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danny
09-17-2009, 05:11 AM
Let's start with UE.

What is their story?

BedanRoar
09-17-2009, 08:11 AM
In 1946, Philippine College of Commerce and Business Administration (PCCBA) was established. Later on in 1951 change its name to Universtity of the East (UE).

UE joined the UAAP in 1952. Long after San Beda Wore the Red & White and when the the Indian Yell was cheered (NCAA member from 1924 to Present).

Well, you may get the picture.

danny
09-17-2009, 08:47 AM
^^^

1952? The 50's is the Crispulo Zamora Cup era when San Beda won the trophy but lost in the number of championships during that decade. This was another Ateneo-San Beda decade filled with Halikinus and Indian Yelling. When Atenean and Bedan cheers and Fight Songs reigned supreme. Battle of the Blue and Red.

But let's hear it from UE first. Their original colors and the origin of their Lapu-Lapu inspired UE Warrior logo.

Take it away Lennin...

BedanRoar
09-17-2009, 09:26 AM
Hindi pa nga U.E. pangalan nila when San Beda was already cheering the Indian Yell.

So I guess Danny. We wont be hearing much from our Red Warrior Friends. ::)

tulf
09-17-2009, 06:25 PM
Question to anyone from UE!
What was UE's monicker when they were still BLUE and GOLD?

danny
09-18-2009, 04:07 AM
Hindi pa nga U.E. pangalan nila when San Beda was already cheering the Indian Yell.

So I guess Danny. We wont be hearing much from our Red Warrior Friends. ::)



How come? They have so much tradition and history to share with us gamefacers especially prior to the entry of Ateneo and La Salle to the UAAP. The transfomation from Blue and Gold to Red and White, Warrior to Red Warrior, Lapu-Lapu to Sitting Bull, No cheering to cheering, no chant to Indian War Chant.

Surely we would like to know these pivotal events in the rich and colorful tradition of UE viewed from the eyes of the Red Tribe. Lennin for sure will do some research for us.

Or I could be wrong.

Again, we have yet to read their story, manufactured or otherwise. ;D

nnahoj
09-18-2009, 02:43 PM
kuya Danny ;D,

wala na yatang pupunta dito sa gameface na tribesmen. yung representative nilang "galing ASU", isang maliit na newspaper clip lang ang pinakita hindi pa ganun ka bigat na ebidensya. ;D

Stardust
09-18-2009, 08:49 PM
Brethren,

I humbly suggest we end our writing re UE. We know who we are and the people that matters know us too. I believe we are not in dire need to associate with the likes of kabayan.

The aping of our cheers, ways and iconography should be our least of worries when we finally meet UE in the UAAP. We are assured of our tradition and we are comfortable with it.

Let us engage again in the lively and intellectual banter and exchange with our respected foes.

Animo!

danny
09-18-2009, 11:24 PM
Brethren,

I humbly suggest we end our writing re UE. We know who we are and the people that matters know us too. I believe we are not in dire need to associate with the likes of kabayan.

The aping of our cheers, ways and iconography should be our least of worries when we finally meet UE in the UAAP. We are assured of our tradition and we are comfortable with it.

Let us engage again in the lively and intellectual banter and exchange with our respected foes.





This Bedan will humbly oblige.

Indeed, we are assured of our tradition and we are comfortable with it.


¡ á n i m o !

mangtsito
09-19-2009, 04:03 AM
Baka naman hindi lang naintindihan ang title kaya ayaw mag-post dito. ;D

lekiboy
09-19-2009, 07:39 PM
Brethren,

I humbly suggest we end our writing re UE. We know who we are and the people that matters know us too. I believe we are not in dire need to associate with the likes of kabayan.

The aping of our cheers, ways and iconography should be our least of worries when we finally meet UE in the UAAP. We are assured of our tradition and we are comfortable with it.

Let us engage again in the lively and intellectual banter and exchange with our respected foes.

Animo!




it's also our tradition :) to give respect to our kuyas- i concur in stopping this .....for now:)

nothing to gein
09-23-2009, 06:15 PM
American Indians are NOT Mascots

To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the R word because to us it is as hideous as the N word is to African Americans. The use of an Indian name in and of itself for mascots is not offensive, but it is what the fans (short for fanatic) do with it that is reprehensible. Native Americans suffer the highest rates of violent crimes committed by people of another race.� In schools, Native children suffer bullying when there are misuses of Native culture used in sporting events.� When they paint their faces, stick turkey feathers in their hair, and do those awful Hollywood chants, it then starts to become insulting and racist to Native Americans. Imagine if you will a team with a mascot called the Zulus. Would African Americans be offended if the white fans painted their faces black, put Afro wigs on their heads, and waved spears in the air while chanting their perception of African war songs? Why%uFFFDname teams for the color of a people's skin - %uFFFD"Redskins?" Why not a mascot for the Blackskins, Brownskins or Yellow Skins? At one Washington Redskin football game the fans painted a pig red, put feathers on its head, and ran it around the football field. What if they had painted it black, put an Afro wig on its head, and then chased it around the football field. Would the African American fans consider this an honor? If the sports fans want to honor Native Americans, honor our treaties. You do not honor us by making us mascots for America's fun and games. In fact, just the opposite is true. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the R word because to us it is as hideous as the N word is to African Americans. The use of an Indian name in and of itself for mascots is not offensive, but it is what the fans (short for fanatic) do with it that is reprehensible. Native Americans suffer the highest rates of violent crimes committed by people of another race.� In schools, Native children suffer bullying when there are misuses of Native culture used in sporting events.� When they paint their faces, stick turkey feathers in their hair, and do those awful Hollywood chants, it then starts to become insulting and racist to Native Americans. Imagine if you will a team with a mascot called the Zulus. Would African Americans be offended if the white fans painted their faces black, put Afro wigs on their heads, and waved spears in the air while chanting their perception of African war songs? Why%uFFFDname teams for the color of a people's skin - %uFFFD"Redskins?" Why not a mascot for the Blackskins, Brownskins or Yellow Skins? At one Washington Redskin football game the fans painted a pig red, put feathers on its head, and ran it around the football field. What if they had painted it black, put an Afro wig on its head, and then chased it around the football field. Would the African American fans consider this an honor? If the sports fans want to honor Native Americans, honor our treaties. You do not honor us by making us mascots for America's fun and games. In fact, just the opposite is true. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
Office of the Speaker H-232, US Capitol
Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-0100

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
Washington DC 528 Hart Senate Office Bldg
Washington, DC 20510

We the undersigned support the following change in American Sports.

Some civil rights agencies report a high correlation between the use of Indian images and civil rights violations.� Research by Stephanie Fryberg proves that Indian team names and mascots negatively effect the self-esteeem of Native children and can contribute to their lack of success in schools that maintain these names and images.


The mainstream media and common ignorance has convinced people that having a Native American mascot for sporting teams is acceptable. We would like the opportunity to educate the public that we, the undersigned, feel that "Indian" Mascots are racist and insulting to Native People and we would like all such racist, degrading material and behavior toward Native people halted within all sports venues.


There are Vikings, Fighting Irish, bison, bulldogs, horses, cowboys, steelers, packers, or boilermakers and so much more. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.

To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the N word because to us it is as hideous as the R word is to African Americans. W ask you, how can a supposed civilized nation in the year 2007 still use a racist logo and name like Redskin and feel that it is an honor to Native Americans? What a terrible way to be honored!

When the four minority media organizations, the National Association of Black Journalists, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Association of Asian Journalists, and the Native American Journalists Association meet at the UNITY Convention in Chicago in 2008, we pray that the use of American Indians as mascots for American Indians as fun and games is high on the list of subjects they bring to the table.

So far the Indian people of America have fought this battle alone. UNITY should know that racism in any form against any minority is racism that impacts all minorities and makes it much easier for racists to extend their form of racism to other races.

We ask anyone reading this petition, whether you hate what we are writing here or not, just open your mind when you watch the playoffs between the Red Sox and the Indians and ask yourself if the grinning caricature of an American Indian is racist. Replace that face with another racial minority and see how the shoe fits. And if you saw the Washington professional football game where the teams fanatical fans painted a pig red, planted feathers on its head, and chased it around the football field at halftime and were not repelled by it, you wouldnt know racism if it bit you on the behind. American Indians are human beings and not mascots for Americas high schools, colleges or professional sports teams.

The following are additional examples of racism against American Indians in the American Sports Venue.

1.The racist cartoon character of a bucktoothed, red faced, caricature of an Indian logo prominently displayed upon the caps of the Cleveland baseball team. What if that dreadful cartoon character had depicted an African American, a Hispanic American or an Asian American? Would members of these ethnic minorities find this cartoon character to be obnoxious? We think so.

2. One year when UND played its main rival, the North Dakota State Bison, a cartoon image made the rounds of an Indian warrior sexually mounting a buffalo with the appropriate language attached. Another time in the city of Bismarck just before a renewal of this instate rivalry, some fans of North Dakota State were calling their UND rivals "The F---ing Sioux." They used the "F" word to not only insult the fans of UND, but collaterally insulted all Native Americans in the state.
3. If one happened to be in Champaign/Urbana, Illinois before a big sporting event, in order to laud their mascot, Chief Illiniwek, a white boy dressed up in Native attire, one could see images of bleary-eyed, drunken Indians painted on the windows of the downtown bars. On sale in the local markets and drugstores, one could purchase rolls of toilet paper with images of Indians imprinted on every sheet.

4. Before a big football game between the Minnesota Gophers and the University of Illinois Fighting Illini, stuffed Indian dummies could be seen with ropes around their necks hanging from buildings and trees on the Minnesota campus.

5. We cannot end this letter without reiterating the Sunday a few years ago when the fans of the Washington professional football team (We will not use the "R" word here), painted a pig red, placed a feathered bonnet on its head, and then chased it around the football field at halftime. If they had painted a pig black and placed an Afro wig on its head and chased it around the football field at halftime, how many African Americans would have considered that an "honor?"

Any Indian or white (or other nationality for that matter) that finds the things written above as "honoring"American Indians holds a very different view of what the word "honor" holds for the majority of Native Americans. The Majority of Native Americans in this country consider their race used as mascots for America's fun and games is an insult and racist treatment and we want this changed nationally and across all sports venues in America (and the whole world).

Liontamer
09-23-2009, 06:17 PM
American Indians are NOT Mascots

To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the R word because to us it is as hideous as the N word is to African Americans. The use of an Indian name in and of itself for mascots is not offensive, but it is what the fans (short for fanatic) do with it that is reprehensible. Native Americans suffer the highest rates of violent crimes committed by people of another race.� In schools, Native children suffer bullying when there are misuses of Native culture used in sporting events.� When they paint their faces, stick turkey feathers in their hair, and do those awful Hollywood chants, it then starts to become insulting and racist to Native Americans. Imagine if you will a team with a mascot called the Zulus. Would African Americans be offended if the white fans painted their faces black, put Afro wigs on their heads, and waved spears in the air while chanting their perception of African war songs? Why%uFFFDname teams for the color of a people's skin - %uFFFD"Redskins?" Why not a mascot for the Blackskins, Brownskins or Yellow Skins? At one Washington Redskin football game the fans painted a pig red, put feathers on its head, and ran it around the football field. What if they had painted it black, put an Afro wig on its head, and then chased it around the football field. Would the African American fans consider this an honor? If the sports fans want to honor Native Americans, honor our treaties. You do not honor us by making us mascots for America's fun and games. In fact, just the opposite is true. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the R word because to us it is as hideous as the N word is to African Americans. The use of an Indian name in and of itself for mascots is not offensive, but it is what the fans (short for fanatic) do with it that is reprehensible. Native Americans suffer the highest rates of violent crimes committed by people of another race.� In schools, Native children suffer bullying when there are misuses of Native culture used in sporting events.� When they paint their faces, stick turkey feathers in their hair, and do those awful Hollywood chants, it then starts to become insulting and racist to Native Americans. Imagine if you will a team with a mascot called the Zulus. Would African Americans be offended if the white fans painted their faces black, put Afro wigs on their heads, and waved spears in the air while chanting their perception of African war songs? Why%uFFFDname teams for the color of a people's skin - %uFFFD"Redskins?" Why not a mascot for the Blackskins, Brownskins or Yellow Skins? At one Washington Redskin football game the fans painted a pig red, put feathers on its head, and ran it around the football field. What if they had painted it black, put an Afro wig on its head, and then chased it around the football field. Would the African American fans consider this an honor? If the sports fans want to honor Native Americans, honor our treaties. You do not honor us by making us mascots for America's fun and games. In fact, just the opposite is true. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
Office of the Speaker H-232, US Capitol
Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-0100

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
Washington DC 528 Hart Senate Office Bldg
Washington, DC 20510

We the undersigned support the following change in American Sports.

Some civil rights agencies report a high correlation between the use of Indian images and civil rights violations.� Research by Stephanie Fryberg proves that Indian team names and mascots negatively effect the self-esteeem of Native children and can contribute to their lack of success in schools that maintain these names and images.


The mainstream media and common ignorance has convinced people that having a Native American mascot for sporting teams is acceptable. We would like the opportunity to educate the public that we, the undersigned, feel that "Indian" Mascots are racist and insulting to Native People and we would like all such racist, degrading material and behavior toward Native people halted within all sports venues.


There are Vikings, Fighting Irish, bison, bulldogs, horses, cowboys, steelers, packers, or boilermakers and so much more. If the fans of these teams choose to honor these symbols for their sports teams, so be it. But when they take real life American Indians and turn them into cartoon caricatures and then mimic them by painting their faces, donning feathers, and doing the tomahawk chop, they cross that thin line called racism.

To most American Indians it is absolutely abhorrent for a professional football team to use the color of their skin as their team mascot. As a matter of fact, we oftentimes refer to the mascot of the Washington professional football team as the N word because to us it is as hideous as the R word is to African Americans. W ask you, how can a supposed civilized nation in the year 2007 still use a racist logo and name like Redskin and feel that it is an honor to Native Americans? What a terrible way to be honored!

When the four minority media organizations, the National Association of Black Journalists, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Association of Asian Journalists, and the Native American Journalists Association meet at the UNITY Convention in Chicago in 2008, we pray that the use of American Indians as mascots for American Indians as fun and games is high on the list of subjects they bring to the table.

So far the Indian people of America have fought this battle alone. UNITY should know that racism in any form against any minority is racism that impacts all minorities and makes it much easier for racists to extend their form of racism to other races.

We ask anyone reading this petition, whether you hate what we are writing here or not, just open your mind when you watch the playoffs between the Red Sox and the Indians and ask yourself if the grinning caricature of an American Indian is racist. Replace that face with another racial minority and see how the shoe fits. And if you saw the Washington professional football game where the teams fanatical fans painted a pig red, planted feathers on its head, and chased it around the football field at halftime and were not repelled by it, you wouldnt know racism if it bit you on the behind. American Indians are human beings and not mascots for Americas high schools, colleges or professional sports teams.

The following are additional examples of racism against American Indians in the American Sports Venue.

1.The racist cartoon character of a bucktoothed, red faced, caricature of an Indian logo prominently displayed upon the caps of the Cleveland baseball team. What if that dreadful cartoon character had depicted an African American, a Hispanic American or an Asian American? Would members of these ethnic minorities find this cartoon character to be obnoxious? We think so.

2. One year when UND played its main rival, the North Dakota State Bison, a cartoon image made the rounds of an Indian warrior sexually mounting a buffalo with the appropriate language attached. Another time in the city of Bismarck just before a renewal of this instate rivalry, some fans of North Dakota State were calling their UND rivals "The F---ing Sioux." They used the "F" word to not only insult the fans of UND, but collaterally insulted all Native Americans in the state.
3. If one happened to be in Champaign/Urbana, Illinois before a big sporting event, in order to laud their mascot, Chief Illiniwek, a white boy dressed up in Native attire, one could see images of bleary-eyed, drunken Indians painted on the windows of the downtown bars. On sale in the local markets and drugstores, one could purchase rolls of toilet paper with images of Indians imprinted on every sheet.

4. Before a big football game between the Minnesota Gophers and the University of Illinois Fighting Illini, stuffed Indian dummies could be seen with ropes around their necks hanging from buildings and trees on the Minnesota campus.

5. We cannot end this letter without reiterating the Sunday a few years ago when the fans of the Washington professional football team (We will not use the "R" word here), painted a pig red, placed a feathered bonnet on its head, and then chased it around the football field at halftime. If they had painted a pig black and placed an Afro wig on its head and chased it around the football field at halftime, how many African Americans would have considered that an "honor?"

Any Indian or white (or other nationality for that matter) that finds the things written above as "honoring"American Indians holds a very different view of what the word "honor" holds for the majority of Native Americans. The Majority of Native Americans in this country consider their race used as mascots for America's fun and games is an insult and racist treatment and we want this changed nationally and across all sports venues in America (and the whole world).


what? is this true?

nothing to gein
09-23-2009, 06:22 PM
Indian Logo Themes: Why They Are Racist!

"Indian" logos and nicknames create, support and maintain stereotypes of a race of people. When such cultural abuse is supported by one or many of society's institutions, it constitutes institutional racism.

It is not conscionable that Wisconsin's Public Schools be the vehicle of institutional racism.

The logos, along with other societal abuses and stereotypes separate, marginalize, confuse, intimidate and harm Native American children and create barriers to their learning throughout their school experience. Additionally, the logos teach non-Indian children that its all right to participate in culturally abusive behavior. Children spend a great deal of their time in school, and schools have a very significant impact on their emotional, spiritual, physical and intellectual development. As long as such logos remain, both Native American and non-Indian children are learning to tolerate racism in our schools. The following illustrate the common questions and statements that I have encountered in trying to provide education about the "Indian" logo issue.

"We have always been proud of our "Indians"." People are proud of their high school athletic teams, even in communities where the team name and symbolism does not stereotype a race of people. In developing high school athletic traditions, schools have borrowed from Native American cultures the sacred objects, ceremonial traditions and components of traditional dress that were most obvious; without understanding their deep meaning or appropriate use. High school traditions were created without in-depth knowledge of Native traditions; they are replete with inaccurate depictions of Indian people, and promote and maintain stereotypes of rich and varied cultures. High school athletic traditions have taken the trappings of Native cultures onto the playing field where young people have played at being "Indian". Over time, and with practice, generations of children in these schools have come to believe that the pretended "Indian" identity is more than what it is.

"We are honoring Indians; you should feel honored." Native people are saying that they don't feel honored by this symbolism. We experience it as no less than a mockery of our cultures. We see objects sacred to us - such as the drum, eagle feathers, face painting and traditional dress - being used, not in sacred ceremony, or in any cultural setting, but in another culture's game.

We are asking that the public schools stop demeaning, insulting, harassing and misrepresenting Native peoples, their cultures and religions, for the sake of school athletics. Why must some schools insist on using symbols of a race of people? Other schools are happy with their logos which offend no human being. Why do some schools insist on categorizing Indian people along with animals and objects? If your team name were the *Pollacks, Niggers, Gooks, Spics, Honkies or Krauts, and someone from the community found the name and symbols associated with it offensive and asked that it be changed; would you not change the name? If not, why not?

"Why is the term "Indian" offensive?" The term "Indian" was given to indigenous people on this continent by an explorer who was looking for India, a man who was lost and who subsequently exploited the indigenous people. "Indian", is a designation we have learned to tolerate, it is not the name we call ourselves. We are known by the names of our Nations - Oneida (On^yotea"ka), Hochunk, Stockbridge- Munsee, Menominee (Omaeqnomenew), Chippewa (Anishanabe), Potawatomi, etc. There are many different nations with different languages and different cultural practices among the Native American peoples as in Europe there are French, Swiss, Italian, German, Polish, English, Irish, Yugoslavs, Swedes, Portuguese, Latvians etc.

"Why is an attractive depiction of an Indian warrior just as offensive as an ugly caricature?" Both depictions present and maintain stereotypes. Both firmly place Indian people in the past, separate from our contemporary cultural experience. It is difficult, at best, to be heard in the present when someone is always suggesting that your real culture only exists in museums. The logos keep us marginalized and are a barrier to our contributing here and now. Depictions of mighty warriors of the past emphasize a tragic part of our history; focusing on wartime survival, they ignore the strength and beauty of our cultures during times of peace. Many Indian cultures view life as a spiritual journey filled with lessons to be learned from every experience and from every living being. Many cultures put high value on peace, right action, and sharing.

Indian men are not limited to the role of warrior; in many of our cultures a good man is learned, gentle, patient, wise and deeply spiritual. In present time as in the past, our men are also sons and brothers, husbands, uncles, fathers and grandfathers. Contemporary Indian men work in a broad spectrum of occupations, wear contemporary clothes, and live and love just as men do from other cultural backgrounds.

The depictions of Indian "braves", "warriors" and "chiefs" also ignore the roles of women and children. Although there are patrilineal Native cultures, many Indian Nations are both matrilineal and child centered. Indian cultures identify women with the Creator because of their ability to bear children, and with the Earth which is Mother to us all. In most Indian cultures the highest value is given to children, they are closest to the Creator and they embody the future. In many Native traditions, each generation is responsible for the children of the seventh generation in the future.

"We never intended the logo to cause harm." That no harm was intended when the logos were adopted, may be true. It is also true that we Indian people are saying that the logos are harmful to our cultures, and especially to our children, in the present. When someone says you are hurting them by your action, if you persist; then the harm becomes intentional.

"We are paying tribute to Indians." Indian people do not pay tribute to one another by the use of logos, portraits or statues. The following are some ways that we exhibit honor:

In most cultures to receive an eagle feather is a great honor, and often such a feather also carries great responsibility.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An honor song at a Pow-Wow or other ceremony is a way of honoring a person or a group.

We honor our elders and leaders by asking them to share knowledge and experience with us or to lead us in prayer. We defer to elders. They go first in many ways in our cultures.

We honor our young by not doing things to them that would keep them from becoming who and what they are intended to be.

We honor one another by listening and not interrupting.

We honor those we love by giving them our time and attention.

Sometimes we honor people through gentle joking.

We honor others by giving to them freely what they need or what belongs to them already because they love it more or could use it better than we do.

"Aren't you proud of your warriors?" Yes, we are proud of the warriors who fought to protect our cultures and preserve our lands. We are proud and we don't want them demeaned by being "honored" in a sports activity on a playing field. Our people died tragically in wars motivated by greed for our lands. Our peoples have experienced forced removal and systematic genocide. Our warriors gave their sacred lives in often vain attempts to protect the land and preserve the culture for future generations. Football is a game.

"This is not an important issue." If it is not important, then why are school boards willing to tie up their time and risk potential law suits rather than simply change the logos. I, as an Indian person, have never said it is unimportant. Most Indian adults have lived through the pain of prejudice and harassment in schools when they were growing up, and they don't want their children to experience more of the same. The National Council of American Indians, the Great Lakes InterTribal Council, the Oneida Tribe, and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association have all adopted formal position statements because this is a very important issue to Indian people. This issue speaks to our children being able to form a positive Indian identity and to develop appropriate levels of self-esteem. In addition, it has legal ramifications in regard to pupil harassment and equal access to education. If its not important to people of differing ethnic and racial backgrounds within the community, then change the logos because they are hurting the community's Native American population.

"What if we drop derogatory comments and clip art and adopt pieces of REAL Indian culturally significant ceremony, like Pow-Wows and sacred songs?" Though well-intended, these solutions are culturally naive and would exchange one pseudo-culture for another. Pow-Wows are gatherings of Native people which give us the opportunity to express our various cultures and strengthen our sense of Native American community. Pow-Wows have religious, as well as social, significance. To parodize such ceremonial gatherings for the purpose of cheering on the team at homecoming would multiply exponentially the current pseudo cultural offensiveness. Bringing Native religions onto the playing field through songs of tribute to the "Great Spirit" or Mother Earth would increase the mockery of Native religions even more than the current use of drums and feathers. High School football games are secular; The Creator and Mother Earth are sacred.

"We are helping you preserve your culture." The responsibility for the continuance of our cultures falls to Native people. We accomplish this by surviving, living and thriving; and, in so doing, we pass on to our children our stories, traditions, religions, values, arts, and our languages. We sometimes do this important work with people from other cultural backgrounds, but they do not and cannot continue our cultures for us. Our ancestors did this work for us, and we continue to carry the culture for the generations to come. Our cultures are living cultures - they are passed on, not "preserved".

"This logo issue is just about political correctness." Using the term "political correctness" to describe the attempts of concerned Native American parents, educators and leaders to remove stereotypes from the public schools trivializes a survival issue. A history of systematic genocide has decimated over 95% of the indigenous population of the Americas. Today, the average life expectancy of Native American males is age 45, of women, 46. The teen suicide rate among Native people is 20 times higher than the national average. Stereotypes, ignorance, silent inaction and even naive innocence damage and destroy individual lives and whole cultures. Racism kills.

"What do you mean, there is hypocrisy involved in retaining an "Indian" logo?" Imagine that you are a child in a society where your people are variously depicted as stoic, brave, honest, a mighty warrior, fierce, savage, stupid, dirty, drunken, and only good when dead. Imagine going to a school where many of your classmates refer to your people as "Dirty Squaws" and "Timber Niggers". Imagine hearing your peers freely, loudly and frequently say such things as "Spear an Indian, Save a Walleye", or more picturesquely proclaim "Spear a Pregnant Squaw, Save a Walleye". Imagine that the teachers and administration do not forbid this kind of behavior. Imagine that this same school holds aloft an attractive depiction of a Plains Indian Chieftain and cheers on its "Indian" team. Imagine that in homecoming displays, cheers, and artwork you see your people depicted inaccurately in ways that demean your cultural and religious practices. Imagine that when you bring your experiences to the attention of your school board and request change, they simply ignore you and decide to continue business as usual. Imagine that the same school board states publicly that it opposes discriminatory practices, provides equal educational opportunity and supports respect for cultural differences.

"Why don't community members understand the need to change, isn't it a simple matter of respect?" On one level, yes. But in some communities, people have bought into local myths and folklore presented as accurate historical facts. Sometimes these myths are created or preserved by local industry. Also, over the years, athletic and school traditions grow up around the logos. These athletic traditions can be hard to change when much of a community's ceremonial and ritual life, as well as its pride, becomes tied to high school athletic activities. Finally, many people find it difficult to grasp a different cultural perspective. Not being from an Indian culture, they find it hard to understand that things which are not offensive to themselves, might be offensive or even harmful to someone who is from a Native culture. Respecting a culture different from the one you were raised in requires some effort. Even if a person lives in a different culture - insight and understanding of that culture will require interaction, listening, observing and a willingness to learn.

The Native American population, in most school districts displaying "Indian" logos, is proportionally very small. When one of us confronts the logo issue, that person, his or her children and other family members, and anyone else in the district who is Native American become targets of insults and threats; we are shunned and further marginalized - our voices become even harder to hear from behind barriers of fear and anger. We appreciate the courage, support, and sometimes the sacrifice, of all who stand with us by speaking out against the continued use of "Indian" logos. When you advocate for the removal of these logos, you are strengthening the spirit of tolerance and justice in your community; you are modeling for all our children - thoughtfulness, courage and respect for self and others.

"Is there any common ground on this issue?" All of Wisconsin's public schools are required to have a non-discrimination statement and a policy to provide enforcement. Through Act 31, all schools are required to provide education, (in the classroom, not on the basketball court), about Wisconsin's Woodland Indians. Many schools have adopted strategic plans emphasizing cultural sensitivity and awareness. These measures should establish considerable common ground between Indian people requesting the removal of the logos and the public schools. Until the logos are removed, however, they are no more than broken promises and hollow, hypocritical rhetoric.

MonL
09-23-2009, 06:48 PM
And another PEx denizen and his "sidekick" alternick has crossed over here armed with brimming hypocrisy.

gameface_one
09-24-2009, 12:07 AM
nothing to gein, state your point or else the article you posted will just be perceived as worthless that can become a candidate for deletion.

admiral thrawn
09-24-2009, 02:46 PM
^^ the nothing guy is a notorious basher of bedans in PEX mr. gameface_one.
Alam ko banned na siya for posting the same articles. Now he is infesting this site. Kayo na po ang bahala.

mangtsito
01-11-2010, 02:59 AM
This is a bit late, but anyone who has seen the movie "The Mighty Ducks 3" will have a new insight as to why the UE Warriors suddenly became Indians. ;)

maroonmartian
05-31-2010, 09:54 AM
As for my beloved school (babalik na ulit at mag-aaral after a year of rest), here is my story on our school colors and iconography. The only PUBLIC SCHOOL in UAAP (we deserve the name State U).

Pinakapinagtatalunan para sa amin kung ano ba yung nasa:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Unibersidad_ng_Pilipinas.png

EAGLE ba (bald eagle because we were created by the Americans or PARROT (we were formerly called the Parotteers daw) because UP people are talkative. :D

As for the Oblation symbol, ewan ko kung bakit yun yung symbol namin for UP aside from the fact na yun yung most fitting symbol for UP students, sacrificing yourself to the motherland. I suggest we are called UP Oblations.

As for the school color, it is really red and green as shown in our anthem, UP Naming Mahal:

"Luntian at pula, sagisag magpakailanman."

But why red changed to maroon or green change to green changed to forest green. Any older UP folks. I quite young.

kerouac82
06-01-2010, 03:15 PM
As for my beloved school (babalik na ulit at mag-aaral after a year of rest), here is my story on our school colors and iconography. The only PUBLIC SCHOOL in UAAP (we deserve the name State U).

Pinakapinagtatalunan para sa amin kung ano ba yung nasa:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Unibersidad_ng_Pilipinas.png

EAGLE ba (bald eagle because we were created by the Americans or PARROT (we were formerly called the Parotteers daw) because UP people are talkative. :D

As for the Oblation symbol, ewan ko kung bakit yun yung symbol namin for UP aside from the fact na yun yung most fitting symbol for UP students, sacrificing yourself to the motherland. I suggest we are called UP Oblations.

As for the school color, it is really red and green as shown in our anthem, UP Naming Mahal:

"Luntian at pula, sagisag magpakailanman."

But why red changed to maroon or green change to green changed to forest green. Any older UP folks. I quite young.


Uhm, siguro dahil walang salita para sa "maroon" at "forest green" sa Tagalog?
"UP Naming Mahal" was originally in English.

maroonmartian
06-01-2010, 07:57 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.P._Naming_Mahal

Yes, it was originally written in English and was titled "UP Beloved" and the music was made by National Artist Nicanor Abelardo. And yes "Red and Green" din yung color. Pero I think fitting yung forest green color because of the lush trees in Diliman and maroon maybe well for the rust of our school buildings (I was joking). ;D

As for the Parrot and Eagle thing, that issue is still not resolved today. Actually, the university now is adopting the Oblation as our symbol. They hate to be associated with the Eagle (American influnce).

And oh there is a new version of UP Naming Mahal, Activist Inspired. It replaced the color from "luntian at pula" to "Silangang mapula (East is red)".

atenean_blooded
07-07-2010, 02:08 PM
ATENEO


The Ateneo Seal

http://www.ateneo.edu/ateneo/www/SiteFiles/Image/about_ateneo/1865-seal.gif

In 1859, the Escuela Municipal carried the arms of the city of Manila, granted by no less than King Philip II of Spain. By 1865, along with the change of name, the school’s seal had evolved to include some religious images, such as the Jesuit monogram IHS and Marian symbols. In 1909, the Ateneo’s Golden Jubilee, a revised seal was introduced, with clearer Marian symbols and the current motto, Lux in Domino.

http://www.ateneo.edu/ateneo/www/SiteFiles/Image/about_ateneo/X-1909-Color-Seal.gif

For 20 years, the 1909 seal was used. It was a mark of clear distinction and historical prestige. But except for the Marian overtones, and a small IHS monogram, the seal contained little that spoke of the Ateneo’s thriving Jesuit academic tradition.

Father Rector Richard O’Brien, S.J. introduced a new seal for the Ateneo de Manila’s Diamond Jubilee in 1929. This seal abandons the arms of Manila and instead adopts a design that is thoroughly Ignatian and Jesuit in character. It is the seal the Ateneo uses to this day. 2004 marks the 75th year of this seal.

http://www.ateneo.edu/ateneo/www/SiteFiles/Image/about_ateneo/1929-seal-tall.gif

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c9/ATENEO-SEAL.png

The Ateneo de Manila seal is defined by two semi-circular ribbons. The crown ribbon contains the school motto, “LUX-IN-DOMINO”, and the base ribbon contains the school name, “ATENEO DE MANILA”. These ribbons define a circular field on which rests the shield of Oñaz-Loyola: a combination of the arms of the paternal and maternal sides of the family of St. Ignatius.

The central image of the seal is the shield of Oñaz-Loyola, a device used by many Jesuit organizations. In precise heraldic terms, the Shield of Oñaz-Loyola may be described as: "Party per pale: Or, seven bendlets Gules; Argent, a two-eared pot hanging on a chain between two wolves rampant." In plain English, the shield is gold, and divided vertically. To the viewer's left is a field of gold with seven red bands. These are the arms of Oñaz, Ignatius' paternal family, which commemorates seven family heroes who fought with the Spaniards against 70,000 French, Navarese, and Gascons. To the viewer's right is a white or silver field with the arms of Loyola, Ignatius' maternal family. The arms consist of a two-eared pot hanging on a chain between two rampant wolves, which symbolize the nobility. The name "Loyola" is actually a contraction of lobos y olla (wolves and pot). The name springs from the family's reputation of being able to provide so well that they could feed even wild wolves.

Above the shield is a Basque sunburst, referring to Ignatius’ Basque roots, but also representing a consecrated host. It bears the letters IHS, the first three letters of the Holy Name of Jesus in Greek. an adaptation of the emblem of the Society of Jesus.

Many people erroneously believe that the Ateneo de Manila seal features the letters JHS. This misunderstanding stems from the peculiar rendering of the letters in the Ateneo de Manila seal. The letter I is drawn in a florid calligraphic style and conforms to the circle’s shape. It therefore appears similar to a J.

The seal’s colors are blue, white, red, and gold. In traditional heraldry, white or silver (Argent) represents a commitment to peace and truth. Blue (Azure) represents fortitude and loyalty. Red (Gules) represens martyrdom, sacrifice, and strength. Gold (Or) represents nobility and generosity.

White and blue are also the Ateneo’s school colors, the colors of Our Lady. Red and gold are the colors of Spain, home of Ignatius and the Ateneo’s Jesuit founders. Finally, these four tinctures mirror the tinctures of the Philippine flag, marking the Ateneo’s identity as a Filipino University.



Blue and White

The Ateneo has adopted the colors of Our Lady as its own school colors. The school colors are therefore signs of the Ateneo’s devotion to Mary and its commitment to become, like her, a constantly true and faithful servant of the Lord.

Marian blue, ultramarine, is the purest, most brilliant, and most enduring of blues. It is also the rarest and most expensive of pigments, and exceeds gold in value. The color must be extracted in tiny amounts from crushed lapis lazuli, a gem. Medieval artists therefore reserved blue for the robes of the Virgin and the Child Jesus. Mary is also Queen of Heaven and Star of the Sea, and appropriately, her color is also the color of sky and water. Sky blue symbolizes distance, divinity, and dreams; Marine blue, mystery, depth, intimacy. In Mary’s blue mantle, Heaven and Earth, depth and height, the divine and the human come together. No wonder then that blue is the color of faith, peace, and commitment. No wonder then, that the Ateneo has made her Lady’s blue its own.

White is also a color of Mary, conceived without sin and clothed with the sun. It is at once colorless and yet bears the entire spectrum of color. White signifies silence, an emptiness and space that is pregnant with possibility. It is also the color of openness, of truth, of purity, and of hope. In a sense, white is the color of ‘yes’. And it is a color of the Ateneo, because, like Mary, we hope to surrender ourselves to God, so that He may do His work through ours, and so that His will may be made flesh in our lives.


Blue Eagle, the King

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/78/AteneoBlueEagle.jpg

For the longest time during the National Collegiate Athletic Association competitions in the 1930s and earlier, the Ateneo had no mascot. The basketball team lorded it over the opposition, proudly carrying the school’s colors and name.

Meanwhile, Catholic Schools in the United States, particularly those named after saints, were distressed by the cheekiness with which they were mentioned in sports pages. Headlines read “St. Michael’s Wallops St. Augustine’s,” or “St. Thomas’ Scalps St. Peter’s.” It was then agreed that each school adopt a mascot, a symbol for the team which sportswriters could toss about with impunity and which would consequently allow the saints to live in peace.

The idea quickly caught on in the Philippines. By the late 30s, the Ateneo had adopted the Blue Eagle as a symbol, and had a live eagle accompany the basketball team.

The choice of mascot, of course, held iconic significance. It was a reference to the “high-flying” basketball team which would “sweep the fields away;” the dominating force in NCAA. Furthermore, there was some mythological—even political—significance to the eagle as a symbol of power.

In On Wings of Blue, a booklet of Ateneo traditions, songs, and cheers published in the 1950’s, Lamberto Avellana writes:

“The Eagle—fiery, majestic, whose kingdom is the virgin sky, is swift in pursuit, terrible in battle. He is a king—a fighting king… And thus he was chosen—to soar with scholar’s thought and word high into the regions of truth and excellence, to flap his glorious wings and cast his ominous shadow below, even as the student crusader would instill fear in those who would battle against the Cross. And so he was chosen—to fly with the fleet limbs of the cinder pacer, to swoop down with the Blue gladiator into the arena of sporting combat and with him to fight—and keep on fighting till brilliant victory, or honorable defeat. And so he was chosen—to perch on the Shield of Loyola, to be the symbol of all things honorable, even as the Great Eagle is perched on the American escutcheon, to be the guardian of liberty. And so he was chosen—and he lives, not only in body to soar over his campus aerie, but in spirit, in the Ateneo Spirit… For he flies high, and he is a fighter, and he is King!”

The eagle also appears in the standards of many organizations, schools, and nations as a guardian of freedom and truth. It is also worthwhile to note that the national bird of the Philippines is an eagle as well.

Dante in his Divine Comedy uses the Eagle as a clear symbol of the Roman Empire, which used the bird as part of its standard. The Romans considered the eagle sacred to Jupiter himself. To this day, the eagle is often seen as the bird of God, the only bird that could fly above the clouds and stare directly at the sun. In fact, the eagle represents St. John, the Evangelist, in honor of the soaring spirit and penetrating vision of his gospel.

riou
07-23-2010, 08:46 AM
Letran Knighthood
http://www.letran.edu/images/new/knight.jpg
The Letranite is personified by the Knight who goes through rigid tests from being a Page to a Squire when his heart and soul are many times tested for purity before he qualifies for the most trying challenge and then granted knighthood. As a Knight, he carries the shield and the lance to protect not his body but his ideals as he fights for them with a pure heart.



Logo

http://www.letran.edu/images/logo/maltese_cross.jpg

http://www.letran.edu/images/logo/letran_seal.jpg

http://www.letran.edu/images/logo/letran_new_full_thumb.jpg

The Colegio’s seal bears the Maltese cross dating back between 1696 and 1716. The Maltese cross is the eight-point cross of Amalfi, a town in Italy whose merchants founded a hostel for the pilgrims of Jerusalem. The group became the Knights of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, who transferred in Malta in 1530 and was allowed to stay in condition that they swear allegiance to Emperor Charles V of Spain. They became known as the knights of Malta from then on because of their pious works they earned for themselves a place of honor within the church. Undoubtedly, Don Geronimo Guerrero, one of the founding fathers of Letran was a Knight of Malta.

The silver cross on a blue and red field encircled by the wreath of green laurel represents the pattern of perfection of which all minds that come to Letran are molded. Its silver bespeaks of the purity which must be attained. The blue and red field indicates Letran, the battleground where the vile things are fought against the daunted and where ultimately the consummate ideal of the cross is accomplished. For that ultimate triumph, there is the wreath of green, ever fresh for every victory.


Maltese Cross
The College seal of a Maltese Cross bearing the inscription of “Collegial de Letran” dates between the 1696 and 1716. This seal is derived from the “Lateran” and Knights of Malta traditions.

Coat of arms

At the top center of the shield is the knight, the title and the name of all members of the Letran community most especially the students must be known. At the left side of the figure is the spear and at the right side is the torch, symbolizing truth and courage every Knight must have in pursuit of quality integral formation. The shield itself contains the Dominican’s cross colored black and white, signifying that Letran is a Dominican institution. At the center is the Letran seal of a silver cross on a blue and red field enriched by the green wreath laurel. On it, hangs the Colegio’s motto, summarizing the core values of love of God, country, and Letran.

Blue and Red Colors

http://www.letran.edu/images/logo/blue_red.jpg

Blue stands for loyalty and justice. It is the loyalty and justice of the blue-blooded, a loyalty of noblest form and a strong sense of justice which grasps fully well the order of waves. Red is for consummate bravery... that firmness of heart, that staunchness of will, that openness of mind. It stands for the firmness of a martyr who welcomes the heathen's sword across his neck and a hero who saves countless lives at the price of his precious own.

The colors of Letran are blue and red, not red and blue... needs must stay before red... for consummate bravery asks of consummate cause. The martyr marches firmly towards the scaffold only in complete faithfulness to his creed, and the hero offers his whole life only if such whole offertory does justice to a sublime cause... bravery simply for the exquisiteness of spilled blood, which ends in supreme sacrifice for a trivial or for no account, this is not Letran's.

Basilica St. John Lateran

http://www.letran.edu/images/logo/stjohnbasilica.jpg

November 9 marks the feast of the dedication of the Basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome.
The Basilica is considered as the mother church of Christendom. This feast was originally observed only in Rome. When the emperor Constantine donated the Laterani Palace to the Pope, the Palace was dedicated to our Lord.
The Palace was owned by the Laterani, a Roman noble family who revolted against Nero in 53-54 A.D. The Emperor Constantine stayed there when he visited Rome in 315 A.D. During the Crusades, the Pope renamed the church after the Benedictine Monastery of St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist (which were situated on both sides of the Palace), but retained the Laterani appellation. Thus, it is the present name of Basilica of St. John Lateran.

During the dark days of the Church, the Papal elections were conducted at the Basilica, from the 12th century onwards. The feast of the Lateran Basilica was observed throughout the Roman Catholic as a sign of devotion to and of unity with the Chair of Peter.

The Dominican spirit of upholding church unity and orthodoxy in faith is clearly manifested when the founding father named the first boy’s school in the country after the mother Church of Christendom: Colegio de San Juan de Letran.