert and drink Fundador Brandy.

    But when the Philippines passed from Spanish to American control after the Spanish-American war of 1898, English completely supplanted Spanish.
    eh kung itinuro ba nila sa mga pampublikong paaralan ang wikang kastila nung panahon nila, di sana kastila nga talaga ang wika natin, hindi ingles. yan ang di alam ng mga mangmang na kastila na nagtataka kung bakit ingles ang lingua franca sa pilipinas ;D
    Mahal kasi ang Fundador, kaya Empoy o Granma na lang ako.
    Brokensauce. Coming soon to a club near you.

  5. #5

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    Is there really a viable market out there for Spanish content?* Sounds like the Vatican instructing local churches to increase the latin content of its masses, may they be english, tagalog, or *insert favorite local dialect here* masses.* Given that Filipinos are slowly losing their command of the english language, and kids from non-english speaking countries like China, japan, Korea, etc. are paying big moolah just to learn english in english-speaking countries like the US and Canada, hindi ba medyo wala sa timing ang initiative na ito?

    Just me trying to make sense out of it.

  6. #6

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    Hi Jaco,

    I don't think the intent is to supplant English as our medium of instruction. Apparently, the initiative is there in order to ensure that the Hispanic heritage that remains, will not dissipate any further. I'm all for buttressing the quality of English instruction, but I'd also hate to see the Castillan part of our history go the way of the dodo bird. Espanol need not flourish again in these parts, (though that would be nice!), lets just not let it die out completely. Saludos.
    In Season 74, it was all about a phenomenal Salva-tion that brought about a Slaughter.

  7. #7

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    There are regional dialects that may become extinct in the near future. Kapampangan is suppose to be one of them.

    Spanish for the masses?

    Why now? The divide and rule tactic of Imperial Spain made sure that we Filipinos will not understand each other. Instead of teaching us Spanish, they divided us by cultivating the regional dialects. Spain ruled for hundreds of years despite the fact that there were too few Guardia Sibil.* To pacify dissent, Pinoys from a different region were pitted against another regional pinoy. The cross was also used in this purpose.

    The American public school system was more egalitarian. The* Spanish school system was racist and elitist.* There was no real public system under Spain.

    Instead of Spanish, let us all learn to speak Mandarin.
    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?

  8. #8

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    its free. A spanish group is paying for the radio air time. there will be filipinos who will like spanish just like there will be filipinos who like other languages like french, mandarin, etc.

    I dont think there was a conscious effort by the spanish authorities in madrid for the educational system during the spanish colonial times to be elitist, although maybe perhaps the local spanish authorities in the philippines or more specifically the mixed blood elite who by reason of having some drops of spanish blood started feeling elitist* * well thats another topic. Remember that the concept of universal public education did not catch on in europe till the 19th century which was also the same century that the spaniards started to do it in the Philippines. most governments in western Europe established universal public schooling only in the 1870s and 1880s, requiring attendance at least at the primary levels. The main practical reason why spanish was not widely spoken in the philippines aside from friars speaking in the native dialects was simply because the philippines was the most distant colony of spain and hence there were only a few thousands spaniards in the philippines compared to the hundreds of thousands of spaniards who immigrated to south america.

    Really, the ability or desire to speak spanish isborne out of desire and the environment you grew up with and not of feelings of elitism or pretensions of having some drops of spanish blood. There are a lot of spanish mestizos in fact who dont know how to speak even a few words of spanish while there are also a lot of native filipinos who can speak either spanish or chabacano. just go to zamboanga and you will see what i mean. they have TV and radio stations there in chabacano.

    By the way, the hardcore chinoys already send their kids to learn mandarin not only in the chinese high schools in the philippines , but for further studies as well in beijing or Fujian.


    Quote Originally Posted by danny
    There are regional dialects that may become extinct in the near future. Kapampangan is suppose to be one of them.

    Spanish for the masses?

    Why now? The divide and rule tactic of Imperial Spain made sure that we Filipinos will not understand each other. Instead of teaching us Spanish, they divided us by cultivating the regional dialects. Spain ruled for hundreds of years despite the fact that there were too few Guardia Sibil.* To pacify dissent, Pinoys from a different region were pitted against another regional pinoy. The cross was also used in this purpose.

    The American public school system was more egalitarian. The* Spanish school system was racist and elitist.* There was no real public system under Spain.

    Instead of Spanish, let us all learn to speak Mandarin.

  9. #9

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    The divide and conquer tactic worked well given that the Philippine colony is the farthest from the center. Language as well as religion were key components.

    There was no real intention to educate the majority of Filipinos during the agrarian era. Education of the masses is suicide for the ruling elite. True, its actually unheard off. The masses were mere appendages of the monarch. How much more the inhabitants of a colony? The 1890s was the time when Europe entered the Industrial Revolution. A time when the old social structures where being challenged.

    During the American occupation, public education was part and parcel of the overall propaganda machinery. Not to mention the pensionados. Of course this is a different story.

    You are correct. It's free. Let's take it.

    As to Mandarin, there is a indeed a rising global appetite to study the official language of China.

    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?

  10. #10

    Re: Spanish radio station in Manila and other cities

    Teka, pachador, mayroon bang internet radio niyan? Makapag-aral nga.
    COURAGE SAN BEDA! / ¡ÁNIMO SAN BEDA!
    Understand? / ¿Entiendes?


 
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