PDA

View Full Version : San Beda College Cheers and Drumbeats



AnthonyServinio
07-01-2006, 12:24 PM
Our "Indian Yell" will always count as the favorite NCAA cheer not just by Bedans but it has earned the liking of non-Bedans as well.

Aside from the "Indian Yell" which I like for obvious reasons, my other favorite cheers are . . .

. . . Pogi Kami, Pangit Kayo Cheer and the classic . . .

. . . Iskwater Cheer!* *:D

toti_mendiola
07-03-2006, 02:57 PM
excerpts from The Lion and The Indian by Mr. Ramon Jose

Ah Ya Akalma
The Cuerba brothers, both Bedans, composed the yell in 1947 after the liberation from the Japanese empire. The Indian Yell was solely performed on drums accompanied by cheers from the students. However, but this made the cheer boring and they needed something to rejuvinate the audience.
And so, they changed the sound of the yell. They adapted a tune from a famous television commercial back then. With this modification, the “dull” Indian Yell became lively and full of spirit.

Screaming Indians
The Indians first appeared on the hard court after the postwar era, in 1947 to be exact. It was primarily for the purpose of entertaining and boosting the Bedan audience. Mon Ventosa, more popularly known as “Tito Mon,” has been recruiting little Indians since that year. However, this training stint stopped in the year 1962.
However, in 1993, then athletics moderator Fr. Paul de Vera needed Tito Mon for his fathomless guidance and support for the recruitment of the Indians. For the love of San Beda, he accepted the task with no hesitation. However, the job given to him was no walk in the park. Tito Mon had a hard time starting from scratch because only few Bedans knew the yell. In addition, the cheerleaders and the Indians at that time lack self-discipline and enthusiasm. There were only three Indians in 1947: Gabriel Gasar and the Casal brothers.
Slowly, the recruitment process changed when Bedans got into the cheering craze. The participation from the grade school pupils rose because many wanted to be part of the prestigious set of Bedan Indians. Even the skinny ones wanted to be an Indian, but Tito Mon declined their application for he wanted the Indians to be stout and adorable. With this, Tito Mon had a carefree time selecting from the huge pool of aspirants.
From three Indians since 1947, the membership rose to eight in the 90’s. he required the little Indians to have at least one training every week before the opening of the NCAA.
However, the San Beda College Cheerleading Squad has a different story to tell. They have to undergo a more rigorous training compared to the Indians. They have to practice three times a week during the summer, memorize the steps of the cheers and learn them by heart. As in the yells, no one knows what “Halamahinika Bikitira” means, but everyone shouts it with pride. Who cares what it means? As long as it serves its purpose, it is here to stay. Aya Akalma Beda Poly Wara!

Jaco D
07-03-2006, 05:15 PM
From three Indians since 1947, the membership rose to eight in the 90’s.

Walo lang?* Wasn't it more than that, at least that's what I remember from the last Ateneo-Beda finals before Ateneo left the NCAA during the mid/late 70s?

razor
07-07-2006, 02:49 PM
The Indian Yell (MP3 download):

http://www.4shared.com/file/2333133/dc10e1d0/san_beda_high_school_glee_club_-_indian_yell.html

(Since this version was studio recorded , it is not as impressive as hearing it live in a jampacked coleseum)*

SIMBA
07-11-2006, 10:56 PM
of course Indian Yell. bdw, during the csb game, i kinda heard them played a drumbeat resemblance of our Indian Yell's "introduction/opening tune".

Our Lion Roar cheer is getting common in all NCAA/UAAP schools..... Woooooh ohhhh wohhhh Go San Beda Fight.

RedKfir
07-12-2006, 08:01 AM
The "Indian Yell" of San Beda counts as one of my favorites. Ganda talaga ng dating. Can our Bedan friends share with us a background of this cheer?



According to some Bedan elders of mine, the tune for the "Indian Yell" came from a radio commercial after World War II. Bedans started chanting the "Indian Yell" not during an NCAA game but during a Boy Scout camping and the lyrics were written by one of our former scout masters whose name escaped me. The yell soon caught up the entire Bedan community and it was adopted for the NCAA. This yell is being chanted to call up the warrior spirit of Bedans during games and other competitions. For easier access on the "Indian Yell", you can look up this link: http://www.bandafest.com/performers/san_beda.htm

Aside from the "Indian Yell", the best cheer for me is UP's "Unibersidad" cheer for obvious reasons.

paralusi
07-14-2006, 10:45 AM
razor's link allowed me to hear beda's indian yell for the first time. galing.

it's also quite refreshing to know that not all the school cheers out there are ripoffs.

danny
07-15-2006, 04:58 AM
The Indian Yell!

Let me share a write-up found on Wikipedia, based on the 1st Propaganda issue of Abbey Monty, which the Bedan hardcores distributed before the NCAA opening.

-----------------------

INDIAN YELL

The Cuerba brothers, both Bedans, composed the yell in 1947 after the liberation from the Japanese empire. The Indian Yell was initially solely performed on drums accompanied by cheers from the students. However, but this made the cheer lacking in power and they needed something to rejuvinate the audience. And so, they changed the sound of the yell and incorporated a horn section. With this modification, the “dull” Indian Yell became lively and full of spirit.

The Indian Yell is San Beda's romanticized version of the Indian war whoop. It mimics the native Indian war chants and vocalization techniques designed to intimidate the opponent together with the accompanying hand gestures. North American Indian war chants are simply verbalization of tunes that implore the great spirits to help them in battle.

The Indian war whoop also gave rise to various derivative chants most especially the Lion's Roar. The Lion’s roar, with the simple OOOOhhhhhhh, also mimics primitive chants of Native Indians.

The Native Indians symbolize courage and defiance. This is also true with the ancient Scottish warriors and their Red Lion Rampant. From the Old World Bedans adopted the Red Lion while from the New World they adopted the Native Americans. Both are Red and both are symbols of Courage.

The ingredients were actually ripe for an Indian inspired theme to gain popularity and acceptance among Bedans. San Beda College has one of the most prestigious Scouting movements in the country.

Worldwide Scouting and the infatuation with North American Indian cultures grew hand in hand. Indians became one of the major "lure" to recruit boys into the movement. Combining this boyhood infatuation and reinforced by the popularity of “Cowboys and Indian” movies led to the blossoming of an Indian inspired theme in San Beda.


LITTLE INDIANS

To accompany the Indian Yell, the Little Indians were conceptualized by Mon Ventoza (. GS '46, HS '51). Mon Ventosa is the longest serving moderator / instructor of the San Beda College Cheering Association. A cheerleader himself during his student days in San Beda College, Mon was appointed as instructor of the College's Cheering Squad (1952 - 1962). He came up with idea to counter the gaining popularity of the dance number of Jose Rizal College.

There were only three Indians in 1947: Gabriel Gasar and the Casal brothers, one of which became a Benedictine monk. Slowly , the recruitment process changed and participation from the grade school pupils rose because many wanted to become Little Indians. Tito Mon wanted the Indians to be stout and adorable. From three Indians since 1947, the membership rose to eight in the 90’s.

-----------------

The Indian Yell again!

http://www.bandafest.com/performers.htm

razor
07-29-2006, 02:05 PM
Indian yell video complete with Little Indians:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pR9yETsRbCk

oca
07-29-2006, 03:51 PM
That Indian Yell at half time of the San Beda-Letran first round game was the best rendition I heard in a long, long, long time.

But this still pales in comparison to when I first heard it way back in the late 70's when I was in grade school, then at the peak of the NC' Wars. All boys pa ang San Beda noon. With the entry of the ladies to the Bedan community, tumaas yung timbre ng boses, hence, it is not as intimidating as it was then.

But it is no denying, at its best rendition and setting aside the now common letter cheers, this is the best cheer in any league.

brian
07-29-2006, 10:21 PM
oca,

pare agree ako dyan, tumaas balahibo ko nung napanood ko ang rendition nung sbc-letran game, considering sa tv lang ako nanood..

yes it reminded me of the 70's ncaa (grde school din ako nun)...pangarap ko magin little indian nun grade school, tas kinukulit ko ang tatay ko ha ha!..

nag-aral ako ng san beda nung grades 1 and 2, my dad's an alumnus though....lumipat lang ako dahil sa riot at bombahan sa mendiola at the time....

i was even sitted atop one of the benches waiting for my "sundo" when i saw this big explosion caused by a molotov bomb right before my eyes..

those were the days ika nga....

lekiboy
07-29-2006, 11:00 PM
That Indian Yell at half time of the San Beda-Letran first round game was the best rendition I heard in a long, long, long time.

But this still pales in comparison to when I first heard it way back in the late 70's when I was in grade school, then at the peak of the NC' Wars. All boys pa ang San Beda noon. With the entry of the ladies to the Bedan community, tumaas yung timbre ng boses, hence, it is not as intimidating as it was then.

But it is no denying, at its best rendition and setting aside the now common letter cheers, this is the best cheer in any league.


Oca,
I was in the game last FRI together with an army of GS and HS alumni. Honestly, we were also discussing the "timbre" and we really did not notice the change, compared when we were still exclusive....The "childhood" was also not audible. :) hahaha

As for the Unibersidad cheer, my apologies as I cannot recall. I have not attended a single UAAP game. I always go back to San Beda and watch the games with my batchmates....manalo, matalo. As for the pther song, I just remember the first line - "UP naming mahal....lalalalala????

It was the first time that I brought wife in a jampacked Indian Yell. She said that it was like in the World Cup -that the timbre was too low to notice that there are ladies singing it. Well, time will tell. Our Bedan sisters will eventually mix with us and 5 years for now, we can have them cheering beside us. They can always do the Indian scream intro. - yun lang ang mataas an timbre.
Lekiboy

danny
09-10-2006, 02:29 AM
Isa sa mga favorito ng Bedista.

A 1950's cheer. (yung mga oldies enjoy na enjoy i-cheer ito na may kasmang "hand gesture" ;D nung araw.)

Stand on the Grandstand

Stand on the grandstand
Beat on the tin can
Who can, we can, nobody else can

Animo San Beda!!
Beat <opponent’s name>! (3x)

Ahhhhhhhhh Fight!
Fight Team Fight!

danny
10-05-2006, 02:41 AM
One retarded innovation that is killing tradition is the playing of the RECORDED alma mater hymn by some schools. No CD can replace an authentic school spirit. Never. You can try to manufacture the illusion but still its just a bubble that will easily pop.

This is the Bedan Hymn by Sen. Raul Roco. Long and complicated but every Bedan knows it by heart. Promise. :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnpnQsGv0ts

Our face painting tradition? That's from the Sioux Nation as well.

danny
10-28-2006, 03:01 AM
Is the RED WAVE considered a non-official Bedan cheer?

Kasi may kasama naman itong mahabang "WOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!"

The Red Wave.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=zXGWe_LLURM

danny
11-03-2006, 04:55 AM
Likewise, as Bedan verbal tradition goes, when we Bedans cheer "Animo San Beda!" we actually mean"Courage San Beda!" or "Have Courage San Beda!".*

Since the beginning of time ;D, we have remained faithful to this meaning* which is consistent with an underlying Bedan theme, COURAGE. Of course the* word "animo" when cheered also means cheer up!, chin up!, come on!. But we prefer courage and have courage to have consistency.

The Red banner, the Red Lion, the North American Indian, the Bedan Hymn and many other Bedan tradition speak of courage.


á·ni·mo
m.
1. - spirit
2. (energía) - energy, vitality
¡ánimo! - courage!
caerse los ánimos - to lose heart
dar ánimo a - to encourage
estar ánimos para (tener ánimos para) - to be in the mood to
http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/entry?lb=e&p=num%3As1510

Ánimo (Spanish m.) soul, mind, courage, intention
¡ánimo!, 'come on!, 'cheer up!'
http://www.dolmetsch.com/defsa7.htm

*ánimo* _m._ courage, spirit
http://www.mi-direccion.com/contigo-pan-y-cebolla/pan-y-cebolla-24.html

II excl ¡ánimo!, cheer up!
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=animo

This is the way we use "Animo San Beda!" This is where we think we have differentiated ourselves from the rest.

Animo used as a word of encouragement, in the context of cheering someone up.

Sometimes it is usefull to look for the definition of the words directly in its original languaje instead of a translation. Here are links similar to our usage:

We use ¡animo! to give courage. To encourage you to continue doing what you were doing.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2932

"Animo muchachas! Courage women!" Silvia tells her new team, slapping them on the shoulders. "We're going to win!"
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Floridian/Away_games.shtml

There were people there cheering, saying “ánimo”, which means “courage” and I went downhill seeing some runners around 200 m ahead. Then, I went on to see some ugly industrial buildings at the entrance of Carboneras, a concrete factory and an electric plant.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-253.html

ANIMO ("courage" en espagnol) est d'ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l'on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu'un s'occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm


¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim's Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

I hope the Bedan way is clear to fellow fanatics from Ateneo and La Salle. As to the rest of the "ANIMO" users, you could use magnifico, ole, andale, adelante and lots of other Spanish expressions to give a semblance of tradition.* *Bravo is taken by Baste, Viva by Mapua.. You can use Vamos if you want.

Come to think of it, we are the only school with a Spanish cheer which goes like this. Hmm ...Letran may have one too...:

El Colegio de San Beda Tiene que ganar! (Spanish Cheer)

El Colegio de San Beda
Tiene que ganar!

Animo, bravo, viva!
San Beda San Beda Arriba
Luchar, zumbar, acudir Hasta morir

Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda
Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda




Now back to our 1950's Stand on the Grandstand. Why o why? ;D

projector_king
11-20-2006, 12:08 PM
Isa sa mga favorito ng* Bedista.

A 1950's cheer. (yung mga oldies enjoy na enjoy i-cheer ito na may kasmang "hand gesture" ;D nung araw.)

Stand on the Grandstand

Stand on the grandstand
Beat on the tin can
Who can, we can, nobody else can

Animo San Beda!!
Beat <opponent’s name>! (3x)

Ahhhhhhhhh Fight!
Fight Team Fight!















http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2eLp6HpeNg
Shows us where some UAAP cheers got their inspiration from.
Pasing-tabi sa mga Atenista... medyo paborito lang talaga kayo ng mga old school Bedans. :)
Animo San Beda!

Mang_Roger
11-21-2006, 10:58 AM
After each game during the Finals in the last NCAA season, Bedans would occupy Dencio's and Rasa in Araneta Colisuem for a beer bash. The "senior" Bedans would lead the crowd in shouting all the cheers of SBC. This includes the tonque-twisting-never-before-heard cheers of SBC. One of their favorites (besides the "What do we do when we all go out, Suntukan, Bugbugan!) is the "Stand on the Grand Stand". According to one of the older Bedans (I believe he belongs to the 60's class in college), during their time, the "Stand on the Grand Stand" would spark animosity between the Bedans and their opponent. The original meaning of the last line --"Animo San Beda, Beat _________!" which is obviosuly to beat the opponent in the game of basketball has mutated into "beat the opponent into pulp" or in tagalog "bugbugin". It was banned by the school officials and anyone caught trying to incite the crowd in cheering the "Stand on the Grand Stand" would be suspended from class for a day or two.

danny
11-22-2006, 03:08 AM
After each game during the Finals in the last NCAA season, Bedans would occupy Dencio's and Rasa in Araneta Colisuem for a beer bash. The "senior" Bedans would lead the crowd in shouting all the cheers of SBC. This includes the tonque-twisting-never-before-heard cheers of SBC. One of their favorites (besides the "What do we do when we all go out, Suntukan, Bugbugan!) is the "Stand on the Grand Stand". According to one of the older Bedans (I believe he belongs to the 60's class in college), during their time, the "Stand on the Grand Stand" would spark animosity between the Bedans and their opponent. The original meaning of the last line --"Animo San Beda, Beat _________!" which is obviosuly to beat the opponent in the game of basketball has mutated into "beat the opponent into pulp" or in tagalog "bugbugin". It was banned by the school officials and anyone caught trying to incite the crowd in cheering the "Stand on the Grand Stand" would be suspended from class for a day or two.




Oh yes....hehehe...Animo San Beat! Beat __________! had a double meaning.

That is why many Bedans were amused when others started using that line without realizing it's "violent" nature in the past and the real life context of this Bedan battlecry.

Isaksak mo ba naman ang kulay PULA, ang RED LION RAMPANT ng Scotland, RED INDIANS ng Amerika, sa paaralang nakatayo sa makasaysayang MENDIOLA na puno ng dugo, pawis, at bala..... talagang "gyera" ang kalalabasan.;D

danny
01-09-2007, 04:49 AM
Wooooooohooowohhh, Go San Beda Fight!

Wooooooohooowohhh, Animo San Beda! Beat __________!*




Natawa naman ako.:P

The line from Stand on the Grandstand* ( Animo San Beda! Beat ______) was never and will never be contested as an original by any other school.

San Beda's usage of "Animo" is already clear.* When we use it to cheer, the Spanish and Latinos understand what we mean.

The only remaining issue* is the "INDIANNESS" of the* Lion's Roar.

How about we do it this way? ;D

Let us simply stick to the "Indianness"* of San Beda's Lion's Roar and the fact that in the Philippines , only San Beda has been* "playing* Indian since 1947".* Ergo those who may be using Indian chants and the like may have actually been* inpsired by San Beda one way or another. This does not discount the possibility that other schools may have also been inspired by the deeply American love affair with North American* Indian symbolisms/iconongraphy. Then again, a single foreign inspiration for an Indian chant is still "playing Indian" in my opinion. Based on an earlier quote by our fellew gamefacer, San Beda is the only school in both the NCAA and the UAAP which adopted the Native American theme.


The Wahooo/Wohooo is a an anglicized Indian warwhoop which drew its inpiration from Euro-Americans' love/hate relationship with North American Indians.

American symbolism and iconography were heavy on Indian content. "Playing Indian" is well entrenched in the American psyche. As some researchers claim, this adpatation is in fact driven by the partial rejection of their European roots and the acclimation of an American one especially during the formation of the new republic.

Why the attraction to North American Indians by early colonists?

For the colonists, the Natives represented the "spirit of the new world" which is in conjunction with the freedom the former yearned for. The Native people provided a model of a proud, free, and fiercely independent lifestlye.

The social phenomenon of playing Indians also have deep political roots. The first protest using Indian imagery occurred in 1734 when a group of colonists dressed as Indians forced themselves in a meeeting of the British governor and British soldiers to protest a new law. Known as the Mast Tree Riot, the British solders were beaten by the "White Indians".
http://www.newhampshire.com/nh-towns/fremont.aspx

The most famous political action through "playing Indian"* was* the* Boston Tea Party of 1773. In American history, the Boston Tea Party was the first drumbeat for the rebellion of which Euro-Americnans defined themselves as someone* other than Brtish colonists.

The patriots donned themselves in Mohawk costume and threw the tea into the harbor. It was really a tea-throwing party. ;D

http://www.americanrevolution.com/BostonTeaParty.htm

Throughout the American Revolution, "Playing Indian" was a powerful image of rebellion. There were Fraternal organzations who were formed during and after this rebellion. What became problematic was after the Revolution when "playing Indian" became something to be feared by many.

However, even during the Indian Wars, the Euro-Americans loved the their "Indian Icon/Symbols" but clearly hated the MAN whom they tried to exterminate. :-[ Such dichotomy would persist for a very long time.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Wars

Lets jump to "playing Indian" in pop-culture and* the sports.


American boys and girls became part of this love -affair through various youth movements like the Son's of Daniel Boone, Seton's Woodcraft Indians then* The Boy Scout Movement,* Camp Fire Girls, The Y-Indian guide of the YMCAand the likes. Playing Indians and learning Indian woodcrafts* became a part of life for many kids.

"Playing Indian" via chanting of a war whoop in collegiate sports started with the romanticized chant of Dartmouth College. A student created the "Wahooo"* *in 1879 to encourage school spirit. The " Wahoo" then migrated to the University of Virginia in the 1890s and is still used today.* From the two collegiate teams together with the need to have a "warwhoop" in sports, spawned the various North American Indian Mascots and cheers which dominated American amateur and professonional sports. Do I need to name the Amercan teams with Indian icons?* Nahhhh..you know them.

From college cheering and mascots* though the apropriation by professional sports capped by* Hollywood Cowboy and Indian movies.....you know the story.

http://www.dartmo.com/Indian_Yell_Meacham.pdf
http://virginiasports.cstv.com/trads/va-trads.html

The Hippies dig the American Indians too..

In the 1960's the* Hippies came brandishing their North American Indian iconography representing freedom, protesting* consumerism, wearing headbands, love beads, moccassins, and men grew their hair long* (just like Geronimo). These hippie-new agers were attracted to* North Americna Indian imagery. They used the Indian as an icon, they looked to the Native Indians for their imagined social and environmental harmony, and tried to live a communal lifesyle inlcuding the use of hallucinogenic substances by Indian Chiefs during rituals ;D..

http://oldhippie.jimgreenlee.com/beingahippie.htm
http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/deloria.html

ERGO,* the hippie movement which culminated in the 1969 WOODSTOCK was heavy on Indian iconograpy. The Hippie Rain Chant (Whoooohooooooo) is part and parcel of the* "INDIANNESS" of the movement. . In fact the term "Rain Chant" has Native American origin. It's an Indian Ritual to pray for rain. (Actually Woodstock had the NO-RAIN CHANT and not the* RAIN CHANT. Matindi na ulan nung panahon na yun.)

We are very sure that the Wahoo/Wohoo is a romanticized Indian Chant and San Beda is the only school in the Philippines who originally adopted* North American Indian symbols and iconography. Yes, inlcuding the Indian yelling and all the derivative chantings like* the* "Wahooo" which is known to us as the Lions' Roar

San Beda may be denied to some extent as the source/influence of the Wohooo in the country. However, the "INDIANNESS" of the Wohooo could never be denied. What a wonderful dilemma.* ;)

But of course w,e believe the persistence of "Indian playing" by other schools will continue. Astig at masarap gamitin eh. Just don't forget the "Indianness" of the chant.. :D


Happy New Year and may the Bedan tribe increase!

danny
01-24-2007, 04:03 AM
Mapalik tayo sa impluwensya ng Native Americans sa mga Hippies na yan.

Sa pananamit, sa pagtatyo ng mga kolektiba, sa paghithit ng a hallucinogen, sa paggawa ng mga tepees, maging yang peace sign na dalawang daliri any may bahid ng sign language ng Sioux , at pait yang pag-RAIN CHANT at kung ano ano pang chant (hoy! Mahilig din silang mag Hindu chant- OOOHHHHHHMMMMMMM..sa katunayan sa isang mobilisasyon nung 1968, pinalibutan nila ang Pentagon, nag-Indian sit at nag Ohhhhmmm. Balak daw nilang lumipad sa ere.) ;D


Mayroon bang tumatanggi sa "Indiannes" ng Hippie Movement?

Wala.

Mayroon bang tumatanggi sa "Indianness" ng Hippie Rain Chant sa Woodstock?

Wala.

Wayroon bang tumatanggi sa "Indianness" ng Lion's Roar (aka Wohooo) ng San Beda?

Wala.

Kailan nagsimula ang temang Indyan sa San Beda?

1947 nang muling nagbukas ang NCAA matapos ang WW2. Panahon ng una at kaisaisang Amerikanong Rector (Simula ng maitatag ang San Beda hanggang 1941, kastilang pare ang mga nagpapatakbo.)


SA makatuwid, hindi mahirap isiping mayroong malaking IMPLUWENSYA ang San Beda sa iba't ibang paaralang gumagamit ng Native American chanting. IMPLUWENSYA ang aking gamit at hindi ang paggaya. Hindi din malayong isiping naimpluwensyahan din naman ang San Beda (kung ano man ang mga ito, pwede din nating pag-usapan. Tapusin lang muna natin ang aming nasimulan para mas-maayos ang usapan.). O tapos na ba ang usapan? ;)

danny
05-01-2007, 01:14 AM
A lot of our chantings were "unofficial". Many cheers, especially the heckling cheers and chants were also "underground".

The present version of the "Wohooo" as documented in Woodstock is just one of many variants of the orginal "Wahoo" of which Dartmouth College started in 1878 to encourage school spirit. The documentary film about the Woodstock festival was released in 1970, thus the version of the Wohooo was only seen for the first time after the release of the film. This film and the music festival itself was based on the earlier Monterey Music Festival in California. Some Monterey Hippies may actually have their version of the "Wahoo".;D

It is not hard to imagine the chantings which mimics the Native American war cries during those days in America. Anything native american symbolized the struggle against this and that. A break from the establsihment. The Eastern influence was also strong. In one mobilization that surrounded the Pentagon in 1968?, the students were chanting the Hindu/Buddhist "Ohhhhhmmmmm" while seated.

Back to the Philippines,as the story goes, we Bedans used several "unofficial" variants of this Indian chant known as the "Wahooo" even prior to the 1970s. We can only speculate on the reason why this particular derivative became the norm. The gallery loved it and I guess Bedans felt the need to assert the Indianness of this chant when the "migration" and Indian chanting influence on other schools became apparent.

The chant is Native American.

Thanks sitsirya.

Wingman
06-14-2007, 01:08 PM
Hail hail alma mater
Hail to san beda!

We'll hold your banner high and bright!
A shield of red and white!
We'll fight to keep your glory bright
And never shall we fail!

Hail to thee our alma mater
Hail! Hail! Hail!


Who's to win this game?
Red!
Who's to win this game?
White!

Red white white white!
Go fight fight fight!
Red white go fight
Red white fight!

Congrats San Beda!
Animo San Beda!

danny
06-15-2007, 03:35 PM
danny:

How exactly did the native American indians inspire San Beda's cheering tradition?



Primarily through San Beda's Scouting Movement (heavy on Native American content), Cowboys and Indian Movies and during the time of sitsirya, the Hippie's* love affair with both Eastern and Native American iconography. Add to that is the popularity of Native American iconography in* American sports. Nothing extraordinary really.* ;D

It was actually during the 1940s when our only* American Rector formalized this infatuation with Native Americans with the adoption of the Indian Yell.* With this formal adoption, playing Indian and chanting "as if we were on a warpath" became part of the tradition. Hollywood movies, Boy Scouting, American sports, the Hippie movement and the like helped sustain and strengthen that tradition.

However,we do not have the love/hate relationship (love the symbol but hate the person) that is pervasive in the American psyche. We enjoyed playing Indian.

Was is just Bedans who got infatuated with the Native American culture? Nope. It is just that in the country, San Beda was the only school doing an Indian-type of cheering/chanting as part of the repertoire . We also do Pow wows. During the time of MonL, relaxing and enjoying the peace pipe. ;D

danny
07-10-2007, 03:50 AM
It's the first time* I watched a CFL game with my son. The defending Grey Cup champion BC Lions won against the Edmonton Eskimos by a mile.

One thing I noticed was this BC Lions' cheer.

Let's Go Lions! Let's Go! 3x

Sounded like one of* my GR. 2 son's school cheer.

Let's Go Irish! Let's Go! 3x

Sounded like San Beda's cheer.

Let's Go Bedans! Let's Go! 3x

Who copied who? ;D

I heard that San Beda will be droping this generic cheer. Hanggang Canada may gayahan. ;D:D

danny
08-18-2007, 02:28 AM
Ang sarap mag-istambay sa beach ng apat na araw. Mata ko! Mata ko! :D

Kumusta na kayong lahat?


Di ba may yelo ang beach ninyo diyan?* *
Naka thermal board shorts ka ba?* * ;D*


Loko. Hindi to North Pole.

Summer ngayon kaya naka Hollister shorts at T-shirt ako. ;D

Yung mga artistahing babae naman ayun sunbathing, rollerblading, biking and strolling. What a life!* :D

Polly Wolly Wanna? This cheer also appeared in the 1950s Bedan songs/cheers book and is still being used today.

There are several versions of this cheer in North America. The Bedan version incorporates* pseudo-Indian sounding words like "Wanna"* and "Wooo" (Wahooo is normally shortened to woooo). Some words were changed to Bedanize the cheer.

Polly Wolly, as Native American as they may sound, actually came from the popular children's song* Polly Wolly Doodle inspired by the southern slaves.

This song is included in Scouting Songbooks.* Since many Bedan cheers* are rooted in the Scouting Movement, the use of Piolly Wolly in this cheer maybe the result of that.. As to the cheer itself, it's as American as the Polly Wolly Doodle. ;).

Take for example the following:

We're R-Y-C-A
And couldn't be prouder
If you can't hear us
We'll yell a little louder
http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:7tSnCweh_5kJ:www.ryca.org/Cheers_Chants.pdf+If+you+cannot+hear+us+,+we%27ll+ yell+a+little+louder&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=11&gl=ca


We’re from OC and we couldn’t be prouder
If you can’t hear us we’ll yell a little louder.
Louder - We’re from OC and we couldn’t be prouder
Pick it Up, Drive it Down
Feel our Power!!!
With your largest display of muscles & power
http://trentisw.com/otonabee/college-cheers/


We are the Mariners, couldn’t be prouder,
If you don’t believe us we’ll shout a little louder!
We are the Mariners, couldn’t be prouder,
If you don’t believe us we’ll shout a little louder!
We are the Mariners, couldn’t be prouder,
If you don’t believe us we’ll shout a little louder!
http://www.ssymca.org/camps/CampSongs.htm

;D

danny
08-29-2007, 04:06 AM
^sang ayon ako dito. Huwag naman tayo maging mapanghusgang righteous.


;D ;D ;D

Let's move on with the discussion.

What schools still perform their* victory songs?

Based on the post, La Salle is not doing this anymore.

In San Beda, before the start of the game, we still sing "The Red and the White". We still perform our traditional victory song* "From Mendiola to the Battlefield"* when we a certain of winning. "The Bedan Hymn"* follows the Victory Song.

However, due to the popularity of the general UAAP version of doing things, some impressionalbe younger* Bedans prefer loud drums rather than continue with the tradition. This is what we are correcting at the moment.

I think we all have a unique set of fight songs. Is this correct?

Stardust
09-06-2007, 10:47 AM
these are cheerbooks of sbc and adm past on to me by my aunt. the bedan cheerbook was circa 1954. i'm assuming the other one and that of adm were also during that time.

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z309/Alex_Bernabe/SBC/sbc-admcheerbk1.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z309/Alex_Bernabe/SBC/sbc-admcheerbk2.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z309/Alex_Bernabe/SBC/sbccheerbk1954.jpg

danny
09-13-2007, 04:25 AM
Bakit kaya ayaw gumawa ng SBCA at BBB ng bagong cheers?* ;D


"The SBCA Animo San Beda!" is new. 1970s new. We just dropped it to give respect to Letran. A goodwill gesture from us.

San Beda's songs and cheers are tradtional. This is the link that binds different Bedan generations. We are a small school thus we consider San Beda as one big fratenity. Our stength is this fellowship. Why alienate the different generations with new cheers?

There is even a porposal to revive the old school Hymn which was replaced by Raul Roco's 1960 Bedan Hymn. Some of our elders from the pre-Roco era still clings to old the Hymn.

Tradition. We can build on them but never replace them.

BedanRoar
11-04-2007, 09:53 AM
I noticed in PEX (yeah, PEX) that people from the green school are more active in the thread about cheers and drumbeats, I invited them to join Gameface instead so that we can hear more people from the green side of things... sana nga lang makipag-discuss din sila ng maayus hehehe Let's see na lang...

On topic:

Favorite Cheers/songs not used or heard so much anymore:

Red and the White, Polly Wolly Wana, Victory Song (I know we play these every game but only a few actually knows it)


Stand on the Granstand, Ice Cream, Ice Drop...

San Beda used to conduct regular cheer rehearsals to all students (especialy GS&HS) many years ago. I think nowaday's, cheers would only be chanted during the PEP Rally's only (A few hours). I know several Bedans na hindi memorize ang mga cheers's natin. (Especialy those who entered and graduated sa college level). While for the Bedan Elders, hindi sila familiar sa Bedan Hymn.

danny
11-21-2008, 05:53 AM
Likewise, as Bedan verbal tradition goes, when we Bedans cheer "Animo San Beda!" we actually mean"Courage San Beda!" or "Have Courage San Beda!".*

Since the beginning of time ;D, we have remained faithful to this meaning* which is consistent with an underlying Bedan theme, COURAGE. Of course the* word "animo" when cheered also means cheer up!, chin up!, come on!. But we prefer courage and have courage to have consistency.

The Red banner, the Red Lion, the North American Indian, the Bedan Hymn and many other Bedan tradition speak of courage.


á·ni·mo
m.
1. - spirit
2. (energía) - energy, vitality
¡ánimo! - courage!
caerse los ánimos - to lose heart
dar ánimo a - to encourage
estar ánimos para (tener ánimos para) - to be in the mood to
http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/entry?lb=e&p=num%3As1510

Ánimo (Spanish m.) soul, mind, courage, intention
¡ánimo!, 'come on!, 'cheer up!'
http://www.dolmetsch.com/defsa7.htm

*ánimo* _m._ courage, spirit
http://www.mi-direccion.com/contigo-pan-y-cebolla/pan-y-cebolla-24.html

II excl ¡ánimo!, cheer up!
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=animo

This is the way we use "Animo San Beda!" This is where we think we have differentiated ourselves from the rest.

Animo used as a word of encouragement, in the context of cheering someone up.

Sometimes it is usefull to look for the definition of the words directly in its original languaje instead of a translation. Here are links similar to our usage:

We use ¡animo! to give courage. To encourage you to continue doing what you were doing.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2932

"Animo muchachas! Courage women!" Silvia tells her new team, slapping them on the shoulders. "We're going to win!"
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Floridian/Away_games.shtml

There were people there cheering, saying “ánimo”, which means “courage” and I went downhill seeing some runners around 200 m ahead. Then, I went on to see some ugly industrial buildings at the entrance of Carboneras, a concrete factory and an electric plant.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-253.html

ANIMO ("courage" en espagnol) est d'ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l'on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu'un s'occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm


¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim's Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

I hope the Bedan way is clear to fellow fanatics from Ateneo and La Salle. As to the rest of the "ANIMO" users, you could use magnifico, ole, andale, adelante and lots of other Spanish expressions to give a semblance of tradition.* *Bravo is taken by Baste, Viva by Mapua.. You can use Vamos if you want.

Come to think of it, we are the only school with a Spanish cheer which goes like this. Hmm ...Letran may have one too...:

El Colegio de San Beda Tiene que ganar! (Spanish Cheer)

El Colegio de San Beda
Tiene que ganar!

Animo, bravo, viva!
San Beda San Beda Arriba
Luchar, zumbar, acudir Hasta morir

Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda
Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda




Akala ko nasa B.com ako.* ;D


Here's another romanticized Native American music ala Indians in a warpath. WE call this "Pandanggo" which Stardust recently mentioned in B.com.


http://media.imeem.com/m/nBR3iKgN8S

danny
12-24-2008, 06:23 AM
The thread should be about Bedan Cheers and Fight Songs. Not Cheers and Drumbeats, IMHO.

No need to talk about drumbeats when they are part of the Cheers and Fight Songs already.

It's Christmas. Since my flight to San Francisco has been canceled twice already, this is the best thing that I can do. Post a* cheer and*some Bedan Fight Songs to kill time prior to my next scheduled departure. :)

Here's the Spanish Cheer.

Spanish Cheer (http://www.imeem.com/people/H8ydSo5/music/PTEbK22F/san_beda_spanish_cheermp3/)


Some Fight/Marching Songs

The Red And The White (http://www.imeem.com/people/cO8SmWP/music/NchAqkvR/sbca_the_red_and_the_white/)

Cannon Song (http://www.imeem.com/people/cO8SmWP/music/CZApCvRj/sbca_cannon_song/)

San Beda Victory Song (USMC Tune) (http://www.imeem.com/people/cO8SmWP/music/xg7HKhfQ/sbca_san_beda_victory_song/)

An instrumental piece ala "Indian on a Warpath" soundtrack* called Pandanggo.

Pandanggo (http://www.imeem.com/bedistaloyalista/music/h76_R-sp/pandanggo/)


Merry Christmas everyone. Live life to the fullest!

LION
12-24-2008, 09:54 AM
Another white Christmas for you eh, Danny? ;D

danny
12-24-2008, 10:41 AM
Another white Christmas for you eh,* Danny?* ;D


Yup. This is frustrating.

danny
07-10-2009, 03:06 PM
Hear the late Bedan Bimbo Danao's rendition of San Beda's traditional fight song "The Red and The White".

Bimbo Danao was a singer-actor during the pre-war and post war era (1940s to 1950s). He made 11 movies and was one of LVNs leading stars during that era.

Let's hear it from Bimbo Danao!


Click this link:

The Red and The White (http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/4NhWSrfCdLENnIiQ4wA6CQOPD86CDEtuxWjzv4qJ1LVJj_7V_K q5Bzh9fHxaiRD9ajH1xanAj3Kv8bwIi0ZUWQlGdSYm5bsRGuKx wQ/Track%2021.mp3)

The Red and The White

The Red and the White
Colors two it is you we defend
Fearless for you our might to the fight we will lend
So wave colors wave
We will fight on for your glory
Red and White
We will fight till the fight is won


(This song is be sung twice)

LION
07-10-2009, 04:13 PM
The Red and the White School - San Beda College.

danny
07-11-2009, 04:19 AM
Yikes!

Pre, document not found ang lumalabas. hahahahaha!

I guess I have to upload na lang the copy of Bimbo Danao's rendition. Sa Bedan yahoogroup pala namin sa Vancouver yung link. hahahaha!

I'll try again later.

danny
07-11-2009, 10:56 PM
Finally!

Hear a classic rendition of San Beda's "The Red and The White". A blast from the past!

Click here please. (http://www.imeem.com/people/MtEqzKO/music/4MVtFO91/bimbo-danao-the-red-and-the-white/)

danny
09-10-2009, 09:19 AM
This is tradition. It's back!

Against the backdrop of lumpen wowowee bastardization and massive drum heavy pop-"cheering", we are reviving our old and tested tradition. A radical departure from the the rest of the newbies who have no sense of their history.

If any lumpen will bastardize this cheer again, might as well give them a dose of old school beating! The traditional way. Not! ;D ;)


--------------------------------------------

As posted in B.com:





Fyi of the community. If my memory serves me right, the Azu Ima Yell performed during the game vs. MIT was the 1st in more than 30 years. We didn't do it in 1976 when I was a cheerleader and I have no recall of it being done in the years after. Our cheerleaders have made Bedan history.

Today, our cheerleaders (including the girls) together with the band spent a great deal of time practicing the original routines of the Azu Ima. They will be performed again in due time.

Let's do our part. Learn the Azu Ima by heart and join us in cheering it.

Should we still be given the blessing to continue our revival efforts, we will teach them Ga-Na-Go and Hi-Di-Hi-Di-Ho. Two North American Indian-inspired cheers done in the 50s up to our time. Pray for us Dan!






AZU IMA YELL!

Azu Ima Yell

Asu (clap clap), Ima (clap clap)
Alakalaka yeho yebo Rah!
Asu (clap clap), Ima (clap clap)
Alakalaka yeho yebo Rah!

Go fight (clap clap)
And win (clap clap)
For S... (clap), B... (clap), C... (clap clap)

Fight, fight (clap clap)
Fight, fight (clap clap)
For Vic... (clap), To... (clap), Ry... (clap clap)

Asu (clap clap), Ima (clap clap)
Alakalaka yeho yebo Rah!
Asu (clap clap), Ima (clap clap)
Alakalaka yeho yebo Rah!

Rah! Rah! (clap clap)
Rah! Rah! (clap clap)
Rah-Rah- Rah-Rah-Rah-Rah!
Alaka -- laka -- ye! Fight!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfWAc2h-x8I

leon.guinto
08-19-2011, 12:57 AM
Post deleted

ArtAttack
08-19-2011, 10:19 AM
Indian Yell Live! (http://soundcloud.com/arthurocks/indianyell/)