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Thread: 2008 Beijing Olympics

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  1. #11

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    RP has no invitation yet to Olympic boxing qualifier in Thailand
    01/08/2008 | 10:15 PM
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    The Amateur Boxing Association of the Philippines (ABAP) has not received an invitation to join the Olympic qualifying tournament in Bangkok, Thailand.

    This was bared Tuesday by ABAP president Manny Lopez who said that with or without invitation, six Filipino boxers will fly to Thailand in the hope of qualifying for the Beijing Olympics in August.

    Lopez said that the Olympic qualifying event is set for January 24 to February 3 and offers Olympic slots to the gold and silver medalists in all 12 divisions.

    "They will see our faces in Bangkok," Lopez said at the first 2008 session of the weekly Philippine Sports Association (PSA) Forum at Shakey's UN Avenue in Manila where he raised a dozen points that led to their controversial protest of the recent Southeast Asian (SEA) Games in Thailand.

    "Up to now, even if the deadline for the submission of the entries to the Olympic qualifying tournament lapsed last December 20, we have yet to receive an invitation from Thailand," Lopez said.

    "But we will go there. We will bring in six boxers. If they don't let us in, there will be a bigger issue of discrimination which is against the Olympic charter," added the ABAP president in the session sponsored by Shakey's and PAGCOR.

    Leading the short lineup, which will be finalized this week, are flyweight Violito Payla and bantamweight Joan Tipon. So far, only lightfly Harry Tañamor is assured of a slot to the Beijing Games.

    After Thailand, the final Olympic qualifying tournament for Asian boxers will be held in March in Kazakhstan.

    Lopez, secretary-general of the Asian Amateur Boxing Federation, defended the act of four Filipino boxers in the recent SEA Games where their surrendered to their Thai foes in the finals without throwing a punch.

    Of 13 finalists (seven men and six women), only Annie Albania got a gold medal, by knocking out out her Thai opponent.

    "You can expect a lot of fireworks in the coming days," Lopez. "And we are threading on rough waters."

    Lopez recently wrote AIBA president Ching Kuo Wu of Taiwan regarding the SEA Games incident.

    "He said he will look into it," Lopez said. Otherwise, we can elevate the matter to the International Olympic Committee."

    The ABAP chief also cited the malpractices committed by Thai boxing officials during the SEA Games.

    He said boxing equipment not approved by AIBA was used, resulting in numerous knockouts and injuries to boxers, and he questioned the fielding of referees who seemed to favor the host country's boxers.

    "Where can you find a boxing tournament where a coach has one hand on a wireless telephone and an earphone while tending to his boxer? They were getting updates on the scoring that's why," Lopez said. - GMANews.TV
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  2. #12

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    HK tries to ease fears summer heat will upset Olympic equestrian events
    01/10/2008 | 07:02 PM
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    HONG KONG – Olympic organizers do not expect other equestrian teams to follow the lead of Switzerland by pulling out of events at this year's Games due to Hong Kong's heat and humidity.

    The Swiss team said Wednesday that it would not take part in the dressage event in Hong Kong because top rider Silvia Ikle was concerned about the stress of the weather and travel on her horse.

    "We haven't been officially notified by the Swiss team, but we will respect their decision," Christopher Yip, media manager of the Equestrian Company, the body overseeing the Games' equestrian events said Thursday.

    "We don't expect to see any other teams pulling out."

    Hong Kong, which has a well-established racing circuit, was chosen to host the equestrian events at this year's Olympics, due to an outbreak of equine diseases and substandard quarantine procedures in mainland China.

    But even the Hong Kong Jockey Club, which organizes horse racing in the Chinese territory and has invested about $109 million (€69 million) into building new venues for the events, does not hold races during the summer months, when temperatures reach 32 degrees Celsius (90 Fahrenheit) with severe humidity.

    Organizers, however, said the weather in Hong Kong was not unique and that horses taking part in past Olympics in Atlanta and Athens faced similar conditions.

    Most horses should be able to acclimatize within about 10 days, Christopher Riggs, the Hong Kong Jockey Club's head of veterinary services, said. "This is what we have advised, and this is what we saw happen in Atlanta and Athens," he said.

    Yip said the dressage and showjumping events would be held at night, and that horses would be kept in air conditioned stables. He said they would employ misting fans, using up to 30 tons of ice a day, to keep the horses cool.

    "We have taken this factor into consideration. There were no problems when riders came to try out the facilities in August," he said.

    But many competitors and their horses did not attend the August trial and that has perhaps led to concerns that the horses will suffer during the hot, humid weather.

    "If you think that your horse is in danger, or is going to die, then there's nothing anyone can tell you about the facilities that's going to make you change your mind," said one rider in the territory, requesting anonymity.

    The Swiss team pulled out after world No. 4 Ikle said she would not risk taking her horse to Hong Kong.

    The precision required in dressage and the finely-tuned temperament of horses in the event make it more influenced by conditions than the showjumping and cross-country events.

    Peter von Grebel, head of the Swiss dressage team, told the Associated Press that "a stressed dressage horse simply can't deliver a top performance."

    "In Atlanta we knew the situation, and it was extremely hot. I have to say our performance in Atlanta was also not optimal, partly due to the weather," he said.

    Swiss dressage trainer Juergen Koschel resigned as a result of the pull-out, von Grebel said.

    "As a professional, he doesn't see any sporting challenges for the coming year, and that's why he said perhaps there are other teams that need a national trainer."

    The Swiss team will be replaced by another on the ranking list at the Games, Hong Kong's Equestrian Company said.

    Approximately 200 horses will take part in the equestrian events in Hong Kong between August 9 to 20. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  3. #13

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    IAAF to decide on Olympic eligibility of amputee sprinter Pistorius
    01/11/2008 | 10:32 PM
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    MONTE CARLO, Monaco – The International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) postponed until Monday its ruling on whether double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius is eligible to race in the Beijing Olympics or whether his curved, prosthetic racing blades give him an unfair edge.

    It was the second postponement in a week after the world athletics federation first granted the 21-year-old South African more time to react to the findings of German professor Gert-Peter Brueggemann, who conducted tests on the prosthetic limbs and said they give him a clear competitive advantage over able-bodied runners.

    The ruling by the International Association of Athletics Federations, which is widely expected to go against Pistorius, was first expected on Thursday.

    "The IAAF has now received a letter from the athlete Oscar Pistorius," the federation said in a statement. "The IAAF will not make any announcement on this case until Monday."

    IAAF president Lamine Diack and the 27-member IAAF Council will assess that letter over the weekend.

    Pistorius or his representatives were expected to make a statement on the issue later Friday in Pretoria, South Africa. The runner could still appeal any decision, including taking the case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Pistorius worked with Brueggemann in Cologne over two days of testing in November to see to what extent the j-shaped carbon-fiber "Cheetah" extensions to his amputated legs differed from the legs of fully-abled runners.

    Brueggemann told Die Welt newspaper last month that, based on his research, Pistorius "has considerable advantages over athletes without prosthetic limbs who were tested by us."

    "It was more than just a few percentage points. I did not expect it to be so clear," he added.

    Brueggemann and his scientists tested Pistorius' energy consumption and compared it with data of able-bodied 400-meter runners of the same speed.

    The IAAF adopted a rule last summer prohibiting the use of any "technical aids" deemed to give an athlete an advantage over another.

    Ossur, the Icelandic company which is a leader in the production of prosthetics, braces and supports and also made Pistorius' blades, has said the blades do not provide an edge over able-bodied athletes.

    Pistorius has set world records in the 100, 200 and 400 in Paralympic events. To make the Olympics in Beijing, Pistorius would still need to qualify for the South African team and make the qualifying times.

    Pistorius was born without fibulas – the long, thin outer bone between the knee and ankle – and was 11 months old when his legs were amputated below the knee.

    He began running competitively four years ago to treat a rugby injury, and nine months later won the 200 meters at the 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens.

    Pistorius – nicknamed the "Blade Runner" – competed in the 400 at two international-level able-bodied meets in 2007. He finished second in a "B" race in 46.90 seconds at the Golden League meet in Rome on July 13 and, two days later, was disqualified for running out of his lane in Sheffield, England. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  4. #14

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    IAAF rules amputee sprinter Pistorius ineligible for Olympics
    01/14/2008 | 10:56 PM
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    BRUSSELS, Belgium – The IAAF ruled Monday that double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius is ineligible to compete in the Beijing Olympics because his prosthetic racing blades give him a clear competitive advantage.

    The International Association of Athletics Federations had twice postponed the ruling, but the executive Council said the South African runner's curved, prosthetic "Cheetah" blades were considered a technical aid in violation of the rules.

    "As a result, Oscar Pistorius is ineligible to compete in competitions organized under IAAF Rules," the IAAF said in a statement from Monte Carlo, Monaco.

    Pistorius, known as the "blade runner," announced last week that he planned to appeal any adverse decision, including taking the case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Athletics South Africa said it would immediately apply the decision, further complicating Pistorius' future since he will not be able to set legal Olympic qualifying times in his own country.

    "That's a huge blow," said Pistorius' manager, Peet Van Zyl. "He has been competing in South African abled-bodied competition for the past three years. At this stage it looks like he is out of any able-bodied event."

    The decision was reached in an e-mail vote by the 27-member IAAF Council. The vote count was not disclosed but was believed to be unanimous.

    The IAAF endorsed studies by German professor Gert-Peter Brueggemann, who conducted tests on the prosthetic limbs and said they give Pistorius a clear competitive advantage over able-bodied runners.

    "An athlete using this prosthetic blade has a demonstrable mechanical advantage (more than 30 percent) when compared to someone not using the blade," the IAAF said.

    The federation said Pistorius had been allowed to compete in some able-bodied events until now because his case was so unique that such artificial protheses had not been properly studied.

    "We did not have the science," IAAF spokesman Nick Davies said. "Now we have the science. We are only interested in competitions that we govern."

    Davies stressed the findings only covered Pistorius' specific blades and did not necessarily mean that all lesser-abled athletes would automatically be excluded.

    The ruling does not affect Pistorius' eligibility for Paralympic events, in which he was a gold medalist in Athens in 2004.

    "It's unfortunate because he could have boosted team athletics at the Olympics at Beijing, because he had the potential to qualify," said Leonard Chuene, president of Athletics South Africa.

    Chuene said the federation would respect the ruling.

    "There's not much we can do," he said. "It rules him out with immediate effect. We use the IAAF rule book. If we had our rules and our own competition, it would be easier. It is a huge problem."

    Pistorius finished second in the 400 meters at the South African National Championships last year against able-bodied runners.

    The runner worked with Brueggemann in Cologne for two days of testing in November to learn to what extent the j-shaped carbon-fiber extensions to his amputated legs differed from the legs of fully abled runners.

    Brueggemann found that Pistorius was able to run at the same speed as able bodied runners on about a quarter less energy. He found that once the runners hit a certain stride, athletes with artificial limbs needed less additional energy than other athletes.

    The professor found that the returned energy "from the prosthetic blade is close to three times higher than with the human ankle joint in maximum sprinting."

    Based on these findings, the Council ruled against Pistorius.

    The findings are contested by the Pistorius camp.

    "Based on the feedback that we got, the general feeling was that there were a lot of variables that weren't taken into consideration and that all avenues hadn't been explored in terms of coming to a final conclusion on whether Oscar was getting some advantage or not," Van Zyl said. "We were hoping that they would reconsider and hopefully do some more tests."

    The IAAF adopted a rule last summer prohibiting the use of any "technical aids" deemed to give an athlete an advantage over another.

    Ossur, the Icelandic company which is a leader in the production of prosthetics, braces and supports and also made Pistorius' blades, has said the blades do not provide an edge over able-bodied athletes.

    Pistorius has set world records in the 100, 200, and 400 in Paralympic events.

    Pistorius was born without fibulas – the long, thin outer bone between the knee and ankle – and was 11 months old when his legs were amputated below the knee.

    He began running competitively four years ago to treat a rugby injury, and nine months later won the 200 meters at the 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens.

    Pistorius competed in the 400 at two international-level able-bodied meets in 2007. He finished second in a B race in 46.90 seconds at the Golden League meet in Rome on July 13 and, two days later, was disqualified for running out of his lane in Sheffield, England. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  5. #15

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    China outlines steps to monitor Olympic food
    01/14/2008 | 11:03 PM
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    BEIJING – Food for the Beijing Olympics will be highly scrutinized and supplied only by approved companies, China said Monday, declaring success in an aggressive food and product safety campaign following international criticism of Chinese standards.

    The initiative that began in August led to officials yanking the export licenses of 600 toy makers, after several countries recalled Chinese-made toys containing lead paint and other dangerous parts, said Pu Changcheng, vice minister of the General Administration for Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine.

    "Product quality and food safety are global issues," Pu said. "There is no end to the improvement of product quality and food safety so we need to work together to do a better job in the future."

    China launched the campaign – part public relations drive, part crackdown – after problems were uncovered last year in Chinese exports. The campaign has also focused attention on the country's chronic domestic product safety woes, particularly as Beijing prepares to welcome hundreds of thousands of visitors for the Aug. 8-24 Summer Games.

    "All the food supplied during the Olympic Games must be produced by accredited companies who have qualified for market access," Pu said. He did not elaborate on the requirements, but said it was the normal accreditation procedure for any Chinese food producer.

    The food will be distributed from specially designated centers, and will undergo repeated inspections from production to consumption, he said.

    Pu defended the safety record of Chinese toys, saying many failed safety standards due to design flaws or the changing regulations of importing countries. But after surveying 3,000 toy producers, quality officials pulled the export licenses of 600 workshops due to lax quality supervision.

    "Even though the products they produce are based on the standards provided by relevant importers in other parts of the world, they need to take a second look at the safety standards to see whether the products are safe enough for consumers," Pu said.

    During the recently concluded nationwide campaign, officials successfully curbed the use of nonfood materials or recycled food, and clamped down on the use of harmful preservatives and colorings, Pu said. Other progress included registering 98,000 food producers and stepping up efforts to create a mechanism to track food products.

    But he said the country's many small food workshops remained difficult to regulate and often produced substandard food.

    "This year, while we will continue to improve the overall oversight of food safety, we will take the overhauling of small food producers as a priority area and we will concentrate our effort to bringing order in this market," Pu said. "We will make sure that we can root out unlicensed small food workshops." - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  6. #16

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    Aussie mining firm presents metal for 2008 Olympic medals
    01/15/2008 | 06:18 PM
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    SHANGHAI, China – The gold, silver, and copper for the medals the winners will be wearing around their necks at the Beijing Olympics this summer was handed over to the Games organizers Tuesday in Shanghai.

    Australia-based BHP Billiton, an Olympics sponsor and the world's largest mining company, presented the metal to the Shanghai Mint, a monumental beige building on the banks of the city's famed Suzhou Creek where the medals will be made.

    Billiton shipped the copper concentrate containing the 13 kilograms (5.9 pounds) of gold from its Escondida mine in Chile. The Cannington mine in Queensland, Australia, provided lead concentrate for the silver medals and the Spence mine in Chile contributed the copper cathodes that will be used to make the bronze medals.

    Some of the raw materials were processed at Chinese smelting plants.

    Altogether, the metal is enough to finish 1,000 medals for each gold, silver and bronze category. The same number of medals will be supplied for the Paralympics, which follow the Summer Games. Another 51,000 commemorative medals made of bronze will be awarded to all participants in both events.

    Gold and jade – which signify respect and virtue in Chinese culture – are the two key elements in the medals, which incorporate traditional dragon design themes. The medals have a center circle inscribed with the Beijing Olympic logo, the five Olympic rings and "Beijing 2008."

    The flip side of the medals carries a design based on the roots of the Olympics in Greece.

    In the case of the gold medal, the inner circle is ringed by jade, supplied by China's remote Qinghai province, surrounded by a gold-plated rim.

    Billiton has not said how much it is spending on providing the metals for the Games, but Clinton Dines, president of BHP Billiton China, said he was convinced that the company's support of the Olympics was a wise investment in "good will." - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  7. #17

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    Opening, closing ceremony tickets for Beijing Olympics now require photo
    01/15/2008 | 06:27 PM
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    BEIJING – In another sign of tightening security for the Beijing Olympics, holders of tickets for the opening and closing ceremonies are now required to submit a photo to prevent the tickets from being sold or transferred.

    The process of submitting photos began Tuesday with a deadline set for Jan. 31, organizers said in a statement. The photo and accompanying identification details will be matched with the ticketholder upon entering the stadium.

    The requirement applies to residents of mainland China and any other ticketholder living outside China.

    Organizers said the measure was being taken to "ensure security, eradicate fake tickets, control speculative ticket selling and safeguard the lawful interests of the majority of buyers."

    Tickets for the two signature events are reportedly sold out at Beijing's National Stadium – known as the "Bird's Nest" – which is set for completion this spring.

    In recent months officials have begun cracking down on foreigners living in China, hoping to keep potential protesters out of the country in the run-up to the Aug. 8 opening of the 17-day Olympics.

    China's one-party government wants to use the Olympics to showcase its growing international stature, but fears the event might be seized by groups wishing to air political or social grievances against the government. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  8. #18

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    Fearing distractions and spying, China has Olympic athletes keep a low profile
    01/18/2008 | 11:24 PM
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    BEIJING – China will field about 800 athletes for the upcoming Olympics, and right now they are hard to find.

    Trying to keep distractions to a minimum – and fearful that opponents might be spying – China is shuttering away its top medal contenders.

    "It seems inevitable that I will see you guys less and less in the coming months," 110-meter hurdler Liu Xiang, the world record holder and Olympic and world champion, told reporters at his training camp a few weeks ago. Liu, who has sponsorships with Nike and Visa, rivals NBA star Yao Ming as the country's most visible athlete.

    Expected to challenge the United States for the most medals and most golds, China is taking no chances and is hoping to keep pressure off key athletes in sports such as badminton, table tennis, weightlifting, volleyball, track and field, and swimming.

    Deng Yaping, who won four gold medals in pingpong, said the pressure could be both a plus and a minus.

    "Our advantage is playing in our home country and having a great level of support, which is a good thing," said Deng, who was voted the top Chinese female athlete of the 20th century. "The disadvantage is the great pressure from the fans."

    In the next few months, many of China's top athletes will move to the heavily guarded, Beijing-based National Sports Training Center. The compound has a 24-hour guard composed of paramilitary police and Beijing municipal police.

    "We are now entering a period of silence," said Li Yongbo, coach of the national badminton team.

    Rain or shine

    Experts are hoping to turn off the rain – and turn it on, too – this summer.

    Chinese weather officials are predicting a 50 percent chance of rain for the opening and closing ceremonies (Aug. 8 and 24). However, as with just about everything else about these Olympics, the Chinese are leaving nothing to chance in a bid to stage perfect theater to showcase the power of China and its one-party state.

    That's why more than 80 rocket launchers have been arranged from nine miles (15 kms) to 75 miles (56 kms) outside Beijing to seed threatening clouds and release their rain before it reaches the Chinese capital.

    Creating rain in and around Beijing might also be attempted to clear the city's polluted air.

    Chronically short of water, Beijing officials honed their rainmaking skills last summer. To make rain, technicians fire silver iodide or other similar catalysts at clouds to cause precipitation.

    Authorities also used rockets and aircraft to disperse clouds before they reached Shanghai for the opening of the Special Olympic Games on Oct. 2.

    The chief of China's meteorological administration avoided talking about specific preparations in a recent interview with state-run China Daily.

    "It is unrealistic to speculate now on weather conditions for the Beijing Games and what moves we'll take then," Zheng Guoguang said. "We have the confidence and are ready."

    Crackdown

    Beijing officials launched a security operation last weekend known as "Action for a safe Olympic Games," which is designed to make sure that foreigners with grudges against China's government don't manage to enter the country and cause trouble.

    Speaking to the state-run Xinhua news agency, Wang Anshun – deputy Communist Party chief of Beijing – said the operation would crack down on gangster-related crime, and tighten surveillance on venues like karaoke bars and bath houses.

    He said the operation was aimed at guaranteeing "strict management and good social order."

    "A comprehensive survey on rented houses and immigrant populations will be a major task," Wang said. "Foreigners who are found to have illegally entered, dwelled and worked in Beijing will also be included in the move."

    The Olympics present a grand challenge for China's communist government, which is trying to maintain tightfisted control and also yield to International Olympic Committee pressure to give journalists open access in a country unaccustomed to transparency.


    Volunteers galore

    Beijing expects between 500,000 and 800,000 foreign visitors for the Olympics. They could be outnumbered by volunteers.

    There's been a deluge of volunteer applications: 760,000 have applied for 100,000 spots at the Olympics and Paralympics. Just over 600,000 have applied for 400,000 positions as city volunteers, who will be working subway stations, bus stops and anywhere foreigners are likely to have questions.

    "This shows that Chinese people love Olympic sports, and they want to participate in the Olympic movement," said Jiang Xiaoyu, executive vice president of the Beijing organizing committee.

    Visiting Beijing recently, US Health Secretary Mike Leavitt, who was the governor of Utah during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, said the surplus of volunteers bodes well for Beijing.

    "The key is the volunteers and the people, that's what makes the Olympic Games work," Leavitt said. "It's the spirit of the Olympics that permeates everyone who comes."

    Tidbits

    Celine Dion will give a first public performance of a song she's dedicating to the Olympics on April 13 at Beijing's Workers Stadium." She sang "The Power of the Dream" at the opening ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics...

    Olympic sponsor Johnson & Johnson is selling Band-Aids adorned with the five Fuwa mascots. The "Five Friendlies" of the games are a panda, Tibetan antelope, fish, swallow and the Olympic flame...
    The National Aquatics Center – known as the "Watercube" – will have its first test beginning Jan. 31 with the China Open. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  9. #19

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    Fiji bans 8 Olympic soccer players over drinking spree
    01/22/2008 | 12:09 PM
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    WELLINGTON, New Zealand - Eight members of Fiji's Olympic soccer team have been fined and banned from representing the country for five years after leaving a training camp to go on a drinking spree.

    Fiji Football Association president Muhammad Shamsu Dean Sahu Khan said the players would be fined between 10,000 Fijian dollars (US$6,400, €4,400) and F$18,000 (US$11,500, €7,900) and banned for leaving the camp at Lautoka without authority.

    Sahu Khan said the incident occured on Jan. 12 while the players were in camp with the national team.

    ''Our academy rule is no kava, no alcohol and no smoking in the academy area,'' he said.

    ''Eight players jumped the fence at 10.30 p.m. and went away. They went and had drinks the whole night and came back to the academy 4.45 on Sunday morning. They will not be considered for any national commitments for the next five years.'' - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!

  10. #20

    Re: The 2008 Beijing Olympics

    Beijing hopes to cut smoking in hotels for Olympics
    01/22/2008 | 05:42 PM
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    BEIJING – Beijing is working to increase the number of smoke-free hotel rooms available in the capital in time for this year's Olympic Games.

    In a proposal by the municipal government, the proportion of smoke-free rooms in hotels will be raised to 70 percent, according to a notice on the Web site of the city's legislative affairs office Tuesday.

    The anti-smoking initiative is the latest development as Beijing officials move to keep fans from lighting up when the Olympics open August 8. Legislation already exists that bans smoking in public places, but enforcement is uneven. Smoking indoors is very common in China.

    Smoking should be banned indoors and outdoors in schools, sport and fitness centers, cultural protected areas, cinemas and other public places, the notice said. It should be banned indoors only at hospitals, government and private offices, and hotels and restaurants, as well as other places, it said.

    According to the World Health Organization, based on 2003 statistics, 57 percent of men in China over the age of 15 smoke.

    China banned smoking in taxis last October, but has not put in place a wider smoking ban for the city, despite promises for a smoke-free Olympics. The Beijing Municipal Health Bureau has promised to ensure no smoking in hospitals designated for priority use during the Olympic Games.

    Beijing organizers have been under pressure to change people's behavior before the start of the Games. In recent months, campaigns have begun to stop people from spitting and teach them to stand patiently in line. Taxi drivers and hotel worker are also receiving etiquette and English lessons. - AP
    And that's the bottom line, because I said so!


 
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