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Thread: What Keeps You Fit?

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  1. #31
    IMPROVE YOUR RUNNING FORM WITH THESE 5 WARM-UP DRILLS

    by Runtastic Team | 27.07.2017

    Good running form might come more naturally to some, but it’s certainly a skill that can be learned. Running with good technique will make you quicker, more efficient and less likely to get injured. Include a combination of these 5 drills in your pre-run warm-up so that you’re prepared to run with good technique.

    5 DRILLS YOU CAN START USING TODAY:

    1. HIGH KNEES

    This drill gets those knees up and gets you running with a high knee drive! A higher knee drive means bigger strides, and bigger strides typically lead to a faster runner. You don’t need to cover a lot of ground – just 30 to 50 meters. Make sure to bring your knee up to hip height before putting it down again (don’t stride forward). This drill also engages your arms. As your knee comes up, swing and drive your opposite arm upwards. This should be a rapid drill, so alternate your legs as fast as possible.

    2. BUTT KICKS

    Butt kicks get your hamstrings working and help you develop a quicker stride rate and a longer stride. Using small steps, almost running in place, quickly lift one foot to your glutes, or just under, and then straight down again (don’t stride forward) – bonus points if you can actually kick your glutes! You should cover a small amount of ground during the drill, about 30 to 50 meters. This is also a quick drill with a fast turnover, so alternate your legs as fast as possible.

    3. STRIDES
    Strides get you practicing good running technique as well as running at a fast pace. They should be done over 100m. Start from standing, speed up to a jog and then keep accelerating until you’re running at approximately 95% of your top speed over the last 10 meters. Go, go, go!

    4. A-SKIP & B-SKIP
    A-Skip

    A-skips (which you can see at 0:30 in the video above) build leg strength and a good knee lift and promote an efficient foot strike. You should be taking small skips, with one knee coming to waist height while the other leg stays as straight as possible. Make sure to land on your mid or forefoot and don’t forget to engage your arms! Both feet should touch the ground at roughly the same time. Do this for 30 to 50 meters.

    B-Skip

    B-skips are similar to A-skips, but instead of bringing the working leg to waist height, kick it out in front of you to waist height, or just below, during the skip. It should then come down to join your back leg and touch the ground at the same time.

    5. CARIOCA

    Pronounced “ka-ree-o-ka”, this drill involves lots of twisting movements. This drill is about ground contact time and will give you a quicker turnover. You need to move laterally for this drill. Start by bringing your right foot over your left foot and move your hips to the left as you do so. Then rotate to the right as you bring your left foot over your right foot, while moving your right foot backward. This switching should be one fluid and constant movement – ensure you travel sideways! Make sure your torso is moving with your feet. When you bring your right foot over your left, you should rotate your torso left and bring your left arm across your body in a twisting motion. Move laterally for about 50 meters and then head in the opposite direction.

    Now’s the time! Get to it and try out these drills! They don’t take much time and can really impact your running form and performance. High knees and butt kicks can be included in every running warm-up, but feel free to mix and match the others and create your own running drills workout. Your running form is sure to improve if you do these drills 2-3 times per week.
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI

  2. #32
    THE 6 KEY DOS & DON’TS FOR RUNNERS

    by Runtastic Team | 14.04.2017

    Whether you are a beginner or have been running for years, there are several basic rules that every runner should follow. Here are the 6 most important dos and don’ts.

    DOS:

    1. START OUT SLOWLY
    Naturally, you are very motivated at the beginning and want to reach your goal as fast as possible. So what happens? You start off too fast and overexertion, side aches and pain are the price you pay. Your body needs time to warm up. Therefore, run the first kilometer at a moderate pace, i.e. where you can easily hold a conversation. That way you won’t burn yourself out on your long runs.

    2. ADD VARIETY TO YOUR RUNNING WORKOUTS
    If you always run the same loop at the same pace, at some point you will plateau and stop making progress. Break out of your comfort zone and mix up your workout routine! You can challenge your body in new ways with a variety of running workouts like interval and tempo runs, hill sprints or running on different surfaces.

    Also, how about doing some cross training with strength training or other endurance sports?

    3. SCHEDULE REST DAYS
    Your rest days are just as important as regular training. Make sure to get plenty of recovery. You don’t want to be tired and exhausted, especially when you are preparing for a marathon.

    So what are you waiting for? Download the Runtastic app today and start tracking your runs!

    DON’TS:

    1. EAT A BIG MEAL BEFORE YOUR WORKOUT
    You order a big cheeseburger and fries although you have an afternoon run planned? This is definitely the wrong food choice and will slow you down during your training. You won’t be setting a new personal best on that day! Fatty, high-fiber and spicy foods are all a bad idea before running. A high-carb snack like a small bowl of oatmeal or a banana gives you the power you need without weighing you down. Also, make sure to leave plenty of time between when you eat and when you start your run.

    2. HIT THE ROAD WITHOUT WARMING UP
    A warm-up is designed to prepare your muscles for the upcoming workout. Warming up properly can improve your performance and prevent injuries. You can find the best stretches for warming up before a run on the Runtastic Blog.

    3. NEVER CHANGE YOUR SHOES
    Running shoes also have an expiration date. Just think of how many kilometers you put on them in a year. There are several factors that influence the lifespan of your running shoes such as your weight, the age of the shoe, your running form, your shoe size, the shoe model and the surfaces you run on. As a rule of thumb, you should change your running shoes every 500 km (300 miles). This helps you avoid injuries.

    Our tip: Thanks to the integrated Shoe Tracking feature, the Runtastic App reminds you when it is time to purchase a new pair of running shoes!
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI

  3. #33
    HOW TO BOOST YOUR METABOLISM AND BURN FAT BY RUNNING

    by Sascha Wingenfeld | 02.04.2018

    Everyone burns fat differently. How much depends on a person’s gender, age and weight, as well as genetic factors. While many people are blessed with a good metabolism and don’t have to do much to reach their desired weight, others have a very hard time losing weight. But the good news is that even if you are not one of the lucky ones who is born with a fat-burning engine, you can still learn how to boost your metabolism. In today’s blog post, expert Sascha Wingenfeld explains how you can lose weight by running.

    CARDIO TRAINING: THE BEST PLACE FOR BEGINNING RUNNERS TO START
    Are you looking for the best way to burn fat and boost your metabolism? Are you a running beginner? Then regular cardio training is the best thing for you. “Running or walking are the best ways to train your metabolism to get the energy it needs from your fat reserves,” explains running expert Sascha. The idea is to train your body to use stored fat to fuel your muscles. This process builds the base for more intense workouts in the future. Cardio training is best for beginners because the workouts are done at low intensity.

    A word of caution:

    Unfortunately, the total number of calories burned by easy cardio training is relatively low. However, it has been shown that beginner runners who initially burn 10 g of fat per 30-minute workout, are able to increase their burn to 30 g after only 12 weeks.

    INTERVAL TRAINING FOR MORE ADVANCED RUNNERS
    More advanced runners should do at least one fat-burning interval training per week. “These workouts burn a higher number of calories due to the increased intensity. Your body also requires a longer time to recover which helps you continue to torch calories after your workout is over.”

    A word of caution:

    Interval training puts a lot of stress on your body, especially your heart and muscles. Therefore, it is only suited for experienced runners. It is also important to work in some easy cardio training between your interval workouts.

    MUSCLE BUILDING AND STRENGTH TRAINING
    Whereas the focus of your training at the beginning is improving the supply of energy to your muscles, strength training is about burning the fat provided by your metabolism: one extra kg of muscle burns an additional 50 calories per day. It is for this reason that your muscles are known as the “fat-burning furnace.” Since the running workouts described above do not particularly challenge or build all your muscles, you should include one or two strength workouts per week in your training. “Make sure to focus on large muscle groups or chains. These workouts promise the biggest gains. Whether you prefer to do bodyweight training with the Results app or lift weights is up to you,” says the running expert. Here, once again, a good mix of the two is probably the best recipe for success.

    SWITCH UP YOUR TRAINING FOR LASTING SUCCESS
    Sascha points out that “when you want to lose weight by running, you’ll have a lot of success at the beginning as each workout will bring you closer to your goal.” However, it is important to keep your metabolism revved up. You need to continually challenge your body so it doesn’t get used to the effort of running the same loop every day. This way your body is forced to provide more energy through its metabolic processes.

    Tip for runners:

    Try to never do the same workout two days in a row. Switch regularly between cardio, strength and interval training and don’t forget to include rest days for recovery. This will force your body to adapt to new and varying training stimuli.

    STICK WITH IT AND SET NEW GOALS
    Runners who succeed in keeping their metabolism in high gear reap the benefits of an increased fat oxidation rate (fat burning) and a higher basal metabolic rate. Make sure to set new goals to stay motivated. “But keep in mind that your body gets used to the new training stimuli after a while and the more often you train, the more efficiently it works,” explains the running expert. Therefore, it is important to cross-train (engage in other types of workouts) if you want to lose weight by running.

    If you want to maintain your weight and boost your metabolism in the long run, you should also keep an eye on your nutrition. “The important thing in the long-term is to find your own perfect mix of exercise and nutrition or, in other words, the right balance between energy intake and expenditure.”

    So, do you feel like running after reading this article? Then download the Runtastic app today and start tracking your runs.
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI

  4. #34
    6 REASONS RUNNING ISN’T LEADING TO WEIGHT LOSS

    by Tina Muir | 29.03.2018

    Whether we will admit it or not, part of the reason we all run is to keep the weight off. To stay healthy and live a long, happy life. Running is not always the most enjoyable form of exercise, but it is definitely effective, and besides, doesn’t that mean we get to enjoy a few more of those sweets without feeling guilty?

    Today, we are going to look into the reasons why you might not be losing weight as quickly as you thought you would, or even gaining weight as you begin to run more.

    By becoming more aware of what you are putting into your body, you can maintain your weight at a level you feel confident at, without restrictions. Running is hard, we know that, but we want to make it easy for you to reap the rewards, and make that hard work worthwhile.

    Many runners will be thinking that their major goal is not to lose weight, but to perform on race day, and this should be the primary goal, but most runners cite maintenance of weight as one of the major reasons.

    YOU MIGHT BE WONDERING: IS THERE ANYTHING I CAN DO TO SPEED UP THE WEIGHT LOSS?
    Unfortunately, sometimes when runners first begin serious training, they end up gaining weight, which can be especially frustrating to new runners (and we wonder why so many runners do not keep it up!).

    If you understand the science behind initial weight gain and the practical reasons for why this happens, you can stay positive towards your training, and keep working towards trust that those long-term gains both to your overall fitness and to your race times will come.

    HERE ARE 6 REASONS RUNNING MIGHT NOT LEAD TO WEIGHT LOSS

    1. THE SCALE IS A TRICKSTER
    If the scale were a person, it would be considered a misleading trickster. A scale only provides one number, your absolute weight, which isn’t always an accurate measurement of what is happening in your body.

    Drink a gallon of water and you are 8.3 lb (3.8 kg) heavier. Take out a kidney (which we do not recommend!) and you are down 2 lb (0.9 kg).

    These may be extreme examples, but it proves that your absolute weight on a scale is not necessarily a truthful assessment of changes in your weight, and especially your fitness.

    2. EXTRA WATER STORAGE
    When you increase your training to prepare for a goal race, your body begins to retain and store additional water to repair damaged muscle fibers and to deliver glycogen to the working muscles.

    Likewise, you may even be drinking more water to stay hydrated after your runs. Water may add weight to the scale, but it is not accurate of the training adaptations.

    3. MUSCLE WEIGHS MORE THAN FAT
    We are not saying you are going to turn into a body builder within a few days of beginning your running program, but over time, your body will begin to build muscle and burn fat.

    While this is great news for your overall fitness and race times, you’re actually gaining weight by replacing low-density fat tissue with high-density muscle tissue. While it may add a bit to the scale, it is a good change and will help you to continue to run faster and get fitter.

    4. LOOKING FOR SHORT-TERM RESULTS
    Did you know? It takes a deficit of 3500 calories to lose one pound (0.5 kg). If you want to lose weight safely and be healthy, you should aim for a 300-600 a day calorie deficit.

    This will lead to losing 1-2 lb (0.5 – 0.9 kg) per week. Checking the scale every morning is going to reveal very little about your long-term progress or how much weight you have actually lost.

    By getting in the habit of weighing yourself every day, you are monitoring the fluctuations in your hydration levels and other non-essential weight metrics.

    In the same way you wouldn’t expect a 1 minute drop in your 5K PR after one week of training, after one week of running, you should not expect a 5 lb (2.3 kg) weight loss.

    5. EATING TOO MUCH TO COMPENSATE
    Here’s the deal: Running burns more calories than any other form of exercise, but while the energy demands of running are high, this does not mean that you can eat whatever you want and still lose weight.

    Runners are guilty of justifying their unhealthy foods by saying, “I ran for an hour today, I earned it”.

    Many running groups meet up at the local coffee shop after a weekend run. However, a Frappuccino and a small cake will quickly eliminate any caloric deficit from the run and actually prevent weight loss.

    Running does burn a lot of calories, but you have to watch the amount of non-nutrient dense foods you consume, or you could quickly gain weight.

    Likewise, as mentioned in the article on how to lose weight and still run well, you need to provide your muscles with the necessary carbohydrates and protein to recover. This is a delicate balance, and probably the most difficult element to losing weight while running.

    Recovery should be the focus, and your muscles receiving the nutrients they need to rebuild should be the priority. The harder you train, the more often you will get hungry and the real secret is to refuel with nutrient-dense and high quality foods.

    Remember: Sacrificing recovery for a few less calories is not a good long-term plan. The numbers on the scale are arbitrary and focusing on them can be detrimental to your long-term progression. If you can continue to build your fitness and training levels, you’ll be running farther, faster, and be much healthier overall.

    Tip:

    Runners will burn an average of 100 calories per mile, but this will change based on your pace, size and metabolism.

    6. HIDDEN CALORIES
    Sports drinks and energy gels are the best example of hidden calories, as they have a high caloric content.

    It’s critical that you practice your fueling strategy during your long runs and hard workouts for optimal performance on race day. You also need to fuel your training and workouts to be able to complete long and arduous marathon workouts. Energy gels and sports drinks make this much easier.

    However: This also means that the total number of calories you will burn from these long runs and hard workouts will be less than you think. But before you think about skipping them, remember, you need those extra calories for optimal performance and training progression.

    Unfortunately, they can also be the reason you might not see the weight loss on a scale.

    CONCLUSION: FOCUS ON THE RIGHT METRICS
    Here is what it comes down to: Running will not automatically result in an immediate weight loss.

    Although running does burn more calories than any other form of exercise, the scale should not be the primary metric by which you gauge your fitness level and training progression.

    Weight loss is always going to be an important part of why many people run, just don’t become a slave to the numbers on the scale.

    Instead pay attention to how you feel – do you have more energy, feel stronger, and like the way your clothes are starting to fit? While not metric measurements, your emotions are a much more accurate measurement of your progression.

    ***

    Tina Muir

    As a former elite runner, Tina knows what athletes need to focus on in their training. "I'm an expert at improving your running."
    FRIENDS LANG KAMI


 
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