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In Your Face!

Coach This 3

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Can you imagine that? In Black's six trips to the UAAP Finals, only Pido Jarencio, at that time a rookie coach to boot, beat him for the championship. Yet I'm sure even the most diehard Jarencio fans would never say that Jarencio > Black as a coach. In his 5-Peat title reign, only Lawrence Chongson of UE, hardly mentioned as among the paradigms of great coaches, beat Black (by a big margin at that) in a game in the UAAP Finals. Again, I'm sure no one would ever say Chongson > Black as a coach.

The point I am trying to make is not to sing praises about the greatness of Black, or Tommy Manotoc, or Franz Pumaren, or Louie Alas, or the late Ron Jacobs. Many people, much greater than I, have already done that.

Instead, what I submit is that, perhaps there really is no such thing as great coaches, so much as there are great talents put together on great rosters.

Think about it. With the possible exception of Brown and Detroit versus the Lakers in 2004, and Ayo this season in the NCAA versus San Beda, the more talented rosters with the more talented players in aggregate, have won championship battles. And even in these two instances, the talent Brown and Ayo had respectively was nothing to sneeze at.

Billups, Hamilton, Prince, and the Wallace boys were all star-level players, who had always been dependable, consistent producers on whatever team they were on. Ben Wallace was not much of a scorer, but his defense and board work were all star caliber, almost Dennis Rodman-like.

Mark Cruz outplayed the more fancied Baser Amer in the NCAA Finals, using speed and a quicker pull-up. Running with Rey Nambatac and Kevin Racal, and even McJour Luib and Jomar Sollano, Ayo's boys proved to be the match-up from hell for the Red Lions who relied almost exclusively on their size and power advantage with 6-8 import Ola Adeogun and 6-4 forward Arthur Dela Cruz.

Yes, a good coach would know how to maximize the talent he inherits from a predecessor, and then build his own roster over time. But again, it is not necessarily about just grabbing every all star available (see Jail Blazers of previous entries). It takes maybe two or three superstars, and a bunch of interchangeable, hardworking role players. Black did that first with Rabeh Al-Hussaini, Nonoy Baclao, and Chris Tiu. Later on he had Greg Slaughter, Nico Salva, and Kiefer Ravena. Pumaren had Don Allado, Renren Ritualo, and Mike Cortez. Koy Banal and later on Bert Flores leaned on Arwind Santos and Mark Isip, with Denok Miranda and later on Jonas Villanueva.

It does not necessarily come down to brilliance in the X and O, so much as brilliance in recognizing what will work best, and then building your roster to achieve that. Coaching becomes easier when you have the elite talent making your favored system working. "Maghanap ka ng magagaling na players, para dumali ang trabaho mo. Isipin mo naman, papano kung ang sentro mo 6-1, na may katabaan, mahina tumalon, mabagal. Kesehodang may good fundamentals 'yan, lalamunin 'yan ng 6-5 na atleta na malakas, kahit hindi magsing-ganda fundamentals nila. Matuturo mo pa skills eh, pano punwesto sa box out, pano mag-ball denial, pano mag-hook shot. Anong turo gagawin mo para maging five seconds or less ang baseline to baseline? Anong turo gagawin mo para maging 36 inches ang vertical ng isang player na 12 inches lang ang kaya?" expounded one longtime UAAP assistant coach and scout.

I recall how Koy Banal, then the FEU head coach, discovered Arwind Santos. FEU went to Pampanga to take part in goodwill games. They played a Pampanga street ball team that featured the wiry Santos. He promptly made mincemeat of Leo Avenido, at that time the FEU star and one of the best players in the UAAP. Santos, a pedicab driver, without any formal, structured training and coaching, made mincemeat of Avenido, a well-trained UAAP star. Did Banal become less of a coach because he could find no solution for a natural talent like Santos? Santos is now a bona fide PBA superstar and an MVP. Does anyone even know what has become of Avenido?

Eric Altamirano was a champion coach last year. This year he lost two of his starters, and his chief backup at center, and he went 7-7, barely making the Final 4. He was hailed as a genius last season. Has he suddenly become a fool this season?

Juno Sauler was a champion coach two seasons ago. Again, he lost a lot of key personnel, and he went 6-8 this season, not even making the Final 4. Was he a genius two seasons ago and suddenly a fool now?

Black's Meralco squad is the worst team in the onging PBA conference. Are we to hold this conference as the ultimate judgement of Black's entire coaching career?

Baldwin, Pumaren, Ayo are in the UAAP. Will they automatically be three of the Final 4? I wouldn't hold my breath on that one.

Great coaches do not make great teams, because it seems there really are no great coaches, only great talents making up great rosters.
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Philippine Basketball

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