twitterfacebookgoogle+register
View RSS Feed

All Blog Entries

  1. 100-POINT FILIPINO BALLERS: PROLIFIC SALVADOR IS THE MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

    For the record, there have been seven 100 points-or-more performances by a Filipino basketball player.

    However, only three found its way to Wikipedia’s “List of basketball players who have scored 100 points in a single game” around the world.

    Those officially documented were the following:

    1. Luis (Lou) Salvador’s 116 points in the Philippines’ gold medal-winning game against China during the 1923 Far Eastern Games in Osaka, Japan, said to be the harbinger of the Asian Games yet featured only three countries – Japan, China and the Philippines – at the time.

    Note that the 30-second shot clock was not yet in existence and neither was the three-point shot.

    A product of Jose Rizal College, the prolific and well-conditioned Salvador unbelievably made most of his shots from midcourt during his historic game against the Chinese, the highest output ever for an official international tournament (as distinguished from a local/foreign league competition).

    According to the Leyte-born Salvador, he had practiced with a medicine ball daily for a whole year at the YMCA compound before registering the mind-boggling 116-point feat.

    Salvador said that he used to throw the medicine ball continuously to accustom himself. And when the time came for him to make the attempt with the actual ball, everything was easy.

    Salvador also was a movie/stage producer and was known to local showbusiness as the “Master Showman” and father to a dozen actors and actresses. Legend has it that he sired 58 children during his earthly existence. He lived with 25 wives and had 14 of them under one roof at one time. Among his children were Leroy Salvador, Alona Alegre, Phillip (Ipe) Salvador and future Philippine Basketball Association professional Roberto (Jumbo) Salvador.

    2. Jeron Teng’s 104 points during Xavier School’s 164-74 blasting of Grace Christian College in a Metro Manila Tiong Lian Basketball Association (MMTLBA) high school game on January 5, 2011.

    Then a 16-year-old, HS junior, Teng completed his second year of varsity eligibility with the De La Salle Green Archers with title finishes in the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) and Philippine Collegiate Champions League (PCCL) and Finals MVP honors in both tournaments.


    3. Clark Quijano’s 120 points during AMA Computer University’s 166-85 shellacking of Lord’s Grace Christian School in a 7th Mariano Bondoc Cup high school tournament on October 20, 2013.

    Quijano now owns the individual record for the most points in a high school game in Philippine basketball history.

    The other four 100-point feats by a Filipino baller, including three from a Cebu collegiate league, have yet to be documented by Wikipedia for some reasons.
  2. A LOOK AT PBA HISTORY:**No 50-point Games for Fernandez, Patrimonio and the "Big J"

    Here's a look at the Philippine Basketball Association, Asia’s first professional league whose current 38th season is momentarily on a sabbatical to give way for the training preparations being made for the participation of an all-PBA squad in the FIBA Asia Championship in Manila from August 1-11.
    *
    Rummaging through the pages of the different issues of “Hardcourt,” the official PBA annual, I found out that not once did some of the legendary figures in PBA annals score 50 points in a game during their distinguished careers.
    *
    Strange but true, all-time PBA greats Ramon Fernandez, Alvin Patrimonio and Robert (Sonny) Jaworski – all of whom were recipients of the Most Valuable Player hardware during their heyday – never tallied a 50 at any time.
    *
    Fondly called “El Presidente” for his elegant, silky-smooth offensive skills, Fernandez, who is now based in Cebu City, owned a career best of 48 points with Toyota in 1980.
    *
    Jaworski, Fernandez’s All-Star mate with the Tamaraws whom I bumped into in Tagaytay City last May 18 (the Big J was one of the sponsors for a wedding held there), notched his personal high of 34 points that same year.* Admittedly, though, Jaworski was more known for his rugged defensive skills than his offensive prowess.
    *
    Patrimonio, who like Fernandez collected an all-time league-high four MVP trophies during his PBA tenure, chalked up a career-high 47 points with Purefoods in 1991.* “The Captain” is now the team manager of San Mig Coffee (the harbinger of Purefoods and B-Meg Derby Ace) in the pro league.
    *
    It’s truly unbelievable that Fernandez (first), Patrimonio (third) and Jaworski (ninth) never registered a 50-point game during their remarkable PBA careers, even if all three continue to rank among the top 10 on the league’s all-time scoring charts until now.
    *
    That being said, herewith are some of the greatest “homegrown” Filipino players who broke the 50-point barrier.
    *
    Five - Allan Caidic (The Triggerman), Paul Alvarez (Mr Excitement), William Adornado (Bogs), Danilo Florencio and Abe King – actually reached the 60-point plateau.
    *
    Caidic hit that many on two occasions – a 79 and a 68.* Alvarez once scored 71 points; Adornado, 64; and King, 60.
    *
    All their efforts, however, occurred between 1977 and 1991.
    *
    Tree-like Benjie Paras, who moonlighted as a comedy actor on television and in the big screen during his prime playing years and is currently a studio analyst during the PBA telecasts on AKTV, once made 50 markers with Shell in 1989.*
    *
    It was the year that the effervescent 6-5 Paras became the first and only player in PBA history to earn Rookie of the Year and MVP honors in the same season.
    *
    Like Paras, Fortunato (Atoy) Co Jr. only had a single 50-point performance during his outstanding PBA career.
    *
    “The Fortune Cookie,” who was known for his difficult turnaround, fadeaway jumpers, got a 50 with the fabled Crispa franchise in 1979.* He, too, secured the MVP plum that year albeit in a controversial fashion.
    *
    Co was way behind Toyota’s Ramon Fernandez in the statistical category but subsequently snared all the media votes – following a get-together with the sports editors of the top national dailies by the late Crispa team manager Danny Floro – to walk away with the MVP award.
    *
    Co is now the rookie head coach of his alma mater, Mapua Institute of Technology, in the upcoming National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) season on a mind-boggling three-year, P10-million contract.* Once a “King Cardinal,” Co was the NCAA’s MVP awardee with MIT in 1971.
  3. FIL OIL FLYING V PREMIER CUP:* A GLIMPSE OF THE 2013 COLLEGE BASKETBALL SEASON

    With the hot and humid weather in the early days of summer, drink a lot of fluids for hydration.
    *
    And to avoid the heat, get yourself into the air-conditioned Arena at San Juan and watch the games of the 2013 Fil Oil Flying V Premier Cup preseason collegiate basketball tournament that features the member teams of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) plus the reigning titlist from the Cebu Schools Athletic Foundation Inc. (CESAFI), Southwestern University.
    *
    The two-month competitions, which conclude on Independence Day (June 12), unwrapped last Saturday with three games – defending tournament champion National University vs. NCAA “three-peat” titlist San Beda College, University of Santo Tomas vs. De La Salle University and UAAP “five-peat” champion Atenedo de Manila University vs. Southwestern University.
    *
    The SWU Cobras were invited to the party when the NCAA’s Mapua Tech begged off from participation.
    *
    In the house for the first game were the greatest Filipino cager of all time Carlos (Caloy) Loyzaga and his eldest son Joaquin (Chito) Loyzaga, the former Philippine Sports Commissioner (PSC) commissioner.
    *
    Products of San Beda College, father and son watched the three games, including the opener that saw back-to-back UAAP Most Valuable Player Bobby Ray Parks Jr. of NU connect a triple to send the game to overtime and the Bulldogs finish off the Red Lions in the five-minute extension.
    *
    SBC, which showed up with a new bench boss in Boyet Fernandez (with Adonis Tierra as his assistant) and balik-Bedan twins Anthony and David Semerad, led most of the way before crumbling at crunchtime..
    *
    The second contest featured the Teng brothers Jeric (UST) and Jeron (DLSU) on opposite sides.*
    *
    Jeric, an incoming fifth-year Growling Tiger chalked up 31 points (including 18 in the first half) while Jeron, a sophomore-to-be with the Green Archers, picked up 10 points.*
    *
    DLSU, whose coaching staff included Gee Abanilla and assistants Allan Caidic (a new recruit), Jun Limpot, Mac Cuan and Juno Sauler, registered a come-from-behind 73-67 decision over UST.
    *
    UST was without head mentor Pido Jarencio, who was assisting Olsen Racela on the Petron Blaze bench during its Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) overtime loss to Air21 at the Mall of Asia Arena that same day.* Estong Ballesteros, a UST assistant, temporarily took over the reins.
    *
    Bull-shouldered Fil-Am Jason Perkins, a former Team B member, contributed 17 points and 13 rebounds in the Green’s success.
    *
    Prior to the DLSU-UST game, a plaque of appreciation was presented to all-time Green Archers great Lim Eng Beng, who was in attendance despite suffering from liver cancer.* Lim propelled La Salle to the NCAA championships in 1971 and 1974 and was subsequently named to the list of the 25 greatest players in PBA history in 2000.
    *
    Former Ambassador Danding Cojuangco, the comebacking DLSU team manager since last year, donated P1 million for the 5-11 Lim’s medical expenses.* Lim once saw action in the pro ranks for San Miguel Beer, which was formerly owned by Cojuangco.
    *
    The DLSU Alumni Association and the Fil Oil group also gave financial assistance to the mild-mannered Lim.
    *
    In the third and final game, SWU showed up with three foreign recruits to replace former Cameroon import Benoit Mbala, who decided to join DLSU last March but is still a couple of years away from UAAP participation due to residency requirements.
    *
    One of the three Cobra imports, 17-year-old, 6-11 Arnel Siewe, looks like a* menacing bouncer with his humongous and portly frame.
    *
    Makes you wonder when will the policy of recruiting players with foreign nationality end in college ball.*
    *
    They are legitimate students in their schools, all right.* But their body language says that they are more like basketball mercenaries.
    *
    Simply put, schools take them in for their cage skills and not for their academic excellence.
    *
    The “win-at-all-cost” philosophy in local college ball* is unacceptable.
    *
    *
  4. Lim Eng Beng:* All-time King Archer Faces Toughest Challenge

    He arrived after 1950s hero Kurt Bachmann Jr., the German-Filipino national known as “Mr. Hookshot” for his patented offensive weapon.
    *
    And he came ahead of stars like Zandro Limpot Jr., Florendo Ritualo (Renren) Ritualo Jr., Mike Cortez and Joseph (Jayvee) Casio who wore the Green.
    *
    But none of the above was better than the straight-shooting Lim Eng Beng, the most prominent King Archer of all time, and undoubtedly the greatest collegiate basketball player ever in De La Salle annals who propelled the Green Archers to a pair of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) titles in 1971 and 1974.* (La Salle joined the rival league University Athletic Association of the Philippines in the mid-1980s.)
    *
    For all his triumphant hardcourt battles during the sixties till the mid-eighties at Chiang Kai Shek College (high school), La Salle (college) and five other ballclubs (Concepcion Carrier, Universal Textile, San Miguel Beer, Crispa and Manila Beer) in the professional Philippine Basketball Association, there still is one major offcourt battle left for the once-sturdy Beng to conquer.
    *
    The Tondo-born Lim, who turns 62 in November, is currently battling cirrhosis and other health issues and will have to undergo a liver transplant at the soonest possible time.
    *
    In addition to our prayers, he needs some financial assistance badly.
    *
    Beng’s former batchmates at CKSC have come to support him, so have his close friends during his heyday at La Salle.* The PBA likewise is expected to lend Beng a hand at his most difficult times.
    *
    Personally, my interaction with Lim came during his four-year stay at the DLSC campus (it was then called a college when I entered the school in June 1972) and when he was coaching the CKSC high school squad in the Tiong Lian competitions during the mid-2000s.* I also casually bumped into him when he played alumni ball for his HS alma mater up until last year.*
    *
    I recall also the day we met up at the old McDonald’s along Araneta Avenue in Quezon City some time in 2005 to personally gift him a copy of the book “Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball” where he was one of the featured star players.
    *
    Lim hooked up with La Salle in 1971 and immediately propelled the Green to an NCAA championship that year as a freshman.* I set foot on La Salle soil for the first time a year later.
    *
    Beng and I were classmates in Typing, with Beng sitting in front of this Hoopster in class.* Yes, typing was still a required subject at the time, so were 12 units of Spanish (Gold bless Mrs. Arboleda wherever she is).
    *
    Beng was an unassuming personality in campus.* Off the classroom, he mingled with his co-Chinese-Filipino batchmates from Xavier School without any air of superiority.
    *
    On the hardwood, at the nearby old Rizal Memorial Coliseum or the Araneta Coliseum, the bull-shouldered Beng was a “beast” as an NCAA performer, without having to taunt the opposition or showboat as the new “beasts” in town boastfully have been doing so lately.
    *
    Though a superstar in his own class, wala kang yabang makikita sa kanyang mga buto-buto.
    *
    A gifted shooter with the uncanny ability to draw free throws, Lim was a hard-hat worker who simply gets the job done on the floor without much frills.* He was a class act so much so his rivals would happily go home to convince their mothers that he was worthy enough to be adopted as their own son.
    *
    As a senior and its team skipper, Beng would again propel La Salle to the NCAA crown in 1974, winning over arch nemesis Ateneo de Manila, 2-0, in the best-of-three finals after angrily declining an offer by a gambling syndicate to throw away the series opener in exchange for P50,000 – a large sum at the time.
    *
    Romping away with league MVP honors that season, he registered a couple of NCAA collegiate records that have yet to be surpassed until today.* He still owns the all-time NCAA single-game scoring mark of 55 points (vs. Letran) and the highest scoring average for a single season with a 30.9-point clip in 14 appearances.*
    *
    The Green Archers subsequently retired No. 14 jersey in Lim’s honor, becoming the first player in La Salle cage history to earn the distinction.
    *
    Lim later apprenticed in the old Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) then joined the PBA with Concepcion Carrier when the league opened shop in 1975, rejoining him with his college mentor Valentin (Tito) Eduque.
    *
    Lim called it quits professionally in 1986 at age 35.* In 2000, he was voted one of the 25 greatest players in PBA history.
    *
    Far away from his legendary hardwood exploits, Lim is now in the midst of another battle, facing a debilitating health issue that is not easy to conquer.
    *
    It’s said ...
  5. LOYZAGA AND RUSSELL:* TWO OF A KIND

    *Carlos (Caloy) Loyzaga is to Philippine basketball what Bill Russell is to the U.S. National Basketball Association.
    *
    Russell went to the NBA Finals well a dozen times during his illustrious pro career and struck water on a league-record 11 occasions.
    *
    Loyzaga, on the other hand, made the Philippines proud in the international arena after collecting a stunning six gold medals in as many Asian competitions (four in the Asian Games and two in the Asian Basketball Confederation, the harbinger of the FIBA Asia Championship) from 1951 to 1963 and securing a bronze during the 1954 Rio de Janeiro World Basketball Championship (which will be renamed FIBA World Cup of Basketball next year in Spain).
    *
    Significantly, the 6-10 Russell and the 6-3 Loyzaga faced each other during the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia.* In a first-round action, the United States crushed the Philippines, 121-53 (66-23).* The Americans went on to secure the gold medal while the Filipinos, who posted a 4-4 record, settled for seventh place after getting back at their quarterfinal tormentor Chile, 75-68 (33-3.
    *
    Unquestionably, the most memorable international appearance for the multi-dimensional Loyzaga was the 2nd FIBA WBC in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from October 22 to November 5, 1954.
    *
    In that quadrennial showcase, the Philippines grabbed the bronze medal for the highest finish ever by an Asian country in WBC history.* Only the U.S. (gold) and Brazil (silver) fared better than the Filipinos.
    *
    A dozen countries took part in the two-week competitions.* Seven came from the Americas, three from Europe and a pair from Asia – the Philippines and Formosa (Taiwan/now known as Chinese-Taipei).
    *
    Despite employing a second-rate unit, the Yanks snared the World title with an unblemished 9-0 mark.* They whipped the host Brazilians, 62-41, in the gold-medal encounter.
    *
    The Americans’ lowest winning margin was five points, a 64-59 (30-26) decision over sixth-place Uruguay in the eight-team final round.
    *
    At the time, the U.S. teams to the World Basketball Championship were selected by the U.S. Amateur Athletic Union, which could only tap players from the industrial or commercial leagues, the minor colleges and the American Armed Forces.
    *
    Brazil, which took the silver medal with an 8-1 card, registered a pair of victories over the Philippines during the tournament – 99-63 in the preliminary round and 57-41 in the eight-team final round.
    *
    In the final phase, the Filipinos dropped a 56-43 decision to eventual titlist United States but not before giving the Americans a scare.* Trailing by only three points at the half, 25-22, the courageous PH squad rallied at the start of the second half and even grabbed a 31-26 advantage.
    *
    However, the Americans’ offense got rolling, having scored 23 consecutive points to establish control, 49-31, with three minutes remaining en route to a 13-point triumph.
    *
    Kirby Minter, a 6-6 forward, led the Americans with 15 points.* Loyzaga was one of three Filipinos in double-digit scores with 12 points.* Team captain Lauro (The Fox) Mumar topscored with 14 markers and 6-2 Jose Rizal College hotshot Mariano (Nano) Tolentino chipped in with 11.
    *
    The Philippines wound up with a 6-3 overall record (including 1-1 in the preliminaries) during the tournament.
    *
    It officially clinched the bronze medal with a 66-60 victory over France in the team’s penultimate assignment in the final round, where all eight participants played against each other on a round-robin basis without any playoffs.* Loyzaga collected 20 points against the fourth-ranked French.
    *
    In the final contest against sixth-place Uruguay, the hulking but springy Loyzaga exploded for 33 markers as he propelled the Filipinos to a 67-63 success despite the absence of head coach Herminio Silva, who had called in sick that day.
    *
    Caloy averaged 16.4 points in nine games, the third-highest in the tournament.* Only Uruguay’s Oscar Moglia (18.6 ppg) and Canada’s Carl Ridd (18.2 ppg) registered higher scoring averages.
    *
    Deservedly so, Loyzaga was the lone Asian on the five-man Mythical Team.
    *
    *
Page 2 of 18 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 12 ... LastLast

 
Visitor count:
Copyright © 2005 - 2013. Gameface.ph