PDA

View Full Version : Recruitment: the ills and the thrills



bchoter
08-18-2011, 04:28 PM
After the Soc Rivera rule has had extensive bandwidth in the BEN, I think it's time this and other recruitment issues should be discussed in general and not only BEN-specific or UAAP-specific.

Now that that Shapiro guy is in the news for, potentially, bringing down University of Miami for improprieties as a booster, this makes recruitment relevant.

xxiocebu
08-18-2011, 08:23 PM
Are their rules in place in the UAAP or NCAA that limit things like allowances, booster gifts, etc?

bchoter
08-19-2011, 02:14 PM
None that I know of. The question, ultimately is, "how much is too much?"

nnahoj
08-19-2011, 06:59 PM
^^^

this is precisely the reason why a national governing body is needed to oversee these kinds of practices and recruitment policies should be on the top of the list.

the US NCAA may not be perfect but they do have rules that needs to be followed.

danny
08-20-2011, 04:28 AM
^^^

this is precisely the reason why a national governing body is needed to oversee these kinds of practices and recruitment policies should be on the top of the list.

the US NCAA may not be perfect but they do have rules that needs to be followed.



This is Manila where two third world leagues could not even go beyond petty elf-interest and posturing for "dominance".

Everything is fine until it implodes. Let's just wait for everything to blow up in our faces...

maroonmartian
08-20-2011, 09:01 AM
What are the considerations offered by teams in order to recruit a player? In my opinion these are legal and ethical considerations:
-free tuition fee (whether its P20k or P100k+)
-board and lodging (for players who came from the province)
-allowances and stipends (for those who came from poor families)

unlawful and unethical considerations:
-lump sum money to entice players to play
-extravagant condominiums

may naiisip pa kayo?

duphaR007
08-20-2011, 02:19 PM
What are the considerations offered by teams in order to recruit a player? In my opinion these are legal and ethical considerations:
-free tuition fee (whether its P20k or P100k+)
-board and lodging (for players who came from the province)
-allowances and stipends (for those who came from poor families)

unlawful and unethical considerations:
-lump sum money to entice players to play
-extravagant condominiums

may naiisip pa kayo?



Brand new car
Under the table allowances
Bribe to the players' families

Well there are certain players din kasi na halata mo yan na yan ang gusto. may iba nagpapataas ng presyo kesyo lalaro dito lalaro doon nag aala Lebron.

fujima04
08-20-2011, 03:20 PM
Package Deals such as benefits are being extended to other members of the family i.e. scholarships sa mga kapatid.

razor
08-20-2011, 04:26 PM
How about Baste's and JRU's and some schools "you will flunk high school, if you won't stay and play for us in college" recruitment tactics vis-à-vis their high school jocks? ;)

razor
08-20-2011, 04:42 PM
Some of these fact and figures supposedly offered/given to blue chip prospects/recruits are (usually) grossly exaggerated.

If you have a respectable institution, a stable program, well meaning and supportive alumni, etc., then a couple of hot dog sandwiches - literally and figuratively - is more than enough to seal the deal and reel in the recruits. ;D

maroonmartian
08-20-2011, 06:27 PM
^ Magkano nga ba ng going rate ng mga blue chip recruits? Wala rin akong alam pero binigyan ako ng idea ni ironcoach (sa UE thread). Ang alam ko lang around P20k (sure ako) na tuition sa UP, DLSU baka P100k (or mali ako) per sem. No question pwede ibigay na yan sa mga players.

Ang tanong ko lang ay sino dapat sisihin sa mga maling palakad sa recruitment? Ang mga pamantasan, mga alumni,mga manlalaro mismo dahil sa pagkagahaman nila o ang mga liga na walang regulasyon?

Buwan ng wika pala, subukan ko magFilipino. ;D

duphaR007
08-20-2011, 07:04 PM
Dahil sa hype na ginagawa sa college ball nowadays, pag parating nanalo ang school ay sikat so that means mas maraming ingay and makaka attract ng potential students na mag enroll sa mga schools na to. This is one of the reasons din siguro why some schools are doing everything in terms of recruitment. Pulling out the possible resources that they can to get talented and blue chip recruits.

danny
08-23-2011, 03:43 AM
Is there anything wrong if I will spend thousands to support my team?

A lot of basketball fans enjoy the elitism yet are critical of how elitists spend their money.

If there are no rules being violated, let them be.

danny
08-23-2011, 04:38 AM
How about Baste's and JRU's and some schools "you will flunk high school, if you won't stay and play for us in college" recruitment tactics vis-à-vis their high school jocks? ;)


Baste at JRU lang ba? Ano pa bang mga paaralan yan sa NCAA at UAAP ang nakikinabang sa ganyang taktika?

Ano ba ang problema sa taktikang isugal ang pera para lang makuha ang isang manlalaro? Hindi ba't napakadaming manlalaro sa Pilipinas na wala sa radar ng mga paaralang may malalaking pondo?

Sa bawat taon, ilan lang ba yang mga manlalarong hinahabol ng may madaming pera? Dalawa? Tatlo? E di kunin ang mga hindi hinahabol na magagaling din naman.

Ano ba ang problema kung pumupuntang Amerika ang ilang paaralan para mag-ubos ng pera pero hindi naman mananalo sa habang buhay?

Hayaan niyong mag-ubusan ng pera ang may pera habang ang iba ay maghanap ng "mura" pero de-kalidad na manlalaro mula sa apat na sulok ng Pilipinas.

Subalit kung ang sa tingin niyo ay pera lang ang nagpapatakbo sa mga liga ngayon, e di kumalas at magtatag muli ng panibagong liga nang lubusan nang magkahati-hati ang bubwit palakasang pangkolehiyo sa Pinas. Baka dun iba naman ang labanan... at kung may rekalmo ulit, kumalas at magtayo muli ng sariling liga. :)

Pera lang yan. Mauubus din yan.

Joescoundrel
08-23-2011, 08:34 AM
I looked up the law creating the Philippine Sports Commission, the government agency tasked supposedly with developing and overseeing sports in the country. RA 6847 I think its called. Siempre walang banggit dun about varsity athletics.

Here are some things I've been thinking up:

I. Definition of Terms

a) Amateur athlete - Any person engaged in any or a number of sporting activity, game, tournament, league, competition with the primary purpose being to achieve victory in the same.

b) Varsity athlete - Any amateur athlete currently enrolled at any curriculum or year level, in a school, university, college, technical and vocational and all other institutions offering educational and training services (herein referred to as 'school'), and who competes as a representative of the same.

II. What a Varsity Athlete May Directly Receive

a) Up to 100% free tuition and miscellaneous fees, including fees that may be charged for co-curricular and extracurricular activities such as but not limited to field trips, theater shows, museum visits and the like.

b) School uniforms, school shoes, school materials and supplies that are actually required in subjects in which said varsity athlete is currently enrolled, inclusive of the uniforms, shoes, materials and supplies to be used in training and the actual sporting event of the athlete.

c) Free use of dormitory facilities. In case the school does not have its own dormitory facilities, or the same are currently at full occupancy, free use of any housing unit not more than 50 meters from the campus where the varsity athlete is enrolled, and provided that rent / lease for said housing unit is not more than the average rent / lease of that locality.

d) Free board. In case board cannot be provided, the varsity athlete may be given a subsistence allowance equivalent to no more than 50% of the legislated national daily minimum wage.

e) Free transportation. In case transportation cannot be provided, the varsity athlete may be given a transportation allowance equivalent to no more than 20% of the legislated national daily minimum wage.

f) Honorarium equivalent to no more than 200% of the legislated national daily minimum wage for public appearances per appearance such as interviews on TV, Radio and Online shows, print and other media.

g) Honorarium equivalent to no more than 500% of the legislated national daily minimum wage and/or merchandise/goods equivalent to no more than 1000% of the legislated national daily minimum wage for commercial/product endorsements per endorsement transaction.

III. Prohibitions

a) Varsity athletes may not recieve any emoluments, remuneration, salary, wage, or any other consideration, in cash or in other forms, except for those enumerated in the preceding Article.

b) Varsity athletes may not receive any other gift, incentive, award, reward, bonus or other material, except if the varsity athlete is also a national athlete and is given a reward or bonus as a national athlete as provided by Law.

c) Coaches, managers, handlers, relatives, friends, legal guardians, teachers, school administration and staff, are not to transact for and on behalf of varsity athletes in order to receive any emoluments, remuneration, salary, wage, or any other consideration, in cash or in other forms, except for those enumerated in the preceding Article.

d) Coaches, managers, handlers, relatives, friends, legal guardians, school administration and staff, are not to transact for and on behalf of varsity athletes in order to receive any other gift, incentive, award, reward, bonus or other material.

IV. Participation in Competition Other Than Varsity Competition

a) Varsity athletes may represent the country as national athletes in international competition, or as local government athletes in national competitions, subject to all of the same provisions in Article II and Article III above.

b) Varsity athletes are not to participate in any competition with prizes, salaries, wages, other remuneration and emoluments of any kind.

c) Should any varsity athlete be found in violation of any provisions herein, said athlete shall be barred immediately and permanently from any varsity competition, and shall be barred from the premises of any venue, stadium, coliseum and the like where any varsity competition is being held.

V. Penal Provisions

a) Natural and juridical persons may be found in violation of this Act.

b) Those found in violation of this Act, whether jointly or severally, must pay a fine of at least P50,000 up to a maximum of P5,000,000 and incarceration of at least six years and one day up to a maximum of 12 years.

c) Schools found in violation of this act shall be suspended from all varsity competition for at least one year up to a maximum of two years. Said years in suspension shall count against the eligibility of all varsity athletes of the offending school.

All varsity competition refers not only to the tournament, league, competition to which the offending school belongs and participates, but all tournaments, leagues and competitions nationwide.

Violations of this Act committed, jointly or severally, individually or in concert, by any official representatives, employees, faculty, staff of the school, in any capacity, are deemed as violations committed by the school.

oca
08-23-2011, 09:37 AM
Whenever a kid is recruited-- laging maganda at matamis ang usapan. Nanunuyo ang booster ng paaralan o ang paaralan mismo at wala sa mga iyan ang magbibitaw ng di magandang salita. Pag nandyan na at recruitED na ang bata pero sa kung anong dahilan ay nagkaroon gusot, sa kadalasan walang laban ang bata kung gagawa ng isang arbitrary o unilateral act ang paaralan.

The example cited by razor, panggigipit ang tawag dun. Pero may iba pang paraan ng panggigipit. Nariyan yung biglang tatanggalan ng scholarship ang bata at manakanakang sisingilin ng napakalaking halaga na dapat ay sagot ng scholarship bago ito tinanggal.

Di naman sikreto ang mga kaso ng panggigipit sa mga batang gusto umalis pero ayaw naman bitawan ng paaralan.

Ano ba pwedeng gawin ng liga patungkol dun?

Simplé lang ang gusto kong mangyari, magkaroon ng malinaw na alituntunin na nagbibigay ng proteksyon sa kapakanan ng student-athletes.

An official guideline from the league itself, declared publicly, that will protect student-athletes from arbitrary and unilateral acts of the school.

1. Sa pag-iipit ng grades o ang bigyan ng bagsak ng marka ang student-athlete na gustong lumipat ng paaralan.

A remedy to this is to REQUIRE EVERY MEMBER SCHOOL TO FURNISH THE LEAGUE COPY OF GRADES OF STUDENT-ATHLETES AT THE END OF EVERY MID-TERM AND FINALS OF EACH SEMESTER. (In the case of hs students, copy of report cards of every grading period.)

This is for all sports for both Srs and Jrs competition. At the very least, hindi na basta pwedeng ibagsak ng paaralan ang bata kung ang i-sinumite nitong documento sa liga ay nagpapakitang pasado naman ang bata sa mga nagdaang semester/ periods. Kung may nagbigay ng maling information, patawan ng parusa na tulad ng suspension na ipinataw sa Adamson sa kaso ni Marlou Aquino.

2. Sa biglaang paniningil ng kung ano-ano sa student-athletes na lilipat ng paaralan.

A remedy to this is to REQUIRE EVERY MEMBER SCHOOL TO ISSUE A CLEARANCE TO EVERY STUDENT-ATHLETE AT THE END OF EACH SEMESTER.

Sa pangkaraniwan, yung mga graduating lang at/o kung kailan na mismo lilipat ang isang estudyante na ang clearance ay kinakailangan. Alam ng lahat kung ano yang clearance na yan-- punta ka sa library (kung alam ng bata saan ang library nila ::) ), punta sa accounting, punta sa kung saang department at magpapapirma. Dapat ang mga clearance na iyan ay mabigyan ng kopya ang liga. This can be in summary form-- ilista ang pangalan ng lahat ng student athletes at sa ibaba ay may isang talata na nagdedeklara na sa pagtatapos ng nasabing semester ay walang outstanding obligation ang mga bata sa paaralan.

Some may argue that on certain grounds the above concerns are "internal issues" that it need not be elevated to the concerns of the league as a whole. Na ang academic standing ng bawat bata, na ang clearances ay sa pagitan lamang bata at paaralan.

Sa puntong iyan, tanungin natin kung anong proteksyon meron ang mga bata sa mga arbitrary at unilateral actions ng isang paaralan.

Base on history and precedence-- WALA. Each student-athlete is at the mercy of the sense of fairness of the school.

PAANO KUNG WALA SA BOKABOLARIO NG PAARALAN ANG FAIRNESS? PAANO LUNG WALANG SENSE?

The leagues has and will always protect itself-- on any issues and concerns.

Anong protection ba ang ibinigay ng liga mismo para sa mga bata patungkol sa mga isyung binanggit ko sa itaas?

Joescoundrel
08-23-2011, 01:36 PM
^ I've always thought that there must be some law somewhere that prevents schools from forcing their players to stay with them.

Here is an interesting legal question: Does a school, or agent of a school (scout, recruiter, teacher, coach, etc) have the right to be reimbursed for effort, time and most of all money, in the recruitment of a varsity athlete if that athlete decides not to play for the school after all, or decides to leave that school to transfer to and play for another school?

Let us say a school coach goes to Cebu or Davao precisely to watch the various school tournaments there in the hopes of landing a good player, bring him back to Manila, and have that guy play for the coach's team. He finds just such a guy, a talented 6'2" swingman who can fly like Vergel Meneses, shoot like Allan Caidic and handle and pass like Hector Calma all rolled into one. Coach texts his Athletics Director to send money for one-way airfare and a little goodwill cash for the guy's mom and dad. When the kid gets to Manila he practices right away and is put on Coach's B Team. During a Fr Martin Game, after their side beats a big UAAP school and the kid scores 40 against one of the best defenses in Manila basketball, the school he beat offers him bigger allowance and a better scholarship, not to mention a chance at a much better quality of education. The kid accepts. He applies for an honorable dismissal on his own, without telling his coach. Coach is informed by the Registrar that the kid is bolting. Coach and the Athletics Director say if he wants to leave he has to pay for the airfare, have his folks return the goodwill cash, and pay back everything he got from the school, to the tune of say P250,000.

Is there a law that says the school and the coach can do this to this kid?

By playing varsity ball for that school hasn't the kid in effect already earned the scholarship given to him?

As for the airfare, was that not contingent expense to bring the kid over and thus a sunk cost that should not be recovered from the object of the cost? Same with the goodwill cash given to mom and pop.

nnahoj
08-23-2011, 02:04 PM
^^^ sa kakarampot kong kaalamanan tungkol sa batas, non-fulfillment ata ng obligasyon yan sa parte ng bata, pero dahil menor de edad kadalasan yang mga yan, guardian o magulang ang may pananagutan kung sakaling hindi matuloy ang "deal" ika nga sa pagitan ng paaralan at yung manlalaro.

kung may abogado dito baka mas malinawagan niya ang nais kong sabihin. ;D

xxiocebu
08-23-2011, 04:34 PM
^ I've always thought that there must be some law somewhere that prevents schools from forcing their players to stay with them.

Here is an interesting legal question: Does a school, or agent of a school (scout, recruiter, teacher, coach, etc) have the right to be reimbursed for effort, time and most of all money, in the recruitment of a varsity athlete if that athlete decides not to play for the school after all, or decides to leave that school to transfer to and play for another school?

Let us say a school coach goes to Cebu or Davao precisely to watch the various school tournaments there in the hopes of landing a good player, bring him back to Manila, and have that guy play for the coach's team. He finds just such a guy, a talented 6'2" swingman who can fly like Vergel Meneses, shoot like Allan Caidic and handle and pass like Hector Calma all rolled into one. Coach texts his Athletics Director to send money for one-way airfare and a little goodwill cash for the guy's mom and dad. When the kid gets to Manila he practices right away and is put on Coach's B Team. During a Fr Martin Game, after their side beats a big UAAP school and the kid scores 40 against one of the best defenses in Manila basketball, the school he beat offers him bigger allowance and a better scholarship, not to mention a chance at a much better quality of education. The kid accepts. He applies for an honorable dismissal on his own, without telling his coach. Coach is informed by the Registrar that the kid is bolting. Coach and the Athletics Director say if he wants to leave he has to pay for the airfare, have his folks return the goodwill cash, and pay back everything he got from the school, to the tune of say P250,000.

Is there a law that says the school and the coach can do this to this kid?

By playing varsity ball for that school hasn't the kid in effect already earned the scholarship given to him?

As for the airfare, was that not contingent expense to bring the kid over and thus a sunk cost that should not be recovered from the object of the cost? Same with the goodwill cash given to mom and pop.



Gusto mo subukan natin dito sa Cebu mag-file? Meron naman test case niyan dito diba?

kerouac82
08-23-2011, 08:21 PM
Manong Joe, pa-propose lang ng addenda sa panukala mo:

VI. Academic Requirements

a) A varsity athlete is to maintain the required Grade Point Average (hereafter referred to "GPA") or Quality Point Index (hereafter referred to as "QPI"), for his or her year level.
b) No special concessions of any form are to be given to varsity athletes. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:
- Lower GPA/QPI limits than those required of students not participating in varsity athletics;
- Specialized academic programs that are created for the sole purpose of accommodating varsity athletes; and
- Excessive assistance given by professors, boosters, and the like, with the exception of preferential access to library/study hall facilities.
c) All varsity athletics programs are to submit a semestral report (or, in the case of institutions running on the trimestral system, a trimestral report) on the academic achievements of their student-athletes.

Joescoundrel
08-24-2011, 07:14 AM
To my knowledge it would at the very least be difficult for a school to claim any breach of contract from a guy who decides to transfer out of his school to play for another school.

If the guy was offered allowances, free tuition, free books and uniforms, to play varsity ball for a school, and he does eventually play varsity ball, then that contract is already perfected.

This is just like a regular academic scholarship isn't it? A guy is getting free tuition and other support from the school if he maintains a certain high grade average. If he fails to maintain it then he loses his scholarship, but I have never heard of the school asking guys like that to return their free tuition. I think this is the same even when this kid decides to transfer to a better school if that better school offers him a better scholarship deal and better opportunities.

Kunwari BS Nursing kinukuha niya sa St Francis, tapos binigyan siya ng better offer ng UST, at lumipat siya sa UST, hindi naman pinipigilan ang student na 'yon, hindi din pinasosoli sa student na 'yon ang lahat ng "nagastos" na ng St Francis. Bakit kung kunwari si Rex Leynes ang lilipat ng school kulang na lang ikadena sa gate ng SFAC si Leynes...?

maroonmartian
08-24-2011, 11:34 AM
I checked the Revised Penal Code and all the penal laws. WALANG BATAS, according to my search, NA NAGPAPARUSA SA MGA GUMAGAWA NG ILLEGAL RECRUITMENT SCHEMES. Best ways may be is for the PSC to adopt its own rules to protect the interest of amateur (including varsity players) from these activities. Its within their power to do so pero di sila pwede magpakulong. ADMINISTRATIVE SANCTIONS lang kaya nila gawin (through the help of DepEd). The different school athletic associations could also make rules but having a unified rules applying to all all schools and sports nationwide is better.

On the other hand, there are provisions in the Civil Code VOIDING CONTRACTS CONTRARY TO MORALS, PUBLIC CUSTOMS and PUBLIC POLICY. Meaning these "informal" and "private" contracts (papahuli ka ba naman) could be not be enforced, to the prejudice of the schools.

danny
08-25-2011, 04:12 AM
National rules and regulation? Para na din nating sinabing mag-isang liga na lang kayo.

We do not have problems with rules. The real problem? RULE MAKERS who are themselves the RULE BREAKERS who make and break rules as they please. Walang solusyon diyan.

Matira matibay na lang mga pare ko. Pahabaan na lang ng pisi. :)

naz-T
08-25-2011, 09:08 AM
Mahirap ata i regulate yan recruitment na yan. maraming paraan ang mga schools na may resources.

Mga gusto siguro magkaroon ng rules sa recruitment yung mga schools na hindi kaya sumabay sa mga offers.

Pero may mga na uuto pa naman at naliligaw ng landas papunta sa mga schools na yan. May sariling diskarte rin naman ang mga schools na can't afford. Pinapangakuan ng playing time na hindi mabibigay ng ibang schools kasi nga loaded ang mga schools na galante at may supporters. Pati nga kapatid na binubusog sa ibang paraan na pwede nila magawa.

Ang mga gumagawa kasi ng rules sa mga liga naghahanap rin ng paraan kung pano makikinabang ang school nila, hindi yung para sa kabutihan ng lahat.

Sam Miguel
08-25-2011, 02:57 PM
Isn't the whole point of recruitment to make your team truly unbeatable, maybe even build a dynasty? UE won seven straight UAAP titles. UM won five straight NAASCU titles. I'm not too sure who holds the record in the NCAA. Recruitment practices are actually the real issue here, i.e. what constitutes "reasonable" for a college player.

I totally agree with Joe on the need for legislation, since trusting the leagues to clean this thing up is like asking the Mob to police their own ranks. Joe's proposed legislation sounds good, and its not like the leagues can stop the plenary power of Congress to legislate "anything under the sun" as Fr Bernas likes to say. I also agree that a college player, no matter how talented, should not be making more than minimum wage.

As Danny pointed out though, in this day and age pahabaan na lang talaga ng pisi ang labanan.

Tiger Happy
08-26-2011, 03:04 PM
The Lower and the Upper Houses may propose new laws on varsity recruitment but the main problem lies on the enforcement and implementation of such laws.

Our (dis)Honorable solons and senators are mostly alumni of those universities who are engaging in "bidding wars" for blue-chip recruits. Now do you honestly think they will risk their school's bragging rights and a backlash from their co-alumni just to level the playing field?

It's only in the Philippines where you can find people value their school loyalty than their nationalistic pride.

oca
08-26-2011, 03:56 PM
OA na yata kung pati Legislative branch ay sumali pa sa pag resolve ng problema.

Outside the school leagues, SBP is the most appropriate body to get involve. Other than the SBP, maybe DepEd and CHED considering scholarships are part and parcel of the recruitment process. Kung wala sa mga paaralan ang titindig para pangalagaan ang kapakanan ng naa-argabyadong student-athletes, imo, pwede pumasok ang DepEd at CHED.

bchoter
09-14-2011, 12:03 AM
Report makes case for paying players
http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/6962151/advocacy-group-says-top-college-athletes-worth-six-figures

oca
09-14-2011, 07:34 AM
Report makes case for paying players
http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/6962151/advocacy-group-says-top-college-athletes-worth-six-figures


The revenue sharing raised in the article/report for the benefit of the players is not applicable to us here, imo.

Una, maliit ang market, I doubt if there is much revenue to share.

Ikalawa, if we are to believe that the basketball competition generates much revenue for the league and the schools, I know for a fact that revenues from basketball subsidizes the holding of other sports.

Imagine how much expense is entailed in holding the track and field events, swimming, tae kwon do, etc. and all the events in the Junior competition. Revenues from the 1st competition of the season helps in providing money to finance the staging of other events for the rest of the season-- kulang pa.

One reason why basketball will never be scheduled in the second semester, as some had suggested so it wont conflict with the FIBA calendar when most tournaments coincide with the 1st semester, because the revenues provide money to ease the financial burden on the season host.

Some may say, nariyan na rin ang women's volleyball generating money for the league, in the case of the UAAP.

Well, until there is solid proof that money from basketball and volleyball has a surplus in the context of money required to host a season, then maybe we can revisit and adapt this report.

Now, if someone says that it is unfair for basketball players (and female v-ball players in the UAAP) to be generating revenues for the rest of the league and yet get no more than the usual scholarship, free meals and quarters; the moment they get more than that I'm sure it will trigger a strike-- at least a protest-- from the academic personnel of the schools.

That will be one bigger issue.

Pero sa totoo lang, kung meron dapat mag-alsa boses kung malaki nga ang kinikita ng liga, walang iba kung di mga boosters. Collectively, they spend more for this well financed teams. Yet, what do they get in return? Not much actually-- free tickets on choice seats? Yet, the schools benefit the most from it and the school reps/ administrators enjoy the perks.

maroonmartian
09-27-2011, 06:47 AM
^ Volleyball games? I doubt it kung may kita sila though I could say the price of tickets is too high. Maybe to cover the games and air it on TV. Just watch a game (except for those big games) and you see how small is the volleyball's audience. Compare to basketball which has expand in years.

Maiba naman po tayo. In the past we are talking of the bad side of recruitment. Let's talk about the other side. The thrilling part.

Here is a story on how Rico Maierhoffer got recruited for the DLSU. This is one of the approach in recruitment that DLSU had done in recent years. Establish a good program so blue chips will flock them. But apparently they have problems with this in recent years:

Conceit, Controversy and Rico Maierhofer
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 17:42:00 01/30/2010

Maierhofer had no plans of leaving Puerto Galera until a Manila-based cousin convinced him to try out for the La Salle basketball team after another UAAP school recruited him.

I had no idea about the colleges in Manila, says Maierhofer. I was a walk-in in La Salle.

Maierhofer says he didn't even know then La Salle coach Franz Pumaren, who has steered the Green Archers to numerous collegiate championships.

I was with my mom when I went to the tryouts. I first approached the ball boy because I thought he was the coach, Maierhofer recalls, laughing. I came in wearing surfing shorts and a sleeveless top. I was wearing a beach attire with rubber shoes.

But Maierhofer's height and skills stood out. He was invited to the team?s training for the next five days, before he even took La Salle's entrance exams.

I really studied and reviewed for it because I wanted to pass, says Maierhofer. I came in for the exam and saw everyone in long sleeves and pants. I came in wearing my tryout clothes. I didn?t have long pants even in high school. Kasi ganoon talaga porma namin sa Puerto, pati pang-simba namin ganoon din [That's how we dress up in Puerto, even for church]. I was really a beach boy who had no idea [about city life].

oca
09-27-2011, 07:46 AM
^ Volleyball games? I doubt it kung may kita sila though I could say the price of tickets is too high. Maybe to cover the games and air it on TV. Just watch a game (except for those big games) and you see how small is the volleyball's audience. Compare to basketball which has expand in years.



kung di kumikita ang abs-cbn/s23 sa v-ball, tiyak pa ring kiikita ang uaap.

when the network and the league entered into a contract, malinaw na ang tatanggapin ng liga, regardless how much the ad placements are during the coverage. magkukumahog at sasakit ang ulo ng network sa pag-solicit ng accounts para sa commercials ng coverage ng games,pero ang liga ay maghihintay sa araw ng collection.

now, para tayo di ot, the coverage helps the league in recruitment.

tv gives exposure to players and to many kids malaking bagay ito to enhance their profile for a possible career in basketball. sa puntong ito umungos ang uaap sa ncaa pagdating sa recruitment sa basketball dahil sa naunang magandang tv coverage ng uaap. pati uaap v-ball ay nakikinabang na as they seem to corner all the best hs talents.

between a uaap cellar dweller in v-ball and another school from a league without tv exposure, palagay mo san lalalagay ang bata?

Sam Miguel
01-02-2012, 02:44 PM
From the NY Times ___

Let’s Start Paying College Athletes

By JOE NOCERA

Mark Emmert, the president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the almighty overseer of American college sports, likes to think of himself as a reformer. A few months ago, after he’d been on the job for a little more than a year, he pushed through a series of improvements, including slightly higher academic standards for college athletes, a full-scale review of the N.C.A.A.’s fat rule book and a new provision giving universities the option of offering four-year scholarships. The current one-year deals are, believe it or not, renewable at the discretion of coaches, who can effectively cut injured or underperforming “student athletes,” as the N.C.A.A. likes to call them.

And one other thing: With Emmert’s backing, the N.C.A.A.’s board of directors, composed of college and university presidents (Emmert himself is a former president of the University of Washington), agreed to make it permissible for Division I schools to pay their athletes a $2,000 stipend. When I saw Emmert in November, shortly after the new rule went into effect, I told him that the stipend struck me as a form of payment to the players. He visibly stiffened. “If we move toward a pay-for-play model — if we were to convert our student athletes to employees of the university — that would be the death of college athletics,” Emmert retorted. “Then they are subcontractors. Why would you even want them to be students? Why would you care about their graduation rates? Why would you care about their behavior?” No, he insisted, the extra $2,000 was an effort to increase the value of the scholarships, which some studies estimate falls on average about $3,500 short of the full cost of attending college annually.

At the time I spoke to Emmert, high-school athletes were signing binding letters of intent to attend a university — letters that said they would get the $2,000. But over the next month, college athletic directors and conference commissioners began protesting the new stipend, claiming they couldn’t afford it. Within a month, more than 125 of them had signed an “override request.” And so it was that just a few weeks ago, the N.C.A.A. decided to suspend the payment. For legal reasons, those athletes who were already promised the $2,000 will most likely still get it. But any athlete granted a scholarship after the stipend was canceled may not. (The N.C.A.A. plans to review the issue on Jan. 14.) In other words, some lucky handful of incoming freshmen will be handed $2,000 without jeopardizing their status as amateurs. Yet any other college athlete who manages to get his hands on an extra $2,000 — by taking money from an overenthusiastic booster, say, or selling some of their team paraphernalia, as a few Ohio State football players did — will be violating the N.C.A.A.’s rules regarding amateurism and will probably face a multigame suspension. Behold the logic of the N.C.A.A. at work.

The hypocrisy that permeates big-money college sports takes your breath away. College football and men’s basketball have become such huge commercial enterprises that together they generate more than $6 billion in annual revenue, more than the National Basketball Association. A top college coach can make as much or more than a professional coach; Ohio State just agreed to pay Urban Meyer $24 million over six years. Powerful conferences like the S.E.C. and the Pac 12 have signed lucrative TV deals, while the Big 10 and the University of Texas have created their own sports networks. Companies like Coors and Chick-fil-A eagerly toss millions in marketing dollars at college sports. Last year, Turner Broadcasting and CBS signed a 14-year, $10.8 billion deal for the television rights to the N.C.A.A.’s men’s basketball national championship tournament (a k a “March Madness”). And what does the labor force that makes it possible for coaches to earn millions, and causes marketers to spend billions, get? Nothing. The workers are supposed to be content with a scholarship that does not even cover the full cost of attending college. Any student athlete who accepts an unapproved, free hamburger from a coach, or even a fan, is in violation of N.C.A.A. rules.

This glaring, and increasingly untenable, discrepancy between what football and basketball players get and what everyone else in their food chain reaps has led to two things. First, it has bred a deep cynicism among the athletes themselves. Players aren’t stupid. They look around and see jerseys with their names on them being sold in the bookstores. They see 100,000 people in the stands on a Saturday afternoon. During the season, they can end up putting in 50-hour weeks at their sports, and they learn early on not to take any course that might require real effort or interfere with the primary reason they are on campus: to play football or basketball. The N.C.A.A. can piously define them as students first, but the players know better. They know they are making money for the athletic department. The N.C.A.A.’s often-stated contention that it is protecting the players from “excessive commercialism” is ludicrous; the only thing it’s protecting is everyone else’s revenue stream. (The N.C.A.A. itself takes in nearly $800 million a year, mostly from its March Madness TV contracts.) “Athletes in football and basketball feel unfairly treated,” Leigh Steinberg, a prominent sports agent, says. “The dominant attitude among players is that there is no moral or ethical reason not to take money, because the system is ripping them off.”

It’s a system that enables misconduct to flourish. The abuse scandals that have swirled around Penn State football and Syracuse basketball. The revelation that a University of Miami booster — now in prison, convicted of running a Ponzi scheme — provided dozens of Miami football players with money, cars and even prostitutes. The Ohio State merchandise scandal that cost the coach, Jim Tressel, his job. The financial scandal at the Fiesta Bowl that led to the firing of its chief executive and the indictment of another top executive.

Another consequence of this economic discrepancy between the players and everyone else, though, is the increasingly loud calls for reform. Not the kind of reform that Emmert talks about — change that nibbles around the edges, while trying to maintain the illusion that college football and men’s basketball players are merely partaking in an extracurricular activity like theater or the chess club. That illusion was shattered long ago, surely. “The huge TV contracts and excessive commercialization have corrupted intercollegiate athletics,” says Brit Kirwan, the chancellor at the University of Maryland system. “To some extent they have compromised the integrity of the universities.”

The new breed of reformers, whose perspective I share, believes that the only way the major sports schools can achieve any integrity is to end the hypocrisy and recognize that college football and men’s basketball are big businesses. Most of these new reformers love college sports — as do I. They realize that having universities in charge of a major form of American entertainment is far from ideal, but they are also realistic enough to know that scaling back big-time college sports is implausible, given the money at stake. Instead, the best approach is to openly acknowledge their commercialization — and pay the work force. This is, by now, a moral imperative. The historian Taylor Branch, who in October published a lengthy excoriation of the N.C.A.A. in The Atlantic, comparing it to “the plantation,” was only the most recent voice to call for players to be paid. Like most such would-be reformers, however, he didn’t offer a way to go about it.

That’s what I’m setting out to do here. Over the last few months, in consultation with sports economists, antitrust lawyers and reformers, I put together the outlines of what I believe to be a realistic plan to pay those who play football and men’s basketball in college. Although the approach may appear radical at first glance, that’s mainly because we’ve been brainwashed into believing that there’s something fundamentally wrong with rewarding college athletes with cold, hard cash. There isn’t. Paying football and basketball players will not ruin college sports or cause them to become “subcontractors.” Indeed, given the way big-time college sports are going, paying the players may be the only way to save them.

There are five elements to my plan. The first is a modified free-market approach to recruiting college players. Instead of sweet-talking recruits, college coaches will instead offer athletes real contracts, just as professional teams do. One school might think a star halfback is worth $40,000 a year; another might think he’s worth $60,000. When the player chooses a school, money will inevitably be part of the equation. For both coaches and players, sweet-talking will take a back seat to clear-eyed financial calculations.

The second element is a salary cap for every team, along with a minimum annual salary for every scholarship athlete. The salary caps I have in mind are pretty low, all things considered: $3 million for the salaries for the football team, and $650,000 for basketball, with a minimum salary of $25,000 per athlete. I would keep the number of basketball scholarships the same, at 13, while reducing the number of football scholarships from 85 to a more reasonable 60, close to the size of N.F.L. rosters. Thus, each football team would spend $1.5 million on the minimum salaries, and have the rest to attract star players. Basketball teams would use $325,000 on minimum salaries, and have another $325,000 to allocate as they wish among players. Every player who stays in school for four years would also get an additional two-year scholarship, which he could use either to complete his bachelor’s or get a master’s degree. That’s the third element.

The fourth: Each player would have lifetime health insurance. And the fifth: An organization would be created to represent both current and former college athletes. It may well turn out to be that this body takes on the form of a players’ union, since a salary cap is illegal under antitrust law unless it is part of a collective-bargaining agreement. (That’s why most professional sports leagues embrace players’ unions.) This organization — let’s call it the College Players Association — would manage the health insurance, negotiate with the N.C.A.A. to set the salary caps and salary minimums, distribute royalties and serve as an all-around counterweight to the N.C.A.A.

Sam Miguel
01-02-2012, 02:53 PM
^^^ Cont'd from above ___

There have been other pay-the-player schemes put forward recently, in particular a Sports Illustrated proposal that would pay every athlete on campus a small stipend, including lacrosse players, golfers and volleyball players. But I think it’s better to acknowledge forthrightly that those who play football and men’s basketball are different from other college athletes — and that the players in those two revenue sports should be treated accordingly. Baseball and hockey players have a choice that football and basketball players don’t have: they can go pro as soon as they leave high school, thanks to the existence of minor leagues. And sports like wrestling and rowing don’t offer the possibility of a pro career — wrestlers and rowers are true amateurs. As James Duderstadt, the former president of the University of Michigan, told me: “Most sports can be justified as part of what a university does. But big-time football and men’s basketball are clearly commercial entertainment and have been pulled away from the fundamental purpose of a university.” The denial of that central fact is the primary reason those sports are so troubled today. Paying the players will cause the vast majority of the scandals to go away. In economic terms, the players’ incentives will be realigned.

To see how, let’s take a closer look at the elements of the plan.

Bidding for Players

Yes, I know: I had a hard time coming to grips with this, too. Then I met two Bay Area economists, Andy Schwarz and Dan Rascher, who work as litigation consultants and have a longstanding interest in the economics of college sports. (Rascher is also a professor of sport management at the University of San Francisco.) The case they make for using the free market to recruit players makes an overwhelming amount of sense.

One of the N.C.A.A.’s primary arguments against paying players is that the concept of amateurism is what defines college sports and make it special — and that to abandon that amateurism would ruin the college “brand.” But Schwarz and Rascher argue amateurism has nothing to do with why fans love college sports. “What draws us to college athletics is that we love seeing students representing our schools,” Schwarz says. “That would be just as true if they were being paid. The N.C.A.A. likes to conflate paying college athletes with the issue of whether they would still be students. Students get paid all the time.”

What about the argument that football and basketball profits subsidize the other athletic programs? “If having a good lacrosse team is part of what the community values, then the university should pay for it,” Schwarz says. “They shouldn’t ask the football team to subsidize it.” As for the objection that colleges with major sports programs don’t have the money to pay $2,000 stipends, much less free-market salaries, Schwarz and Rascher just roll their eyes. “It’s already an arms race,” Schwarz says. Rascher points not just to the millions the coaches make but also to the money schools spend on facilities to impress recruits. Wouldn’t it make more sense to simply pay some of that money to the recruits instead? “Economically, a big chunk of that money really does belong to the players,” Schwarz says. The fact that they are not getting anything is precisely why everyone else is getting so much.

If it is still hard to imagine schools dangling financial contracts in front of high-school kids, consider that nonathletes get stipends all the time from universities. Besides, how much worse could it be than the status quo, in which parents and hangers-on too often angle for a little something to steer their children to this school or that one? In the world Schwarz and Rascher envision, athletes would hire advisers to help them. Legitimizing relations between agents and college athletes would be another huge improvement, because players could get good advice about their professional prospects. Currently, any player who so much as talks to an agent loses his eligibility to continue playing college sports.

Would coaches sometimes overpay players who turn out to be duds? Of course. But they would learn, just as the pros have had to learn, how to bring a financial perspective to evaluating talent. Actual coaching — x’s and o’s — would become more important. The number of recruiting violations would quite likely shrink to a negligible figure, as would most of the scandals that involve players taking money. They wouldn’t need to take money because they would be paid for their work.

The Salary Cap and the Minimum Salary

Not everybody can be a highly paid star, of course. Teams need right tackles and backup point guards too. The minimum salary is not meant to make anybody rich. It is meant to ensure that no matter what your status on the team, you can still live like other students on campus — maybe even a tad better — even if you come from a disadvantaged background. For all the stereotypes of college jocks living large, the reality is often quite harsh. Indeed, to inquire about the life of college athletes is to hear, invariably, about players who wear the same clothes every day because they don’t own any others. N.C.A.A. rules make no allowance for poverty, yet surely college athletes should be able to go on a date, rent an off-campus apartment, lease a car, have some clothes, visit home and pay for their parents to see them play once in a while. That is what the minimum salary will provide.

As for the salary cap, it is an acknowledgment of two things. First, without a cap of some sort, the wealthiest athletic departments, like Texas’s, with its own sports network, and Oklahoma State’s, which has Boone Pickens’s fortune behind it, could well dominate the recruiting of top players. A salary caps equalizes the amount every team can pay to recruit players. Those who succeed will be those who use that money most intelligently. (Competitive balance is another reason the N.C.A.A. gives for not paying players.)

Second, the salary cap recognizes that university athletic departments don’t have unlimited sums of money to throw at football and basketball players. Andrew Zimbalist, the noted sports economist at Smith College — and a critic of many N.C.A.A. practices — told me he agrees with the contention that schools can’t afford to pay players. In his recent book of essays about college sports, “Circling the Bases,” he also called for federal legislation to cap — and lower — coaches’ egregious salaries. But if the players were paid, the market would probably readjust coaches’ salaries all by itself. At the University of Texas, Mack Brown, the football coach, can earn up to $6 million with bonuses. Texas could pay its entire salary cap merely by hiring a $3 million coach instead of a $6 million one. The point is, if schools had to pay their workers, they would find the money. It would simply mean trimming excess elsewhere.

There is another possible benefit. Schools could turn to boosters to help raise money to pay the players. What an improvement that would be — using booster money to legitimately pay players instead of handing them cash under the table.

One obvious rejoinder is that paying players will create haves and have-nots in college sports. That is true — the Alabamas and Florida States would have a much easier time coming up with $3.65 million for their football and basketball players than Youngstown State. But the big-name college programs already have overwhelming advantages over the smaller Division I schools; paying the players doesn’t really change that fact. What it will most likely do is force smaller schools to rethink their commitment to big-time athletics. Schools that truly couldn’t afford to pay their players would be forced to de-emphasize football and men’s basketball — and, perhaps, regain their identity as institutions of higher learning. Ultimately, I suspect that if schools had to start paying their players, we would wind up with maybe 72 football schools (six conferences of 12 teams each) — down from the current 120 Football Bowl Subdivision programs — and 100 or so major basketball schools instead of the 338 that now play in Division I. Seems about right, doesn’t it?

The Six-Year Scholarship

If you were starting from scratch, you would never devise a system that relies on universities to serve as a feeder system for pro sports. It is not what universities were intended to do, and no other country in the world does it that way. In Europe, where soccer is king, children with professional potential are culled from the educational system in their early teens and often receive separate schooling from their soccer teams. Those who don’t wind up playing professionally are then ruthlessly tossed aside.

College athletes are routinely tossed aside, too — after they have used up their athletic eligibility. Even those who officially “graduate” often do so without getting a real education. It is the unspoken scandal that permeates college sports, and it is corrosive not just for the athletes but also for the entire student body. “Within two or three weeks of coming to a university, players often find out they are woefully underprepared for college work,” Duderstadt says. “Very quickly they give up and major in eligibility. They take the cupcake courses. It is an insidious thing.”

There is another issue: Players who were stars in high school inevitably come to college with big dreams of going pro one day. Yet, as Emmert notes, “we had 5,500 Division I men’s basketball players last year, and only 50 went to the N.B.A.” By the time most players realize that they are not going to make it to the professional ranks, so much time has been lost that they can never catch up academically. In most cases, they also can’t afford to quit football and concentrate on their studies, because that would cost them their athletic scholarships.

Sam Miguel
01-02-2012, 03:00 PM
^^^ Cont'd from above ___

The primary purpose of a six-year scholarship is to give athletes whose playing days have ended a chance to get their degrees — and to really have time to focus on classes that can prepare them for a future without football or basketball. It would allow players to take fewer courses during their years of athletic eligibility, giving them a better chance to succeed at the courses they do take. And it would make it possible for those players who do graduate within four years to pursue a graduate degree. The N.C.A.A. would no longer need to obsess over an athlete’s academic performance; as long as he met the same standard the school applied to every other student, he could stay in school and play on the team. The extra two years would place the onus on the athlete to get an education, while also giving him the opportunity. Isn’t that how it should work anyway?

It is not just professional football players who have concussions. Nor are they the only ones who take painkillers to disguise their injuries — or who suffer chronic pain by the time they are in their 30s thanks to the beatings their bodies took during their athletic careers. Taylor Branch, the author of the Atlantic essay, was a good football player in high school, but he turned down a football scholarship to Georgia Tech because he knew his body was already breaking down just from playing high-school football. “I wouldn’t have had any shoulders left if I had played football in college,” he told me recently. Providing lifetime health insurance as a benefit for anyone who plays at least two years of college ball is a no-brainer.

The College Players Association, which would administer the health-insurance plan, would also represent the players whenever salary caps or minimum salaries are being set, as well as on those occasions when the N.C.A.A. or a college conference is cutting a deal with a television network or a marketing firm. Players would receive a percentage of the revenues — I am thinking 10 percent at first, though that, too, would quite likely rise — to be disbursed after they leave school, giving them a small share of the revenue their team generated while they were there. The organization would handle licensing deals on behalf of players whose jerseys are being sold, too, and collect fees whenever the N.C.A.A. markets the images of former players. (A portion of those fees would be used to pay the health insurance costs.) This clearinghouse role would resemble the system by which songwriters receive royalties from B.M.I. or Ascap whenever their songs are played on the radio or on television.

I borrowed the idea of a college players’ association from Michael D. Hausfeld, a plaintiffs’ lawyer who likes to take on high-profile cases with an element of social justice to them. Since the summer of 2009, he has been representing former Division I college football and basketball players in a class-action antitrust lawsuit against the N.C.A.A. for licensing their images without compensating them. It’s called the O’Bannon case, after the lead plaintiff, Ed O’Bannon, a former college basketball star who led U.C.L.A. to a national championship in 1995. A trial is scheduled for May 2013.

(Full disclosure: William Isaacson, a lawyer with Boies, Schiller & Flexner, is among more than a dozen attorneys from various firms who have assisted Hausfeld in bringing the O’Bannon lawsuit. My fiancée is the firm’s director of communications. She has played no role in the case, and does not stand to profit if O’Bannon wins.)

The case has received attention because it’s a legitimate threat — maybe the first one ever — to the N.C.A.A.’s longstanding refusal to compensate its players. This is partly because the plaintiffs are former players — including basketball greats like Oscar Robertson and Bill Russell — who do not appear to be in it for a quick buck but seem to genuinely view themselves as trailblazers. For his part, Hausfeld has embraced this litigation as a cause akin to a lawsuit he once filed against Texaco for discriminating against minority employees. That case, he says proudly, “resulted not just in a monetary judgment, but a restructuring of the company’s relationship with minorities.”

Hausfeld insists that athletes have rights: “They have rights to a fair allocation of revenue, to health care, to career development, to education and to posteducational opportunities.” He says that he believes that the O’Bannon case could well lead to a “restructuring” of the relationship between college athletes and the N.C.A.A. Which, in turn, might lead to paying the players.

It is possible, certainly, that the N.C.A.A. could win the O’Bannon case. It is also possible that the case could be decided or settled narrowly — allowing former players to be compensated for the use of their images but leaving the status of current players unchanged. But both Hausfeld and the N.C.A.A. have been acting as if the stakes are higher than that. Hausfeld has been attacking the concept of amateurism head-on, and the N.C.A.A. has been defending it with equal fervor. So there is at least a possibility that a judge will conclude that the N.C.A.A.’s refusal to pay its players has less to do with protecting the sanctity of amateur athletics than with its needs as a cartel to illegally suppress wages.

Anticipating the day when a judge might ask him what sort of remedy he would propose for the plaintiffs, Hausfeld has put forward the idea of an organization that would negotiate licensing agreements on behalf of former players and then act to collect and distribute the money they are due. I would take that notion a step further, and have that organization represent current players as well and negotiate a wider range of issues on their behalf. If Hausfeld wins the case, that may be where we are headed anyway.

To those who question why I am willing to pay these two categories of male athletes, but not any female athletes, my simple answer is that football and men’s basketball players occupy a different role on campus — the role of an employee as well as a student — that female (and most other male) athletes do not. If the time comes when women’s basketball is as commercialized and profit-driven as men’s basketball, then yes, the women should be paid as well. But we’re a long way from that point.

There are almost surely Title IX issues surrounding my plan, which would probably have to be settled by the courts. (Title IX is the law that guarantees women equal athletic opportunities in college sports.) But I would argue that the employee status of those who play football and men’s basketball means that paying them does not violate Title IX. It is worth noting that, even now, 40 years after Title IX became the law of the land, many schools still spend far more money on men’s than women’s sports without running afoul of it.

To hear the gnashing of teeth by those who believe that money will soil college sports is to hark back to the days when baseball was on the cusp of free agency, or the Olympics was considering abandoning its longstanding adherence to amateurism. In both cases, critics feared that the introduction of serious and legitimate money would damage the sports, turn off the fans and lead to chaos. Instead, baseball and the Olympics got much better.

College sports will become more honest once players are paid, and more honorable. Fans will be able to enjoy football and men’s basketball without having to avert their eyes from the scandals and the hypocrisy. Yes, it’s true: paying players will change college sports. They will be better, too.

Sam Miguel
01-02-2012, 03:02 PM
In the case of the UAAP, why don't we just say "Let's Legitimize the Paying of College Athletes", since everybody and his brother already knows money changes hands for top recruits... :-X

danny
02-23-2013, 01:05 PM
Magkano na ba ngayon ang bayaran?

danny
02-24-2013, 11:51 PM
Pera pera lang naman talaga ang labanan. Panapanahon lang yan. Tutal wala na namang mga kaluluwa ang madaming paaralan.

james_hunt
02-25-2013, 01:11 PM
Pera pera lang naman talaga ang labanan. Panapanahon lang yan. Tutal wala na namang mga kaluluwa ang madaming paaralan.

Eh di Status Quo nalang. Now that La Salle is benefitting from the generosity of Amb. Cojuangco, let them be. Pag nagsawa sya na tulungan ang La Salle saka kami aangal hehe. You're right, weather-weather lang talaga lahat. :D