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  1. A Barrel of (D) Draft

    Let's take a look at how the various PBA D League teams did in the first-ever D League Draft over the weekend:

    Round 1 ___

    1. Cagayan - Moala Tautuaa, 6-7, 230 pounds, Forward-center

    Tautuaa is an ASEAN Basketball League veteran who brings a lot of size and athleticism to a Cagayan squad sorely lacking both. However, he isn't exactly a classic low post big man, and likes to play from the outside going in. Fans will see shades of Kelly Williams and Jay Washington in him, but only shades. Still, he was far and away the consensus Number 1 choice as the top pick in this draft.

    2. Tanduay - Chris Newsome, 6-2, 185 pounds, Swingman

    Newsome is arguably the best all-around player in this draft, bringing a complete package of athletic ability and skill. He will probably play forward for Tanduay, the same position he plays for the Ateneo. "Siya talaga gusto kong kunin," declared Coach Lawrence Chongson. "Mas gusto ko 'yung speed and skill kesa sa size."

    3. Cafe France-CEU - Arnold Van Opstal, 6-8, 235 pounds, Center

    Van Opstal probably has the best combination of athleticism and size after Tautuaa, and Cafe France can certainly use a lot of that. He isn't exactly a high-skill player though, and will need the ball in the right spots to produce, but he does hit the boards hard and distracts opposing players with his height and length. "Management decision to get him," Coach Egay Macaraya simply said.

    4. Cebuana Lhuillier - Norbert Torres, 6-6, 235 pounds, Center

    Torres plays behind Van Opstal in Lasalle but is actually the more skilled and productive player between the two. Like Van Opstal though, Torres needs to get the ball in the right spots to produce, although he does have a bit more in terms of spot-up shooting from up to 15 feet, and has some nifty post moves inside. He'll be most valuable off both boards and helping on defense with his ability to block shots on the weak side.

    5. Jumbo Plastic - Kris Rosales, 6-0, 175 pounds, Pointguard

    Rosales made the news about a year ago when he was being seriously considered for the NBA's D League. He brings a complete package to the pointguard position for Jumbo but will probably find himself attacking and scoring more than setting the table for his team. Think of him right now as a poor man's Mike Cortez, or a bigger Roi Sumang.

    6. M Builders-FEU - Anthony Hargrove, 6-6, 215 pounds, Forward-center

    As a school tie-in, M Builders went for the FEU center to bolster their inside game. Hargrove is an athletic, hard worker type who hits the boards and gets some opportunistic baskets inside. He will be among familiar faces and that should make things a little easier for him in the D League.

    7. Wangs - Rob Hainga, 6-5, 200 pounds, Forward-center

    Hainga barely stirred on the UST roster over the last couple of years and is strictly a backup big man. He probably won't bring much for Wangs other than his 6-foot-5 frame and five fouls.

    8. Racal/St Clare - Fabien Redoh, 6-3, 190 pounds, Forward

    Redoh is a Cameroonian import and a mainstay for the St Clare Saints in the NAASCU. He will have to find a way to produce against much more talented and taller timber in the D League. Perhpas he can put his snappy mid-range jumper to good use here to open up the lanes.

    9. Hapee/San Beda - Maverick Ahanmisi, 6-1, 190 pounds, Guard

    Ahanmisi is a legit US NCAA Division 1 player who attended the University of Minnesota. Although he was an end-bench player for the Golden Gophers, he still put in time for a legit Division 1 program, the same program that produced NBA legend Kevin McHale. Ahanmisi might become a Sol Mercado-lite.

    10. AMA - Zaldy Angeles, 5-11, 170 pounds, Swingman

    Zaldy Angeles is another one of those high skill players strutting his stuff in a small league. He will be sorely tested in the D League environment.

    11. MP Hotel - Wowie Escosio, 6-1, 180 pounds, Forward

    Escosio helped the UV Green Lancers win the 2013 CESAFI title but was let go prior to this season due reportedly to a questionable attitude. There is no doubt as to his talent, with his ability to score and also help off the defensive boards. He will get a chance to show if he indeed has the big city game to back up his supreme self confidence.

    12. Bread Story/Lyceum - John Azores, 5-9, 160 pounds, Guard

    Yet another school-based pick, Azores was a mainstay of the Lyceum Pirates in the NCAA. He is a high skill player who does not really have an elite-level game to hang his hat upon. Look for him to help advance the ball against pressure and maybe provide some outside shooting.
    Tags: pba d-league Add / Edit Tags
    Categories
    Philippine Basketball
  2. 2014 UAAP MEN’S BASKETBALL: RAVENA IS MVP

    With the Most Valuable Player race in Season 77 of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) men’s basketball tournament wholly based on statistics, Ateneo de Manila University hotshot Kiefer Ravena is a cinch to romp away with the prestigious individual plum.

    The 6-foot Ravena, who has powered the Blue Eagles to the top of the 14-game elimination round standings with an 11-3 record and a twice-to-beat advantage in the Final Four playoffs, is the league pacesetter in scoring (21.2 points per game – the only player to reach double-digit scores in all his 14 assignments) and assists (5.6 apg) and ranks second in steals (1.50 spg – trailing only guaranteed league leader Sheak Sheriff, 1.69 spg, of the University of Santo Tomas).

    The fourth-year guard is also grabbing 5.9 rebounds every time out – second on the team behind Chris Newsome’s 7.9 rpg.

    Reigning UAAP titlist De La Salle University’s Jeron Teng, the 2013 Finals MVP, is expected to secure the No. 2 spot in this year’s regular MVP polls.

    A third-year swingman, the 6-2 son of retired professional cager Alvin Teng has registered averages of 18.1 points (UAAP second-highest), 7.14 boards (10th in the league) and 4.0 assists (second in the league) as the Green Archers wound up in a deadlock with the Far Eastern University Tamaraws at the No. 2 spot with identical 10-4 records.

    La Salle and FEU will clash in a playoff for the second seed and the other twice-to-beat incentive that goes with it. Essentially, it will become a best-of-three affair as the two schools will also be tangling in one Final Four pairing.

    FEU knocked off DLSU twice in the elims but the Tamaraws have dropped their last two assignments against the University of the East and Ateneo.

    The Tams are bannered by Mark Belo and Mike Tolomia, who themselves are among the prominent MVP candidates.

    The much-improved Belo finished the elims with norms of 16.1 points (UAAP third best) and 7.1 rebounds (11th in the league) and is expected to land among the top 10 in blocked shots at 0.79 bpg.

    Tolomia, who “choked” in FEU’s final elims assignment that saw Ateneo buck a 19-point deficit (45-26) entering the fourth quarter before forcing overtime (59-all) and eventually winning, 68-64, in the battle for first place.

    In the other F4 matchup, Ateneo still awaits its opponent as the owner of the fourth and last semifinal ticket has not been determined.

    National University, at 9-5, may yet be forced to a playoff for the final F4 berth if UE, currently at 8-5, beats UST during the final elims playdate at the Araneta Coliseum on Tuesday.

    In the “main” game of Tuesday’s twinbill, the University of the Philippines (1-12) seeks to repeat over winless Adamson University (0-13). The “Soaring” Falcons, though, will look to avoid its first winless campaign since 2001 and 2000.

    The winners in the statistical race for scoring, assists, steals and blocked shots (NU’s Alfred Aroga is the runaway leader at 2.21 bpg) have been determined but the rebounding derby is still up for grabs.

    DLSU’s Jason Perkins currently is on top with 9.71 reebies an outing but UE’s Charles Mammie (9.38 rpg) and UST’s Karim Abdul (9.67 rpg) are in a position to overtake Perkins during their Tuesday encounter.

    Mammie needs 15 rebounds to move past Perkins. Abdul, currently ranked No. 2, needs only 11 caroms (and so long as Mammie collects less than 15) to claim the “King of the Boards” title.

    Updated 09-15-2014 at 08:21 PM by gameface_one (grammar)

    Tags: henry liao, uaap Add / Edit Tags
    Categories
    Philippine Basketball
  3. HOOPSTER 967

    Forget about Gilas Pilipinas’ bittersweet performance in the ongoing FIBA Basketball World Cup.

    Better just reminisce the Philippines’ momentous bronze-medal finish in the FIBA World Basketball Championship – which the FIBA World Cup was previously known until this year – six decades ago in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Until now, it is the best-ever finish by an Asian country in the World’s 64-year history.

    The astonishing feat came during the 2nd World games from October 22 to November 5, 1954. The Pinoys gained the bronze medal and only the United States (gold) and host Brazil (silver) fared better.
    A dozen countries participated. Seven came from the Americas, three from Europe and two from Asia.

    Because the Brazilian government did not have diplomatic ties with the governments of the socialist countries of Europe at the time, some of the top teams from that continent (champion Soviet Union, second-placer Hungry and fourth-placer Czechoslovakia) were no-shows.

    The best teams from the Americas were present with the exception of Mexico, which had declined an invitation. The top squads from Asia – the Philippines and Formosa (Taiwan/now known as Chinese-Taipei) – also were in attendance.

    From Europe, however, the best teams were nowhere to be found as only France, Israel and Yugoslavia could take part, and they wound up third, fifth and sixth, respectively, during the 1953 European Championship (now known as EuroBasket).

    Despite employing a second-rate unit, the United States grabbed the World crown with an unblemished 9-0 record, having blasted host Brazil, 62-41, in the gold-medal contest. The Americans’ lowest winning margin was five points, a 64-59 (30-26) decision over sixth-place Uruguay in the eight-team final round.

    There are two reasons why the Americans were unable to send their best amateur team.

    Firstly, the date of the tournament makes it practically impossible to call on players from the colleges and universities. It was aggravated by the fact that the tournament largely had been held south of the Equator, thus making the choice of the dates unsuitable for teams coming from the north.

    Secondly, it was the U.S. Olympic Basketball Committee that chose its Olympic team at the time and it had the luxury of utilizing players from all sections of the country, including the leading colleges and universities.

    In contrast, the U.S. teams to the World Basketball Championship (now known as the FIBA Basketball World Cup) were picked by the U.S. Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), which could tap only from the industrial or commercial leagues, the lower –division (or junior) colleges and the American Armed Forces.

    In 1954, Brazil captured the silver medal with an 8-1 record, including a pair of victories over the Philippines (99-63 in the preliminary round and 57-41 in the eight-team final round).

    The Filipinos finished with a 6-3 overall mark (including 1-1 in the preliminaries) and officially clinched the bronze with a 66-60 win over France in the team’s penultimate game in the final round, where all eight teams played against each other on a round-robin basis without any playoffs.

    Carlos (The Big Difference) Loyzaga chalked up 20 points against the fourth-ranked French. In the finale against sixth-place Uruguay, the 6-3 Loyzaga (who turned 84 last August 29), exploded for 33 markers as he powered the Filipinos to a 67-63 triumph despite the absence of head coach Herminio Silva, who called in sick that day.

    Loyzaga was the tournament’s No. 3 scorer behind Uruguay’s Oscar Moglia 918.6 ppg) and Canada’s Carl Ridd (18.2 ppg) with a 16.4-point clip in nine appearances. He also was voted to the five-man All-Tournament Team.

    Team skipper Lauro (The Fox) Mumar averaged 9.3 ppg and elongated Mariano Tolentino normed 9.1 ppg.
    Other members of the Philippine team were Antonio Genato, Napoleon Flores, Francisco Rabat, Florentino Bautista Jr., Rafael Barretto, Benjamin Francisco, Ponciano Saldana, Bayani Amador and Ramon Manulat.

    The Philippines is one of only 15 countries to secure a medal (gold, silver or bronze) in FIBA World Cup history.
  4. 2014 FIBA World Cup: Greece Bites the Dust; Top 4 in Group A Make Quarters

    Wildcard entry but FIBA fifth-ranked Greece became the latest to fall out of the unbeaten ranks, losing its Round of 16 encounter with a shocking 90-72 loss to Group A fourth-placer Serbia in the ongoing FIBA Basketball World Cup in Spain.

    Meanwhile, defending World titlist United States and host and back-to-back Olympic silver medalist Spain marched to their sixth victory in as many appearances with easy triumphs in the second-round single-elimination knockout stage.

    In the Round of 16, Group C No. 1 seed United States eliminated Group D fourth seed Mexico, 86-63; Group A third-placer France ousted Group B second seed Croatia, 69-64; Group D second seed Slovenia crushed Group C third seed Dominican Republic; Group A topnotcher Spain breezed past Group B fourth-placer Senegal, 89-56; Group D leader Lithuania best Group C fourth seed New Zealand, 76-71; Group C second seed Turkey edged Group D third seed Australia, and Group A second-placer Brazil knocked off Group B third-placer Argentina, 85-65.

    All the top four finishers from Group A – Spain, Brazil, France and Serbia – qualified for the single-elimination knockout quarterfinals (third round).

    The Round-of-8 quarterfinal games will be played on September 9 and 10 and feature Lithuania (5-1) vs. Turkey (4-2) and the United States (6-0) vs. Slovenia (5-1) in one bracket and Serbia (3-3) vs. Brazil (5-2) and Spain (6-0) France in the other bracket.

    Brazil and Turkey were wildcard entries to the 24-nation World Cup.

    The semifinal games or Final Four will be held on September 11 and 12 with the Lithuania vs. Turkey winner battling the U.S. vs. Slovenia victor for one finals ticket and the Serbia vs. Brazil winner taking on the Spain vs. France victor for the other finals berth.

    The bronze-medal game between the two semifinal losers will be played on September 13. The gold-medal encounter between the two semifinal winners will be held on September 14.

    The Palacio de Deportes de la Comunidad de Madrid in Madrid will host the medal-round hostilities.

    Only the gold-medal winner will automatically earn a berth in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
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    Others
  5. Team Philippines: Bronze medalist in 1954 World Games

    Forget about Gilas Pilipinas’ bittersweet performance in the ongoing FIBA Basketball World Cup.

    Better just reminisce the Philippines’ momentous bronze-medal finish in the FIBA World Basketball Championship – which the FIBA World Cup was previously known until this year – six decades ago in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Until now, it is the best-ever finish by an Asian country in the World’s 64-year history.

    The astonishing feat came during the 2nd World games from October 22 to November 5, 1954. The Pinoys gained the bronze medal and only the United States (gold) and host Brazil (silver) fared better.

    A dozen countries participated. Seven came from the Americas, three from Europe and two from Asia.

    Because the Brazilian government did not have diplomatic ties with the governments of the socialist countries of Europe at the time, some of the top teams from that continent (champion Soviet Union, second-placer Hungry and fourth-placer Czechoslovakia) were no-shows.

    The best teams from the Americas were present with the exception of Mexico, which had declined an invitation. The top squads from Asia – the Philippines and Formosa (Taiwan/now known as Chinese-Taipei) – also were in attendance.

    From Europe, however, the best teams were nowhere to be found as only France, Israel and Yugoslavia could take part, and they wound up third, fifth and sixth, respectively, during the 1953 European Championship (now known as EuroBasket).

    Despite employing a second-rate unit, the United States grabbed the World crown with an unblemished 9-0 record, having blasted host Brazil, 62-41, in the gold-medal contest. The Americans’ lowest winning margin was five points, a 64-59 (30-26) decision over sixth-place Uruguay in the eight-team final round.

    There are two reasons why the Americans were unable to send their best amateur team.

    Firstly, the date of the tournament makes it practically impossible to call on players from the colleges and universities. It was aggravated by the fact that the tournament largely had been held south of the Equator, thus making the choice of the dates unsuitable for teams coming from the north.

    Secondly, it was the U.S. Olympic Basketball Committee that chose its Olympic team at the time and it had the luxury of utilizing players from all sections of the country, including the leading colleges and universities.

    In contrast, the U.S. teams to the World Basketball Championship (now known as the FIBA Basketball World Cup) were picked by the U.S. Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), which could tap only from the industrial or commercial leagues, the lower –division (or junior) colleges and the American Armed Forces.

    In 1954, Brazil captured the silver medal with an 8-1 record, including a pair of victories over the Philippines (99-63 in the preliminary round and 57-41 in the eight-team final round).

    The Filipinos finished with a 6-3 overall mark (including 1-1 in the preliminaries) and officially clinched the bronze with a 66-60 win over France in the team’s penultimate game in the final round, where all eight teams played against each other on a round-robin basis without any playoffs.

    Carlos (The Big Difference) Loyzaga chalked up 20 points against the fourth-ranked French. In the finale against sixth-place Uruguay, the 6-3 Loyzaga (who turned 84 last August 29), exploded for 33 markers as he powered the Filipinos to a 67-63 triumph despite the absence of head coach Herminio Silva, who called in sick that day.

    Loyzaga was the tournament’s No. 3 scorer behind Uruguay’s Oscar Moglia 918.6 ppg) and Canada’s Carl Ridd (18.2 ppg) with a 16.4-point clip in nine appearances. He also was voted to the five-man All-Tournament Team.

    Team skipper Lauro (The Fox) Mumar averaged 9.3 ppg and elongated Mariano Tolentino normed 9.1 ppg.

    Other members of the Philippine team were Antonio Genato, Napoleon Flores, Francisco Rabat, Florentino Bautista Jr., Rafael Barretto, Benjamin Francisco, Ponciano Saldana, Bayani Amador and Ramon Manulat.
    The Philippines is one of only 15 countries to secure a medal (gold, silver or bronze) in FIBA World Cup history.
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