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gameface_one
12-14-2008, 09:59 PM
POC awaits Laos nod for hoops
By Joaquin Henson Updated December 14, 2008 12:00 AM
Philstar.com


It’s a certainty that basketball will be included in the Southeast Asian (SEA) Games calendar in Laos next year but POC official Go Teng Kok said yesterday he’ll only rest easy when the organizing committee, led by deputy prime minister Somsavat Lengsavad, confirms it in writing.

Go said he is now awaiting word from the committee to fly to Laos anytime this week and meet with other country representatives before finalizing the schedule.

“There is an agreement in principle that basketball will be included in the schedule,” said Go. “The deadline to finalize the events was last Dec. 8 or a year before the start of the next SEA Games. We came to an agreement a week before the deadline. Mr. Lengsavad is now in China so we are waiting for his availability to meet.”

Since April, three meetings were held in protracted negotiations to firm up the SEA Games events. The initial count was 22 sports but archery, cycling, basketball and wrestling were later added to bring up the total to 26 broken down into 388 medal events.

SBP executive director Noli Eala drafted a multi-party memorandum of agreement, which Go sent to Lengsavad three weeks ago to confirm basketball’s inclusion. Go said he foresees no problem in sealing the deal with the signing of the memorandum.

The memorandum stipulates the responsibilities of the Laos Basketball Federation, the Basketball Association of Thailand, SBP and FIBA-Asia in organizing the competition.

“FIBA-Asia will supervise the tournament with Thailand and Laos underwriting the expenses,” said Eala. “Thailand and the SBP will conduct clinics for the Laotian national team. And the SBP will hold seminars for referees and table officials, providing technical support through the POC. Basketball is considered a developmental sport in Laos and the SBP will do its share in charting a course for its future.”

Lobbying for basketball was Go’s assignment from POC president Jose Cojuangco Jr., and it was an uphill battle starting the first committee meeting last April.

“In the beginning, the organizing committee ruled out basketball because there was no venue,” said Go. “So I proposed for the Philippines to bring over the wooden floor which would cost about P3 Million.”

In the second meeting last August, Go continued to press for basketball but couldn’t get a clear nod from the group of 11 nations.

Finally, in October, Go committed for the Philippines to donate the hardcourt with Thailand sharing in the expenses to run the tournament. But before the committee could act on the proposal, Go said he was surprised to find out a multi-purpose stadium was under construction in Laos with the Chinese builders confirming suitability for basketball, volleyball and badminton. The arena will be finished before the coming SEA Games.

Go found out the Chinese government pledged a $79 Million budget for the stadium in exchange for 1,000 hectares of prime Laotian property where a Chinatown will rise.

Go said Philippine ambassador Elizabeth Buensuceso joined in the lobby effort to convince Lengsavad to include basketball in the SEA Games calendar.

“Ambassador Buensuceso went out of her way to help us even if she was already preparing to leave for her next posting in Norway,” continued Go. “She met with Mr. Lengsavad, who is her personal friend, and made the appeal for basketball. Mr. Lengsavad assured her of his support on condition the inclusion would not violate the SEA Games charter.”

Under the SEA Games charter, the approval for a sport to be included in the calendar must be confirmed a year before the first day of competition.

Go mentioned that FIBA-Asia secretary-general Dato Yeoh Choo Hock of Malaysia was requested by FIBA-Asia board member Suthep Banjobhoki of Thailand to supervise the tournament.

Basketball was not played in the SEA Games when the Philippines hosted in 2005 because of the FIBA suspension. But in 14 of the 15 SEA Games where basketball was scheduled, the Philippines won the gold medal with only Malaysia preventing a sweep in 1989.

amdgc82
01-26-2009, 06:55 PM
http://www.bernama.com.my/bernama/v3/news_sports.php?id=386045

January 26, 2009 13:59 PM
SEABA Willing To Help Laos

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 26 (Bernama) -- The South East Asian Basketball Association (SEABA) is willing to help Laos if the SEA Games Federation (SGF) decides to include basketball at the Vientiane SEA Games.

Malaysian Basketball Association (MABA) deputy general secretary Sim Sin Heng said the commitment was given by representatives from six SEABA member countries who met here last week.

"But first the SEABA members must ask their respective Olympic Council to appeal to SGF* for the inclusion of basketball in Vientiane."

He said MABA would send an official letter to the Malaysian Olympic Council (MOM) appealing against the SGF decision to drop basketball citing lack of facilities.

Sim said the SEABA meeting had been told that Laos has a basketball court in a newly built stadium.

"SEABA members are committed in helping Laos in the technical aspect provided basketball is included at Vientiane."

Malaysia's women's team won the basketball gold while the men's returned with bronze from the Korat SEA Games in Thailand two years ago.

The Vientiane SEA Games from Dec 9-18 will involve 390 events in 26 sports.

They are athletics, archery, swimming, badminton, billiard & snooker, boxing, cycling, football, golf, judo, karate, sepak takraw, shooting, soft tennis, ping pong, taekwondo, tennis, volleyball, wrestling, weight lifting,* wushu, muay thai, petanque, silat, fin swimming and shuttlecock balancing.

-- BERNAMA

CrossOver
01-26-2009, 11:05 PM
*edited*

(sorry wrong thread)

amdgc82
01-28-2009, 06:01 AM
http://www.gmanews.tv/story/146198/Laos-turns-down-SEA-Games-basketball--again

Laos turns down SEA Games basketball – again
01/28/2009 | 01:10 AM

MANILA, Philippines – A high-ranking official of the Laos government has rejected the inclusion of basketball from the Southeast Asian Games, a development that would likely stun local basketball stakeholders who were assured a cage tournament would take place in the biennial games.

But Go Teng Kok, the head of the sports and rules committee of the Philippine Olympic Committee, said he would talk to Laos Deputy Prime Minister Somsavat Lengsavad to clear the matter.

Somsavat, who is also the chairman of the Laos SEA Game Organizing Committee, presided over a SEAG Federation summit over the weekend and announced there that basketball would be scrapped from the roster of sports. Go was not present during the meeting.

Since it was awarded the hosting duties for the SEA Games, Laos was never keen on playing hoops, citing the absence of facilities to hold a tournament.

The Philippines, the event’s men’s defending champion, and Thailand have previously pledged to support the holding of a cage event, and even vowed to assist in any logistical requirements. Fiba-Asia has also promised to back any efforts along the line.

The POC, Go said, would ask Laos to reconsider its latest decision.

The Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas, the country's basketball federation, has yet to comment on the matter. – GMANews.TV

amdgc82
01-28-2009, 06:04 AM
http://sports.inquirer.net/inquirersports/inquirersports/view/20090128-185975/Basketball-stricken-off-SEAG-listagain

Basketball stricken off SEAG list–again
By June Navarro
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:40:00 01/28/2009

MANILA, Philippines—Basketball remains in limbo as far as inclusion in the Laos Southeast Asian Games is concerned.

The country’s favorite sport was again stricken off the list of disciplines to be played in the biennial meet after the Laos SEAG Organizing Committee thumbed it down for a couple of rational reasons.

Go Teng Kok, who represented the Philippine Olympic Committee during the SEAG Federation meeting in Laos over the weekend, said the lack of a proper venue and monetary constraints forced the host country to cancel basketball in the Dec. 13-21 multi-sport event.

Go pointed out that Laos deputy minister Somsavat Lengsavad, head of the SEAG Organizing Committee, moved that basketball be removed since Laos has no national federation for the sport, which will take care of holding the competitions.

“He (Lengsavad) was misinformed,” said Go. “We already had an earlier agreement that the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand and FIBA-Asia would address the various concerns and bankroll the competitions.”

The Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas has offered to spruce up a venue in Laos where basketball can be held, FIBA-Asia has proposed to take care of the technical side while Malaysia and Thailand have said they will infuse capital and other necessities for basketball to push through.

amdgc82
01-28-2009, 08:43 AM
No hoops in Laos, but Philippine sports officials are not giving up * * * *
Written by Reuben Terrado / Reporter* * *
Wednesday, 28 January 2009 01:00*
www.businessmirror.com.ph

LAOS has excluded basketball—men and women—on the 25th Southeast Asian (SEA) Games program.

And the way it looks, it is official.

But Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) officials will again try to convince the hosts to include the sport closest to the heart of Filipinos.

And to do that would mean vigorous campaigns and lobbying, including seeking the help of Antonio Cabangon Chua, the country’s former ambassador to the land-locked country.

Cabangon Chua, according to Go Teng Kok, the POC sports and rules committee head, has developed a deep relationship with Laotian government officials during his tenure as ambassador.

The head of the Laos SEA Games Organizing Committee, Laos Deputy Prime Minister Somsavat Lengsavad, is believed to be a good friend of Cabangon Chua, according to Go.

Go had initially tried to appeal basketball’s inclusion when the SEA Games Federation Council met over the weekend, but Lengsavad failed to attend the meeting because he had a previous engagement with the Thai prime minister who was visiting the country.

The POC, Go said, would write Cabangon Chua very soon to explain the predicament and seek his help.

Go said that ironically, even the Laos Olympic Committee, just like the 10 other SEA Games members, is agreeable to the inclusion of basketball. “But the decision fell on the deputy prime minister’s lap,” he said.

Go said the hosts could have dropped basketball because they don’t play the game and they don’t have the facility to host the sport.

“The officers of the Laos basketball federation are still new. But we have already told them that we are willing to help with the technical requirements,” said Go, who was with wushu head Julian Camacho in the meeting.

“We remain hopeful that basketball will be included because it was agreed upon by all member-nations about the inclusion of basketball,” said Go.

Ever since basketball—particularly in the men’s division—was included in the SEA Games program in 1977, the Philippines has captured the gold each time except in 1989. In 2005 basketball was not on the calendar when the country hosted the Games because of the Fiba suspension on the Philippines.

Soft tennis was also excluded from the program, Go said.

Archery, weighlifting and cycling have officially been included bringing the number of sports to 25. The other sports are athletics, swimming, badminton, billiard and snooker, boxing, football, golf, judo, karate, sepak takraw, shooting, table tennis, taekwondo, tennis, volleyball, wrestling, wushu, muay thai, petanque, pencak silat, fin swimming and shuttlecock.

amdgc82
02-06-2009, 09:26 AM
http://sports.inquirer.net/inquirersports/inquirersports/view/20090206-187736/Fretting-about-no-hoops-in-Laos

ONE GAME AT A TIME
Fretting about no hoops in Laos?
By Sev Sarmenta
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 07:15:00 02/06/2009

OF ALL THE games and the medals to be won in an international sports meet, we always worry about the basketball competition.

To those unaccustomed to it, this just might be an odd view of sport priorities. Two golds are at stake in basketball, one each in the men’s and women’s tournaments. If you win both, the victories are counted as just two gold medals.

While other countries are concerned about medal-rich sports like athletics, martial arts disciplines like boxing, taekwondo and karate, as well as shooting and swimming, we are worried if there will be basketball at all—like in the Laos Southeast Asian Games this year.

The latest report is that Laos cannot accommodate basketball because of logistical and organizational problems.

There was an offer to hold the tournament outside Laos but that would not really sit well with the first-time hosts.

The more interesting proposal was to build a basketball arena ASAP. But even that never really took off.

The organizers wouldn’t dare cancel football despite its bigger logistical needs. The game is just too popular in the region and not having it in the SEA Games would be a big letdown to those who follow the game passionately.

* * *

If you find our basketball passion odd, then you don’t know how much this country cares about the game.

This is the sport many of us grew up on, cheered for in school, played in company or industry leagues and continue to play in weekend groups or in alumni tournaments, like those of Xavier School, Ateneo de Manila University and De La Salle University, even if our legs can no longer obey what the brain wants to do.

We even have a fully dedicated basketball cable channel that could be the only one of its kind in the world outside of NBA TV.

The channel exists because there are those who can’t get enough of the game.

* * *

Our concern over SEA Games basketball stems from three streams.

One is from a television perspective that worries that the absence of basketball will not attract viewers to watch the games at all.

The second view is that a SEA Games campaign will not be able to attract support if there’s no basketball gold to compete for.

Lastly, how can we check if we are still the best in the region if basketball is not played?

* * *

Maybe, despite our love for the sport, we should get real and accept that there may be times that a basketball competition will not take place in the SEA Games.

There’s nothing wrong about reaffirming our basketball superiority in the region every two years, but if hoops is the only sport we appreciate and support, then we need to evaluate our view of Philippine sports.

If it does finally happen, the absence of basketball unavoidably shifts attention to the strengths and weaknesses of the other sports.

Then so be it. Let’s take a long hard look and check if we are still ahead of our neighbors in disciplines we used to dominate or if we have really lagged so far behind.

D_I_A
02-20-2009, 12:47 AM
Basketball won’t make calendar
Manila Standard Today
By Ronnie Nathanielsz
2/19/2009

THE chances of basketball being included in the forthcoming Southeast Asian Games in Laos is almost nil.

That’s the word from the general director of the Laos National Olympic Committee Southanom Inthavong, who informed Philippine Olympic Committee spokesman Joey Romasanta of the developments during a regional forum of the Olympic Council of Asia in Singapore.

“While the door isn’t entirely closed, like soft tennis, the chances of basketball being included are almost nil,” Romasanta told www.insidesports.ph, Standard Today and Viva Sports.

Romasanta indicated that the problem was really logistical, because of the large number of players and officials in a basketball team and the lack of accommodations in Laos.

Special assistant and president of the Philippine Amateur Track and Field Association Go Teng Kok has been shuttling back and forth to Laos in an effort to have basketball included, but indications are it won’t.

This will almost certainly deprive the Philippines of a gold medal.

Meantime, Fiba Asia secretary-general Dato Yeoh of Malaysia told www.insidesports.ph, Standard Today and Viva Sports in an overseas telephone conversation that Indonesia was supposed to inform them about the date for the Southeast Asia Basketball Association Championships, which will serve as a qualifier for the Fiba Asia Men’s Basketball Championships in Tianjin, China, from Aug. 6 to 19.

He said Jakarta was also hosting the Fiba Asia Champions Cup from May 12 to 20 but hadn’t informed Fiba Asia of the dates for the Seaba tournament.

Schortsanitis
02-20-2009, 06:00 PM
I wonder why the heck would Cambodia insist in hosting the SEAG when it can't even host some major sports competitions? Its crazy. They just crawl back to whatever hole they crawled out from, and come out only when they have the capability to host most, if not all of the major sports in the SEAG.

As for the Cambodian National Basketball team, goodness, 'kaht San Beda Red Cubs ata kayang talunin ang mga iyon.' A team of 5'8" players.

digitalsuperman
02-20-2009, 08:58 PM
hey..thats not good.. i think we should be thankfull enough that cambodia has done something to host such event. cambodia is a poor country and i think its a good way for them to expose their country to other asean games.
and don't pick on their basketball team.even if they are small(but i think filipinos and cambodians are of the same height in general), at least they have a team..

JonarSabilano
02-20-2009, 09:09 PM
I wonder why the heck would Cambodia insist in hosting the SEAG when it can't even host some major sports competitions?* Its crazy.* They just crawl back to whatever hole they crawled out from, and come out only when they have the capability to host most, if not all of the major sports in the SEAG.

As for the Cambodian National Basketball team, goodness, 'kaht San Beda Red Cubs ata kayang talunin ang mga iyon.'* A team of 5'8" players.


I was particularly impressed by Cambodia's 5'10" shooting guard Souphain Toun. He scored around 25++ points against Gabe Norwood in 2007, two of which came from a turnaround, fadeaway jumper with Norwood's hand in his face. Turns out that "Soap" was a former D-2 standout. There's also this 6'5" half-Cambodian playing in the Asian leagues in California last year. Forgot the name, though. I'm quite sure there are more players out there but have not been exposed due to other priorities, like rebuilding a country from scratch.

Schortsanitis
02-20-2009, 10:29 PM
Guys, what pis_es me off about Cambodia, is not that they are poor, but because it seems they are intent to remove basketball from this version of the SEAG, for some reason.

Thailand was PLEADING for those bunch of midgets to allow Basketball to be reinstated in the coming SEAG, even offering venues near their border with Cambodia to hold the damn games.

But despite such offers of assistance, the basta_ds refused them outright, and insisted on their way. Hence, there will be no basketball in the coming SEAG.

Nothing is sadder, or more contemptuous than seeing a poor country like Cambodia act arrogantly trying to go their way at the cost of the sport of basketball.

That's why I'm saying, 'ipadala ang SBC Red Cubs laban sa mga iyan. Papartidahan ko pa ng plus 5 points ang mga iyan.'

JonarSabilano
02-20-2009, 11:01 PM
Guys, what pis_es me off about Cambodia, is not that they are poor, but because it seems they are intent to remove basketball from this version of the SEAG, for some reason.*

Thailand was PLEADING for those bunch of midgets to allow Basketball to be reinstated in the coming SEAG, even offering venues near their border with Cambodia to hold the damn games.*

But despite such offers of assistance, the basta_ds refused them outright, and insisted on their way.* Hence, there will be no basketball in the coming SEAG.

Nothing is sadder, or more contemptuous than seeing a poor country like Cambodia act arrogantly trying to go their way at the cost of the sport of basketball.

That's why I'm saying, 'ipadala ang SBC Red Cubs laban sa mga iyan.* Papartidahan ko pa ng plus 5 points ang mga iyan.'


Wait. I think you're barking up the wrong tree. Cambodia is not the host of the SEA Games this year. It's Laos. Laos doesn't even have a basketball federation nor a basketball team of its own.

Schortsanitis
02-21-2009, 07:02 PM
Okay, sorry I got the wrong country, but the circumstances are the same.

kangkong2000
02-22-2009, 09:08 AM
The Laotians prefer to play football instead of basketball. That's the reason why the basketball tournaments in SEA Games will be scrapped-off. ;D

JonarSabilano
02-23-2009, 09:34 AM
Okay, sorry I got the wrong country, but the circumstances are the same.


I'm willing to cut Laos some slack here. This is a war-torn country that has yet to recover from the Indochinese wars and years of backward leadership. It was not only basketball that was cut from the calendar; I think this year's SEA Games will be the smallest in recent memory, in terms of events to be staged. A lot of sports do not have NSAs in Laos. Unfortunately, basketball is one of them.

In a few years, when Laos has finally recovered, perhaps they would have both an NSA and a team in the game we love most. But for now, we better look for other tournaments for the RP development pool.

pachador
02-23-2009, 12:51 PM
cambodians can be pretty good. they are concentrated in cities like long beach where there are also big filipino populations. it turns out that because a lot of them look like filipinos, they hang out with filipinos too and so they develop a love for basketball specially filipino-style balling.* they get hot tempered when you shut their game down and call you for the flimsiest of excuses just so they get back the ball just like some of my countrymen* *;)* * *. hehe






I wonder why the heck would Cambodia insist in hosting the SEAG when it can't even host some major sports competitions?* Its crazy.* They just crawl back to whatever hole they crawled out from, and come out only when they have the capability to host most, if not all of the major sports in the SEAG.

As for the Cambodian National Basketball team, goodness, 'kaht San Beda Red Cubs ata kayang talunin ang mga iyon.'* A team of 5'8" players.


I was particularly impressed by Cambodia's 5'10" shooting guard Souphain Toun. He scored around 25++ points against Gabe Norwood in 2007, two of which came from a turnaround, fadeaway jumper with Norwood's hand in his face. Turns out that "Soap" was a former D-2 standout. There's also this 6'5" half-Cambodian playing in the Asian leagues in California last year. Forgot the name, though. I'm quite sure there are more players out there but have not been exposed due to other priorities, like rebuilding a country from scratch.

animo
02-23-2009, 01:55 PM
i wonder who decided to award the SEAG hosting to Laos?
Why award it to a country who in the first place don't have the logistics to carry the task?

JonarSabilano
02-23-2009, 01:59 PM
i wonder who decided to award the SEAG hosting to Laos?*
Why award it to a country who in the first place don't have the logistics to carry the task?


I think the SEAG Federation does it on a rotating basis.

D_I_A
02-24-2009, 11:30 PM
GTK pleas for caging in Laos
Malaya
2/25/2009

GO Teng Kok flew to Laos yesterday to seek an audience with Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Dr. Thongloun Sisoulith and lobby for the inclusion of basketball in the 25th Southeast Asian Games.

The meeting was arranged by former Laos and Cambodian Ambassador Antonio Cabangon-Chua.

"We used all our options and clout to make sure that basketball will be included in the SEA Games," said Go, RP’s representative in the SEAG Sports and Rules Committee and special assistant to Philippine Olympic Committee president Jose Cojuangco, Jr.

Go travelled to Laos alone but expressed optimism the host will reconsider its decision to exclude basketball.

Last month, the SEAG Organizing Committee announced the sports calendared in the Laos meet scheduled December 9-18, with basketball not included despite endorsement of all 10-member countries.

The organizers cited previous concerns, such as lack of venue and technical people to hold a basketball event.

The Philippines is the defending champion in basketball, winning it for the sixth straight time in the 2007 SEA Games in Thailand.

The sports already approved in the biennial tournament are athletics, aquatics, shuttlecock, taekwondo, karate, boxing, fin swimming, judo, pencak silat, muay, wushu, billiards and snookers, wrestling, petanque, sepak takraw, table tennis, lawn tennis, badminton, golf, beach volleyball, indoor volleyball, football, shooting, archery, cycling and weightlifting.