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In Your Face!

Coach This 2

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Where were we?

Oh yes, coaches.

Generally fans have this idea that the coach is the guy who crafts plays, shuffles substitutions, calls timeouts, gets in game officials' faces, during games.

This is where these same fans get the mistaken notion that anybody with a modicum of game know-how could become a full-time basketball head coach.

I am friends with actual coaches who have been doing this thing for years, a few of them have been at this coaching thing for decades, a number of them have even won major championships across the various levels of basketball competition in our country and in international tournaments.

One common thing they tell me is that at least 80% of coaching happens away from the arenas and stadiums. 80% of the job of a coach is in practice, practice planning, breaking down game video, scouting, evaluating and trying to get good talent to play for them. Anything else that the fans get to see during games is probably the least work coaches have to do, because all of the real work happened during the offseason, or during the days leading up to a game.

"A lot of people do not realize that coaching really is a full-time job, and it is not for dilettantes, it is something you constantly do, and you have to know your stuff," said a long-time Gameface member who used to coach a small Quezon City school. "Ensayo pa lang paplanohin mo mga drills, scrimmage, mga itatakbo ninyong sets, depende pa 'yan sa scouting report mo sa kalaban ninyo. Hindi 'yan kaya ng kung sino-sino lang," he exclaimed.

Arguably however the one thing that seems to be most important to the success of any coach is getting the talent he needs to put together as strong a roster as he possibly can. And this is made easier if you are a winning program. "When we first came in back in the 1970's nobody wanted the job, because the team was so awful. Nalaman namin unang-una wala pala sa kondisyon ang mga bata, so imbes na ensayo, we got them into tip-top shape. Katwiran namin, how can we play a game that demands a lot of running and jumping if we get tired easily? Awa naman ng dyos nung nag-take over kami within one year nag-champion ang team," explained a long-time coach with multiple high school and international titles.

When they won it became easier for talented players to come to their school and play for their team. "Dere-derecho na 'yon. Kahit hindi kami mag-recruit, lahat ng magagaling na bata gusto sa amin mag-aral at maglaro. You cannot win without talent. Papano ka mananalo kung lahat ng players mo 5'8" lang na mga lampa at mababagal? Tapos kalaban niyo lahat 6-footers na malalakas at batak sa laro? Hindi chicken or egg 'yan. You try to win first, because when you win mas madali na recruitment. And when you have the best player, you win more, you keep getting the top recruits, ganun lang 'yon," he added.

And therein lies the crux of the matter. As with any other sport, in basketball, generally talent is directly proportional to success. Talent here means the talent of the players, over and above the talent of the coach. The coach does not play, and there is only so much he can do with a poor roster. He might make them competitive, but turning them into champions only happens in Hollywood.

Again, look back on the last 10 UAAP and even NCAA champions. With the possible exception of this year's Letran Knights, all the other champions had the superior talent.

In the NCAA, San Beda's title reign was interrupted only twice, this year and in 2009, when the San Sebastian Stags dethroned the Red Lions after a grand slam title reign. Even then, those Stags had Calvin Abueva, Ronald Pascual, Ian Sangalang, all of whom are legit PBA players now.

In the UAAP, the Ateneo had five of the last 10 championships during their 5-Peat title reign. FEU owns two of those title, first in 2005 during the Arwind Santos-era, and now in 2015 in the Mac Belo-era. La Salle had that 2007 title, while Santo Tomas took home the 2006 title with a mature, talented, tall, and athletic crew led by then "veteran rookie" Jervy Cruz, Jojo Duncil, and Dylan Ababou, again all three are legit PBA players.

Exactly how much of a factor were the coaches in each of those title teams? Could any other coach have handled those teams and gotten the same result?

It might be instructional to look into the case of San Beda. Eight of the last 10 NCAA championships belong to San Beda, with the aforementioned Grand Slam, and their own 5-Peat title reign cut by Letran this year. They went through the following coaches: Koy Banal, Frankie Lim, Ronnie Magsanoc, Boyet Fernandez, and this year Jamike Jarin. Magsanoc in fact sat in a one-season "interim" capacity only, bridging the eras of Lim and Fernandez. So five different coaches win titles with basically the NCAA team that had the strongest roster when they won.

Ateneo treats Norman Black as their UAAP God and Savior, as Black presided over the glorious 5-Peat era. Somehow glossed over is the fact that Black won his first UAAP title in his fourth year, and that a lot of Ateneo fans were asking for his head in the first three years when he wasn't winning titles yet. They did after all expect a lot of Black, one of only a handful of coaches to complete a PBA Grand Slam.

Black even lost to then-rookie coach Pido Jarencio in UST's 2006 title romp. the Ateneo was favored in that title showdown, having beaten these same Tigers by 36 points in their first round encounter. UST claimed the title in an epic three-game series. Does this make Jarencio > Black as a coach?

(To be continued)
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