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Schortsanitis
11-20-2009, 12:54 AM
The Sweet Science's "Deconstructing Manny"

"The Sweet Science" website came out today with probably the best article written about Manny Pacquiao so far. It is written by a writer named, "Springs Toledo".

"Springs Toledo" is a strange name, even for a writer. If you reverse it, it ends up "Toledo Springs", which is like a familiar-sounding place in the US.

This writer also writes irregularly, sometimes a month apart, indicating that the topics he writes are carefully chosen.

The strange name, irregular, well-screened subjects and extra-ordinary writing style makes me think that "Springs Toledo" is a pseudonymn of a great literary writer/boxing fan. Or perhaps it is the work of a pool of writers, sharing their work for a special topic. In this case, it is Manny Pacquiao.

Here are the first five paragraphs of the article. The rest of the article can be read at the link at the bottom of the page:

"DECONSTRUCTING MANNY

By Springs Toledo

Manny Pacquiao: I’m just [an] ordinary fighter...

Freddie Roach (interrupting): –You’re not ordinary.

Manny Pacquiao: Sorry about that, master.



“He finds gaps,” said Emanuel Steward after Manny Pacquiao stopped Miguel Cotto in the twelfth round. Those three words mirror the words of a far older, far more legendary war tactician: Sun Tzu. “Strike at their gaps,” The Art of War asserted two thousand years ago, “attack when they are lax, don’t let the enemy figure out how to prepare.” The second knockdown of Cotto illustrated this theory. Cotto, a conventional boxer-puncher, was hit in the fourth round by an uppercut from the left side that went inside and underneath his guard. Pacquiao found a gap, capitalized on the momentary carelessness of an onrushing opponent, and spent the rest of the fight exploding every potential solution Cotto thought he had.

“When you are going to attack nearby make it look as if you are going to go a long way,” Sun Tzu said, “when you are going to attack far away, make it look as if you are going just a short distance.” Pacquiao seems to be moving out when he’s coming in and coming in when he’s moving out. He exploits expectations with illusions. He “draws them in” and then “takes them by confusion.” Trainer Freddie Roach, himself a former professional boxer, agrees that Pacquiao is “very hard to read.” Pacquiao continues punching when his opponent expects a pause, his angles are bizarre, and he is often not where he is expected to be after a combination. Due to such unorthodoxies, this southpaw is a master of destroying the timing and rhythm of a conventional fighter. He is similar to Joe Calzaghe in that regard. Mikkel Kessler said that Calzaghe “ruins your boxing.” Indeed, Pacquiao does worse than that.

While a disruptive boxer like Calzaghe spills ink all over your blueprint and laughs about it, Pacquiao ruins your blueprint, but then adds injury to insult by crashing the drafting table over your head.

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MANNY
Pacquiao has athletic gifts that translate well in the ring: disruptive rhythm, timing, and speed, all financed by shocking power that belies his featherweight frame. As if this weren’t enough, his whiskers safely absorbed the shock of Cotto’s left hooks. He was never hurt, which raises eyebrows. Manny, we must remember, was exchanging punches in a division forty pounds north of the one he began in. And he reveled in it, he invited it, even snarling at times and standing disdainfully in the final stanzas to challenge the manhood of the retreating Puerto Rican. Roberto Duran, 58, watched from the crowd. His coal-black eyes remembering the night he dethroned another welterweight who thought he could outgun a smaller man. Duran watched Pacquiao’s black hair flying with the force of his blows, his beard paying unintentional tribute. A smile, once sinister, betrayed his lips."

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.thesweetscience.com/boxing-article/7437/deconstructing-manny/?article_id=7437&comment=0#comments

pio_valenz
11-20-2009, 09:50 AM
^I agree with the comments. Very, very well-written article. Makes you feel like you're talking with Roach or seated next to Duran.

yungha
11-23-2009, 12:09 AM
anyone else notice that whatever division manny fights in immediately becomes the "most exciting" and "deepest" division in boxing. 3 yrs ago feather/super feather was the deepest and most exciting with pac, barrera, morales and jmm. then manny moved up to lightweight and suddenly that's the most exciting with juan diaz, casamayor, katsidis, guzman, valero and then marquez when he moved up. then manny moved to jr welter and suddenly everyone's excited about amir khan, hatton, bradley, malignaggi, judah, rees and campbell all in one division. they were talking about how bradley and campbell can KO manny. now manny's in welter and suddenly it's the best division with pac, floyd, sugar shane, cotto and the returning antonio margarito. even good-but-not-great fighters like clottey and berto suddenly become marquee names. that's the star power manny brings to boxing. the division he enters suddenly lights up and the one he leaves becomes dry and stale. are we even aware what valero, diaz and guzman's next fights are?

mark my word, if manny moves up to jr middleweight, sisikat bigla sina yuri foreman, cory spinks and sergio martinez. i don't know much about martinez but yup, i think manny can beat either foreman or spinks.

mighty_lion
11-23-2009, 08:54 AM
But Floyd Mayweather Jr. said he controls boxing and boxing will die if he will retire. ;D

bluebruiser90
11-23-2009, 02:35 PM
But Floyd Mayweather Jr. said he controls boxing and boxing will die if he will retire. ;D


That clown retired for 21 months and nobody gave a rat's ass. The boxing world continued to turn and the best pound-per-pound crown was taken from a jester and given to the rightful king.

bluebruiser90
11-23-2009, 02:38 PM
mark my word, if manny moves up to jr middleweight, sisikat bigla sina yuri foreman, cory spinks and sergio martinez. i don't know much about martinez but yup, i think manny can beat either foreman or spinks.


Corey Spinks doesn't have KO power and is the perfect fodder for Pacman. Does he have a crown that Pacman can gobble? I haven't seen too much of Foreman but Manny can still pick him apart. Corey Spinks is not that tall at 5'9 1/2" while Foreman is 5'11". Their KO ratio is less than 30% so Pacman won't have to deal with very heavy hitters. I know it's a hollow crown but eight world titles is still eight world titles. Let's see Floyd JOY Mayweather top that.

yungha
11-27-2009, 07:23 PM
quote from manny during the cotto weigh-in. in more ways than one, the 2nd jmm fight was the turning point in his career. gone were the wild reckless swings and lunges, likewise the wild nights that disrupted his training. it was after that fight that pac really dominated and became the global superstar he is now.

“Speed conquers all but I also have the power. The second Marquez fight made me think. I never looked at my opponents’ tapes before that fight but now I do. At this level, hard gym workouts are not enough. I need to go to school for every opponent. I need to study them. I consider myself a student of boxing now, not just a fighter."

Schortsanitis
11-28-2009, 01:36 PM
^^^
I thought Pacquiao-Morales II was the turning point in Pacquiao's career. After being beaten by Morales thru the use of superior boxing skills in Pacquiao-Morales I, Pacquiao realized he needed to improve his own boxing skills to climb even greater heights.

Manny started developing his right hook, which Roach called "Manila Ice". You see him feinting more, moving his head better from side to side, and getting better with his footwork, moving laterally much better than he ever did before.

The result: A ninth-round knock out of Eric Morales, who at that point had never been knocked out before, If memory serves me right.

easter
12-16-2009, 10:08 AM
Technique wise, the 2nd Morales fight would be a turning point. But in terms of changes in winning attitude, the 2nd JMM match probably was crucial and maybe the main event in his career which enabled him to propel to legendary heights in boxing.

yungha
12-23-2009, 12:46 PM
CNNSI.com fighter of the decade - link here (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/magazine/specials/2000s/12/13/boxing.highlights.lowlights/index.html)

CNNSI.com top 20 male athletes of the decade - link here (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/magazine/specials/2000s/12/21/top.male.athletes/index.html?eref=sihp)

iba ka talaga, manny. CNNSI na yan, hindi pipitsuging publication. mabuhay ka!

yungha
12-29-2009, 01:40 PM
trivia-

first fighter ever signed by oscar dela hoya's GBP - marco antonio barrera

GBP's first ever boxing promotion - barrera-pacquiao 1

now you know why golden girl has such an axe to grind against manny.

MonL
03-17-2010, 05:31 PM
Quite a long read. Seven pages The best? You be the judge.

"Pronounced like a comic-book sound effect: pack--ee-ow!"
-- What his opponents hear and react to after getting hit. :D



The Biggest Little Man in the World

What do you get when you cross Muhammad Ali, Sly Stallone, Vaclav Havel, Michael Vick, Che Guevara, & Clay Aiken? Manny Pacquiao

By Andrew Corsello

http://www.gq.com/sports/profiles/201004/manny-pacquiao-boxer

LION
03-17-2010, 07:18 PM
^Great read. I'd like to get this old issue of GQ.

Also, read the Vanity Fair series of articles on the Pacquiao - De La Hoya fight written by Peter Nelson.

Manny Pacquiao is the Michaelangelo of boxing.

yungha
03-19-2010, 01:29 AM
heard about erik morales angling for a 4th fight with pacquiao? this comes three years after a fever-stricken manny annihilated him in 3 rounds, going down in a KO so brutal he looked at his dad, shook his head and said no mas. this was at 130 where erik was already struggling to bring opponents down after moving up from 122 and 126. moving further up to 135, he couldn't even hurt B-level fighter david diaz. now, he wants another shot at manny at 147!

this can only mean one thing - after 3 years out of the ring, the guy's broke.

LION
03-19-2010, 08:18 AM
^ Totally agree. He wants a Clottey-like paycheck. Very much willing to absorb punches from Pacman for a million bucks.

The guys who ain't broke like David Diaz, Hatton, Golden Boy are not asking for a rematch.

Schortsanitis
03-27-2010, 07:12 PM
After reading about Manny's lifestyle on the April 2010 issue of GQ, I think Manny should heed this warning:

********************

http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-2759-Business-and-Finance-Examiner~y2010m3d27-Stewards-and-Thomas-Hearns-financial-woes-a-warning-for-Pacquiao

Steward's and Thomas Hearns' financial woes a warning for Pacquiao

March 27, 1:20 AM

Marv Dumon

Popular HBO commentator Emanuel Steward was slapped with a tax lien last month for owing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) about $38,000 for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, according to The Detroit News.

Steward has trained over 30 world champions including Evander Holyfield and Thomas Hearns.

Thomas "The Hitman" Hearns himself is facing foreclosure on his home and owed nearly $1 million in unpaid taxes and mortgage payments. (Hearns reportedly earned close to $40 million during his career.)

Regarding Emanuel Steward, penalties and interest caused his tax debt to balloon to close to $48,000. HBO's popular commentator said that he recently paid off his tax bill, and blamed the late payments due to possibly not checking his mail.

His response and version of the story seems incredulous. The tax lien was for calendar years 2006 and 2007. He has not checked his mail in over three years?

With the fast approaching IRS April 15 tax deadline, these cases serve as reminders for active fighters to practice prudent financial management. Floyd Mayweather, Jr, as it was widely reported last year, owed the IRS over $5 million in back taxes, penalties, and interest. Mayweather also reportedly faced repossession of numerous vehicles as well as owed the neighborhood trash collecter several thousand dollars.

The National Basketball Association and National Football League have programs that routinely give their players training and classes regarding budgeting, financial and investment management. Boxing currently has no similar program. Golden Boy Promotions does sit down with fighters to give them periodic personalized financial overviews and reports.

Emanuel Steward's and Thomas Hearns' cases serve as warning for today's current big spender and pound-for-pound king Manny Pacquiao. Think of the once-great Mike Tyson. The former heavyweight champion earned over $400 million during his fight career. Titanic purses since lost on mind-boggling expenses, Tyson declared bankruptcy not too long after his prime.

Regarding Manny Pacquiao, "Pacman's" entourage size is approaching 200, and the congressional candidate is reportedly budgeting $10 million for his May electoral campaign.

While, the Filipino is expected to earn around $15 million in pre-tax income, IRS taxes (and Pacquiao belongs to the highest tax bracket) would bring earnings closer to $9 million.

That amount seems rich until you consider that the Philippine government also takes its portion of taxes. Pacquiao is taxed millions of dollars each year on both U.S. and Philippine soil.

Expenses are probably close to $2 million (about $1 million for Freddie Roach).

After its after-tax tabulation, the Joshua Clottey fight probably provides only about half the funds needed in order to financially support his congressional bid - a race that many are forecasting Pacquiao to lose.

A source close to the team also suggests that Pacquiao still ways to go in setting up a legal entity(s) that can classify his business expenses as deductibles in order to reduce his tax burden. If this information is true, and we say if, Pacquiao is likely losing several million dollars each year due to a lack of estate and tax planning in the United States alone.

If Pacquiao is not careful, business expenses can wholly eat up his investment income and start to reduce his cash-generating assets. Entourage spending reportedly tops $700 for a single restaurant sitting at Nit Nai (next to the Wild Card Gym), and that's just for one meal - dinner.

Gives proper meaning to the term "free loader" doesn't it? Chartered jet? Costs for a small commercial plane can range between $15,000 to $35,000. That's one hefty plane ticket bill.

Setting up legal entities, such as a Limited Liability Corporation (LLC), continues to be sound practice for managing legal risk exposure as well as for decreasing tax liabilities. The IRS tax code, as extremely complex as it is, provides ways to minimize taxes for individuals through the deduction of business expenses as well as provides tax credits for certain qualified expenses.

However, there continues to be no substitute for common sense and restraint when it comes to financial management. Cash is king. Unfortunately, many stars equate fame with financial stability. Far, far from it. Most likely, the opposite is true. The more fame, (eventually) the less financial stability.

Schortsanitis
04-15-2010, 09:53 PM
Manny Pacquiao with an "Exclusive" video on Funny or Die:
- http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/c403374464/manny-pacquiao-s-1-music-video

yungha
05-11-2010, 02:32 AM
looks like manny's going win in saranggani. the first reigning world champ elected to congress. only in the philippines.

congrats manny.

The_Big_Cat
05-11-2010, 02:23 PM
Pacquiao is way ahead of Chongbian. 56,000 against 25,000 votes.

Will he retire or will he give us the fight everybody is clamoring for (Mayweather)?

Schortsanitis
11-23-2010, 01:33 PM
Who's next for the Greatest Pinoy Boxer ever?

* Shane Mosley - He maybe big, but too old, gassed out starting round three in his last fight with Homoweather. A boring, predictable fight. Another sacrificial lamb to be offered on the altar of Manny Pacquiao.

* Juan Manuel Marquez - Interesting, if only to see The Pacman finally knock him out. But he has to win against Katsidis, first.

* Floyd "The Homo" Mayweather Jr. - Interesting, but that faggot will never likely fight Manny. He's just too scared. Too gay. LOL

* Sergio Martinez - After knocking out the seemingly invincible Paul Williams with one punch, Martinez suddenly thrust himself as one of the most fearsome boxers of today. The best opponent in my book. But might be too big for Manny. Remember that big Margarito hurt Manny real bad in their last fight. Arum already rejected a proposal by Martinez's Manager for a 155 lb catchweight. A lower catchweight, maybe 148 lbs. would probably be good enough for Manny. If the Pacman beats Martinez, then I am pretty sure Manny will not have to fight Homoweather anymore to cement his legacy in boxing as the greatest fighter of his generation.

On to Sergio Martinez, and eternal boxing legacy for Manny Pacquiao.

yungha
07-20-2011, 03:25 PM
manny pacquiao retired hatton, dela hoya, clottey and mosley. morales and barrera still fight, but manny practically retired those guys from elite competition. the joke going around boxing fora now is that manny's latest retirement is that of ross greenburg of hbo.

danny
07-21-2011, 01:03 PM
Pampataba ng puso niyo:

;)

Pacman/HP Commercial (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzjqH3FBnko&NR=1)

maroonmartian
09-10-2011, 10:59 AM
http://www.gmanews.tv/story/231937/nation/pacquiao-mulls-running-for-vice-president-in-2016-polls

PacMan announces his intention to run for VP in 2016. The bad part about this is no one from his camp told him he is still not qualified to the age requirement (40 years old dapat). I don't know if this is a joke but please think before you would run. Show us something what you have done in Congress.

Sam Miguel
11-26-2013, 08:47 AM
Redemption

By Conrado de Quiros

Philippine Daily Inquirer

10:26 pm | Monday, November 25th, 2013

All of Manny Pacquiao’s fights have imposed a tremendous burden on him. Each time he fought in the past, I’d worry about him losing. Of course there’s always that possibility in any fight and with any fighter, but such has become our level of expectation, no, of faith, that he would naturally win, I’d dread what would happen if he lost. Other people say, “Death is not an acceptable excuse,” we say, “Defeat is not an acceptable option.” At least with our hearts if not with our mouths.

It’s too monstrous to contemplate, which went beyond contemplation to reality last year when the “Pambansang Kamao” not only got beaten but got beaten to a pulp. Everywhere in the world, at home and abroad, Filipinos walked about like the Taclobanons after Supertyphoon “Yolanda.” The devastation was complete. The spectacle of Pacquiao lying senseless on the canvas for an eternity—one worried at that point the eternity might be literal—so shocked Filipinos they trooped out of the movie houses in silence, unable to comprehend what had just happened.

But none I think brought more weight on Pacquiao’s aging shoulders than this last fight. He put it there himself, quite apart from his torn and bleeding nation, vowing never again to fail his countrymen. He had cried twice this past year, he said, his heart wrung by two horrors. The first was not when he was decked out by Marquez—he had had come to accept it as a fact of boxing life, or death—but when he saw the pain and grief and desolation in the eyes of his countrymen when he came home. The second was when he saw the pain and grief and desolation in the eyes of the Taclobanons after Yolanda.

He was going to win this fight. Defeat was not an acceptable option.

Win it he did.

In a way that rolled back his defeats of the past year, in a way that rolled back the debris in Tacloban, in a way that rolled back the hands of time itself. This wasn’t the Pacquiao who lost cataclysmically to Juan Manuel Marquez. This wasn’t the Pacquiao who won against Timothy Bradley though was cheated barefacedly of it: In a way that was a defeat too because he looked slow and listless and aging in it. This was the Pacquiao who went through Ricky Hatton, Oscar de La Hoya, Miguel Cotto, Shane Mosley and Antonio Margarito and left them torn and bleeding, or with faces their mothers would be hard put to recognize.

The speed was back. I hadn’t seen him this fast in a long time, his lateral movement in full display, turning right and left on a dime, befuddling and frustrating his opponent. Indeed, amply demonstrated by Brandon Rios taking roundhouse swings at him after cornering him, or thinking he had cornered him, only to slice air. Not just once or twice, but again and again, drawing roars and laughter from the crowd. It was like that NBA advertisement of Chris Paul where he goes poof, nibbles French fries with Magic Johnson and Steve Nash in a bar, and materializes back in the game. Pacquiao’s sudden disappearance from Rios’ view had that same now-you-see-me-now-you-don’t quality.

There were changes of course. Some of the power had disappeared too. A couple of years ago, that flurry of punches would have sent his opponents wobbling. A whole series of them would have sent them to sleep. Pacquiao himself would say it was a testament only to his opponent’s toughness, and he marveled at it: “I hit him with lefts and rights and he was still standing.” In the last couple of rounds, Freddie Roach would say, he had the chance to take Rios out but wouldn’t take it. Again Pacquiao had an explanation for it: He had learned his lesson from his fight with Marquez.

Roach however had quite another: Alas, boxing-wise, Pacquiao has discovered compassion.

Indeed, Pacquiao looked every inch like a changed man: more subdued, more introspective, stronger. Stronger, that is, in spirit, though he may very well have grown stronger in body too. The cockiness was gone. He had been chastised by his crushing defeat in the hands of Marquez but, unlike Hatton whom he too had crushed and who had fallen by the wayside afterward, he had not been bowed. He had clawed his way back by dint of his belief in himself, by dint of his belief in his duty to his countrymen, by dint of his belief in his God.

It seems almost unimportant at this point where he goes from here. What is important is that he has plucked himself out of the clutches of defeat and risen to become champion again, with or without the belt. What is important is that he has plucked his countrymen, particularly the storm-ravaged and hope-deprived, from the clutches of despair, with or without the knockout. I said yesterday I thought Pacquiao needed nothing less than a knockout to revive his career, but this wasn’t just the next best thing, this was an even better thing. It wasn’t just that this was a rout, as complete and utter as anything boxing has seen. It was that this rediscovery of form, this display of inner strength, this show of compassion wasn’t just career-reviving, it was life-affirming.

Certainly, it was so for those who watched the fight in the schoolhouses, gymnasiums and relief shelters of Tacloban. The same people who just a couple of weeks ago huddled in the cold and dark, in wind and rain, to watch the dying of a city and grieve over the deaths of loved ones. More than the tons relief given by the aid-givers, this was relief of an order that slaked more than hunger and thirst. More than the comfort and sympathy offered by the bishops and the government officials and the humanitarian groups, this was balm to wound, a candle in the night.

Manny Pacquiao needed a crack at redemption and his countrymen a crack of salvation.

Last Sunday, he supplied both. Despair was not an acceptable option.

Sam Miguel
11-26-2013, 09:44 AM
Why Rios stayed on his feet

SPORTING CHANCE

By Joaquin M. Henson

(The Philippine Star) | Updated November 26, 2013 - 12:00am

MACAU – Manny Pacquiao failed to knock out Brandon Rios in their 12-round bout for the vacant WBO International welterweight crown at the Cotai Arena inside the Venetian Resort Hotel here Sunday morning and fans are wondering why because it seemed relatively easy to hit the slow-moving target.

Here are 10 possible reasons why Rios got off the hook.

• Rios tough as nails. BamBam proved he can take a punch. He got banged up by Manny, downstairs and upstairs. In the first round, it looked like Pacquiao scored a knockdown but inept referee Geno Rodriguez ruled it a slip. But even if Rodriguez called a knockdown, Rios would have easily beat the count. He was up in a flash from his “slip.” Rios established his durability more than ever before.

• Pacquiao losing his touch. The ring icon hasn’t stopped an opponent since Miguel Cotto in 2009. His last five wins were on points. Is Pacquiao unable to bring up his power to impact on bigger fighters? As he gets older, is his power diminishing? Pacquiao hammered away at Rios but couldn’t put him down.

• Pacquiao held back. When he fought Antonio Margarito, Pacquiao could’ve finished off the Mexican but opted to keep him on his feet. He took pity on Margarito who suffered a fractured orbital bone in losing a decision. Freddie Roach said Pacquiao could’ve disposed of Rios in the last two rounds. The decision to go the full route was strictly Pacquiao’s. Rios was battered, bloodied and bruised. Pacquiao did enough to win the decision by a comfortable margin and had no heart to bludgeon Rios into submission.

* * * *

• Pacquiao worked on his stamina. With newly-designated conditioning coach Gavin McMillan, Pacquiao did away with a lot of Alex Ariza’s drills. Coming from back-to-back losses, it was critical for Pacquiao to regain his confidence by fighting more rounds instead of less. “Manny needed the workout,” said Argentinian cutman Miguel Diaz. The implication was Pacquiao carried Rios until the final bell.

• Pacquiao wary of a lucky punch. Last December, Pacquiao sensed that Juan Manuel Marquez was on the way down and pressed his attack even with less than 10 seconds left in the round. As Pacquiao moved in for the kill, he got careless. Marquez tagged him with a right straight smack on his face. Pacquiao collapsed face down and was out cold for a few minutes. The memory of that tragedy is in the back of Pacquiao’s mind. Pacquiao didn’t want the same thing to happen to him against Rios.

• Punishment for Rios. For his bad-mouthing and trash-talking, Pacquiao wanted to administer a clinical beating, punish Rios and torture him. A quick knockout ending would’ve been anticlimactic. Pacquiao deliberately kept Rios on his feet so he could pummel him repeatedly. He saved him for a beating he’ll never forget.

• Rios’ stonewall defense. Sometimes fighting like Joshua Clottey defensively, Rios held both arms close with his elbows near the midsection and the gloves held up high to protect the face. Pacquiao tried to break down Rios’ defense by probing for an opening and sneaking in punches through the stonewall. Rios sacrificed his offense for defense, avoiding a shameful exit by knockout.

* * * *

• Rodriguez threw off Pacquiao’s rhythm. The referee allowed Rios to tie up and roughhouse Pacquiao. There were warnings but never a deduction to dissuade Rios from using dirty tricks. With Rios getting away with bullying tactics, Pacquiao had to improvise and couldn’t get the flow to create the angle for a knockout.

• Ring rust. Pacquiao hadn’t fought in nearly a year or since losing to Marquez in Las Vegas. He displayed excellent footwork and hand-eye-foot coordination. But it’s possible his offensive motor wasn’t tuned up for precision. It was a timely workout for Pacquiao to shake off the rust from a long layoff.

• Pacquiao afraid to inflict permanent damage. With Rios on the receiving end for most of the fight, Pacquiao could’ve intensified the heat and sent BamBam to the hospital. But the point of boxing is not to maim an opponent. Pacquiao wanted to unravel his boxing skills and used his speed to execute.

Some fans were disappointed that Pacquiao didn’t shut Rios up with a devastating knockout. They wanted the Bad Boy to bite the dust and grovel. Other fans were content to witness Pacquiao’s masterful display of boxing skills, speed and movement with no concern for a knockout. The bottom line was Pacquiao beat Rios convincingly on points. It didn’t matter that Rios wasn’t knocked out. Pacquiao got his 12-round workout to regain his form, timing, reflexes and confidence and did it at Rios’ expense.

Sam Miguel
11-26-2013, 09:44 AM
Rios breaks down after painful loss

By Dino Maragay

(philstar.com) | Updated November 26, 2013 - 3:46am

MACAU – The pain of losing the biggest fight of his career – in a lopsided manner – turned out to be too much to bear for Brandon Rios.

In a video that appeared on YouTube, Rios couldn’t hold back his tears during an interview with journalist Crystina Poncher at the post-fight presser of his bout with Manny Pacquiao at the Venetian Resort here.

At first, Rios made sure to stress that Pacquiao didn’t hurt him throughout the fight, which ended up in a one-sided decision victory for the Filipino.

The Mexican-American banger tried to explain what transpired in the ring that time.

“Every time I threw (punches), I felt like I was gonna get countered,” Rios, who was then sporting a pair of shades to cover the cut and bruises he sustained, told Poncher.

Then he started breaking down.

“I trained my a** off to win,” he said, eventually turning away from the camera in an effort to compose himself. He then returned to finish the rest of the interview.

“It hurts me bad because I... I've liked, worked my a** off so hard. Five months in the gym, training, training, training. And I think it was the best camp ever. It happens. Then it goes the other way,” explained Rios, who was still trying to hold back his tears.

Through most of the fight, Rios was at the receiving end of flurries from Pacquiao, who in a fine display of footwork and head movement didn’t leave room for his foe to significantly respond. The Oxnard, California-based slugger ended up suffering the worst beating of his career.

At one moment during the interview, Poncher tried to console Rios, pointing out that he lost to a world-class fighter like Pacquiao – something one couldn’t be ashamed of.

But Rios just couldn’t hide his grief.

“He's very fast, he's very awkward. It hurts really bad. It felt like, I let my team down... because I tried and we worked so hard and we were so confident and everything. That's where it hurts,” he continued.

Being the proud warrior he is, however, Rios vowed to return as much a better fighter.

“I'll bounce back. You learn from your mistake. I'll bounce back,” he ended.

Sam Miguel
11-27-2013, 08:55 AM
Pacquiao staggered by BIR tax punch

By Aquiles Z. Zonio, Michelle V. Remo

Inquirer Mindanao, Philippine Daily Inquirer

4:33 am | Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

GENERAL SANTOS CITY, Philippines—One of the world’s richest athletes, boxing icon Manny Pacquiao, is fighting out of the ring with the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) over a P2.2-billion tax delinquency case.

“My lawyers will eventually settle that issue with the BIR,” said Pacquiao, who returned on Monday to a hero’s welcome in his hometown directly from Macau after his masterful conquest of Mexican-American Brandon Rios in a welterweight bout.

The BIR issued a warrant of “distraint” early this year against the bank accounts of the eight-division boxing champion after it said he failed to remit taxes amounting to P2.2 billion to the government on his earnings from top-billed prizefights in the United States in 2008 and 2009.

Under the National Internal Revenue Code, the issuance of the warrant is allowed as a civil remedy to collect taxes from delinquency.

The amount being demanded by the BIR is much bigger than the P1.8 billion in total assets and net worth declared by Pacquiao, who is also Sarangani representative, in his statement of assets, liabilities and net worth (SALN).

Court case

Pacquiao did not pay the amount or protested the BIR assessment, but instead filed a case in the Court of Tax Appeals (CTA) in Quezon City to nullify the warrant.

Last week, the CTA issued a “status quo ante” order restraining both parties from engaging in any action against each other pending a review of the case. It will issue a ruling on Dec. 5.

In a press conference late Tuesday afternoon, however, Pacquiao unleashed punches against the BIR, insisting that his conscience is clear and that all his tax liabilities with the government were properly paid. He appealed to the agency to lift the warrant.

“There are many crooks in the government whose bank accounts and properties were not subjected to garnishment,” he said in Filipino. “I had absorbed many blows just to earn money and give pride to the nation, but this is what happened.”

“I could not withdraw a single centavo from my own money,” he claimed. “I could not use my money to help especially those who are victims of the calamity.”

Borrowing from friends

He said he had to borrow money from friends to keep his promise to help the survivors of Supertyphoon “Yolanda” in the Visayas. His plan to distribute relief items to them might be delayed because of the BIR action, he added.

The BIR confirmed the local bank accounts of Pacquiao and his wife, Jinkee, had been frozen, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. “According to the collection division we have issued a garnishment of his bank accounts,” Dino Somera, litigation division official of the tax bureau, told AFP.

Somera said he did not know how much money was in the bank accounts of the couple, the AFP report added.

Pacquiao explained that the tax case stemmed from his failure to include the multimillion-dollar taxes deducted by the US Internal Revenue Service from his 2008 and 2009 fight earnings when he reported his income to the BIR.

“The IRS gave us a copy of the taxes deducted from my earnings covering that period. Unfortunately, the BIR refused to honor the copy of tax deduction credited by the IRS,” he said.

He claimed that the BIR was demanding a certified true copy of the IRS document.

In Manila, Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares said a Filipino who generated income in another country during a temporary visit and remitted the corresponding income tax to that country’s government would still have to fulfill certain obligations to the BIR.

In particular, she said, the individual should still report to the BIR the earnings generated abroad and provide documentary evidence that the corresponding taxes had been paid to the foreign government.

“They [Filipinos generating income abroad] have to report and show proof that taxes had been paid,” Henares told the Inquirer.

Tax treaty

The Philippines and the United States have a tax treaty, which is meant to prevent “double taxation”—which happens when an individual pays full income tax in the foreign country and also pays full income tax in the Philippines for the same income.

But Henares said such treaty did not automatically exempt any Filipino from reporting to the BIR and submitting documents that would prove claims of tax payments.

“He [Pacquiao] had been given the opportunity to show this [proof of tax payment to the United States] for the past two years, but he failed to do so,” she said.

His legal counsel, Franklin Gacal Jr., earlier said Pacquiao was not engaged in “hocus-pocus” when it came to declaring his earnings as a boxer.

“He could not hide his total earnings. The BIR could easily monitor it because all his commercial endorsements and boxing fights were covered with contracts,” Gacal said.

Typhoon relief

Pacquiao said he would keep his promise to visit areas ravaged by Yolanda and distribute relief items to survivors who have hardly received assistance. His mother, Dionisia, hails from Leyte province.

“With God’s help, we will always find a way. We will overcome this challenge,” he told the Inquirer by phone.

Pacquiao said he might fly out to the Visayas Wednesday or Thursday and would ask his mother to accompany him. “My wife can’t join because she’s pregnant and the trip might endanger her condition,” he explained.

He said he had been eager to visit the typhoon-ravaged areas even before his fight in Macau, but his American coach, Freddie Roach, advised him to postpone it as he was at the final stage of his preparations against Rios.

The Filipino ring sensation has dedicated his victory over Rios to his countrymen, particularly the typhoon survivors.

Pacquiao, known to be generous in sharing his blessings, said he could not say yet how much he was donating to the survivors. “We should find out how many have not yet received aid or had been given only once since the relief operations began,” he said.

Last year, Forbes magazine listed him as the 14th-highest-paid athlete globally with an estimated $34 million in earnings.—With an AFP report

Sam Miguel
11-27-2013, 08:55 AM
Court of Tax Appeals denies ordering freeze on Pacquiao assets

By Tetch Torres-Tupas

INQUIRER.net

6:24 pm | Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—The Court of Tax Appeals denied reports that it has issued a freeze order over the P2.2-billion assets of boxing champion Manny Pacquiao.

“There is no freeze order,” CTA first division Clerk of Court Margaret Guzman said.

The CTA first division is handling Pacquiao’s tax evasion case. It is also handling the motion filed by the boxing champion to suspend the warrant of distraint and/or levy issued by the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR)

Under the Tax Code, a warrant of distraint and/or levy (WDL) is issued to enforce collection of the assessment of tax liability of a taxpayer.

Lawyer Claro Ortiz, chief of the BIR enforcement and advocacy service, said the WDL was issued last July but Pacquiao’s camp filed a motion to suspend before the CTA.

Ortiz, in a text message, said they started enforcing the WDL but with an existing agreement with the Pacquiao camp, they have not pushed through with its enforcement.

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 10:37 AM
Being a hero

By Randy David

Philippine Daily Inquirer

10:23 pm | Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

A day after returning to a grateful and adoring nation from his redemptive win over Brandon Rios in Macau, boxing legend and Saranggani Rep. Manny Pacquiao faced the press to complain about the way Philippine tax officials have been treating him. The Bureau of Internal Revenue apparently had earlier ordered a freeze on all his local bank accounts pending full payment of his tax obligations. Pacquiao claims he has been conscientious in paying his taxes both in the United States and in the Philippines. But, according to the BIR, he has tax deficiencies on his boxing earnings abroad in 2008 and 2009.

The crux of the matter seems to be the boxer’s failure to submit a certified true copy of a document showing the taxes collected from him by the US Internal Revenue Service. The BIR recognizes that such taxes are deductible from a Filipino national’s tax liabilities in the Philippines so long as proof of payment is presented. Pacquiao says the BIR insists on seeing the original document and has refused to accept a copy.

We can be certain that there are no issues here that a reasonably good tax lawyer cannot sort out. The legal questions appear to be simple. It is the context, however, that is rich in complexity. Because it is complex, one needs subtlety and cautiousness in dealing with it.

Pacquiao has said many times that his mission in Macau was not just to avenge his two previous defeats but also, more importantly, to bring happiness to the Filipino people in this time of overwhelming grief and depression. Without any doubt, he has tremendously succeeded in both objectives. It was uplifting to see a mature and skillful boxer like him dispose of his opponent not by a lucky knockout punch but in a dazzling display of total superiority in speed and punching power. I’m not a boxing analyst, but I think his duel with Rios will long be remembered as one of Pacquiao’s best fights.

It was equally wonderful to watch the viewers in the devastated areas rise from their seats and punch the air with their fists every time their idol connected to Rios’ swollen face. It was as though they were furiously hitting back at the winds and storm surges brought by “Yolanda.” Pacquiao has given the supertyphoon’s survivors a catharsis beyond compare.

But, I wonder if our “pambansang kamao” has not somehow diluted the purity of his victory by choosing this moment to bring up the banality of taxes. It is not clear from the reports when the order to freeze his bank accounts was issued. It could not have been on the day of his actual return from Macau. That would have been the height of stupidity and ineptness on the part of the BIR. It is likewise not clear how much money there is in these accounts. But for Pacquiao to say that because of the freeze on his deposits he has had to borrow money to pay his expenses is to strain the imagination. All his big fights have been held abroad, yet he has no accounts abroad?

He says he is eager to visit the disaster victims in Samar and Leyte to bring them his own donations, but that his admirable intentions are being hampered by the freeze order from the BIR. What terrible villains these government officials are! But, one could sense there is more to this than meets the eye.

We are in the midst of a gathering political storm. We have a government that is perceived, rightly or wrongly, to be grossly incapable of protecting the public coffers from being pillaged by corrupt politicians and other government officials. Yet, this is the same government that relentlessly pursues ordinary citizens who quietly earn an honest living for their supposed failure to pay their taxes in full. Now, Manny Pacquiao himself has decided to bring this paradox to the fore. “There are many crooks in the government whose bank accounts and properties are not subjected to garnishment,” he said in Filipino at his press conference. “I have absorbed many blows just to earn money and give pride to the nation, but this is what happened.”

Although he is quick to say that his travails with the taxman have nothing to do with the President, his lament is heard as more than just a way of softening the BIR. He is making a political statement. Without saying as much, he is hinting that some people are doing this to him because they see him as a force to contend with in the 2016 national elections. Is he?

Given our culture and the immense popularity he enjoys, I believe he is. He has great charisma, and is the perfect personal validation of the poor man’s highest aspirations. In a time of great disaffection with conventional politicians, it is natural to think of him as an alternative. But if he has presidential ambitions, he will have to wait until 2022, because he will still be below 40 in 2016. Still, he is a sure winner if he runs for senator. He will be a big asset in any presidential aspirant’s campaign.

But from what I have seen of Manny Pacquiao’s presence in Congress, which isn’t much, I think he is no different from those icons of popular culture that rode on mass adulation to launch a career in politics. They neither have a vision of a transformed society nor a coherent program of government. Their political habits—mostly revolving around patronage and dynasty-building—are incorrigibly backward. But, more crucially, they suffer from a lack of an organized constituency from which they can draw the political strength they need to end the privileges of the traditional oligarchy that rules our country. Manny Pacquiao is a greatly admired hero to our people. He should value and keep that role by staying out of politics.

* * *

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 10:41 AM
TKO

By Conrado de Quiros

Philippine Daily Inquirer

10:22 pm | Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

My first thought was: Has the government gone suicidal?

That was after I saw Manny Pacquiao complaining to the press a day after his bout with Brandon Rios about the shoddy treatment he got from the Bureau of Internal Revenue. The BIR, he said, had just frozen his bank deposits along with his properties. Consequently he had nothing to give to the survivors of “Yolanda,” to whom he had promised his personal help and to whom he had dedicated his fight. But not to worry, he told the Taclobanons, he had borrowed P1 million from friends to be able to come to their aid.

He protested the freeze order as unjustified, saying he had already paid his taxes in the United States, a practice recognized in this country. The BIR just refused to recognize it. “I am not a criminal or a thief, I am not hiding anything. The money that was garnished by the BIR is not stolen. It came from all of the punches, beatings, blood and sweat that I endured in the ring.” Why is it, he asked, that crooks in this country are treated better than honest and hardworking people?

BIR chief Kim Henares dismisses Pacquiao’s complaint. It’s all his fault, she says. The BIR has given him all these years to comply with its requests to submit the necessary documents. He hasn’t. All he has submitted is a letter from US promoter Top Rank saying he has paid his taxes in the United States. “This is a mere scrap of paper; anyone can write that.” Request has turned to demand, and the BIR has enforced it. It just so happened the ruling of the tax appeals court’s First Division to freeze his deposits came out the day after he won the fight. The court made the ruling two weeks ago.

In any case, Henares says, the court has frozen only two of Pacquiao’s bank deposits amounting to P1.1 million. “Don’t tell me he only has P1.1 million. Where is the rest of [his] money? I have no idea. It has not been garnished (seized).” She says she can’t understand why Pacquiao is making a big deal out of his tax case at this point. “Maybe he should hire better lawyers and accountants.”

Well, the caustic tone isn’t going to help. The public is going to read arrogance in it, and it wouldn’t be entirely wrong. At the very least, questions remain. How much of Pacquiao’s money has really been frozen? It strains credulity to see how Pacquiao, who may or may not be scrupulous about his accounting, would complain about having been rendered penniless by the loss of P1.1 million. We should know soon enough if that’s true.

More to the point, Pacquiao may not have submitted the documents but has submitted a good argument, or one the public can buy. “If I have not paid the correct taxes in America, the US authorities would have come after me and I would not have been able to travel there.” You know what they say: The only two inevitable things in America are death and taxes. Both fall on, and fell, the good and the bad, the rich and the poor. Maybe Pacquiao already has good lawyers and accountants, nobody’s running after him in America. Only here.

But that is the least of the government’s worries.

Can there be a worse case of bad timing? You don’t know where to begin to talk about the tsunami the BIR has just sent in the government’s direction. You knew Pacquiao was going to make a comeback fight, you knew the country was prostrate from a killer typhoon, you knew the people needed a hero to give them the hope they could climb back from their pit of despair. And you couldn’t hold your tax case in abeyance? You couldn’t set aside your freeze order for a while? You had to stick it to the one person who had just given more relief to the survivors of Yolanda than the aid-givers? You had to bring down the one person the ravaged, the desperate, and the despairing identify with heart and soul?

That’s not just lacking a sense of the public pulse, that’s lacking a grasp of reality. When the BIR started going after Pacquiao a couple of years ago, P-Noy was at the height of his popularity. He is now at his lowest since he became president, widely pilloried if not for the fury of Yolanda at least for the fury of its effects. Imagine now Pacquiao landing in Tacloban to be swarmed upon by the survivors of Yolanda, the same people who gathered in the gymnasiums and found respite from their troubles in the way he pummeled Rios to submission, in the way he came back from his own crushing defeat last year, in the way they knew they would rise from their own abject state, and saying, “Sorry, I wanted to bring more, but waray na pera, na-checkpoint ni Kim.”

Much of that will be (melo)drama: Pacquiao knows his theater, he has been known to wring emotional situations for whatever they are worth, and he has his political ambitions, too. But it won’t just resonate with the Taclobanons, it will resonate with Filipinos nationwide and abroad.

In the end, what will the BIR accomplish by freezing Pacquiao’s deposits, whatever the amount? Will it succeed in showing it is resolute and will go after the high and mighty along with the poor and lowly, death and taxes being inevitable in this country, too? No. Pacquiao’s millions (of dollars) notwithstanding, the poor and lowly will continue to think of him as one of their own, who get by not by pork and perk, not by inheriting a family fortune or a family crime, but by toiling and scrapping and, yes, fighting. The poor and lowly will see only that, unlike Pacquiao, people like Lucio Tan will find only death inevitable, not taxes.

Will the BIR succeed in putting the fear of God, or Henares, in the ungodly or tax-evading, and make them pay their taxes? No, it will succeed only in lighting up defiance in their hearts, in solidarity with their unappreciated hero, in solidarity with their oppressed idol.

Guess who’ll get TKOed in this fight.

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 11:03 AM
Arum comes to Pacman’s rescue; BIR open to compromise

By Zinnia dela Peña

(The Philippine Star) | Updated November 28, 2013 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines - Manny Pacquiao’s promoter Bob Arum said he expects certified US tax paperwork for the Philippine boxing hero to be received by authorities in his homeland “very soon” after they froze the fighter’s assets.

Arum said allegations of P2.2 billion ($50.2 million) in unpaid taxes from US bouts in 2008 and 2009 are false and that his Top Rank agency made certain the proper money was paid to US authorities just to avoid such problems.

“Filipino authorities confirmed that Manny is not required to pay double tax,” Arum said in a statement yesterday.

“If Manny paid US taxes for fights and endorsements that occurred on US soil, he is not required to pay double taxes in the Philippines,” he said.

Pacquiao, 34, said the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) had rejected the documentation he provided to show payments had already been made to the US Internal Revenue Service (IRS), a claim Arum supported.

BIR commissioner Kim Henares said they are open to a compromise deal with Pacquiao if he could present the documentation.

Henares said the BIR under the law is allowed to compromise the payment of any tax when there is reasonable doubt as to the validity of the claim against the taxpayer or the financial position of the taxpayer demonstrates a clear inability to pay the assessed tax.

Arum maintained that in each of Pacquiao’s fights in the US, including those in 2008 and 2009, Top Rank withheld 30 percent of the Filipino boxer’s purses and paid those monies directly to the Internal Revenue Service via Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT).

“Top Rank has deposit confirmations for each payment. Top Rank has done the same for all US endorsements it has facilitated on Manny’s behalf,” Arum said.

But Arum said the BIR wanted certified paperwork of those transactions from the IRS rather than deposit confirmations.

“Top Rank submitted copies of the EFT deposit acknowledgements to the Bureau of Internal Revenue as proof of payment. The BIR received the documents but directed Manny to obtain ‘certified’ documents directly from the IRS itself.

“Obtaining certified copies of documents from the IRS takes time. Manny made the formal request to the IRS and we have every expectation that the necessary documents will be furnished to the BIR very soon,” he said.

‘I am not hiding anything’

In the meantime, Pacquiao’s bank accounts remain frozen and he remains unable to make good on a pledge he made after taking a unanimous decision Saturday in Macau over American Brandon Rios to help support victims of Super Typhoon Yolanda.

“I am not a criminal or a thief. I am not hiding anything,” Pacquiao said.

“I have already paid my taxes in America. Had I not paid the correct taxes, they (US authorities) would have come after me, and I would not have been able to travel there,” he said.

Pacquiao, one of the highest paid athletes in the world, and his wife Jinkee have filed an urgent motion before the Court of Tax Appeals to lift the warrants of garnishment in a bid to stop the BIR from freezing the bank accounts.

The BIR assessed the Pacquiao couple of having deficiency income tax for the years 2008 and 2009 in the total amount of P2,229,020,905.50 (inclusive of 50 percent surcharge and 20 percent per year interest).

The alleged tax deficiency has increased to P3.2-billion due to additional penalties imposed by the BIR.

Pacquiao’s lawyers argued the amount was “incredibly high.”

Pacquiao himself noted the assessed penalty was more than his total net worth.

‘Where’s the proof?’

Under the Tax Code, a compromise payment of at least 40 percent of basic tax assessed may be allowed when reasonable doubt as to the validity of the assessment against the taxpayer exists.

In cases where the taxpayer is suffering from a net worth deficit or has been declared bankrupt, a minimum compromise rate equivalent to 10 percent of the basic assessed tax can be assessed.

Where the basic tax involved exceeds P1 million or where the settlement offered is less than the prescribed minimum rates, the compromise shall be subject to the approval of the BIR’s evaluation board.

Henares said no offer of compromise would be entertained unless the taxpayer waives in writing his or her privilege of the secrecy of bank deposits.

Such waiver shall constitute the authority of the BIR commissioner to inquire into the bank deposits of the taxpayer.

Compromise of tax liabilities is discretionary upon the BIR.

Henares said Pacquiao has yet to prove he paid taxes in 2008 and 2009.

She explained all Filipino taxpayers are under obligation to report to the BIR all their earnings and submit documents that would prove claims of tax payments.

“What he submitted was a mere scrap of paper. That is self-serving. What he can do is go to the IRS, ask IRS to certify this copy as a true copy. We have been waiting for that for two to three years,” she said.

Even while a taxpayer has paid income tax to the foreign country, he or she may still have a remaining tax liability, Henares maintained.

“That’s why it’s important for him to submit the required documents so we know if he paid the right amount of taxes,” Henares said.

Arum, on the other hand, said in an interview on ANC yesterday that Henares should have asked the IRS for the document herself.

“My question is why, this lady, as the head of the tax bureau in the Philippines, didn’t ask her counterpart in the United States for such a certificate?” Arum questioned. “She put the burden on Manny.”

“Manny requested the certificate from the IRS, and I am sure the certificate will be coming in the next week or so, but it’s not Manny’s fault. It’s her (Henares) fault,” Arum stressed.

Arum said the governments of the US and the Philippines should have corresponded with each other to get the certificate, instead of putting the burden on Pacquiao to get the certificate from the US, of which he is not even a citizen.

Set an example

Malacañang defended the BIR and called on Pacquiao to set a good example.

“Actions taken by the BIR have adhered to what the law requires. He has been given ample opportunity to comply, and he will continue to be treated fairly,” Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said yesterday.

“As a public official, it will be well for him to demonstrate that he, too, is a law-abiding citizen,” Coloma said.

Coloma said Pacquiao was not being singled out and that he would have to face the tax evasion case filed against him.

He said “harassment is not in our agenda” and “citizens may avail themselves of appropriate legal remedies.”

Despite the tax issue, the Senate approved yesterday a resolution commending Pacquiao for his recent victory against Brandon Rios in Macau.

Senators Sonny Angara, Grace Poe, Lito Lapid, JV Ejercito, Nancy Binay and Koko Pimentel filed their respective resolutions commending Pacquiao on his victory.

Angara expressed hope that the BIR and Pacquiao would come up with an arrangement to solve the tax issue.

“We do not want to blow this out of proportion and allow the international media to further exacerbate it,” Angara said.

“Pacquiao is without question a national treasure and a hero. For the good of the nation, may this controversy be immediately resolved amicably,” he added.

San Juan Rep. Ronaldo Zamora, for his part, advised his colleague lawmaker from Sarangani province to get the services of a good accountant and a good lawyer to get him out of his tax woes. – With Christina Mendez, Paolo Romero, Ramil Bajo

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 11:05 AM
Henares to Pacquiao: Don't use BIR as excuse

By Louis Bacani

(philstar.com) | Updated November 27, 2013 - 11:28am

MANILA, Philippines - Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) Commissioner Kim Henares fired back at Filipino boxing icon Manny Pacquiao who claimed that his bank deposits were frozen by the agency over a P2.2-billion tax case.

Henares said in an interview with ANC's Headstart on Wednesday that Pacquiao should not use the BIR as an excuse if he cannot use his own money to even help typhoon victims since his accounts have been allegedly frozen.

Pacquiao has claimed that he has borrowed money to help the victims of Super Typhoon "Yolanda" since he cannot access all his accounts, including his wife's, due to the garnishment warrant issued by the BIR two weeks ago in connection with his tax case.

But Henares reiterated that the warrant of garnishment on the boxer's assets involved only P1.1 million of his bank deposits.

“He’s making it appear that he cannot pay his staff’s salary, he cannot continue scholarships, he cannot give relief to the Yolanda victims because of us. But the only thing that we have of his money is P1.1 million. So how can he say that he cannot do all these things because we have all his money?” Henares said.

"I don’t know where his other money is. If he cannot help people, if he cannot pay people, he should not make us his excuse,” Henares added.

In an interview over radio dzMM on Wednesday, lawyer Remegio Rojas, Pacquiao's legal counsel, said the boxing champion cannot withdraw his money from 22 banks due to the garnishment notice of the BIR.

"Once na may notice of garnishment na ipinadala ang BIR, 'yung mga bangko hindi na papayagang mag-withdraw ang sinumang account holder base doon sa notice," Rojas said in the radio interview.

But Henares said of the 22 banks her agency has ordered to report on Pacquiao's accounts, only two said they held deposits for the boxer which totaled to the P1.1 million the BIR now has.

Pacquiao's tax case stemmed from the supposed failure of his accountant to report in his income tax returns the millions of dollars in taxes that he paid in the US in relation to his fight purses from 2008 to 2009.

Two weeks before his comeback fight in Macau on Sunday, the BIR reportedly issued a warrant of garnishment which led to the freezing of Pacquiao's bank deposits.

Henares said the boxing icon's case would have been settled had he presented the required documents two or three years ago.

She said Pacquiao's camp has yet to submit the document from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of the US, which states that he did pay his taxes.

The BIR chief said what they only received from Pacquiao's camp is a letter from Top Rank, the boxer's promoter, which said that taxes have been deducted from his earnings..

Henares said this letter won't suffice as an official proof since it can be made by anybody.

"That's a useless paper," she told ANC, "It does not prove that IRS has received this return and has received this money."

The former pound-for-pound king said the freezing of his bank assets is a form of harassment and hinted that politics was behind the tax case.

“I could not withdraw a single centavo of my own money, I could not use it to help. The money garnished by the BIR was not stolen, it’s not PDAF or DAP. These all came from the punches, beatings, sweat and blood that I endured in boxing," a STAR report quoted Pacquiao as saying.

“I was beaten up, earned money and the government took it. But those who steal… I have yet to see anybody who has stolen a lot and gotten the same garnishment,” he added.

But Malacañang said Pacquiao was not being singled out and that harassment was not the government's agenda.

Henares, for her part, said in the radio interview that the BIR is not a political office and that they are only performing their mandate, which is to collect proper taxes. - with the Associated Press

Sam Miguel
11-29-2013, 08:10 AM
Pacquiao given all chances to settle tax deficiencies for 2 years

By Christine O. Avendano

Philippine Daily Inquirer

8:24 pm | Thursday, November 28th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—World boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao “technically misdeclared” his income in 2009 when he stated in his tax return that he earned only less than P50 million in the Philippines and when he failed to include his earnings from his two fights in the United States that year, Internal Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares said on Thursday.

His gross income should have been closer or even more than P1 billion, Henares said as she defended her agency from public criticisms, especially those hurled by Pacquiao’s camp, after it froze his bank accounts for failing to settle P2.2 billion in tax deficiencies.

The BIR chief stopped short of confirming that Pacquiao, one of the world’s richest athletes, could later be held liable for tax evasion and left the door open for him if he wanted to talk about his tax problems with the agency.

Since Monday, when he returned to his hometown in General Santos City after a convincing victory over American Brandon Rios in a welterweight match in Macau, Paquiao has been protesting the BIR’s move to freeze his bank accounts pending his submission of proof that he had already paid taxes from his earnings in the United States in 2009.

Pacquio, who is also Sarangani representative and the country’s richest lawmaker, has insisted that he had given to the BIR copies of tax returns submitted to the US Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to show that he had paid his income taxes. His promoter, Bob Arum of Top Rank, has supported his claim.

The Philippine Daily Inquirer tried but failed to reach Pacquiao for comment on Thursday night.

In a news conference at the Department of Justice (DOJ), where she has filed tax evasion cases every two months under the RATES program of her agency, Henares said she wanted to clarify the BIR’s issue with Pacquiao, considering the “drama” and the “endless exchanges” between them.

Contrary to what the “people’s champ” was saying that the Aquino administration was singling him out, Henares stressed that the bureau had actually given him “much leeway” in dealing with his tax woes.

She disclosed that the BIR started to investigate and audit Pacquiao in late 2010 until early 2011 after an “abrupt” drop in his ranking among the country’s top taxpayers. From 2006 to 2008, Pacquiao was in the top 10 percent of highest taxpayers, but he slid to the top 30 percent in 2009, she said.

When the BIR audited him for his 2008 and 2009 income tax return (ITRs), Pacquiao did not submit any documents, thus prompting the agency to subpoena him. He responded by executing an affidavit declaring his US income and tax payment in his 2008 ITR but without any supporting documents.

In that instance, Henares said the BIR did not become strict in asking documentation and allowed him to claim tax deductions.

But when Pacquiao claimed tax deductions for expenses, he was unable to provide documentation, she said. The BIR then assessed that he had P769 million in tax obligations, including value-added tax (VAT).

On his 2009 ITR, Henares said Pacquiao did not declare any US income but only less than P50 million earned in the Philippines, thus the “underdeclaration.”

The agency computed his tax obligations for 2009 at P1.433 billion based on his income in the United States from “public information” on his bouts there and shares from pay-per-view and online ticket purchases, as well as endorsements,

“Despite having not declared his US income, we still gave him two years the opportunity to prove he paid taxes for that. Actually, it’s too late for him to make this declaration because it was not in his ITR … . But out of respect for him, we asked him to give us his IRS copy,” Henares told reporters.

This copy should be original and certified, she added, noting that this has always been a practice.

She said the BIR issued a notice of assessment of Pacquiao’s tax obligations in May this year. Since Pacquiao’s camp did not protest this, the notice became final in June.

On July 1, the BIR issued a warrant of levy and distraint to 35 entities. Pacquiao went to the Court of Tax Appeals (CTA) to seek a review of the BIR assessment and seek the lifting of the warrant.

Pacquiao’s move to go to the CTA to file a case against the BIR in August showed that he was aware of the warrant, according to Henares, She scoffed at his earlier statement questioning the timing of the issuance of the BIR warrant after his win in Macau that only showed he was being singled out.

“If you’re a celebrity, you cannot hide your income because it’s seen by the whole world,” Henares said, stressing that the law was made for everyone and should be applied to everyone.

The BIR, she said, was just doing its job in enforcing the law by collecting taxes so that the government could spend money for programs.

Asked whether his technical misdeclaration of his 2009 income made him liable for tax evasion, Henares declined to comment.

“I don’t want to talk about what would happen in the future. As far as I am concerned, we are just collecting taxes. Please pay us so we don’t have to go to the next decision point,” she said.

If Pacquiao would pay his tax obligations within six months as stated by law, the BIR would lift the warrant of levy and distraint, she added.

Henares said she had not issued more warrants after the CTA came up with a “status quo ante” order. The court scheduled a hearing for Dec. 5.

Sam Miguel
11-29-2013, 08:12 AM
Pacquiao shows IRS document on taxes paid in 2008, 2009

By Aquiles Z. Zonio

Inquirer Mindanao

6:37 pm | Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

GENERAL SANTOS CITY, Philippines – Boxing champ and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao brought out a copy of his income tax payment to the Internal Revenue Service in the United States in 2008 and 2009 to dispute the statement of BIR commissioner Kim Henares that he only submitted a copy of a letter of Top Rank’s big boss Bob Arum.

“Ito ang magpapatunay na nagbayad ako ng taxes sa US. Kopya ito galing sa IRS,” Pacquiao said pinpointing a copy of his 2008 and 2009 tax returns from IRS.

Pacquiao reacted to the statement made by BIR Commissioner Kim Henares that they submitted only the letter sent by Top Rank honcho Bob Arum to the BIR informing the tax agency that Pacman had settled his tax liabilities in the US.

“She’s not telling the truth. We submitted a copy of IRS from the US which they refused to honor because they want an original copy,” Pacquiao told reporters here.

The eight-division boxing champ said it was also not true that only two of his accounts were frozen by the BIR.

In an interview with the media, Henares claimed only two of Pacquiao’s bank accounts were ordered frozen.

“That is not true. BIR commissioner Kim Henares was just referring to my wife’s accounts. All of my accounts were frozen,” Pacquiao bared.

The boxer-lawmaker claimed he could not withdraw even from his six other bank accounts in HSBC, China Bank, BDO, Security Bank, Union Bank and Metro Bank.

He admitted he was hurt by the freeze and garnishment orders issued by the BIR.

“Hindi naman ako tatakbo. At pinaghirapan ko ang pera na yan. Hindi ko ninakaw. Pagkatapos ng karangalan na ibinigay ko sa bansa, ganito lang ang mangyayari?” Pacquiao lamented.

He, however, expressed optimism the problem would be settled eventually.

“Problema ito sa pagitan ko at ng BIR. Walang kinalaman dito ang Pangulo (President Aquino). Kaya lang masakit at naperwisyo ako ng todo. May mga tauhan akong pinapasweldo, may mga scholars na pinapag-aral at nangangailangan ng tulong ang mga kababayan nating sinalanta ng bagyo (This is a problem between me and the BIR. The President has nothing to do with this. But I have been seriously inconvenienced. I have employees to pay, scholars to send to school and people displaced by typhoons to help,” he said.

He appealed to the BIR to lift the freeze order, saying, “Nakikipag-usap naman kami sa kanila (We’ve been talking to them).”

Arum, in a statement, said for Pacquiao’s fights in the United States, Top Rank withheld 30 percent of the boxing champ’s prize money and paid “directly to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) via Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT).”

“Top Rank has deposit confirmations for each payment. Top Rank has done the same for all U.S. endorsements it has facilitated on Manny’s behalf,” Arum said.

He added that Top Rank “submitted copies of the EFT deposit acknowledgements to the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) as proof of payment.”

“As I am sure people appreciate, obtaining certified copies of documents from the IRS takes time. Manny made the formal request to the IRS and we have every expectation that the necessary documents will be furnished to the BIR very soon,” Arum said.

Sam Miguel
11-29-2013, 08:13 AM
BIR explains why Pacquiao’s tax liability reached P2.2B

By Michelle V. Remo

Philippine Daily Inquirer

8:10 pm | Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines – The Bureau of Internal Revenue said on Wednesday, it took into account the taxes paid by boxing icon Manny Pacquiao to the US government, but in the end, it still calculated a remaining tax liability of P2.2 billion.

The BIR said the P2.2 billion in tax liabilities covering 2008 and 2009 stemmed partly from Pacquiao’s failure to present proper documentation of his tax payments to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of the United States.

Pacquiao also failed to pay value added tax, the BIR said.

Claro Ortiz, the BIR lawyer handling Pacquiao’s tax-deficiency case, showed the breakdown of Pacquiao’s tax liabilities in a phone interview with the Philippine Daily Inquirer.

Ortiz said that for 2008, Pacquiao’s gross income was estimated at P1.5 billion. The amount took into account earnings from his fights abroad, his share in income from “pay-per-view” cable services that aired his fights, and his endorsements of various brands.

According to the Tax Code, the lawyer said, a Filipino earning an income ought to pay an income tax of 32 percent.

Based on the estimated amount of Pacquiao’s gross income for 2008 and on the 32-percent income tax rate, Ortiz said, the boxer was obligated to pay P340 million in income tax to the BIR on top of the P120 million he remitted to the US government.

“We took into account what he reported as his payment to the IRS. But still, he has unpaid obligations to the BIR,” Ortiz said.

The fact that Pacquiao failed to pay the P340 million in income tax liability only made things worse for him because of the surcharges and interests on unpaid tax liabilities, the lawyer said.

The lawyer said the BIR imposed a 50-percent surcharge, or P170 million, on Pacquiao’s basic income tax liability.

Also, the BIR imposed a cumulative interest of P250 million for the four years that the boxer failed to pay the income tax liability.

Under the Tax Code, the lawyer explained, the BIR might impose a 50-percent surcharge if a tax-deficiency case involved fraud. Ortiz said that in the tax deficiency case of Pacquiao, the BIR believed Pacquiao committed fraud when he deliberately withheld some of his earnings from the BIR.

But in cases where there is no fraud involved, a tax deficiency case is slapped a surcharge of only 20 percent.

The Tax Code likewise states that the BIR shall impose an interest of 20-percent per annum on unpaid tax obligations.

The lawyer said that on top of his income tax liabilities—the basic income tax due, plus surcharge and interest—Pacquiao also had an unpaid value added tax of P4.3 million.

The amount of VAT liability also includes surcharge and interest, the lawyer said.

Thus, for 2008, Pacquiao’s total unpaid tax liabilities—combining basic income tax due, basic VAT due, and the penalties—amounted to P760 million.

For 2009, the lawyer said, Pacquiao’s estimated gross income was higher at about P2 billion.

Based on this, the lawyer said, the BIR has been running after P688 million in basic income tax liability.

For 2009, Ortiz said, Pacquiao did not report any income tax payment to the US government. As such, the lawyer said, the BIR had nothing to deduct from the income tax liability.

Again, Ortiz said, the BIR imposed surcharge and interest to the unpaid income tax obligation. The surcharge amounted to P344 million, while the cumulative interest for the three years that the liability remained unpaid amounted to P373 million, he said.

The lawyer said Pacquiao again did not pay VAT in 2009. The unpaid VAT liability, including surcharge and interest, was P26.7 million.

Thus, Pacquiao’s total unpaid tax liabilities for 2009—including the basic income tax plus the surcharges and interest—stood at P1.4 billion.

The combined unpaid tax liabilities of Pacquiao for 2008 and 2009, therefore, is nearly P2.2 billion.

Sam Miguel
11-29-2013, 08:14 AM
Aquino chides Pacquiao: Don’t bring tax case before media

By Christian V. Esguerra

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:03 am | Friday, November 29th, 2013

President Aquino on Thursday threw a jab at Manny Pacquiao, saying the international boxing superstar should not bring his P2.2-billion tax case before the media.

He also shrugged off speculations that his administration was harassing Pacquiao, who is allied with Vice President Jejomar Binay’s United Nationalist Alliance.

“Why would he be harassed? Where’s the logic in that?” the President asked during a visit to Bohol province to check on rehabilitation efforts there following last month’s 7.2-magnitude earthquake.

“If he did right, then I’m sure he will be able to prove that he did right, and therefore there is no issue,” Aquino said. “So the way to settle it is to answer all of these queries of the BIR (Bureau of Internal Revenue) and not to engage in a media war.”

He added, “The media will not decide who is right or wrong.”

Aquino echoed the BIR’s position that it had been two years since the agency called Pacquiao’s attention to his supposed tax liabilities.

“The issue with the BIR is that he was being asked two years ago [about the supposed liabilities] and to my understanding, it seemed that he had a cavalier [attitude], that he was not responding to legitimate summonses by the BIR,” he said.

“With all due respect to Congressman Pacquiao, if he believes he has complied with all the necessary rules and all the necessary laws, then I’m sure he has all the evidence to [support his case].”

Sam Miguel
11-29-2013, 10:46 AM
Other boxing greats also had bouts with taxman

By Neal H. Cruz

Philippine Daily Inquirer

10:15 pm | Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Manny Pacquiao is now engaged in a fight that he cannot win. Unlike many of the bimbos that he conquered in the ring, the taxman is powerful and merciless in all countries, including the Philippines. The whole country is watching this new fight closely; as in his boxing bouts, the people are cheering him on.

And the champ is playing the underdog to the hilt. He said the freeze on his bank accounts is “harassment” and was caused by “politics.” Reading from a statement obviously prepared by a ghost writer, Pacquiao claimed that he had to borrow P1 million with which to buy relief goods for the typhoon survivors of Leyte because he could not withdraw even P1 from his bank accounts; that he did not steal his billions; and that he earned his money by receiving punches and sweating blood and tears. Poor Kim Henares, she is being pummeled in the media and public opinion.

But the issue is quite simple. Commissioner Henares of the Bureau of Internal Revenue is just trying to collect taxes from the billions of pesos that Pacquiao earned in purses, pay-per-view television shares, and endorsements and commercials. Pacquiao said that he had already paid taxes in the United States and that under a tax treaty with that country, the Philippine government can no longer collect taxes from him.

Very well then, said the BIR, show us your income tax return (ITR) in the United States.

The BIR waited two years for Pacquiao to present the document. After the long and fruitless wait, the BIR assessed his unpaid income and value-added taxes in the Philippines for 2008 and 2009 at P2.2 billion, including surcharges and interest. When Pacquiao did not contest the assessment, the BIR issued warrants of distraint and levy on his bank accounts to ensure payment, effectively freezing his bank accounts.

Last October, Pacquiao’s lawyers went to the Court of Tax Appeals but by then the warrants had become final.

Instead of the ITR that the BIR wants, Pacquiao showed a letter from his promoter, Bob Arum, saying that Pacquiao’s taxes had been paid in the United States.

We do not want any letter, said the BIR. Anybody can write a letter. Show us your ITR, which is the best proof of payment. That is not difficult to do.

Pacquiao said in his statement that the BIR is asking for the “original” of the ITR, which is filed in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)—the American counterpart of the BIR—and which the US government would, of course, not give to anybody.

But the BIR is asking for, not the US government’s copy, but Pacquiao’s own copy. ITRs come in several copies. When a taxpayer files his ITR, he gives two copies to the tax collector, the rest he keeps for himself as proof of payment. That is also an original. That is what the BIR is asking for. It is very easy to present that if you have one, di ba? So why hasn’t Pacquiao shown it to the BIR for the last two years?

Without it, the BIR naturally suspects that he did not pay taxes in the United States. (For all the money he is paying them, Pacquiao’s manager, lawyers and accountants are not serving him well.)

Last Wednesday, Pacquiao showed reporters in General Santos City copies of his US tax returns for the years 2008 and 2009. Yun pala, why does he not show these to the BIR and get it over with? If the BIR is satisfied that the documents are genuine, it will withdraw its freeze order on Pacquiao’s bank accounts.

Poor BIR, it is being damned for doing what it is supposed to do—collect taxes. If the media and the public learn that somebody did not pay the correct taxes and the BIR did not try to collect from him, it would be damned. Now that it is trying to collect from somebody who happened to be Pacquiao, the boxing champion idolized by the Filipino masses, it is also being damned. It is a case of damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.

“Why am I being singled out?” Pacquiao cried.

But he is not being singled out. The BIR is also going after other celebrities who are earning millions, movie stars particularly. At least two movie stars have been sued by the BIR for nonpayment of the correct taxes.

“Harassment! Politics!” wailed Pacquiao, echoing the common excuse of politicians.

Pacquiao is not a political kingpin who is being harassed. While his career in Congress is more than mediocre, the people of Saranggani still reelected him and even elected his wife Jinkee as vice governor. That is not harassment; that is condonation.

The admiration of the Filipino masses that Pacquiao enjoys may have spoiled him. He has begun believing that he can get away with anything, including not paying the correct taxes.

The problem of boxers with the taxman is not unique to Pacquiao. Other boxing greats who earned millions of dollars during their boxing careers have also been sucker-punched by the taxman. Joe Louis, the longest reigning heavyweight boxing champion of the world and the most admired, owed the IRS millions of dollars in unpaid taxes and was forced to come out of retirement to earn a few dollars more to be able to pay up. Mike Tyson is now bankrupt. Even the great Muhammad Ali had his problems with the IRS.

Boxers are not famous for managing their financial affairs. They leave that to their managers and hangers-on who suck up much of the money that they earned by giving and receiving punches. And many of these boxers who made millions wake up one day to find that the money is gone, that they are poor.

Let’s urge Manny Pacquiao not to let that happen to him.

Sam Miguel
12-05-2013, 08:55 AM
Allies seek tax exemption law for Pacquiao

By Leila B. Salaverria

Philippine Daily Inquirer

5:01 am | Thursday, December 5th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—Independent lawmakers led by Buhay party-list Rep. Lito Atienza have filed a bill that would stop the government from dipping its hands into boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao’s hard-earned winnings and those of other national athletes who win prizes and awards in international competitions.

Atienza’s bill provides tax exemptions for prizes of both amateur and professional Filipino athletes in sports competitions sanctioned by international groups or certified by the Philippine Sports Commission.

The exemption would apply to prizes and awards in all competitions earned 10 years prior to the effectivity of the proposed law. Those who had paid taxes for the prizes or awards they had received in internationally recognized competitions within the last 10 years of this act would be entitled to tax credits, the bill proposes.

In their explanatory note, the lawmakers said Pacquiao’s recent tax woes, which stemmed from his alleged failure to attach some documents about his earnings from two fights in the United States in his tax return, highlight the need to provide incentives to award-winning athletes.

These athletes bring honor to the country, and the tax break would be a fitting reward for this, they said.

The other authors of the bill are Leyte Rep. Ferdinand Martin Romualdez, Quezon Rep. Aleta Suarez, Cavite Rep. Lani Mercado-Revilla, Abakada party list Rep. Jonathan de la Cruz, La Union Rep. Victor Ortega, Surigao del Sur Rep. Philip Pichay and Camarines Sur Rep. Diosdado Macapagal Arroyo.

Sam Miguel
12-05-2013, 08:56 AM
^^^ Two words: bull, shit

Sam Miguel
12-05-2013, 09:14 AM
Motions and demotions

By Conrado de Quiros

Philippine Daily Inquirer

9:58 pm | Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

What Manny Pacquiao did not get from his government, he got from his countrymen. After coming home not to a ticker tape parade but to a tax evader’s charade, he flew to Tacloban City where he was hailed, despite somber skies and the still somber mood of a stricken population, as a returning hero.

Tacloban was not without its own version of greeting a returning hero. In ancient Rome, when conquering heroes came home, they didn’t just have a parade thrown their way down the Appian Way, they also had a slave standing next to them on their chariots whispering in their ear, “All glory is fleeting.” What Tacloban had in lieu of an ego-deflating whisperer were decomposing bodies that lay under the debris, driving home in a macabre way how truly fleeting all glory was. Or at least how all of our yesterdays have lighted fools the way quite literally to dusty death. Pacquiao and entourage espied a couple of those bodies in a remote village they went to, showing quite incidentally how the body count is still rising.

Still, Pacquiao’s descent into hell, or Tacloban, was not without its triumphant and moving moments. Nenita Badida, 64, had lined up since early morning in part to get some relief goods which Pacquiao was reported to have brought with him, but in greater part simply to catch a glimpse of her idol. She was not disappointed by what she saw. The sight of him, she said, took away some of her grief and pain.

Couple Roland and Corita Ubal, both 35, echoed the sentiment: “His visit made us forget the calamity for a while. Thank you for visiting us, Pacman. We will never forget you.”

Before he left, Pacquiao of course delivered the inevitable speech: “Don’t lose hope. As long as we live, there is hope. We can manage to return to normal living. Never forget God. He will never abandon us. I know you can rise again just like me. In the past, I, too, fell. But I persevered to get up and I rose again.”

This was not without its uplifting or inspiring aspects, and Pacquiao did well to visit the devastated and despairing city and sustain a little more the survivors whose spirits he had sent soaring a week before with his thrilling victory over Brandon Rios. But this was also not without its disturbing or unsavory aspects, Pacquiao having gone there not just as inspirational figure but also as a political one, not just as a transcendent boxing hero but also as an leaden politician with not very secret presidential ambitions.

It did not help that he went around in the company of the Romualdezes, who showered him with praise in lieu of garlands along the way, and who basked in his shining light. The Romualdezes might not have been completely to blame for the swath of destruction “Yolanda” left behind—true enough, nobody could have anticipated the depth of its fury—but they are to blame, too, for not having prepared their constituents better for it. Alfred Romualdez would come out on CNN later telling his heroic tale of how he survived the howling winds by the skin of his teeth, but what in God’s name was he doing heroically inspecting some structure offshore when the world had been warning that this was going to be the worst storm of the year in all the world? If the mayor of Tacloban himself could, and would, not take the warnings seriously, why should his fellow Taclobanons do otherwise?

And in the aftermath of the nightmare, their disappearance. A disappearance as vast and utter as a tomb.

This is what has always made Pacquiao a hugely difficult person to admire unstintingly or without reservation. The fact that his politics sucks, and the fact that he has turned himself into a politician. He has moved around with the seediest characters in politics, with Chavit Singson, with Lito Atienza, with Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. He rose to international acclaim under the auspices of the last, and it’s not idle speculation to wonder how long Arroyo would have lasted had Pacquiao not been there to lend her some luster. It got to a point that when you became ambivalent each time he had a fight, not knowing whether to cheer or jeer him. Until he stepped into the ring, when you remembered you were a Filipino and cheered him lustily anyway.

He continues to hew to the same path, his choices in political life marked by the seediness of the company he keeps.

Frankly, I don’t know why he became a politician at all. It’s a demotion. It’s just a testament to our sorry culture that most of us like to imagine that becoming a public official is the pinnacle of success, the ultimate goal of human striving. Pacquiao was, and is, already bigger than a politician; he was, and is, already more influential than a secretary or a judge. He should have gone on to become a living ambassador of goodwill, someone who motivated the poor, as he himself had been, to be the best that they could be in whatever they applied themselves to. He should have gone on to become a mythical figure, someone who could have inspired the down-and-out, which he once was, to reach beyond their grasp.

Instead, he became a congressman. That is not a bang, that is a whimper.

The message Pacquiao has carried with him to Tacloban is a powerful one. His rising from the ashes like a phoenix does resonate—and has resonated, loudly—not just with the survivors of Yolanda but also with the survivors of other disasters, natural and manmade, with the people of this country. A pity that has to be weighed down by other conflicting messages. Had Pacquiao stayed out of politics, his message would have rung loud and clear. As transcendent boxer, he would have given relief and hope to this stricken land. As mediocre congressman, he’ll just be giving relief goods to us.

Pacquiao’s greatest foe will never be Mayweather. It will always be himself.

Sam Miguel
12-05-2013, 09:21 AM
More and more like a ‘trapo’

By Solita Collas-Monsod

Philippine Daily Inquirer

11:14 pm | Friday, November 29th, 2013

I may help to get the basic facts correct in the appreciation of the issues surrounding the controversy involving Manny Pacquiao and the Bureau of Internal Revenue with regard to the taxes he paid (or did not). The following is a background and a time line of events:

In 2008 Pacquiao paid some P125 million (roughly $2.5 million) in taxes. He reported all his income including the income he earned from abroad, and he claimed taxes paid in the United States as a credit against his taxes due in the Philippines, which is his right under the law. So what was the problem? Well, the BIR assessed his tax liability (what he should have paid) to be close to P400 million. He failed to substantiate some expenses and he failed to pay his value-added tax.

The discrepancy between P125 million and P400 million is much more than 30 percent, which means, again by law, that there is a presumption of fraud. So he was slapped with a 50-percent surcharge, and interest of 20 percent per annum computed up to Dec. 31, 2012. Everything done according to Hoyle. Thus, his tax liability was P767 million.

In 2009 he paid P7.4 million in income taxes. Why the sudden drop? Because he did not report any income earned from the United States, or any taxes paid to it. He was assessed P1.4 billion in taxes, resulting from his total income from the United States, plus his undeclared income from the Philippines, plus the disallowed expenses (he did not present the supporting documents), plus the VAT, plus the 50-percent surcharge, plus the 20 percent per annum computed to Dec. 31, 2012.

(Please realize, Reader, that anytime your tax liability drops between one year and the next (especially from P125 million to P7.4 million), that is like a red flag waved before the BIR bull. You have to be ready for an audit, and that is what happened.)

On July 27, 2010, a Letter of Authority (LOA) was served on Pacquiao, informing him that the taxman was coming. That is, he was informed that his tax returns of 2008 and 2009 were to be audited.

On Sept. 21, 2010, that LOA was converted to another LOA, and this time Jinkee Pacquiao was included. For some reason, the couple received this only on Dec. 1, 2010.

Then a long hiatus. On June 21, 2011, six months after Manny and Jinkee received the LOA, a subpoena duces tecum was issued, requiring them to submit a list of documents to the BIR on July 15, 2011. (A subpoena is usually issued when a taxpayer, after being served the LOA, fails to present documents. Among the documents being required for submission is their US income tax return.)

The spouses submitted a sworn affidavit stating that they had received the subpoena and would submit the documents on July 29, 2011. (P.S. They did not submit their US income tax return, nor did they submit their books of accounts, receipts, and contracts.)

On Jan. 20 2012, Pacquiao received a notice of informal conference, which was subsequently held.

On March 22, 2012, a preliminary assessment notice (PAN) dated Feb. 20, 2012, was served, which Pacquiao protested.

His protest was denied, and on June 28, 2012, Pacquiao received the formal letter of demand with final assessment notice (FLD/FAN) dated May 2, 2012.

On July 20, 2012, Pacquiao filed a protest against the FLD/FAN, essentially invoking the same arguments raised against the PAN.

On May 20, 2013, the final decision on disputed assessment dated May 14, 2013, was received by Pacquiao at his congressional office.

On July 1, 2013, warrants of distraint and levy were issued to companies and banks who may be holding cash for Pacquiao. (Thirty warrants were issued; 22 answered and eight have not yet replied. Of the 22, two banks said they held P300,000 and P800,000 of his money.)

On July 23, 2013, Pacquiao received a copy of the preliminary collection letter (PCL) dated July 19, 2013. NOTE: The final decision on disputed assessment became final after 30 days, when the BIR did not receive any protest from Pacquiao, hence the issuance of the PCL.

On Aug. 1, 2013, Pacquiao went to the Court of Tax Appeals and filed a petition for review. He has filed (in October 2013) an urgent motion to lift the warrants of distraint and/or levy and garnishment, for the issuance of an order to suspend the collection of tax (praying for the issuance of a temporary restraining order). The BIR is fighting it tooth and nail. The next court hearing is on Dec. 5.

What does this all tell us? First, there was an audit of Manny Pacquiao’s tax returns when the taxes he paid fell from P125 million to P7 million. Please to remember: This was in 2009 when he was at his peak (in 2008 he had Marquez, Diaz, and De la Hoya under his belt, while in 2009 he had Hatton and Cotto). Would you believe that his income fell that much when he was pound-for-pound champion, plus the darling of the world?

Second, he was already a congressman when all this started (July 2010).

Third, the BIR seemed to lean backward on its treatment of him. Look at the timeline and see where the BIR gave him every opportunity (short of breaking the law). No tax evasion case was filed; the BIR did not try to name and shame him.

Pacquiao even went on the offensive. He went to the Court of Tax Appeals. He could have produced his US income tax returns anytime. He didn’t. He could have sought compromise or abatement. He didn’t. He acted like a spoiled brat.

And he is still acting like one, putting all the onus on the BIR for everything, including his failure to pay his staff and borrowing to help the “Yolanda” survivors. The BIR just garnished P1.1 million of his money.

He is acting more and more like a trapo. For shame.

Sam Miguel
12-06-2013, 08:09 AM
Court gags Pacquiao, BIR over tax suit

By Tetch Torres-Tupas

INQUIRER.net

10:58 am | Thursday, December 5th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—The Court of Tax Appeals has prohibited the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) and boxing champ Manny Pacquiao from talking about the tax suit filed against him.

During Thursday’s hearing, CTA Presiding Justice Roman Del Rosario said both parties should refrain from talking to the media to avoid further confusion.

Reports said that the Tax Court issued a freeze order on billions of assets of Pacquiao.

The Tax Court denied issuing such order.

“It’s in the best interest of both parties,” lawyer Felix Paul Velasco of the BIR said.

Sam Miguel
12-06-2013, 08:10 AM
Paquio, BIR in out-of-court negotiation

By Michelle V. Remo

Philippine Daily Inquirer

4:14 am | Friday, December 6th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—The Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) and the camp of boxing champ Manny Pacquiao have agreed to pursue an out-of-court negotiation over the P2.2-billion tax case of the boxer.

“Both parties agreed to explore further negotiations over the matter,” Claro Ortiz, the BIR lawyer handling the tax case of Pacquiao, told the Inquirer.

Ortiz said the decision of both camps to negotiate was relayed on Thursday to the Court of Tax Appeals (CTA), which called on the two parties for a hearing.

Gag order

The CTA gathered the two parties supposedly to conduct a hearing on a motion previously filed by Pacquiao to contest the tax liability assessment issued by the BIR.

But Ortiz said both camps informed the CTA that they would pursue negotiations.

In response, the CTA issued a gag order, thus preventing both camps to comment publicly about the case while they explore ways to negotiate.

The Tax Code allows compromise settlements on tax cases under certain circumstances.

The BIR and Pacquiao’s camp will see whether his tax case would fit any of the Tax Code’s provisions on compromise settlement.

Earlier this year, the BIR slapped Pacquiao with a P2.2-billion tax deficiency assessment.

Penalties

The amount covers allegedly unpaid taxes plus penalties for incomes he derived in 2008 and 2009. Incomes covered winnings from his fights, earnings from pay-per-view cable services that aired the fights, and earnings from endorsements.

Penalties accounted for about half of the P2.2-billion tax liability assessment.

The Tax Code states that unpaid tax liabilities may be slapped a maximum 50-percent surcharge and an annual interest of 20 percent.

Following his alleged failure to respond to the BIR’s tax assessment within allowable time, the BIR in July issued a warrant of distraint and levy on the two bank accounts of Pacquiao worth P1.1 million.

Just two accounts found

The move was an attempt to get hold of the money as partial payment for his alleged tax liabilities.

The BIR was looking for other bank accounts of Pacquiao, but had so far found only two.

Pacquiao then immediately filed a motion with the CTA to contest the tax assessment and to prevent the BIR from getting hold of his money.

The CTA last month issued a status quo order, which called on both parties not to do anything with the money in the two bank accounts.

The order meant that the BIR is not allowed take the money, and that Pacquiao is not allowed to withdraw from the two bank accounts.
On the two camps’ meeting at the CTA on Thursday, Ortiz said, the court decided to maintain the status quo order.

Sam Miguel
12-06-2013, 08:14 AM
Tax amnesty for billionaire Pacquiao? Why?

By Neal H. Cruz

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:01 am | Friday, December 6th, 2013

What, tax amnesty for Manny Pacquiao? For heaven’s sake, why? Pacquiao is a billionaire who can afford to pay, and should pay, the correct income taxes. Is this what we have come to, a billionaire tries to cheat on his taxes and he is granted tax amnesty?

The clerk or janitor or teacher earning a few thousand pesos a month, and who can hardly make both ends meet, is not allowed to escape the tax bite. They pay their taxes without complaining. And here comes Pacquiao, who earns billions of pesos and flaunts it, wanting to be treated differently, to be allowed to get away with P2.2 billion in unpaid taxes. What is he, another Janet Napoles? That is the surest way to make other taxpayers cheat on their taxes. That is the surest way to teach people that crime pays.

When so many Filipinos live wretched lives, Pacquiao and his family live like maharajahs, throwing crumbs to poor people. They have mansions, several expensive cars, a helicopter, and, some say, a yacht, all trademarks of the conspicuous consumption of the filthy rich. When Pacquiao went to Leyte to distribute relief goods, he came in a private plane. Wife Jinkee is rumored to have a wall-to-wall cabinet full of signature bags each costing several thousands of pesos. If Imelda Marcos is obsessed with shoes, Jinkee is said to be obsessed with designer bags.

Manny himself walks around in all-white, three-piece suits. His mother Dionisia boasts that she has two houses. She built a new house, she said, because she has a difficult time climbing the stairs of the other one. And yet when the Bureau of Internal Revenue tried to collect taxes from her earnings as a product endorser, she shrieked to high heavens that she has no money.

Where did the money for the houses come from? the BIR asked.

From son Manny, of course.

Did he or she pay the donor’s tax? the BIR asked.

No answer.

The family hosts lavish parties that rival those thrown by Imelda Marcos in the old days. Recently, Dionisia Pacquiao hosted a housewarming party for her new residence that lasted until the morning. And some people want tax amnesty for this family?

Aside from the immorality of granting tax amnesty to a billionaire in the midst of the widespread suffering of the people in typhoon-devastated Eastern Visayas, it is illegal. Even President Aquino cannot grant Pacquiao tax amnesty. That is granted by an act of Congress. But if Congress does that, it would be class legislation and unconstitutional.

In fact, some congressmen led by Pacquiao ally Lito Atienza have filed a bill that would give tax exemptions to Pacquiao and other athletes who have won big purses in world athletic tournaments dating back to 10 years. Again, I ask: Why?

Allegedly because they brought honor to their country. What about the beauty queens who win in international pageants? They bring more honor to the country. And the other Filipinos who win awards in their fields of endeavor? They also bring honor to the country.

As for the athletes, wouldn’t they bring more honor to their country if they set the example by paying correct taxes and not trying to wiggle out of these obligations?

Where is the justice and morality of taxing the poor without mercy and at the same time exempting the rich from paying?

But we all know that including other athletes in the proposed tax-exemption measure is only to hide the fact that it is meant primarily to benefit Pacquiao. Why are these lawmakers doing this? Don’t they have anything better to do? Without tax collections, where would the government get the money to pay their salaries and their lavish allowances?

The answer is that by coddling Pacquiao, they hope to gain some of the popularity that he has among the masses and, hence, more votes. Indeed, a couple of politicians position themselves beside or behind Pacquiao whenever cameras are pointed at him. By doing so, they hope to bask in the glory around the people’s champ.

This idolatry of Pacquiao may be partly caused by the sportswriters who write exceedingly adoring stories about him. When Pacquiao breaks wind, it hits the sports pages. When his mother says something idiotic or Jinkee comes out in a fashionable gown, these hit the women’s sections or magazines.

If Pacquiao will pay the taxes he owes the BIR, he will surely hit the front pages.

* * *

Is this what the Senate has come to—senators hysterically throwing below-the-belt dirt at each other? We used to view senators as better than congressmen. Were we wrong?

Senators Juan Ponce Enrile and Miriam Defensor-Santiago trading filth on the floor of Congress may be funny to some, but it is not. It is dismaying. Don’t the senators have anything better to do?

Many people found dismaying the sight of Senator Santiago shrieking and pointing an angry finger at Senator Enrile sitting before her and playing a game on his tablet. Their fellow senators found it dismaying, to, and some want the shameful Enrile-Santiago exchange stricken off the Senate records. Others want new Senate rules to avoid a repetition of that circus.

Who are we voting into the Senate? If they’re not stealing the people’s money, they are throwing dirt at each other.

Sam Miguel
12-12-2013, 09:44 AM
Pacquiao owes IRS $18M – report

By Bong Lozada

INQUIRER.net

1:12 pm | Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines—Boxing champion Manny Pacquiao’s tax woes are getting complicated.

Entertainment website TMZ has reported that Pacquiao has $18, 313, 668.79 in tax debt that he owes to the Internal Revenue Services.

Pacquiao’s new problems emerged after his current P2.2-billion tax debt to the Bureau of Internal Revenue was revealed by Commissioner Kim Henares last month.

TMZ has acquired official documents from IRS showing Pacquiao has tax debts from 2006 through 2010.

The year-by-year breakdown is as follows:

2006 — $1,160,324.30
2007 — $2,035,992.50
2008 — $2,862,437.11
2009 — $8,022,915.87
2010 — $4,231,999.01

Pacquiao dismissed the report as part of demolition job against him.

“This is no doubt part of demolition job against me. I don’t know why there are people who want to destroy me. It’s not true I owe IRS $18 million in back taxes,” Pacquiao told the Philippine Daily Inquirer by phone.

Just a few days back, he said, an article claiming that he is a green card holder came out.

“It was meant to discredit me. I’m not a green card holder,” Pacquiao said.

On the US tax issue, Pacquiao said: “How could it be? Top Rank Promotions is deducting IRS taxes automatically before giving or releasing my purse. In the US, taxes are immediately deducted from your income.”

The boxer-lawmaker could not say who are the people and what is the motive behind the demolition job against him.

“Even before I could climb up the ring, right inside my dressing room, IRS people are already waiting. So, how could I escape from paying my taxes?” Pacquiao said.

He said Top Rank big boss Bob Arum had already taken appropriate action in the US to clarify the issue.

“Bob Arum had already issued statements in the US to set the record straight. I’m confident this issue will be cleared up,” Pacquiao said.

The boxing icon said he’s taking this issue as another challenge, a test to his faith.

“When God and truth are on our side, who can put us down? I know these are all part of the tests to gauge the strength of my faith in Him,” Pacquiao said. With a report from Aquiles Z. Zonio, Inquirer Mindanao

Sam Miguel
12-12-2013, 09:46 AM
Pacquiao denies he owes IRS $18M

By Aquiles Z. Zonio

Inquirer Mindanao

12:52 am | Thursday, December 12th, 2013

GENERAL SANTOS CITY—Eight-division boxing champion Manny Pacquiao on Wednesday said the reports that he owed more than $18 million in taxes in the United States were the handiwork of people out to destroy him.

“This is no doubt part of a demolition job against me,” Pacquiao, who holds the seat of Sarangani in the House of Representatives, told the Inquirer on the phone.

“It’s not true I owe the [US Internal Revenue Service] $18 million in back taxes,” Pacquiao said.

Pacquiao, who is slugging it out with the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) to keep for himself P2.2 billion that the tax collection agency claims he owes the government in back taxes, noted that only days ago a report came out that he was a green card holder.

“[That’s] meant to discredit me,” he said. “I’m not a green card holder.”

On Dec. 10, the celebrity news website TMZ reported that Pacquiao owed the IRS $18,313,668.79 in back taxes for five years.

Broken down by year, TMZ said, Pacquiao’s tax liability is $1,160,324.30 for 2006; $2,035,992.50 for 2007; $2,862,437.11 for 2008; $8,022,915.87 for 2009; and $4,231,999.01 for 2010.

TMZ said the figures were based on official documents it had obtained, but did not publish.

Partly owned by Time Warner and based in the United States, TMZ has broken major celebrity stories, including the death of pop king Michael Jackson on June 25, 2009, hours ahead of mainstream news outlets, and the assault on R&B singer Rihanna by her boyfriend Chris Brown on Feb. 7, 2009.

Pacquiao fought 12 fights between 2006 and 2010, including the megabuck bout against Mexican-American Oscar de la Hoya in 2008 for which he pocketed a guaranteed purse of $11 million and another $11.2 million in pay-per-view buys.

But Pacquiao said he had paid taxes on all of his earnings from those fights.

No way to run

“How can that be?” he asked, referring to the report about his supposed tax liability. “Top Rank Promotions is deducting IRS taxes automatically before giving or releasing my purse. In the US, taxes are immediately deducted from your income.”

Pacquiao said there was no way he could have missed paying taxes on his US earnings.

“Even before I could climb the ring, right inside my dressing room, IRS people are already waiting. So how can I escape from paying my taxes?” Pacquiao said.

He said Top Rank big boss Bob Arum had already taken appropriate action in the United States to clarify matters.

“Bob Arum had already issued statements in the US to set the record straight. I’m confident this issue will be cleared up,” Pacquiao said.

On his website Pacland, the champ said he saw a pattern in all the “lies” being thrown at him.

He could not say, however, who were behind the attempt to discredit him.

He told the Inquirer that he was taking the TMZ report as another challenge, a test of his newfound Christian faith.

“When God and truth are on your side, who can put you down?” Pacquiao said. “I know these are all part of the test to gauge the strength of my faith in Him.”

‘Gossip’

BIR Commissioner Kim Henares thinks Pacquiao’s new challenge could be “gossip.”

“The reports were based on entertainment news. It could be just gossip,” Henares told the Inquirer by phone.

She said the IRS had not informed the BIR that it is running after Pacquiao for unpaid taxes.

The IRS, however, has no obligation to inform the BIR that it is going after Filipinos who owe back taxes in the United States, Henares said.

In the same way, she said, the BIR has no obligation to inform the IRS that it is running after Americans who have unpaid taxes in the Philippines.

Henares said earlier that Pacquiao was in the top 10 percent of highest tax payers from 2006 to 2008, but he slid to the top 30 percent in 2009.

It was in 2009 that Pacquiao made it to Forbes magazine’s list of the world’s highest-paid athletes, ranking sixth with estimated earnings of $40 million from June 2008 to June 2009.

A BIR audit of Pacquiao’s tax returns for 2008 and 2009 led to the discovery of his supposed P2.2 billion in tax liabilities in the Philippines.

Pacquiao disputed the BIR findings, leading to litigation and a freeze on the boxing champion’s bank accounts.

The two sides are discussing a settlement, but the Court of Tax Appeals has ordered them to stop talking publicly about the controversy.

Get best advisers

House Minority Leader Ronaldo Zamora told reporters on Wednesday that he had spoken to Pacquiao about the TMZ report.

“He says he doesn’t owe the US government any taxes,” Zamora said.

He said Pacquiao should use his earnings to get the best legal and financial advisers to solve his tax problems.

“If he’s able to do that, then many of his problems will disappear,” Zamora said.—With reports from Michelle V. Remo, Leila B. Salaverria and Ana Roa, Inquirer Research

Joescoundrel
12-27-2013, 09:14 AM
US taxman after Pacquiao

Tax problems come amid fears he’s going broke

1:15 am | Friday, December 27th, 2013

(First of a series)

The taxman has Pacman against the ropes amid fears that he might be going broke, given his lavish lifestyle and propensity to dole out cash to friends, political supporters, hangers-on and even random strangers.

Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao was 14th on the list of highest-paid athletes last year, with estimated earnings of $34 million, according to Forbes magazine.

He was considered the wealthiest member of the House of Representatives, based on his statement of assets, liabilities and net worth (SALN). He reported a net worth of P1.77 billion in 2012, up from P1.13 billion in 2010.

But Pacquiao said he had to borrow more than P1 million so he could deliver aid to victims of Supertyphoon “Yolanda” in Leyte and Samar provinces late last month.

In the United States, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued a levy on Pacquiao’s US bank accounts in an effort to recoup more than $18 million in alleged tax liabilities from 2006 to 2010, documents obtained by the Inquirer showed.

US notice of tax lien

The IRS levy came after Pacquiao was issued a separate “notice of federal tax lien” in the amount of $18,313,669. The notice was issued by the Glendale office of the IRS in Los Angeles, California, on Nov. 22.

Pacquiao did not answer phone calls and text messages when reached by Inquirer Mindanao on Thursday.

Pacquiao’s former accountant, Michael Joseph Cabuhat, said the levy could jeopardize his planned bout in Las Vegas in April because the IRS could block ticket sales and similar activities related to the prize fight.

“Any compensation under your name will be taken out because there is an order of levy. So if the fight is next year, it will earn. The IRS may levy the earnings right away,” said Cabuhat, chief financial officer of VisionQwest, a California-based accountancy firm hired by Pacquiao in 2010 but was eventually fired the following year.

“They have to make an arrangement to settle this or at least take care of it through an installment agreement or negotiation or compromise. Otherwise, the April fight is in danger,” Cabuhat said.

‘Lifted’

But Pacquiao’s camp, through his Philippine lawyer Tranquil Salvador, on Wednesday insisted that the “IRS liens on his properties and bank accounts” were “vacated” (lifted) late last week.

“We have been told that the IRS liens on his properties and bank accounts were vacated on Dec. 20,” Pacquiao’s “team” told the Inquirer in an e-mail sent through Salvador.

“It means he has satisfied the requirements of the US law,” Salvador added in a text message.

On its official website, the IRS differentiated between a “lien” and a “levy.”

“A lien is not a levy. A lien secures the government’s interest in your property when you don’t pay your tax debt. A levy actually takes the property to pay the tax debt. If you don’t pay or make arrangements to settle your tax debt, the IRS can levy, seize and sell any type of real or personal property that you own or have an interest in,” the IRS said.

The IRS described a federal tax lien as “the government’s legal claim against your property when you neglect or fail to pay a tax debt.”

“The lien protects the government’s interest in all your property, including real estate, personal property and financial assets,” it said.

‘Flawed’ reports

Pacquiao’s camp said stories about his alleged tax problems in the United States were full of errors.

“Representative Pacquiao’s US attorneys have previously commented that the recent stories regarding his problems with the IRS are seriously flawed and tainted with errors, and that he remains committed to working with the IRS to resolve any outstanding issues,” Pacquiao’s camp said in the e-mail.

Unless the alleged tax liabilities are settled, Cabuhat said the IRS could “barricade” the April clash, meaning it could step in and claim proceeds from the fight. He claimed that the IRS “almost did it” for another Pacquiao bout before VisionQwest came in.

Bank issued IRS levy

In a letter dated Nov. 27, one bank informed “Emmanuel D. Pacquiao,” one of boxing’s biggest draws, that it had been “served with an IRS levy in the amount of $18,564,663.6 naming you as debtor.”

As a result, the bank said it was putting the balance of his two accounts on hold for “21 days,” warning that it would be sent to the IRS unless the levy was lifted by next month.

“Unless we receive a Release of Levy from the IRS before 1/10/2014, we are required to hold these funds for 21 days, after which they will be remitted to the IRS,” Pacquiao, boxing’s only eight-division titleholder, was told.

As of Nov. 27, each of the bank accounts contained a balance of less than $100.

17 accounts, US properties

During the brief period that VisionQwest worked for Pacquiao, Cabuhat said the boxer was known to have 17 accounts in four banks.

Pacquiao is said to own properties in the United States—a five-bedroom house on Plymouth Boulevard in Los Angeles, a 10-unit apartment and another house in Orange County.

Cabuhat, whose company was dumped by Pacquiao in 2011, said the best option was for the boxer to settle with the IRS.

“If I [were] Manny Pacquiao and I am charged $18.3 million, I [would] pay it right now or make an installment agreement rather than ignore it because the IRS could come back and seek higher tax liabilities,” he said.

The IRS said “paying your tax debt—in full—is the best way to get rid of a federal tax lien.” It “releases your lien within 30 days after you have paid your tax debt.”

The writing was on the wall as early as 2010, the year VisionQwest was hired by Team Pacquiao to clean up his financial mess.

Michael Lodge, the firm’s president and CEO, said VisionQwest was tasked with “represent[ing] Manny Pacquiao and MP Promotions Inc. on a tax audit for 2006 and 2007, which then led to 2008 and 2009.”

Cabuhat said the agreement included a review of Pacquiao’s bout and endorsement contracts.

The company was also tapped “to organize his financial data and create an automated financial system to record everything.”

On its website, VisionQwest Accountancy Group is described as a firm that provides “full international tax services as it relates to entertainment and sports clients [who] need representation in the United States on special tax issues.”

Alleged irregularities

But what was supposed to be a three-year engagement was cut short after VisionQwest uncovered alleged irregularities in Pacquiao’s finances and asked that they be fixed soon.

Asked why Pacquiao fired VisionQwest, his camp said in the e-mail: “Representative Pacquiao has the right to engage professional advisers of his own choosing and he can terminate their services if he no longer wishes to continue such professional relationship for whatever reason.

“It is public knowledge that Representative Pacquiao and VisionQwest parted ways on less than amicable terms and the manner by which VisionQwest handled the story publicly through media only reinforces the correctness of Representative Pacquiao’s decision to terminate their services in 2011.”

In a June 30, 2011, letter addressed to Pacquiao, Lodge raised a number of issues, warning in particular about Michael Koncz’s role as the boxer’s adviser.

“After a careful review of tax documents provided to us from Michael Koncz for 2006, 2007 and other years I feel that the documents that were in handwritten form, e-mails and written notes have been clearly misstated on revenue and expenses of Manny Pacquiao and MP Promotions USA Inc.,” Lodge wrote.

Joescoundrel
12-27-2013, 09:14 AM
^ (Continued)

‘Recycled’ issues

In the e-mail, Pacquiao’s camp said the issue raised against Koncz was among the “recycled issues that have been discussed by VisionQwest through the media over the past couple of years in an effort to discredit [promoter] Bob Arum and Mike Koncz.”

“To date, Representative Pacquiao continues to trust his team of advisers,” his camp said.

Lodge alleged that Koncz misstated the tax returns and that there was no reliability in the tax data provided to the IRS.

“Mr. Koncz has now placed our client in a possible tax liability based on his false documentation and that now VisionQwest Accountancy Group must justify through our own gathered and documented records a new tax position to the ,” he said.

Lodge went as far as advising Pacquiao to get rid of Koncz. The Inquirer tried but failed to contact Koncz.

“I would request that Mr. Koncz be removed from his role immediately and that no further business that affects Manny Pacquiao or MP Promotions USA Inc. be done by Mike Koncz,” he said. “This is hereby stated so that our client may be protected from tax or legal liabilities.”

Services terminated

Pacquiao later terminated the services of VisionQwest, which then sued its erstwhile client for $649,017 in purported loan. Cabuhat said the case was settled in 2012, with Pacquiao paying an undisclosed amount.

In a 2011 report on The Ring Magazine’s website, Koncz was quoted as vowing that Pacquiao’s camp would “vigorously defend [itself against] these false allegations contained in the lawsuit.”

Koncz alleged that VisionQwest “has breached a number of confidentiality laws contained within their own contract and made a number of slanderous statements against Manny Pacquiao and myself alleging that I’m misappropriating money and stealing money, which is totally bulls**t.”

He said VisionQwest “spent more time focusing on trying to handle Manny’s endorsements and then subsequently trying to be fight promoters by putting together the fights, that they lost their focus and never worked on our taxes.”

“They didn’t inform Manny [about] the true standing of our taxes, which subsequently has been done by our new accounting firm.”

In the “Notice of Federal Tax Lien,” the IRS listed Pacquiao’s alleged tax liabilities over five years: $1,160,324 (2006), $2,035,992 (2007), $2,862,437 (2008), $8,022,916 (2009), and $4,231,999 (2010).

Pacquiao earlier denied owing the IRS such amounts, insisting that the allegation was “no doubt a demolition job against me.”

$25M in ’09, excluding PPV

The year 2009 was a banner year for Pacquiao in terms of earnings.

He fought twice—a second round knock out of Briton Ricky Hatton and a 12th round TKO of Puerto Rican star Miguel Cotto—and pocketed a combined $25 million, excluding pay-per-view (PPV) shares, based on his reported purses.

$40M earnings in 2008

The year before, his combined purses in three fights, as reported in media, were estimated at nearly $20 million. His bout with Mexican-American superstar Oscar De La Hoya alone earned him a reported purse of $11 million and a PPV share worth $20 million.

Back home, the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) is also going after Pacquiao for his alleged failure to pay taxes for his fight earnings in the United States in 2008 and 2009. He was assessed a tax liability of P2.2 billion, including penalties.

Gag order, meeting with Kim

A court has issued a gag order to the BIR and Pacquiao regarding the tax issue, but two independent sources told the Inquirer that the boxer had sat down with Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares to discuss his problems.

One tax expert told the Inquirer that Pacquiao’s assessed liability with the BIR was already final, although the boxer could still seek relief through a compromise.

The BIR could supposedly agree to a compromise based on doubtful validity, but Pacquiao would have to provide supporting documents to prove that he had been wrongly assessed.

And the supposed lack of documents has proven to be at the root of Pacquiao’s current tax mess.

The BIR earlier issued a warrant of “distraint” to force Pacquiao to pay up, a move the congressman has questioned in the Court of Tax Appeals.

“There are many crooks in the government whose bank accounts and properties were not subjected to garnishment,” he complained in a previous press conference.

“I had absorbed many blows just to earn money and give pride to the nation, but this is what happened.” [I]With a report from Aquiles Zonio, Inquirer Mindanao

Sam Miguel
11-26-2014, 07:54 AM
Henares tells Pacquiao: Macau fights taxable

by Jon Carlos Rodriguez, ABS-CBNnews.com

Posted at 11/24/2014 9:40 PM | Updated as of 11/24/2014 9:40 PM

MANILA – After dominating American boxer Chris Algieri in Macau, boxing champion and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao will face a familiar foe when he returns to the Philippines: taxes.

Pacquiao has had issues with the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) over alleged unpaid taxes from his earnings from previous fights and endorsements in the US.

According to BIR Commissioner Kim Henares, Pacquiao’s earnings from his most recent bout are also taxable because Macau has a lower income tax rate.

Macau has a top tax rate of 12 percent compared to the top tax rate of nearly 40 percent in the US, where most of Pacquiao's fights were held before last year's bout against Brandon Rios.

“Kung sa Macau siya lumaban, I would think na mayroon [siyang babayarang buwis] kasi mas mababa ‘yung income tax rate nila,” Henares told dzMM.

Pacquiao reportedly made more than $20 million (around P900 million) for the Algieri fight.

Henares said that if, for instance, Pacquiao made at least P1 billion for the fight, he will have to pay the Philippine tax rate of 32 percent, or P320 million, in taxes.

If Pacquiao already paid P100 million in Macau, he will still have to pay the remaining balance of P220 million to the BIR.

Pacquiao’s camp will have to declare this amount and pay before the April 15, 2015 deadline.

The boxer’s victory on Sunday again brought recognition to the country, with Henares saying she is happy because the fight will also contribute to the BIR’s collections.

“Masaya ako dahil magko-contribute siya sa ekonomiya ng Pilipinas, hindi naman sa akin. Kasi ‘yung lahat ng koleksyon wala naman akong matatanggap doon,” she said.

Pacquiao is currently facing a tax liability case amounting to an estimated P3 billion.

Pacquiao’s accountants have been criticized for the boxing champ’s tax woes, which hounded him since last year.

“Ang laki-laki naman ng kinikita niya, siguro naman dapat mag-hire din siya ng tamang tao na professional, na makakatulong sa kanya at hindi lang ‘yung mga taong nagte-take advantage sa kanya at walang binibigay na tamang serbisyo,” she said.

Sam Miguel
11-27-2014, 08:40 AM
Stick to boxing

Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:12 AM |

Thursday, November 27th, 2014

Manny Pacquiao’s victory over previously undefeated American Chris Algieri showed just how much he still has to offer the boxing world.

The expected knockout didn’t happen, yes, and Pacquiao’s matches that went the distance—or at least the ones he won—continue to stretch farther out from that November evening in 2009 when he stopped Miguel Cotto in Las Vegas. But the failure to score a knockout was not a total discredit of his ability to inflict damage in the ring. Algieri did hit the deck six times, a result of that distinct blend of speed and power that our eight-division champ has perfected on the way to superstardom.

That Algieri did not get waved off was a credit to Pacquiao’s caution (a stunning knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez forced him to check his knack of swimming into an opponent with whipping combinations at the risk of walking into a haymaker), Algieri’s caution (he welshed on his vow of toe-to-toe engagements), and an amusing pep talk from the American’s corner (his trainer kept urging him on with exhortations that “we are where we wanted to be” even after he hit the canvas with alarming regularity).

Critics are correct to douse the ardor over last Sunday’s victory. Beating an opponent of Algieri’s quality doesn’t exactly polish a boxer’s legend, after all. And Algieri’s punching power was heavily questioned going into the Macau bout. Still, it was good to watch Pacquiao unleashing combinations in a manner that evoked snapshots of his great victories. He put up an exciting show—something even tepid admirers would stay up to watch on a late-night rerun.

Because this is where people love to watch Pacquiao: in the ring, surgically dismantling rivals until they are but shells of their old selves (see De La Hoya, Hatton). Everything else he does, or tries to do, is a novelty that should—must—wear off. Playing pro basketball? Singing? Acting? Taking a seat in the House of Representatives? Planning a shot at a higher office (God forbid)? Novelties.

Let’s not get into his intentions because for sure, he remembers his roots and has demonstrated a soft spot for the poor. He loves basketball, hogs the mic, and does what he damn well pleases and can afford to do (and he can afford plenty).

What is fervently hoped is that, despite whatever is whispered in his ear by the company he keeps, Pacquiao will realize that the people’s passion is unequivocal when he is in one place, and one place only: in the boxing ring.

Opinion is divided on whether Pacquiao’s success on the basketball court translates into a tangible good for either player or sport. People are divided, too, on whether politics is the best, or the only, way for him to help the poor. When his team notches a victory in the PBA, when he wins an elective office, or gains a reprieve in a battle with tax officials, some do cheer. But we don’t cheer as hard and as passionately as when he fights for flag and country in the ring.

The proof is not just in the adulation that embraces him for every victory. The most glaring proof that it is as a boxer that this country fawns over Pacquiao the most is during his times of defeat. People won’t agonize if his team loses by a rout in the PBA. There was in fact a loud sigh of relief when he lost his first run for public office. People can laugh at these defeats, as evidenced by the funny memes that go viral in the aftermath of his “losses” during his moonlighting moments.

But people don’t laugh at his defeats in the ring. And making jokes and funny memes out of his boxing losses thrusts one into the role of a vile villain (ask Justin Bieber). Each time he loses in the ring, the only things missing to complete the atmosphere of a national day of mourning are flags flown half-staff.

There was a palpable sense of gloom, an eerie silence, in the theaters that broadcast live Pacquiao’s fall to Marquez. There was a collective anger over a decision to award Timothy Bradley with a victory that experts felt should have gone to Pacquiao. It is during those dark defeats that the country shows its pure affection for its champ.

The message is, or should be, clear to the “Pambansang Kamao”: Stick to boxing, to the place where you forged your legend.

Sam Miguel
01-14-2015, 09:52 AM
4: Number of days Pacquiao reported in Congress in 2014

DJ Yap

@inquirerdotnet

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:17 AM | Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

MANILA, Philippines–Boxing champion and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao showed up for work at the House of Representatives only four days last year.

Negros Occidental Rep. Julio Ledesma IV was a bit better—the records showed he attended the session seven times.

The two congressmen were the top absentees in the chamber, each with a total attendance of seven, according to official records posted on the House’s website.

Pacquiao, also a part-time actor, singer and basketball coach, was actually present in only four session days but he was “deemed present”—meaning his absence was excused—for three days.

He spent 25 days on “constituency work” and registered two unexcused absences, based on the records.

Busy fighting

The boxing hero had two fights last year, the first against Timothy Bradley in April and against Chris Algieri in November. The Filipino won both fights by a unanimous decision.

On the other hand, Ledesma, a third-termer, was physically present only seven days, doing constituency work for 14 days. He was listed as absent without leave for 13 other days.

The attendance of two representatives under house or hospital arrest was left blank: Former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and Lanao del Norte Rep. Abdullah Dimaporo.

Hospital arrest

Arroyo has been under hospital arrest in Quezon City since October 2012 in connection with a plunder complaint against her involving alleged misuse of state lottery funds.

She has not attended any session in the current 16th Congress.

Dimaporo, on the other hand, has been under hospital arrest since August 2013 while facing charges of malversation for the alleged fictitious purchase and delivery of P5 million worth of fertilizer through a nongovernment organization in 2004.

Perfect attendance

Only 65 lawmakers out of 290, led by Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., posted a perfect attendance of 34 session days from Jan. 20 to Dec. 17, 2014.

There were actually 70 session days but the roll was called in only half of that time to dispense with the need for a quorum.

In the past, the House journal service counted the days when there was no roll call (when all members were considered present), resulting in skewed attendance numbers.

Low attendance

For instance, the records at one point showed Arroyo and Dimaporo—who were supposedly under hospital arrest—being present during certain days.

Low attendance was a cause of problem in the House last year as the chamber needed to pass a number of priority measures, chief of which was the P2.6-trillion national budget for 2015.

In the last quarter, as House leaders were scrambling to enact the budget, low numbers threatened to derail its approval as opposition lawmakers questioned the quorum on the plenary floor.

Other absentees

Other top absentees included Camarines Sur Rep. Rolando Andaya Jr. with an attendance record of 10, Iloilo Rep. Hernan Biron Jr. with 11 and Leyte Rep. Lucy Torres-Gomez with 15.

Abang Lingkod Rep. Joseph Stephen Paduano also registered an attendance of 15 days, but he was sworn in only in May.

Sam Miguel
01-14-2015, 09:52 AM
4: Number of days Pacquiao reported in Congress in 2014

DJ Yap

@inquirerdotnet

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:17 AM | Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

MANILA, Philippines–Boxing champion and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao showed up for work at the House of Representatives only four days last year.

Negros Occidental Rep. Julio Ledesma IV was a bit better—the records showed he attended the session seven times.

The two congressmen were the top absentees in the chamber, each with a total attendance of seven, according to official records posted on the House’s website.

Pacquiao, also a part-time actor, singer and basketball coach, was actually present in only four session days but he was “deemed present”—meaning his absence was excused—for three days.

He spent 25 days on “constituency work” and registered two unexcused absences, based on the records.

Busy fighting

The boxing hero had two fights last year, the first against Timothy Bradley in April and against Chris Algieri in November. The Filipino won both fights by a unanimous decision.

On the other hand, Ledesma, a third-termer, was physically present only seven days, doing constituency work for 14 days. He was listed as absent without leave for 13 other days.

The attendance of two representatives under house or hospital arrest was left blank: Former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and Lanao del Norte Rep. Abdullah Dimaporo.

Hospital arrest

Arroyo has been under hospital arrest in Quezon City since October 2012 in connection with a plunder complaint against her involving alleged misuse of state lottery funds.

She has not attended any session in the current 16th Congress.

Dimaporo, on the other hand, has been under hospital arrest since August 2013 while facing charges of malversation for the alleged fictitious purchase and delivery of P5 million worth of fertilizer through a nongovernment organization in 2004.

Perfect attendance

Only 65 lawmakers out of 290, led by Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., posted a perfect attendance of 34 session days from Jan. 20 to Dec. 17, 2014.

There were actually 70 session days but the roll was called in only half of that time to dispense with the need for a quorum.

In the past, the House journal service counted the days when there was no roll call (when all members were considered present), resulting in skewed attendance numbers.

Low attendance

For instance, the records at one point showed Arroyo and Dimaporo—who were supposedly under hospital arrest—being present during certain days.

Low attendance was a cause of problem in the House last year as the chamber needed to pass a number of priority measures, chief of which was the P2.6-trillion national budget for 2015.

In the last quarter, as House leaders were scrambling to enact the budget, low numbers threatened to derail its approval as opposition lawmakers questioned the quorum on the plenary floor.

Other absentees

Other top absentees included Camarines Sur Rep. Rolando Andaya Jr. with an attendance record of 10, Iloilo Rep. Hernan Biron Jr. with 11 and Leyte Rep. Lucy Torres-Gomez with 15.

Abang Lingkod Rep. Joseph Stephen Paduano also registered an attendance of 15 days, but he was sworn in only in May.

Sam Miguel
02-24-2015, 08:21 AM
Monies Missing in Pacquiao Events

Jerry Forsyth

Feb. 22, 2015

The unfortunate bottom line for both the World 10-Ball Championship and the Manny Pacquiao Cup scotch doubles event in General Santos City, Philippines, is that the players did not get paid their total prize monies in either event. And while Manny Pacquiao himself must bear the ultimate responsibility for this it is not at all clear at this moment that he even is aware of the shenanigans perpetrated by the wife of his brother Bobby, Lorelei Pacquiao, the lady in charge of both events.

First, at the World 10-Ball Championship, the players paid the WPA sanction fee with their entry fees. That is all the money that the WPA took from the event. But when the players got paid their pay envelopes were 5% short of what they were owed. And one player who asked why was told that it was to pay the WPA sanction. This is simply untrue. We have no idea of why the Pacquiao’s chose to remove expected funds from the event but it amounted to a $10,000 shortfall for the players. We have tried to contact the WPA to ask if they knew this had happened and for a comment on this but everyone appears to be in transit home at the moment.

It wasn’t that the organizers used the money to improve this World Championship event. Many players complained about the quality of the tables. The organizers did not bother to put carpet down on the floor, there were no chairs for spectators except in the TV Arena, some of the referees were so incompetent that they had to be removed and there was not even a scoreboard so anyone could follow the play. One player simply described it as “a mess”.

To show the atmosphere of pool in the Philippines, no one we spoke with wanted their names revealed. There is fear they would never be invited to future events again if they speak out publicly. To their credit, several players have chosen to make statements on their Facebook pages.

Minus the 5%, all players were paid on time at the Ten Ball event. Then we moved on to the Manny Pacquiao Cup, a doubles event with 54 teams expected to participate. After the organizers took the $150 entry fee from every player and were about to begin play they announced that the $100,000 prize fund had been reduced to $60,000. $40,000 disappeared from the promised prize fund with no explanation. Add that to the $10,000 already missing from the World 10-Ball and you have a $50,000 rip in the fabric of these Pacquiao events.

Where did the missing money go? We have no idea. All we know for certain is that the events were run by Lorelei Pacquiao, wife of Bobby Pacquiao, and that the events carry the name and reputation of Manny Pacquiao. The answer is within that family and it is to them that the players and fans must expect a statement. Hopefully that statement will include plans to reimburse the players. Offering someone a certain amount for a job and then reducing that amount first after the job is done and then before the next is begun but after all travel expenses including entry fees are output is simply unacceptable.

Some players have already made their statement. The expected field of 54 teams dwindled to less than half of that prior to the first ball being struck.

AZBilliards will provide updates to this story as they become available.

Sam Miguel
02-24-2015, 08:21 AM
Monies Missing in Pacquiao Events

Jerry Forsyth

Feb. 22, 2015

The unfortunate bottom line for both the World 10-Ball Championship and the Manny Pacquiao Cup scotch doubles event in General Santos City, Philippines, is that the players did not get paid their total prize monies in either event. And while Manny Pacquiao himself must bear the ultimate responsibility for this it is not at all clear at this moment that he even is aware of the shenanigans perpetrated by the wife of his brother Bobby, Lorelei Pacquiao, the lady in charge of both events.

First, at the World 10-Ball Championship, the players paid the WPA sanction fee with their entry fees. That is all the money that the WPA took from the event. But when the players got paid their pay envelopes were 5% short of what they were owed. And one player who asked why was told that it was to pay the WPA sanction. This is simply untrue. We have no idea of why the Pacquiao’s chose to remove expected funds from the event but it amounted to a $10,000 shortfall for the players. We have tried to contact the WPA to ask if they knew this had happened and for a comment on this but everyone appears to be in transit home at the moment.

It wasn’t that the organizers used the money to improve this World Championship event. Many players complained about the quality of the tables. The organizers did not bother to put carpet down on the floor, there were no chairs for spectators except in the TV Arena, some of the referees were so incompetent that they had to be removed and there was not even a scoreboard so anyone could follow the play. One player simply described it as “a mess”.

To show the atmosphere of pool in the Philippines, no one we spoke with wanted their names revealed. There is fear they would never be invited to future events again if they speak out publicly. To their credit, several players have chosen to make statements on their Facebook pages.

Minus the 5%, all players were paid on time at the Ten Ball event. Then we moved on to the Manny Pacquiao Cup, a doubles event with 54 teams expected to participate. After the organizers took the $150 entry fee from every player and were about to begin play they announced that the $100,000 prize fund had been reduced to $60,000. $40,000 disappeared from the promised prize fund with no explanation. Add that to the $10,000 already missing from the World 10-Ball and you have a $50,000 rip in the fabric of these Pacquiao events.

Where did the missing money go? We have no idea. All we know for certain is that the events were run by Lorelei Pacquiao, wife of Bobby Pacquiao, and that the events carry the name and reputation of Manny Pacquiao. The answer is within that family and it is to them that the players and fans must expect a statement. Hopefully that statement will include plans to reimburse the players. Offering someone a certain amount for a job and then reducing that amount first after the job is done and then before the next is begun but after all travel expenses including entry fees are output is simply unacceptable.

Some players have already made their statement. The expected field of 54 teams dwindled to less than half of that prior to the first ball being struck.

AZBilliards will provide updates to this story as they become available.

gameface_one
05-19-2015, 02:28 PM
Pacquiao attends House session, hailed 'true winner' over Mayweather by colleague

BOXING champion and Sarangani Province representative Manny Pacquiao showed up in Congress on Monday where he was hailed by colleagues as the ‘winner’ in his welterweight megabout against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

A round of applause greeted the 36-year-old ring great upon his arrival at the House, while the ad hoc committee was in the middle of a hearing on the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL).

Ad hoc committee chairman Rufus Rodriguez acknowledged Pacquiao’s presence the moment he arrived, and immediately congratulated the boxing champion who he referred to as the 'true winner’ over Mayweather in their 12-round match held at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas last May 3.

Pacquiao wore a coat, although his injured right shoulder remains in a sling after undergoing surgery in Los Angeles last week to repair a tear in his rotator cuff.

The eight-time world division champion suffered the injury while in the course of his two-month training for the Mayweather fight.

Pacquiao, who arrived from the U.S. last Wednesday, lost by unanimous decision against his unbeaten 38-year-old American foe.

gameface_one
05-20-2015, 01:15 PM
32 cases filed vs Pacquiao over shoulder injury

ABS-CBNnews.com
Posted at 05/19/2015 8:20 PM | Updated as of 05/19/2015 8:28 PM

Cases are mounting in the US against Manny Pacquiao for his failure to disclose his injury prior his supposed super bout against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

According to an Associated Press report released Tuesday, there are at least 32 class action suits filed against Pacquiao in the US.

Most of the plaintiffs argued that Pacquiao and his promoter virtually defrauded fight fans by failing to live up to the hype.

"The fight was not great, not entertaining, not electrifying. It was boring, slow and lackluster," according to one complaint filed in Texas that accused the boxer and his promoter of racketeering.

Another case filed on behalf of Flights Beer Bar in California described the “Fight of the Century” as "nothing but a cash-grab."

Each of the complaint sought for a jury trial and at least $5 million in damages. Some of the cases include Mayweather and his Mayweather Promotions, along with cable and pay-per-view companies HBO and Showtime.

Mayweather got a unanimous verdict after engaging an "injured" Pacquiao.

The super bout between Pacquiao and Mayweather garnered at least 4.4 million pay-per-view buys across the US. This brings the revenue guarantee for Mayweather up to $200 million, while Pacquiao stands to gain at least $100 million for his losing effort.

The pay-per-view was sold at $100 each.

However, experts expressed doubt if the plaintiffs will be able to win the case, arguing that Pacquiao, Mayweather and those involved in the bout stand to face more cases had they postponed the fight.

"They'd have more lawsuits if they didn't hold the fight," said Maureen Weston, director of Pepperdine University's entertainment, media and sports dispute resolution project.

gameface_one
05-24-2015, 06:43 PM
Possible Pacquiao fight in Dubai next year thrills Bob Arum. Find out who's the likely opponent

From: Reuben Terrado
May 23, 2015, 01:22 pm

NO rematch with Floyd Mayweather Jr? No problem for Manny Pacquiao.

Top Rank Promotions chief Bob Arum bared receiving an offer for the 36-year-old Pacquiao to fight in Dubai by next year not against Mayweather but against a former sparmate and world champion.

Arum said the Dubai delegation suggested British boxer Amir Khan as the Filipino’s possible opponent as first reported by Gareth Davies of The Telegraph.

“I just had a delegation from Dubai trying to talk to me about a Manny Pacquiao fight sometime early next year in Dubai. That would be interesting,” said Arum.

"One of the names they suggested as an opponent is Amir Khan. That would be a possibility. We’ll have to see,” added the 83-year-old promoter.

Pacquiao is coming off a 12-round unanimous decision loss against Mayweather in which he suffered a tear on his right rotator cuff that needed surgery.

Mayweather initially went on public to say he’s willing to give his bitter rival a rematch, only to make a 360 degree turn later on as he labeled Pacquiao a ‘sore loser’ and a ‘coward.’

Khan, the former light-welterweight champion who once served as Pacquiao’s sparmate, is a viable choice, according to Arum, considering he’ll generate interest in Dubai being of Pakistani descent and is a devoted Muslim.

He is set to fight Chris Algieri in New York next week that could possibly lined him up for a meeting with Mayweather in September should he get past the former Pacquiao opponent.

But Arum said a meeting with Khan would still depend on Pacquiao’s recovery from his right shoulder operation, which doctors say would take at least six to nine months to totally heal.

“I would think that Manny, if everything goes right with the surgery, would look to be back in early 2016, maybe in Dubai. I don't want to rush him,” said Arum.

The Top Rank official though, didn’t deny he’s with the Dubai offer.

The Dubai delegation, according to Arum, claims there is a “great interest” to stage a fight there as British fans will also able to fly directly to Dubai to watch the fight.

Of course, there is also a huge Filipino community in the Middle East city.

“Apparently, there is a great interest from Dubai in doing big-time boxing there. With the Emirate airline making regular flights from UK to Dubai, it’s a great place for British fight fans to watch a fight,”
said Arum.

gameface_one
05-27-2015, 02:01 PM
'Pacquiao was the draw, not Floyd'

ABS-CBNnews.com
Posted at 05/26/2015 4:17 PM
Retired boxer Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini believes that people came to see Manny Pacquiao and not Floyd Mayweather Jr. in their much-publicized super fight early this month.

Mancini, who ruled the lightweight division in the early '80s, acknowledged that Mayweather is a special fighter with superb defensive skills. But this is also the reason, why Mayweather isn’t such a big draw in boxing, he said.

“For me, I’m not paying to see him. He’s got special skills and he’s a special fighter but I’m not paying to see him. On free TV, fine. If not, no. Pacquiao was the draw, everyone knows that,” the former WBA lightweight champion said in an interview with On The Ropes Boxing.

But what about Mayweather’s pay-per-view records?

Mancini explained that the undefeated American gets big pay-per-view numbers because he partners himself with the more exciting boxing stars.

“Usually he keeps bragging that he has the top pay-per-view fights, this fight, the [Oscar] De La Hoya fight and the Canelo (Saul Alvarez) fight. But look who were the stars, Pacquiao, De La Hoya and Canelo,” he said.

Mayweather defeated Pacquiao via a unanimous decision during their much promoted “Fight of the Century” earlier this month. It raked in at least 4.4 million pay-per-view buys at $100 each.

But the super bout failed to live up to the hype, especially after the American spent most of the time hitting and running rather than engaging the Filipino superstar.

Mancini accused Mayweather of not caring about the paying public.

“I always said that athletes in general and fighters in particular have an obligation to the paying public to give them the best fight possible. He doesn’t care about that and he hasn’t cared about that,” said Mancini.

“He’s a modern-day Houdini, he doesn’t take a lick of a chance, he takes your money and he gets away with it. He doesn’t take a lick of a chance and he gets away with it.”

gameface_one
05-27-2015, 02:01 PM
'Pacquiao was the draw, not Floyd'

ABS-CBNnews.com
Posted at 05/26/2015 4:17 PM
Retired boxer Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini believes that people came to see Manny Pacquiao and not Floyd Mayweather Jr. in their much-publicized super fight early this month.

Mancini, who ruled the lightweight division in the early '80s, acknowledged that Mayweather is a special fighter with superb defensive skills. But this is also the reason, why Mayweather isn’t such a big draw in boxing, he said.

“For me, I’m not paying to see him. He’s got special skills and he’s a special fighter but I’m not paying to see him. On free TV, fine. If not, no. Pacquiao was the draw, everyone knows that,” the former WBA lightweight champion said in an interview with On The Ropes Boxing.

But what about Mayweather’s pay-per-view records?

Mancini explained that the undefeated American gets big pay-per-view numbers because he partners himself with the more exciting boxing stars.

“Usually he keeps bragging that he has the top pay-per-view fights, this fight, the [Oscar] De La Hoya fight and the Canelo (Saul Alvarez) fight. But look who were the stars, Pacquiao, De La Hoya and Canelo,” he said.

Mayweather defeated Pacquiao via a unanimous decision during their much promoted “Fight of the Century” earlier this month. It raked in at least 4.4 million pay-per-view buys at $100 each.

But the super bout failed to live up to the hype, especially after the American spent most of the time hitting and running rather than engaging the Filipino superstar.

Mancini accused Mayweather of not caring about the paying public.

“I always said that athletes in general and fighters in particular have an obligation to the paying public to give them the best fight possible. He doesn’t care about that and he hasn’t cared about that,” said Mancini.

“He’s a modern-day Houdini, he doesn’t take a lick of a chance, he takes your money and he gets away with it. He doesn’t take a lick of a chance and he gets away with it.”

gameface_one
05-28-2015, 02:33 PM
‘99% of people told me Pacquiao won,’ says Roach

Bong Lozada
@BLozadaINQ
INQUIRER.net
11:06 AM | Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Boxing’s most expensive fight may have been over for weeks, but famed trainer Freddie Roach still has something to say about it.

Roach told Radio Rahim of BoxingScene.com almost all of the people he interacted with, after his student Manny Pacquiao lost Floyd Mayweather Jr., said the Filipino boxer got robbed.

“Most of the people and the fans told me we got robbed, then the next day at the airport 99 percent of the people told me that we won the fight,” Roach said in the report.

Pacquiao lost to Mayweather via unanimous decision and conceded his WBO Welterweight title as the undefeated American unified it to his WBC and WBA Welterweight Championships.

READ: Pacquiao: ‘Still the people’s champ’

It was the fight the sporting world waited for almost half-a-decade and the hype easily fizzled when the fans never saw a glimpse of a full-on brawl.

Mayweather easily ducked, and hugged, Pacquiao, who was suffering an injured right shoulder during the May 2 fight at MGM Grand Garden Arena.

READ: ‘Mayweather won with hugs’– boxing fans

“I thought he could have thrown more flurries like we had planned to. I think he was working very well. We were out-punching Mayweather. The thing is, Mayweather did run a lot,” Roach said.

He admitted, though, he hasn’t re-watched the fight and could not evaluate fully. IDL

gameface_one
05-28-2015, 02:33 PM
‘99% of people told me Pacquiao won,’ says Roach

Bong Lozada
@BLozadaINQ
INQUIRER.net
11:06 AM | Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Boxing’s most expensive fight may have been over for weeks, but famed trainer Freddie Roach still has something to say about it.

Roach told Radio Rahim of BoxingScene.com almost all of the people he interacted with, after his student Manny Pacquiao lost Floyd Mayweather Jr., said the Filipino boxer got robbed.

“Most of the people and the fans told me we got robbed, then the next day at the airport 99 percent of the people told me that we won the fight,” Roach said in the report.

Pacquiao lost to Mayweather via unanimous decision and conceded his WBO Welterweight title as the undefeated American unified it to his WBC and WBA Welterweight Championships.

READ: Pacquiao: ‘Still the people’s champ’

It was the fight the sporting world waited for almost half-a-decade and the hype easily fizzled when the fans never saw a glimpse of a full-on brawl.

Mayweather easily ducked, and hugged, Pacquiao, who was suffering an injured right shoulder during the May 2 fight at MGM Grand Garden Arena.

READ: ‘Mayweather won with hugs’– boxing fans

“I thought he could have thrown more flurries like we had planned to. I think he was working very well. We were out-punching Mayweather. The thing is, Mayweather did run a lot,” Roach said.

He admitted, though, he hasn’t re-watched the fight and could not evaluate fully. IDL

Sam Miguel
08-02-2018, 07:03 AM
Pacquiao scores another victory – this time in tax court vs BIR

By: Tetch Torres-Tupas - Reporter / @T2TupasINQ

INQUIRER.net / 08:27 PM August 01, 2018

Following his victory in the boxing ring against Argentinian Lucas Matthysse, Sen. Manny Pacquiao scored another victory – this time, at the Court of Tax Appeals (CTA).

In a resolution promulgated July 27, 2018, the CTA First Division ordered the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) to “cease and desist” from collecting over P3-billion worth of deficiency tax for taxable years 2008 and 2009 against the senator and his wife Jinkee.

The BIR’s tax assessment which was originally P2.26 billion went up to P3.29 billion due to surcharges and penalties.

The Pacquiao couple went to the CTA on August 2012 questioning the BIR’s assessment and the order for them to pay the supposed deficiency tax.

They said the BIR proceeded with the collection process even without a Final Decision on Disputed Assessment (FDDA).

An FDDA is needed to give the taxpayer the opportunity to question the final decision of the BIR.

However, in 2013, a tax lien was issued against the properties of Pacquiao as well as a warrant of distraint and levy and garnishment to cover the liability.

A tax lien continues to be attached for as long as the deficiency taxes, as well as the interest and surcharges, have not been paid. The BIR issues a notice of tax lien to protect the interest of the government as stated under the Tax Code.

Pacquiao questioned the BIR order before the CTA. The Tax Court conducted hearings on the case and eventually required them to pay more than P3 billion cash bond or a surety bond of P4 billion in order to stop the implementation of the BIR order against their assets.

The couple then took the case to the Supreme Court.

That same year, the high court ruled in favor of Pacquiao and ordered the tax court to recompute the bond or determine if it could be waived.

The CTA conducted hearings, and in its recent ruling, it said that it was “dispensing the required cash deposit or bond.”

“Respondent [BIR] is ordered to cease and desist from implementing the Final Decision on Disputed Assessment (FDDA) and from collecting the subject deficiency tax assessments issued against petitioners for taxable years 2008 and 2009 for lack of merit,” the CTA said.

The CTA also ordered the BIR “to lift the warrants of distraint and/or Levy and Garnishment issued in relation to the same FDDA and deficiency tax assessments, pending the final disposition of this case.”

“Petitioners’ Motion to Lift Notices of Tax Lien Annotated on Properties Registered in the Name of Petitioners filed on May 30, 2016, the same is granted. The Notice of Tax Lien dated January 8, 2015…served at the Register of Deeds, General Santos is cancelled and withdrawn,” the CTA added.

The CTA has set a pre-trial conference for the main case which is the petition filed by the senator and his wife the result of the assessment conducted by the BIR. /atm