PDA

View Full Version : Coaches from yesteryears ?



pachador
10-27-2008, 10:40 PM
Does anybody recognized the following names? Where they involved in sports at one time? as coaches perhaps? or maybe in another field ? Thanks

Eduardo Mesina
Rafael Roco
Angelino Sunga
Oscar Taņedo

dioning
10-28-2008, 06:32 PM
not sure but i think rafael roco played/coached mapua
he is the father of bembol roco

Toto Battung
06-13-2009, 09:57 AM
As I was reviewing the threads for Bounce Past, I think we pretty much covered the different leagues that made up Philippine basketball. NCAA, UAAP, MICAA, PBA, MBA, PBL, UCAA, BAA . Some other topics might come up in the near future but one thing I like to add for now is : who are our Coaches? Iam sure they have also stories to tell. So in between checking old files, we must also look for articles on our great coaches. There are many I am sure. To name a few:
Pedro Villanueva
Alfredo del Rosario
Dionisio Calvo
Felicisimo Fajardo
Herminio Silva
Leo Prieto
Valentin Eduque
Arturo Rius
Enrique Crame
Carlos Loyzaga
Lauro Mumar
Ignacio Ramos
Nicanor Jorge
Ron Jacobs
Joe Lipa
Robert Jaworski
Norman Black
Tim Cone
Jong Uichico
Vincent Reyes
Arturo Valenzona
Chito Narvasa
Pilo Pumaren
Tommy Manotoc
Narciso Bernardo
Vincent Reyes
Yeng Guiao
Fort Acuna
there are others that escape my mind right now, and I'll add more. You might notice some are still active, so stories on how they started is a must read for the new fans. Hope we can generate interest on our coaches thread. Thanks, Toto.

Emon74
06-13-2009, 10:23 AM
Great Idea Mods Toto, We can also posted Coaches profile too.

pepman
06-13-2009, 12:39 PM
You forgot Baby Dalupan, Dante Silverio, Franz Pumaren, Derrick Pumaren, Joel Banal, Aric Del Rosario, Jimmy Mariano, Leo Isaac, Alfrancis Chua, and Roehl Nadurata. May I contribute for some profiles? First 5 muna. Here's my take:

1. Virgilio "Baby" Dalupan- The greatest Philippine basketball coach, if not, maybe one of the greatest we have ever seen. He has coached teams such as Crispa, Great Taste, and Purefoods, and schools such as UE and Ateneo. He steered all of his teams en route to several titles with the leagues he has competed. He has mentored players such as Robert Jaworski, Johnny Revilla, Atoy Co, Bogs Adornado, Alvin Patrimonio, Joy Carpio, Steve Watson, Jerry Codinera, Ricardo Brown, Ritchie Ticzon, and other players to tell.

2. Arturo Valenzona- Next to Dalupan, maybe, is also a great coach. But prior to being a player, he became a court general for the Yco Paints before briefly playing in the Utex during the early years of the PBA and retired after 1976. Has has coached many teams in every league, for 32 years of existence. It all started from APOCOR to Tanduay to Alaska/Hills Bros. to Pop Cola to Ginebra and to Montana, and he also coached schools such as FEU, SSC-R, and Olivarez College.

3. Joe Lipa- Ever wondered of a "real" coach and a discipinarian? That's him, from the first hime you will look at him, from his face (which actually had a moustache, he shaved it prior to being Ateneo's coach), you'll really feel pressured. And his strategy and perfect dealing with players made him a winner, by having titles with UP and Philips Sardines. He also coached Shell, FedEx, Ateneo, Ateneo-Pioneer, Wilkins, Oriental Battery, and A&W Rootbeer.

4. Aric Del Rosario- Like Lipa, he is also a "real" coach and a diciplinarian. 4 straight UAAP titles, you got it. He also coached the Pampanga Dragons, Smart-Pampanga Buddies, and AMA-UST.

5. Earl Timothy "Tim" Cone- Next to Dalupan, he's one of the greatest PBA coaches ever seen, and has never wondered to be successful, but his players' hardwork and his determination, and he became a winner, you got it, 12 championships, plus a grandslam. And he has mentored players to many generatons, which started from Frankie Lim to Paul Alvarez to Jojo Lastimosa to Johnny Abbarientos to John Arigo to Ali Peek to Nic Belasco to Sonny Thoss and to Willie Miller.

Toto Battung
06-14-2009, 01:11 AM
Pepman....yes, how can I forget Baby Dalupan and Dante Silverio two coaches whose great minds led to the Crispa-Toyota rivalry. And Aric del Rosario architect of UST's unbeaten squad in the 90's. Like I said there are many more coaches we need to ackowledge.
Emon74...coaches profiles is good. Thanks.

ponce
06-14-2009, 03:22 PM
Another great coach is Ed Ocampo. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think his Royal Tru Orange team was the one that broke Crispa and Toyota's strangle-hold of championships in the early years of the PBA. He also coached the last Toyota team that beat Crispa in a championship series in the 1981 Open Conference. And I believe that this was the last Crispa-Toyota finals series.

amdgc82
02-24-2010, 10:52 AM
Manila Standard, Thursday, April 23, 1987
Turo Valenzona
The coach who has come a long way
By Raffy Japa

The bench seemed to be the natural destination of former Yco ace sentinel Arturo Valenzona, the man who calls the shots for Tanduay in the Philippine Basketball Association.

Even as a player of the late Peping Yee at Far Eastern in the late 50's, Valenzona would find himself analyzing game situations, spotting weaknesses and mismatches, and suggesting strategies for easy baskets.

When he was taken by Yco in the next decade, Valenzona was wooed by the Reyes brothers of FEU to train the Tamaraws while he was reviewing at the school for the CPA examinations.

In 1972, he agreed to take on the bench chores for FEU although it was short lived since active players are not allowed to call the shots for university teams. He was banned by former Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation president Ambrosio Padilla from coaching in the UAAP, because of a protest from other coaches, but somehow he tried to find ways and means to reach the bench without being called "coach".

First, he was appointed as consultant to regular FEU coach Che Poblete, then he was elevated to team manager. From behind the bench he would pass out instuctions. As team manager he had the liberty to sit on the Tamaraw bench without being thumbed out.

"Wala silang makitang rule book na nagsasabing hindi puwedeng maging manager ang active na player at lalong hindi nila puwedeng paalisin sa bench ang team manager," said Valenzona the other day of his "remote control coaching" to steer the Tamaraws to several UAAP titles.

Even as a member of the U-Tex Wranglers in the PBA in 1977 and 1978, Valenzona would find himself kibitzing on game strategies and situations. Under coach Tommy Manotoc, he gained valuable insights on defense and motivation.

He read several books, among them, Hank Iba's On Defense. Then he talked with many noted coaches who encouraged him to taste the life on the bench.

Lauro Mumar, Baby Dalupan, Fely Fajardo, Tito Eduque, Nilo Verona. All of them gave him their two cents worth of advice in between gulfs of beer at various watering holes near the Rizal Coliseum or Araneta.

He listened intently and plotted imaginary X's and O's. Things he put to good use when he finally plunged into active coaching after he retired in 1978. And like Midas touch, most of his teams in the amateur leagues turned out to be champions, Solid Mills, APCOR, The 1978 Philippine Youth team.

In 1982 after the Herdis owned APCOR team was disbanded, Valenzona was elevated to the bench chores of the PBA, calling the shots for Gilbey's Gin which despite having no superstar in its line up managed to finish as runner up thrice to Toyota and Crispa in two years.

Valenzona claims he never had any problem with superstar players, saying "kahit naman si Robert Jaworski (Gilbey's) o Ramon Fernandez (Tanduay) ay sumusunod kung ano ang ipagawa ko sa court."

"My being a former player helped me a lot to understand how these players feel I know how to handle even those superstars since I had been a star player myself," he added.

It was when he moved over to Tanduay in 1985 third conference that Valenzona found a team loaded with promise. A promise which he fulfilled the next year with two straight titles in the Reinforced and All-Filipino conferences.

Valenzona, had his humble beginnings in the seamy side of that dreaded street called Leveriza in the heart of Malate, where he grew up along with neighbourhood toughies, picking up fights as often as his then frail frame would allow.

The need to survive forced the young boy from Baybay, Leyte, to support himself by working as a "ball boy" at the nearby tennis courts of the Rizal sports complex, oftentimes finding himself selling frozen goodies on the side to augment his income.

Whatever he earned from this entrepreneurship, Valenzona used for his studies at the Aurora elementary school and in taking up karate lessons to defend himself against the street bullies.

Plain dedication and hard worked allowed Valenzona to finish his elementary schooling six years later and move on to Far Eastern U where another phase of his colorful career was to start.

"The first title of Tanduay and my first championship as a national coach for the 1978 Youth team were my sweetest triumphs as a coach," said the 44-year old Valenzona.

In the PBA where players are (usually) equipped with fundamentals, the even tougher chore of molding individual skills together is the biggest challenge of a coach.

Valenzona is liberal yet he commands respect from his players, no matter what level of stature they are. He shapes their individuality into the team concept, transforms selfishness into sacrifice, weaknesses into strength, divergence to unity.

"Simple lang ang rules ko. Huwag ma-le-late at seryoso sa practice. I place much emphasis on attitude. I try to give everybody a chance to show their worth on the team, although sometimes, sumasama rin, katulad noong matalo kami sa Philippine team," Valenzona said.

This early, Valenzona's Rhum Makers are eyeing one of two outright semi-finals berths in the 1987 PBA Open Conference. Only Great Taste Coffee and Magnolia appear to be theiir chief rivals for the top two slots after the double round eliminations.

"Ang trend namin ngayon ay running game, pero kung talagang hindi makuha ay nag-i-slow down kami," said Valenzona, who is drilling the Rhum Makers on the fastbreak patterns with the help of trainer Gigi Sanchez for their endurance and quickness.

Just the same the coach's bench is the most sensitive spot in the game. Coaches are the shock absorbers of team defeats, yet in moments of triumph, they are half-seen, half-forgotten heroes while the players savor the applause of the crowd.

"Talagang ganoon kapag panalo, player ang panalo. Kapag talo coach ang sinisisi," said Valenzona.

Emon74
02-24-2010, 12:06 PM
Valenzona claims he never had any problem with superstar players, saying "kahit naman si Robert Jaworski (Gilbey's) o Ramon Fernandez (Tanduay) ay sumusunod kung ano ang ipagawa ko sa court."

"My being a former player helped me a lot to understand how these players feel I know how to handle even those superstars since I had been a star player myself," he added.

It was when he moved over to Tanduay in 1985 third conference that Valenzona found a team loaded with promise. A promise which he fulfilled the next year with two straight titles in the Reinforced and All-Filipino conferences.

Valenzona, had his humble beginnings in the seamy side of that dreaded street called Leveriza in the heart of Malate, where he grew up along with neighbourhood toughies, picking up fights as often as his then frail frame would allow.

The need to survive forced the young boy from Baybay, Leyte, to support himself by working as a "ball boy" at the nearby tennis courts of the Rizal sports complex, oftentimes finding himself selling frozen goodies on the side to augment his income.

Whatever he earned from this entrepreneurship, Valenzona used for his studies at the Aurora elementary school and in taking up karate lessons to defend himself against the street bullies.

Plain dedication and hard worked allowed Valenzona to finish his elementary schooling six years later and move on to Far Eastern U where another phase of his colorful career was to start.

"The first title of Tanduay and my first championship as a national coach for the 1978 Youth team were my sweetest triumphs as a coach," said the 44-year old Valenzona.

In the PBA where players are (usually) equipped with fundamentals, the even tougher chore of molding individual skills together is the biggest challenge of a coach.

Valenzona is liberal yet he commands respect from his players, no matter what level of stature they are. He shapes their individuality into the team concept, transforms selfishness into sacrifice, weaknesses into strength, divergence to unity.

"Simple lang ang rules ko. Huwag ma-le-late at seryoso sa practice. I place much emphasis on attitude. I try to give everybody a chance to show their worth on the team, although sometimes, sumasama rin, katulad noong matalo kami sa Philippine team," Valenzona said.

This early, Valenzona's Rhum Makers are eyeing one of two outright semi-finals berths in the 1987 PBA Open Conference. Only Great Taste Coffee and Magnolia appear to be theiir chief rivals for the top two slots after the double round eliminations.



I remember that game when the RP Team upsets Tanduay, A young Alvin Patrimonio scored 31 points, one of the highlights was his 3-point play off prolific import David Thirdkill around the 2nd period, it brought the crowd to its feet, I cant forget as well the "color" between Turing Valenzona and Ginebra playing coach Robert Jaworski in one of those classic Tanduay-Ginebra rivalries that same conference that year.

Agreed that Tanduay's first title has to be the most memorable kay turing, not only because its the first championship but they beat a team that almost won a grandslam the previous year, Great Taste, dalawang beses din tinalo ni Valenzona sa finals ang dean of Philippine coaches, none other than Baby D. the maestro.

Emon74
03-31-2010, 08:35 AM
This Coach is a Winner
March 1989
By Nene Dela Rama

Newly-Crowned national collegiate champions San Sebastian College Stags coach Francis Rodriguez may want to keep a low-profile in basketball, but his record as a cage mentor in the last four years is more than most coaches can boast of. In only four years of coaching, Rodriguez has given his school six championships, two in the NCAA (1985 and 1988 season), two National Collegiate titles (1987 and 1989), two MMBL crowns (1985 and 1986) and on the side, steered the Gold Gee Acryllic team to its first championship in the Filipino-Chinese Basketball league last year.
Coach Rodriguez's latest triumph, the 1989 National Inter-Collegiate Championship held at the ULTRA and hosted by Pasig, may yet be his best accomplishment as a coach to date. For in crowning his school team as the best collegiate team in the country, he defeated such respected teams as the Ateneo Blue Eagles, the reigning UAAP and National UAAP champion, the De la Salle Green Archers, the defending national champions and runner-up in the 1988 UAAP tournament coached by no less than the present national coach Derek Pumaren, and the Western Visayas champions, the Southwestern University Cobras. With this triumph and his past accomplishments in winning titles, Rodriguez, takes his rightful place as one of the country's top court tacticians. With these records speaking for themselves, the BAP should make good use of Francis Rodriguez in national and international competitions.
Francis Rodriguez started his basketball career as a member of San Sebastian College senior varsity team in 1973 which won the school's first NCAA crown together with Boy Mora, the late Jimmy Otazu, Benjie Cleofas and Marte Samson. Twelve years later in 1985, Francis, as his school's coach, steered his alma mater team to its second NCAA title on his first year as head coach. After playing for his school team, Francis, standing at 6-3, played center with the Crown Motors team, a sister team of Toyota in the PBA under coach Nat Canson and later the Solid Mills team in the defunct MICAA. His first coaching stint was with the Romualdez Group of Companies where he mentored the Program team to the championship.
He served as assistant to his brother-in-law, Orly Castelo, in the San Sebastian College in 1983 and 1984 before assuming the position of head coach of the Stags after Orly Castelo resigned to devote full time to his job at Elizalde y Cia. Francis is also presently a member of the regular coaching staff of the BEST (Basketball Efficiency Scientific Training). Francis Rodriguez is definitely a national coach material and the BAP should do well in looking over the records and potential of this young, winner of a coach.

Emon74
07-18-2010, 10:02 PM
Bogs before making the bold jump
By: Lyn Versoza
October 1988

It is now confirmed that Bogs Adornado will coach the Alaska quintet after Arturo Valenzona tendered his resignation a week ago. Alaska recently took it on the chin against a badly-depleted Anejo Rum in the 2nd Coca-Cola PBA-IBA World Challenge Cup.
Prior to that championship encounter, this writer had a short tete-a-tete with Bogs in his comfortable, elegant household in Valle Verde. Bogs' wife, the former Agnes Heredia has been a close friend since the pre-People's Power revolution days.
The three-time PBA MVP recounted how he found his way to the Pat Riley Camp in California right after the Open Conference ended. The couple flew to the States last July 27, just in time for the camp's opening on July 31. When Adornado reached Thousand Oaks, California on the day of the registration, he already had a feel of what it would be like at the summer camp conducted by a well-renowned NBA coach. There was camaraderie all around youngsters with their parents understandably excited about this forthcoming training under the able tutelage of coach Riley himself, plus around 20 coaches and several counselors.
Bogs was able to meet Riley up close at the camp held at the College of the Lutheran University. And as a sign of goodwill and friendship, Bogs handed Riley a book about the Philippines and the EDSA Revolution.
In one of their talks, the LA Lakers mentor told Bogs "I understand you're a three-time MVP, have you played with Billy Ray Bates," Bogs told him about Bates' stint in the PBA then. And when Bogs requested that he be allowed to observe the practice games of the Lakers, Riley chided him, "Why do you want to see the practice?...You wanna change me?" there was of course laughter and conviviality all around, further breaking the ice between Riley and his new-found friend.
Of course, Bogs already knew the fundamentals, the basics. But it was worthwhile seeing all those moves given another dimension. For after all, the one leading the camp is Pat Riley himself, the mentor of the NBA World Champions. It wasn't just anybody discussing the proper attitude that players must always be armed with. The more Bogs listened, the more he realized he really had a lot to learn from this NBA institution.
In one of those day-to-day sessions, one of the kids attending the camp kept trying to shoot from way out. Somehow, the ball would always bounce off the rim and would drift towards Adornado. Bogs would then get the ball and would accurately shoot from afar. Amazed, one of the lady's parents said, "Hey, three in a row" and looked at Bogs with unbelieving eyes. They didn't have the slightest idea that shooting from that area is one of the assets of this former star forward and now head coach of Alaska.
Right now, Adornado has his hands full. He will take over the coaching reins of the Milkmen and it will surely be a tremendous burden. But given his own abilities plus all those times he sat on the bench listening to their head coach, he probably pass the crucial tests.
So, shall we say, let's give the guy a break.

Emon74
02-01-2011, 01:22 PM
JACOBS STRESSES IMPORTANCE OF ROLE PLAYERS
September-October 1988

Former national basketball team coach Ron Jacobs came "home" recently for a brief visit and predicted the Philippines could regain supremacy in the sport in Asia with the right kind of leadership.
Jacobs, who planed in with the Los Angeles Jaguars last Sept.16 and left a week later, said the advent of open basketball would primarily benefit the Philippines not the United States. He said despite the expected opening of the doors to the pros in the Olympic and world basketball competitions, American stars in the NBA would hesitate to jeopardize their lucrative contracts by joining international tournaments.
But while Filipino pros would become eligible to play in the Olympics, Jacobs foresaw problems in negotiating for the release of certain stars from their mother clubs to be drafted into the national squad. He said training for the Olympics or the biennial Asian Basketball Confederation (ABC) championships can't be done in two or three months, recalling his own experience at the helm of the national team. That will certainly be a damper on the hopes of commercial establishments employing pros to win in the PBA.
Jacobs lamented the fact that the nucleus of a cohesive national team built up by former project director Eduardo Cojuangco has been dismantled. "It took us five years to assemble a competitive national team and it took the BAP only a single blow to destroy what we worked so hard for," he sighed.
The former West Coast Athletic Conference (WCAC) Coach of the year from the Loyola Marymount University said under Cojuangco, players never wanted to turn pro because the Tarlac businessman gave them the direction to remain intact. "Money was never a factor in keeping the boys together," he said, citing each player received a monthly allowance of "only" P4,000 until late 1985 when it was raised to P14,000, still comparatively less than what the PBA could offer. "But the team had tremendous loyalty for Mr.Cojuangco who looked after their families, listened to their problems, and promised them jobs in his companies when their playing days were over. He provided for free education and advised them to think of their future, of what they could be after basketball."
In fact, Jacobs related how the players voted to remain intact even without receiving salaries when Cojuangco was forced into exile in February 1986. But a BAP decision to release the nationals to the PBA made the vote academic.
Jacobs said he couldnt understand how the Philippines could deteriorate so fast as an Asian basketball power. He explained that with the right combination of talent, the national team could easily beat the People's Republic of China and South Korea.
"Of course, you would train differently for the Chinese than the Koreans but I know we should never have any problems with either," he said "Against the Chinese, all you do is stop them from dominating the inside, control the defensive boards, and force them to play the perimeter. I think that with the three-point shot, we could beat anybody on a good night as we showed at the world club championships in Barcelona and the Jones Cup in Taipei in 1985."
In Spain, the Filipinos lost 78-77 decision to Brazil which showed up with national players Marcel and Maury de Souza, Israel Andrade, Joao Vianna, and American import Bob Miservicious. The nucleus of that same Brazilian squad upset the United States at the Pan American Games last year.
"We don't need seven-foot centers," continued Jacobs. "I'd rather choose 6-7 or 6-8 centers like Dennis Still who are mobile and get at the ball rather than wait for the rebound to come their way. There are enough Filipinos at that height right now who could be developed without us having to recruit naturalized players for the job. but without a credible leader with the vision to motivate players, we'll always find it difficult to compete internationally."

Toto Battung
02-08-2011, 06:11 AM
Emon74..thanks for keeping this Coaches topic alive. Haven't had the time to do more research on great coaches of the Philippines. Hope others should do more research for stories on coaches.

Emon74
03-17-2011, 10:19 AM
The Legacy of Valerio "Amang" Lopez
1999 Article

Amang, as he is fondly called by everyone in local cagedom, is presently the Athletic Director of the Mapua Institute of Technology. He is a graduate of Mechanical Engineering, and for many years now, an active member of the Management committee of the NCAA.
But very few of those who belong to today's "X" generation know much about Amang's feats and exploits as a player.
Amang brought MIT to several championships in the NCAA - as a player for the Cardinals in 1949 when MIT captured its first ever NCAA title, in 1965 as a coach of the senior team that brought home the second title for the school, and in 1981, this time as the athletic director for the intramuros-based school.
As an athlete, Amang was arguably the flashiest in the court. He would terrorize his opponents with his amazing delivery of plays, and would always come out the speediest among 'em all.
"Siya ang Johnny Abarrientos nung panahon namin," Angel De Jesus, a basketball consultant and teammate of Amang in the early 40s relates.
An injury later on prevented Amang from pursuing his basketball career but he continued by displaying his wares from the bench. Under Amang's stewardship, the Cardinals and the Red Robbins went on to capture several titles in the NCAA.
He later became another champion coach in the MICAA while handling the Concepcion Motorola team. Among those who reached stardom under the guidance of Amang were Junel Baculi, Bong Ramos, Leo Isaac, Atoy Co, Bong Dela Cruz, Freddie Hubalde, Kevin Ramas and Alvin Patrimonio.
Amang says that basketball during the early 40s and 50s were entirely different from the basketball that we're seeing today. "Nung panahon namin noon, ang mga players, laban kung laban, patay kung patay. Talagang nagpapakamatay para sa bola. Ngayon, ang mga players natin, takot na takot sa banggaan. Dahil baka nga naman mabasag ang mukha nila, mawala yung pagka-pogi nila."
Amang spent more than half of his life serving Mapua and yet his most fulfilling reward is seeing his athletes gain good fortune and good life. Basketball will always be in Amang Lopez's heart. And mind.
And basketball, too, will never forget it once had a flashy, wily backcourt general whose wisdom in the hardcourt has continued to influence basketball players generation after generation.

Emon74
12-30-2016, 08:49 AM
The Drillmaster from UST
By Joaquin Henson

Herminio Silva was nickname Herr for good reason. He was like a Prussian drillmaster, often resorting to Gestapo-like tactics to put his boys in line.
For years, Silva was a toast of Philippine basketball and acknowledged dean of coaches. He piloted University of Santo Tomas to several UAAP crowns and also had a stint on the Letran bench.
In 1934, Silva played on the Philippine squad that captured the Far East Games title, whipping China, 37-27, in the Finals. His teammates included UST standouts Jacinto Ciria Cruz and Primitivo Martinez plus such stars as Ambrosio Padilla and Franco Marquicias. The national coach was then Alfredo del Rosario.
Twenty years later, Silva called the shots to the National team at the Asian Games in Manila and made international headlines by using the freeze to steer the hosts to the crown. After the Philippines erected a seven-point lead early in the second half. Silva instructed his charges to kill the clock and put China to sleep. With no shot clock in use. Silva ordered his boys to hold the ball until hell froze over. The frustrated Chinese, playing a zone were helpless and couldn't adjust their defense.
The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) eventually got wise to Silva's trick and in 1956, instituted the 30-second shot clock.
Silva never coached in the Olympics but was clearly a legend of his own time. He married Mina Custodio, head of the UST Physical Education program for girls, and died in the 1970s.