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Joescoundrel
10-07-2008, 03:27 PM
For those who like to cook and would like to share their recipes feel free to share right here. Read through the recipe from start to finish before you actually try it.

Allow me to start.

BASIC SPAGHETTI BOLOGNESE

1 kilo ground beef, tender chuck or brisket
2 whole large native garlic heads, bashed then minced
2 whole large purple onions, minced
2 large stalks of celery, de-stringed and small chopped
2 large styro trays button mushrooms, small chopped
1 large carrot, small chopped
6 large or 8 medium ripe red tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1 small tin tomato paste
1 cup medium bodied or full bodied red table wine
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dried oregano flakes
1 tablespoon dried thyme flakes
1 tablespoon dried basil flakes
1 tablespoon black pepper corns, rough hand ground
1 tablespoon course salt
1 cup tap water
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 kilo spaghetti noodles

Heat a deep heavy-gauge stew pot over medium to medium-high heat. Heat the oil until just before it gets to the smoke point. Put in the meat and brown fully. Add in the garlic, onions, celery, tomatoes, mushrooms and carrots. Saute every thing very well until all the vegetables are well-cooked. Add in the wine, water, tomato sauce, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce. Mix everything very well. Add in basil, oregano and thyme and mix well. Add in wine and water and bring everything to a good simmer.

Lower the heat to medium-low and simmer for an hour making sure there is still some bubbling to the simmer. Stir around every 15 minutes.

In the last 15 minutes of simmering the sauce cook the spaghetti noodles in a separate pot about a minute less than package directions instruct. Make sure the water the noodles cook in is well-seasoned, about a tablespoon and a half of salt for every 500 grams of pasta.

When spaghetti noodles are done take all of them out of their pot and put them directly into the sauce pot. Add in 3-4 tablespoons of the pasta water the noodles boiled in. Mix everything together well.

Serve immediately with good crusty bread, may or may not be toasted and/or buttered.

Should serve 4-5 people. If it was just me, this will serve me and maybe two other normal people. ;D

Joescoundrel
10-22-2008, 12:33 PM
Does anyone have a favorite adobo recipe? Here's mine.

1 kilo pork liempo, chopped into serving cubes
1/4 kilo chicken livers, diced small
3 tablespoons tap water
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 tablespoon black peppercorns
1/4 tablespoon mill-ground black pepper
1/4 cup sukang Paombong or any native white or gray vinegar
1 tablespoon good quality soy sauce
1/2 tablespoon good quality iodized patis
2 large whole heads of native garlic, bashed, peeled then minced
1 thumb-size piece of ginger (about an inch long and an inch around), peeled, bashed then minced
1 dried laurel leaf
1/2 tablespoon dried flaked oregano (or 1 tablespoon shredded fresh oregano)
1 cup tap water

Heat up a deep pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Put first three tablespoons of water and bring to a rolling boil. Put in pork and liver and saute well. Lower heat to a minimum and cover to allow the pork to render off its natural fat. Check the pork and livers every few minutes to determine browning and rendering. When the pork has browned well enough on all sides remove about half of the rendered off fat and set aside. Turn heat back up to medium-high then add dd garlic and ginger and saute until light brown. Add soy sauce, patis, salt and both kinds of peppers and stir and mix well. Add in vinegar and allow the vinegar to come to a boil first and then stir well. Put in one cup of water and bring to a rolling boil. Put in laurel leaf and oregano then bring heat to low and simmer everything for 25-30 minutes or until pork achieves personally desired tenderness.

Serve immediately with freshly steamed fine white rice or garlic fried rice. Chop some ripe tomatoes and purple onions together and set aside as a nice side dish.

Should serve 5-6 normal people. ;D

LION
10-22-2008, 02:01 PM
Adobo partners well with pinakbet. Ay nagimas apo! :)

bchoter
10-22-2008, 04:07 PM
Adobong iloko is cooked in vinegar. Naimas agpaysu!

I will share my pandaya na prawn in szechuan sauce when I have time.

Kid Cubao
10-22-2008, 04:20 PM
we'll be waiting for it, bchoter, kaya pakibilis-bilisan naman ;D

this thread is making me salivate.

Coolmanny
10-28-2008, 04:38 PM
Recipe: Coke Liempo

1/2 kg of liempo
500 ML of Coke (regular) - kung diet kayo pwede rin coke zero or coke light

babad overnight ang liempo sa coke
palambutin ang liempo sa coke na pinagbabaran hanggang maluto

medyo dagdagan ang coke habang pinakukuluan (matitira lang kasi asukal kapag natuyo)

i tried this back in 1997 when I was in Japan, nauumay na kasi ako sa jap food na serve sa dorm namin

aircanda
10-28-2008, 10:57 PM
Adobo partners well with pinakbet.* Ay nagimas apo!* :)*


my mom cooks adobo and partners it with garlic salad ba un? ??? basta eggplant siya with lots of garlic in it.. sarap

naglaway ako sa recipe ni sir Joe

Joescoundrel
10-30-2008, 10:39 AM
Recipe: Coke Liempo

1/2 kg of liempo
500 ML of Coke (regular) - kung diet kayo pwede rin coke zero or coke light

babad overnight ang liempo sa coke
palambutin ang liempo sa coke na pinagbabaran hanggang maluto

medyo dagdagan ang coke habang pinakukuluan (matitira lang kasi asukal kapag natuyo)

i tried this back in 1997 when I was in Japan, nauumay na kasi ako sa jap food na serve sa dorm namin


I believe this is a version of what the Chinese call Dongpo Pork, or those tender blocks of pork liempo braised in a clay or ceramic pot over a charcoal fire.

1 kilo slab pork liempo, bones still in, chopped into four blocks as even as possible
1 large purple onion, chopped
1 large whole head of garlic, bashed and peeled
1 thumb-size piece of ginger about two inches long, peeled and bashed
5-6 large whole onion leeks
1/2 tablespoon whole black pepper corns
4 tablespoons brown or washed sugar
4 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 tablespoons black rice vinegar
1/2 cup red Chinese rice wine

* Use a clay or ceramic pot with a matching cover, or a 3 to 3.5-inch deep casserole dish

Get a good charcoal fire going on a grill or outdoor clay stove. While the coal fire settles prepare the dish. Place the leeks, ginger, half the garlic and half the onions at the bottom of the pot to serve as a bed. Place the pork blocks on the bed. Add the pepper corns, sugar, soy and oyster sauces, vinegar and wine over top of the pork, making sure everything is well coated. Place the remaining garlic and onions evenly on top of each pork slab. Cover well to make sure it is as sealed as possible. Place on the charcoal fire grill or stove. Do not open and let cook for 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Serve immediately as is as an appetizer or with good old Pale Pilsen or Gran Matador as pulutan or with steamed rice as a robust ulam. Do not eat with sissy wines because I guarantee the robustness of this dish will overwhelm even the toughest Cabernet Sauvignon or Barollo.

* You may also throw the whole works into a normal oven. Preheat at 350 F or 250 C for five to six minutes. Throw in the pot and let cook for an hour to an hour and a half.

bchoter
10-30-2008, 01:57 PM
Wala bang pa house party diyan Manong Joe?

thadzonline
10-30-2008, 05:00 PM
sus ginoo! kagutom! ;D

Joescoundrel
10-30-2008, 11:11 PM
Bchoter, house parties are the specialty of Kid Cubao. His house is now called HOTNESS along Aurora Boulevard. I daresay the dishes there are tastier than anything listed here so far... ;D

Joescoundrel
11-13-2008, 09:54 PM
Beer and braising, really good combination, especially when there is good beef brisket involved.

Joescoundrel
12-11-2008, 10:14 PM
Here's an easy beer beef stew for the holidays if you want to impress the would-be in-laws. Just make sure the people you are serving do not have beer issues. Beer leaves a very distinct flavor when used in cooking, unlike wine, vodka or other forms of the good stuff.

BEER BEEF STEW

1 to 1 1/4 kilo beef brisket or beef chuck, chopped into stew cubes about a cubic inch and a half or so

This first set of vegetables should be diced slightly smaller (no more than a cubic inch or so) than the beef:

1 large celery stalk, diced
1 medium carrot, peeled and diced
1 medium radish, peeled and diced
1 large purple onion, diced
2 large ripe tomatoes, diced

The following should be diced as close to the size of the beef as possible:

2 large dark brown potatoes, peeled and diced
1 large carrot, peeled and diced

1/2 cup frozen green peas
350 ml of pale beer (one bottle of San Miguel Pale Pilsen of course)
3/4 cup tap water
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon course salt
1/4 tablespoon mill ground black pepper
2 tablespoons Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons A1 steak sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon dried and flaked tarragon

Heat oil and butter in a large deep heavy bottom stew or casserole pot on medium-high flame. Add in the beef and saute well until all the beef pieces have gotten slightly charred and browned.

Add in the first set of vegetables and stir in well except the tomatoes. When these vegetables have sweated well enough, add in tomatoes. Mix everything well. Add in beer, water, salt, pepper, Worcestershire and steak sauces and mustard. Stir well and bring to a good but not rolling boil. Lower flame to low and simmer covered for 75-80 minutes. Stir slightly every 30 minutes to make sure nothing sticks to the bottom of the pot. Turn flame back up to medium-high then add in larger cut potatoes and carrots, peas and tarragon and stir well and again wait to come to a good boil. Lower heat back down to low then simmer covered again another 20 minutes.

Remove from heat but keep covered another four to five minutes then serve immediately with rice pilaf or good crusty or chewy-crusted bread, i.e. French Batard or plain French long loaf.

Should serve five to six normal people or two to three really gluttonous heathens.

NB: the first set of vegetables are what those folks on TV refer to as mire poix, which is a fancy French cookery term meaning "bunch of dirt-grown plant life used as pang-gisa by the white man" ;D

Joescoundrel
02-09-2009, 09:23 PM
My good buddy Jun is from Isabela and just loves his Dinakdakan. This is his recipe.

DINAKDAKAN NI JUN

1 whole large pork face (maskara), about one and three-quarters to two kilos, cut into eight roughly even pieces
1 whole pork brain
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
1 tablespoon course salt
2 tablespoons iodized patis
6 tablespoons fresh-squeezed kalamansi juice
4 tablespoons Ilocos vinegar
1 tablespoon black peppercorns, roughly crushed
1 large purple onion, minced
1 large white onion, minced
3 large stalks of leeks, minced
2 thumb-sized pieces of ginger (roughly an inch and a half long by an inch thick), bashed, peeled and minced
1 red devil chili (siling labuyo), minced
1 long green chili (siling haba), minced
4-5 litres of tap water for boiling

Make sure pork is cleaned especially the hairs in the ears.

Bring water to a good rolling boil in a large pot over high heat. Add in pork pieces, salt, vinegar, half the pepper, half the ginger, half the leeks, half the white onions. Lower heat to medium and simmer at a good boil for 16-18 minutes covered. In the meantime, get a good charcoal fire going on the grill. Bring heat back up to high and add pork brains, then lower heat back down to medium and simmer for another 3-4 minutes.

Remove everything from heat. Remove brains gently first and set aside. Remove pork pieces and allow to dry, maybe 7-8 minutes on a wood chopping board. Grill the pork, and get as many sides as possible, get good char lines on as many sides of the pork as possible. Remove from the grill and allow to cool on the chopping board again, maybe 9-10 minutes.

Prepare a large mixing bowl. Chop the pork into small bite-size pieces, maybe no more than an inch long and half an inch wide. Toss in the pork pieces, brain, mayonnaise, all the other remaining ingredients and mix well in the bowl. Set aside for about an hour before serving. Makes excellent ulam/pulutan, best with Ginebra San Miguel Blue, Pale Pilsen or Gran Matador.

Joescoundrel
03-17-2009, 03:45 PM
Because my good friend Tolits is coming back home after two whole years in Saudi Arabia, here is his recipe for his macaroni soup.

SOPAS NI TOLITS

400 to 500 grams of elbow macaroni, cooked two minutes less than package directions

1 whole large head of native garlic, bashed and minced
1 whole large head of native purple onion, peeled and minced
3/4 cup evaporated filled milk
350 grams chicken thigh fillets, small diced about half an inch cube
3 jumbo common red hotdogs, chopped at an angle about a quarter-inch thick
1 large celery stalk, finely chopped
1 medium carrot, finely chopped
1 pork bullion cube
1 tablespoon room temperature margarine
2 tablespoons corn oil

2 litres of tap water

Course salt and mill-ground black pepper to taste

Heat a large soup or stew pot over medium-high heat. Heat oil and melt margarine. Put in chicken and hotdogs and cook until chicken pieces turn lightly browned. Add in garlic, onion, celery and carrot and saute everything well together until everything turns lightly browned. Put in water, bullion cube, salt and pepper and stir and bring to a brisk rolling boil. Put in macaroni and stir to a brisk boil. Lower heat to medium-low and allow to slow boil two to three minutes. Remove from heat and add in the milk while stirring.

Serve very hot, makes for a good enough accompaniment to steamed rice.

angels45
06-04-2009, 08:16 PM
I like the recipes that you have.Thanks for sharing it.


_________________
Refrigerator Water Filter (http://www.filter-outlet.com/)

Joescoundrel
06-16-2009, 07:19 PM
Here's a quick and easy carbonara recipe:

500 grams penne regatte, cooked according to box directions

4 large whole eggs
1 tin of all-purpose cream
1 cup of fresh milk
1 cup of Parmesan or Cheddar cheese, fine grated
1/2 cup Parmesan or Cheddar cheese, coarse grated
250 grams mild-cured bacon, chopped fine
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon margarine
1 tablespoon fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1 medium purple onion, chopped fine
Coarse salt and mill-ground black pepper to taste

Cook pasta and drain but do not wash. Once drained place in a large mixing bowl.

In a separate mixing bowl, beat eggs and mix in cream, milk and fine grated cheese.

Heat up a skillet or pan over medium-high heat and cook bacon and until it turns brown. Be careful not to burn the bacon. Once it turns a nice light brown and releases its smoked aromas it is done. Add onions and melt in butter and margarine just until they are completely melted. Remove everything from heat.

Pour the egg mixture into the serving dish that contains the pasta. Mix everything well. Add in the bacon and onions and mix these in well as well.

Sprinkle parsley and coarse grated cheese and mix well. Serve immediately.

Joescoundrel
07-01-2009, 10:05 PM
I hate baking, so when I share a pastry recipe you better believe it is the easiest and tastiest thing in the world.

EASY APPLE CRUMBLE

6 green tart large American or Japanese apples; peel, core, quarter then slice about a centimeter thick (a little over a half-kilo of apples)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup bottled apple juice or orange juice, do not use powdered or tetra packaged juices
2 heaping tablespoons brown sugar or washed sugar
1/2 tablespoon molasses
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
1 teaspoon course salt

For the crumble___

112.5 grams butter (half the standard small brick of butter), softened to room temperature
3 level tablespoons brown or washed sugar
4 heaping tablespoons of unsifted all-purpose flour

Preheat oven at 100 C or 200 F while making the crumble and apple stew.

Mix everything very well together by hand until it turns into the consistency of crumbled cookies. It is not supposed to turn into a paste or a dough. Set aside in a clean bowl.

Heat a deep skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Melt in and heat vegetable oil and butter. Add in apples and saute until they just begin to soften. Add in sugar, molasses, cinnamon, vanilla and salt and mix well. Add in juice and allow to come to a slight boil. Lower heat to medium-low and continue cooking apples down until they just stew and turn slightly soft. Put in a deep baking dish.

Sprinkle the crumble over the apple stew as evenly as possible. Put into preheated oven and turn temperature up to 200 C or 400 F. Bake for 24 to 26 minutes or until crumble on top turns nice and brown.

Serve hot or cool to room temperature and serve with vanilla ice cream.

JonarSabilano
07-01-2009, 10:48 PM
Since Manong Joe has posted his carbonara recipe, here's my own:

JonarSabilano's Fettucine Carbonara

500 g San Remo fettucine, boiled in water with a bit of oil to keep them from sticking together, well-drained

2 cans Campbell mushroom soup
1 can button mushrooms, chopped
250 g bacon, chopped
1 chicken breast, shredded
1/2 stick butter
1 cup fresh milk
1 medium-sized onion, finely chopped
2 small boxes, Nestle all-purpose cream
Black ground pepper to taste
1 cup cheddar cheese, finely grated

In a non-stick saucepan, let bacon fry in its own fat until golden-brown. Add Next, add butter and wait until it has melted before adding the chicken, then the chopped onion. Once the onion bits are translucent, put the button mushrooms into the saucepan. Saute for a minute, then add mushroom soup, milk, all-purpose cream, and 1/2 of the grated cheddar cheese, in that order. Let the sauce simmer until it has thickened. Serve immediately.

Joescoundrel
08-18-2009, 10:33 PM
Any body with a long-time family pancit recipe...?

bchoter
08-19-2009, 12:11 AM
^ I'll try to get my lola's pansit cabagan recipe pare

Joescoundrel
09-07-2009, 02:06 AM
^ Where is the recipe?

Sakto, mukhang dadamputin ang Tigers sa pancitan with these last two games. :-X






Gameface is Philippine Basketball

bchoter
09-13-2009, 07:58 PM
Hmpo. secret na kasi nagkatotoo yung hula mo :( :'(

hehehe...

Baka pwedeng mag get together bago Final Four para matikman ang recipes mo pare ;)

thadzonline
11-19-2009, 03:40 PM
I tried some lamb chops last night. I always despised lamb kasi masyadong maanggo but I tried experimenting last night. Here's what I did:

Took out a cut of lamb(about a 100 grams ata yun). No marinade, I just soaked it in rock salt for about 15 minutes. I placed about half a cup of butter in the non-stick saucepan over medium heat. When the butter is clarified, I put in some minced garlic(1 clove), and onions(half of a small onion). Fried the lamb, medium rare. When I turned it over, I seasoned with salt, pepper and Spanish paprika. I did the same with the other side. Fried both sides until well done. For the sauce, tried some Pinoy flavoring. Juice from 2 calamansi, Kikkoman soy sauce and a tablespoon of brown sugar. Charap! The butter seems to take out that maanggo smell and flavor.

Wang-Bu
11-24-2009, 09:30 AM
Hmpo. secret na kasi nagkatotoo yung hula mo :( :'(

hehehe...

Baka pwedeng mag get together bago Final Four para matikman ang recipes mo pare ;)


Sir Bchoter supladito sa kusina si Sir Joe. Dun lang sa bahay namin nagluluto 'yan at para lang pasiklaban ang ibang lasenggo duon, hehehe!

Sam Miguel
11-26-2009, 03:21 PM
Here's an easy recipe for curing hangovers - - -

Two packs of instant beef mami, cook according to package directions
Small jar of spicy kimchi

Mix the kimchi into the mami before the noodles are fully cooked. Enjoy hot.

Joescoundrel
01-19-2010, 01:22 PM
Cooking with Spirit (or Spirits as the Case May Be)

Continental cooking abounds with the use of wine and beer. After all, Europe is still arguably the best wine territory on the planet. The French have their reduction and jus taken from essentially boiling down their robust reds and buttery whites. These sauces are excellent accompaniments for meats and poultry throughout the four seasons. Italians and Spaniards use their own earthy and spicy wines as braising mediums for the not-so-popular parts of cows and pigs such as beef tongue and beef cheek, pork intestines and other offal and of course their traditional paella and risotto.

Seldom however do we hear of stronger spirits such as whiskeys and bourbons being used in the Continent. Thankfully the home cooks of North America saw the value of using these beautiful grain-based liquors in their cooking. Aging these spirits in burnt oak barrels brings a lot of smokiness and depth to various barbecue sauces, stews and marinades for grilling and roasting recipes, staples of America’s culinary scene.

Having your Bourbon and eating it too so to speak. And here you thought they just made for good drinking. My personal favorite bourbon, classic Jack Daniels, makes for one heck of an aroma and flavor kick as a marinade/braising liquid in this adobo-style dish.

JACK'S BOURBON BRAISED LIEMPO AND CHICKEN GIZZARD

1 kg pork liempo, deboned and chopped, about 2 inches x 1 inch x 1 inch
1/2 kg chicken gizzard (complete with heart and liver), separate the liver from the gizzard and heart
1 1/2 cups Jack Daniel's Whiskey (Wild Turkey will do as well. Do not use Southern Comfort or any of the "premium" small batch whiskeys.)
3 tablespoons fresh kalamansi juice
3 tablespoons native vinegar (preferrably Ilokos or Quezon)
2 tablespoons Hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons Oyster sauce
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon Muscovado sugar (washed sugar will do)
1 tablespoon small red chili peppers, minced
1 tablespoon black pepper corns, roughly crushed
1 whole large head of native garlic, chopped
1 whole large purple onion, chopped
2 thumb-sized ginger roots, peeled, bashed and chopped
1/2 cup scallions, chopped small
2 large bayleaves, hand crumpled

Combine all marinating ingredients (except the scallions) in a large bowl and mix well. Marinade pork and chicken, two hours at room temperature, four to five hours if refrigerated. Turn over every 30 minutes to ensure an even marinating of all the meat pieces.

Remove pork and chicken from marinade and put in a separate bowl or deep platter. Also remove as much of the solid bits of spices and herbs as you can with a slotted spoon or spatula, also set aside on a deep saucer. Save the marinade.

Heat a large deep pan or pot over medium-high heat. When it is well heated through, put in the pork two to three pieces at a time. Then put in the chicken pieces, two to three at a time as well. Saute just so until all the meat pieces are a nice light brown with some slight burnt crusting. Roughly mash the livers with a fork until they break up, you don't need to pulverize them. Some fat would have rendered by this time. Add in the solid bits and saute them until they sweat. Add in the marinade. Bring everything to a good rolling boil while stirring. If you cease to stir your dish will burn. Add a half-cup of water as insurance liquid. Bring the flame down to low and cover. Simmer for 35-40 minutes.

Serve hot in large bowls or deep platters. Sprinkle scallions all over before serving; goes well with rice of almost any kind: plain, java, garlic, herbed. If you’re anywhere in Kentucky or Tennessee you will likely have mashed potatoes and some sweet coleslaw.

The marinade in this recipe could also actually be used as a barbecue marinade. Instead of going the extra step of stewing the meat, you could finish cooking off everything right on the grill. You can then reduce the sauce over a controlled simmer, strain it through a chinois or any good fine sieve and use that as your sauce.

Joescoundrel
01-19-2010, 01:42 PM
Getting It Back

I am not a doctor, and I barely got past high school biology. That being said, I must say that athletes are a lucky bunch. While most of us need to watch what we eat and how much we eat, it seems they can pretty much stick anything into their gobs given that they burn calories away at a warp speed pace. Endurance athletes such as triathlon and marathon guys and other time-distance racers are perfect examples of people burning calories like nobody’s business.

Basketball players may not be quite in the same class as endurance athletes but they do have to deal with a five other guys on the court who will bump them, grind them and basically do anything to stop them from moving the ball and getting to the basket. Even practice can be killer. Same thing for other team sports athletes like football players, volleyball players and the like. And unlike the guys who are either just running or riding for a couple of hours, team sports athletes are also jumping, changing directions constantly, and avoiding the defense. At the end of the game these guys are looking to load up and get back everything they lost on the field or on the court.

This is the idea behind the recovery meal: that meal an athlete would have after a tough game or a hard practice. A typical recovery meal for a varsity basketball player would have a big carbohydrate component, a good protein component and some vegetables for fiber. These components help you gain back the muscle and fat you lost, and thus help you gain back your normal energy levels. In this country that usually means the standard ulam at kanin, but there are other ways to get it back.

Make your own recovery meal!

JOE’S SATAY-STYLE PASTA SALAD

500 gms spaghetti (1 typically large pack form your favorite store will suffice), cook according to package directions

350 gms chicken thigh fillet, seasoned with 1 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt, 1 1/2 teaspoon mill-ground black pepper, 2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, 4 teaspoons fresh squeezed kalamansi juice (marinade for 1 hour at room temperature, 3 hours refrigerated).

Grill over a good charcoal or wood fire until there are grill marks on as many sides of each thigh as possible, about 4-5 minutes per side is enough, skin side first. Then chop into about 3/4-in dice.

1/2 cup toasted peanuts and/or cashew nuts, roughly chopped or crushed (don't over do it, its for texture and flavor)
2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

1/2 cup scallions, chopped
1/4 cup spring onions, chopped
1 small yellow pepper, 1 small green pepper, 1 small red pepper, each julienned

For Dressing __

1/3 cup crunchy American peanut butter (local ones are too sweet)
1/3 cup creamy American peanut butter (ditto)
2/3 cup light olive oil
2 tablespoons local garlic, minced
1 heaping tablespoon fresh squeezed kalamansi juice
1 tablespoon iodized fish sauce (patis)
1/2 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon mill-ground black pepper
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce

Mix all of the above ingredients together and pulse lightly in a food processor for about 10 seconds. Adjust for saltiness, acidity and spiciness according to personal taste. If you had to use local (and thus sweet) peanut butter, you might want to adjust by using either more of the fish sauce or more coarse salt.

Toss everything together in a large bowl except the nuts and sesame seeds. Chill for about an hour in the refrigerator. When the noodles and other ingredients have been well coated by the dressing then sprinkle nuts and sesame seeds and toss a little bit more. Serve immediately.

There might be purists out there who will say this is not really “satay” in its traditional sense. Do not let the name of the dish throw you though. All I can guarantee is that this will taste good and more importantly do wonders for your recovery after any strenuous physical exercise.

Joescoundrel
01-23-2010, 10:52 AM
Baa Baa White Sheep

Filipinos seem to have a love-hate relationship with lamb. Understandably, the common complaint is that there is a certain stench associated with the meat that Filipinos commonly refer to as "maanggo", loosely translated as a musky kind of stink, not exactly an appetizing description. Lamb indeed has a rather distinctive smell, but that should not stop you from trying it. One thing to keep in mind is that this is the type of meat that should not be used in "sabaw" dishes such as Nilaga and Sinigang, since the broth of these dishes will carry the smell of the meat and also make for a difficult medium to overcome said smell.

Lamb is the type of meat that lends itself well to sauces, braising, marinating, roasting, grilling and barbecue. Herbs such as rosemary, thyme, oregano, basil, mint and taragon traditionally go very well with lamb. Garlic, onions and onion-relatives such as scallions, shallots and leeks also go well with lamb, as do ginger, turmeric, fennel seeds, cumin seeds and mustard. Use these herbs and spices in just the right quantities and you'd be surprised how delicious lamb can be after all. You might also want to try things you would not normally associate with cooking gamey meats such as thick, natural yoghurt. Lemons, limes, all sorts of vinegars and other such acids help not only to take the smell away but also to break down the muscle fibers to tenderize them.

Try this:

JERK-STYLE BARBECUED LAMB CHOPS

1 kg bone-in lamb chops, about five or six chops depending on the size of the mother slab

Marinade___

1 tsp cayenned pepper
1 tsp mill-ground black pepper
1 tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp cinnamon powder
1 tsp dried flake rosemary
1 tsp dried flake oregano
1 tsp green Tabasco sauce
1 tsp lemon zest, minced
1/2 tbsp coarse salt
1 tbsp Grey Poupon mustard
1 tbsp Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp butter, softened to room temperature
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp natural yogurt
1/4 cup medium to full-bodied red wine
1 whole head of local garlic, minced
1 whole head of local purple onion, minced

Mix all marinade ingredients together well until it forms a sort of paste. Smother paste onto all of the lamb chops. Set aside and let the marinade work, one hour at room temperature, five to six hours or even overnight if refrigerated.

Heat grill to medium-high to high. Make sure the grill is hot by putting your hands palms down about 10 centimeters above the grill. If you cannot keep it there for five seconds that grill is ready. If you are using a natural charcoal or wood grill, move all of the coals or wood to one side. Put the lamb chops on the side cleared of the coals or wood. Cover the grill. Turn the chops over after 20 minutes, and then cover the grill again. After another 20 minutes remove the chops and serve immediately.

At the beginning of the grilling, while the chops are just starting their grilling, take a cup of the red wine you used for the marinade and put it into a small sauce pot. Bring that to a quick boil over high flame and then reduce the flame and allow it to simmer. Add in the remainder of the marinade paste into this wine, add in a teaspoon of coarse salt and mill-ground black pepper. Reduce that until there is only one-half to two-thirds of the wine remaining. Add in a tablespoon of butter or heavy all-purpose cream and swirl it in, do not stir it in. Spoon onto the chops as a sauce.

Sam Miguel
02-09-2010, 12:00 AM
Anybody with a good kambing recipe? Either kaldereta or adobo.

patupup
07-22-2010, 10:45 AM
hi, i really love PANCAKE HOUSE's classic spaghetti... Does anyone of you know or at least can share this recipe?

Thank you!

Sam Miguel
07-23-2010, 02:15 PM
^^^ Pancake House's spaghetti is pretty much the American version of the classic Spaghetti Bolognese of Italy. i.e. its al dente to nnot-quite-yet al dente spaghetti with a chunky and robust meat sauce that is on the salty and brown side rather than the red and tomato-rich version of the original.

The sercret therefore is in the meat sauce. Their meat sauce uses coarse ground beef or (if you have the patience for it like in the old days of Pancake House and Makati Supermarket's Coffee Shop) fine dice chopped beef. You might also want to use a less-prime cut like chuck or brisket since these are more flavorful and better suited to the long simmer required of any good traditional pasta sauce.

I'd say for every half-kilo pack of spaghetti you use a half-kilo of beef. All you need to do is saute that in one whole minced garlic, one medium purple onion, two large stalks of celery, two large or three medium ripe red tomato, one large dried bay leaf or Laurel leaf, and season it with salt and pepper to taste. Add in 250 ml of water to help the simmering process and put in one beef flavoring cube (I prefer Knorr). Simmer this for about 40-45 minutes to allow some of the liquid to reduce away. Serve immediately on top of your cooked spaghetti. Sprinkle with grated Kraft sharp cheddar cheese.

LION
07-23-2010, 05:08 PM
My all-time favorite in Pancake house's menu are Tapsilog, beef taco and coffee. Perfect lunch meal for me.

patupup
08-03-2010, 10:16 AM
^^^ Pancake House's spaghetti is pretty much the American version of the classic Spaghetti Bolognese of Italy. i.e. its al dente to nnot-quite-yet al dente spaghetti with a chunky and robust meat sauce that is on the salty and brown side rather than the red and tomato-rich version of the original.

The sercret therefore is in the meat sauce. Their meat sauce uses coarse ground beef or (if you have the patience for it like in the old days of Pancake House and Makati Supermarket's Coffee Shop) fine dice chopped beef. You might also want to use a less-prime cut like chuck or brisket since these are more flavorful and better suited to the long simmer required of any good traditional pasta sauce.

I'd say for every half-kilo pack of spaghetti you use a half-kilo of beef. All you need to do is saute that in one whole minced garlic, one medium purple onion, two large stalks of celery, two large or three medium ripe red tomato, one large dried bay leaf or Laurel leaf, and season it with salt and pepper to taste. Add in 250 ml of water to help the simmering process and put in one beef flavoring cube (I prefer Knorr). Simmer this for about 40-45 minutes to allow some of the liquid to reduce away. Serve immediately on top of your cooked spaghetti. Sprinkle with grated Kraft sharp cheddar cheese.

thank you very much sir Sam Miguel!
question: wala ba talaga itong liver spread? :)

Wang-Bu
08-03-2010, 01:52 PM
Nabanggit na rin lang ni sir lion ang tapsilog ako naman ay may ginagawa na tradisyonal sa tapa. hindi kasi ako mahilig sa matatamis na version ng tapa, mas gusto ko 'yung kinalakihan ko na maalat at pinirito hanggang malutong ang tapa. ang sikreto lang naman diyan ay asnan ng maige ang tapa at siguruhin na manipis ang pagkakagayat ng karne, mapa-baka man o kalabaw. sabihin na nating sa bawat kilo ng karne nasa dalawang kutsarang magaspang na asin ang gamitin. tsaka may isa pang sikreto diyan: isampay ninyo kapag naasnan na, hangga't maari isang buong araw dun sa nabibilad. isampay niyong parang labada na nakasipit sa sampayan. oo lalangawin nga, pero wala naman 'yon kasi piprituhin naman sa napakainit na mantika ang tapa, patay kung ano mang mikrobyo idapo ng langaw o ano pa man. kapag tag-ulan ilatag niyo ang karne sa bilao at tutukan niyo ng electric fan sa pinakamababang setting, isang buong araw din, para bang style ng mga puti na "dry aging" kuno. talaga naman kasing dina-dry ang totoong tapa para nga kapag pinirito na may kunat at lutong siya, hindi gaya nung mga nakakasalukasok na marinadang tapa na minsan akala mo lumalangoy pa sa marinada kapag hinain na.

bchoter
08-03-2010, 06:40 PM
Sa mga magagawi sa Norte at tinatamad mag tapa... hanapin sa Tuguegarao ang Light house sometihng. Masrap ang kanilang tapang kalabaw na sakto sa nipis ang hiwa na hindi mananakit ang ngipin sa pag nguya... samahan niyo na rin ng longanisa

Sam Miguel
08-04-2010, 09:22 AM
^^^ Pancake House's spaghetti is pretty much the American version of the classic Spaghetti Bolognese of Italy. i.e. its al dente to nnot-quite-yet al dente spaghetti with a chunky and robust meat sauce that is on the salty and brown side rather than the red and tomato-rich version of the original.

The sercret therefore is in the meat sauce. Their meat sauce uses coarse ground beef or (if you have the patience for it like in the old days of Pancake House and Makati Supermarket's Coffee Shop) fine dice chopped beef. You might also want to use a less-prime cut like chuck or brisket since these are more flavorful and better suited to the long simmer required of any good traditional pasta sauce.

I'd say for every half-kilo pack of spaghetti you use a half-kilo of beef. All you need to do is saute that in one whole minced garlic, one medium purple onion, two large stalks of celery, two large or three medium ripe red tomato, one large dried bay leaf or Laurel leaf, and season it with salt and pepper to taste. Add in 250 ml of water to help the simmering process and put in one beef flavoring cube (I prefer Knorr). Simmer this for about 40-45 minutes to allow some of the liquid to reduce away. Serve immediately on top of your cooked spaghetti. Sprinkle with grated Kraft sharp cheddar cheese.

thank you very much sir Sam Miguel!
question: wala ba talaga itong liver spread? :)


I don't think so. Liver spread tends to make sauces pasty, thus defeating the purpose of the rough grund beef in this sauce. Besides, I do not aste any liver spread in this dish. There is usually a bitter aftertaste to anything with liver spread, and there is none here.

lekiboy
08-04-2010, 11:41 AM
^^^
I'd say for every half-kilo pack of spaghetti you use a half-kilo of beef. All you need to do is saute that in one whole minced garlic, one medium purple onion, two large stalks of celery, two large or three medium ripe red tomato, one large dried bay leaf or Laurel leaf, and season it with salt and pepper to taste. Add in 250 ml of water to help the simmering process and put in one beef flavoring cube (I prefer Knorr). Simmer this for about 40-45 minutes to allow some of the liquid to reduce away. Serve immediately on top of your cooked spaghetti. Sprinkle with grated Kraft sharp cheddar cheese.


Sam,
Instead of 250ml of water, you should try 250ml of fresh milk sometime then add 2 tbsp of butter...the taste will be richer and the sauce will have more body. The kids, in particular, will love them.

Sam Miguel
08-04-2010, 03:02 PM
^^^ Lekiboy if I add in that much animal fat to beef that might become my last meal... :-X

Sam Miguel
08-04-2010, 03:13 PM
I love kilawin na isda, but I also go for the cevice of the Latin Americans. They are essentially the same: you employ an acidic liquid like citrus juice or vinegar in order to cold cook raw fish.

I enjoy a good tuna cevice. Use a half kilo of fresh tuna diced into about an inch-cube, does not have to be sashimi grade, and in fact I rather like the not-so-prime tuna because they have a meatier flavor, not as antiseptic-clean as sashimi tuna.

Mix the fish in a large bowl with one small fine-chopped purple onion, one small fine-chopped white onion, one small bunch of fine-chopped spring onion, one thumb-sized peeled, bashed and minced ginger root, one large small-diced red tomato, one medium small-diced and peeled cucumber, and two tablespoons of toasted-fried minced garlic.

Add in a quarter cup of fresh-squeezed kalamansi juice, two tablespoons of sukang paombong, a quarter cup of kakang gata, coarse salt and mill-ground black pepper to taste.

Refrigerate for one or two hours or let sit at room temperature for 20-30 minutes then serve.

Sam Miguel
12-11-2012, 11:10 AM
‘Bacalhau’, gambas, ‘frango no churrasco com piri piri’–Portuguese cooking done exceptionally well

By Reggie Aspiras

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:35 am | Thursday, December 6th, 2012

JOÃO Branquinho’s delectable “comfort food” done the Portuguese way

I had the most wonderful meal at Xavier School’s First Saturday Market. It’s amusing to think that some of the best culinary experiences we’ve had centered on dishes that were simple.

Take, for instance, the delectable chicken dish I had, which was well-marinated for 48 hours and grilled for 45 minutes, Portuguese-style. The cooking must have been flawlessly executed so that the chicken was soft and moist on the inside, with flavorful charred bits of crackling skin.

The grilled chicken was served with mouthwatering piri-piri sauce (mild or spicy—a blend of peppers, chilies, herbs and spices, soaked in olive oil and allowed to age and mellow over time) and a tasty black olive-flavored rice.

So simple yet so unforgettable!

Excellent gastronomy

João Branquinho is responsible for the meal that left me craving for more. When I learned that he caters, I booked him for Monday lunch and I asked him to prepare a typical Portuguese menu. He cooked bacalhau a bras (codfish), frango no churrasco com piri piri (grilled chicken), gambas com piri piri (grilled prawns) and black olive rice.

João is from South Alentejo, Portugal. With pride, he said that his native region he is full of history, excellent gastronomy and empty beaches. “We produce very excellent wines, olive oil, Iberian pork, hams; and the region is very rich in marble, which is my family’s main business.

“I moved to the Philippines in 2009 with my Filipino-Chinese wife Stephanie. I felt it was the right time; the country was filled with promise. Not knowing what to do exactly, I started importing Super Bock, Portugal’s most famous and multi-awarded beer, blending the southern Portuguese barley with German hops and northern mountain water.

“In fact, the chicken was something I came up with so I could sell more beer. It was an experiment I did at an event in Rockwell, in April 2010, for Father’s Day. Luckily, the people enjoyed the food, particularly Elbert Cuenca and Raffy David (I owe them a lot) who loved the chicken and asked if I could cook for their car-wash event.”

It was a success, as there couldn’t have been a better formula—men, cars, beer and freshly grilled chicken with spicy piri-piri sauce!

Nice texture

As he was cooking, João regaled us with his stories. At half past 12, lunch was served. His cooking style was evident in every dish—simple fare cooked to perfection by drawing out the best quality from every ingredient.

The whole spread was exceptional. The bacalhau was not only tasty but also had a nice texture; the chunky bits of fish and the fried potatoes made all the difference.

The gambas was to die for—the shrimps were soft, tasty and juicy, even when cold. All these were topped with mouth-watering piri-piri sauce.

When the chicken was finally taken off the grill and served, João uncorked a bottle of Portuguese wine, a Filoco Duoro Tinto that he imports exclusively. Even the wine turned out to be a very pleasant surprise—one of the best wines of the season for me! At P450 a bottle, it is clean, easy to drink, light, with “no sharpness,” has a nice finish, and leaves no heaviness. It is a beautifully tinged red that can be had for lunch.

Monday lunch turned out better than I expected. With João’s cooking, the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

(E-mail João at portoalegregourmet@gmail.com and have him cater your Christmas parties for a merry and tasty Portuguese-style Christmas.)

João shares a traditional Portuguese Christmas Recipe.

Bacalhau Da Consoada

(Christmas Eve Cod)

1 kg salted cod cut around eight fillets; João gets his from Cash & Carry.

6 large potatoes, boiled until soft, skin on and peeled, cut to large cubes

1 large napa cabbage, sliced into eight, crosswise; blanch until tender

6 hard-boiled eggs, sliced in half

1 c extra virgin olive oil

9 cloves garlic

3 tbsp sherry, apple cider or wine vinegar

Rinse cod and soak for 24 hours submerged in water in a bowl, with several water changes.

Put the bacalhau in a pot.

Submerge the fish in water.

Cook very briefly. When the water starts to boil, stop cooking

Drain cod, remove the bones and excess skin. You may leave the rest of the skin on; remember not to flake the bacalhau, they should be in large chunks, about 2 x 2-inch chunks.

To arrange: Divide a large platter in four. Each ingredient should be laid on the same platter, but separately. On one side, arrange the cabbage; beside it, the fish; beside the fish, the eggs; beside the eggs, the potatoes.

Sprinkle parsley only over the potatoes to garnish.

To make the sauce: In a pan, heat olive oil and cook garlic until almost brown.

Off the fire, add vinegar and mix well.

You can put some chopped coriander on the sauce.

Transfer sauce to a bowl and serve on the side with bacalhau.

Feliz Natal!

Sam Miguel
12-13-2012, 08:56 AM
Horseradish crusted salmon

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

11:25 pm | Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

In her television shows “Fresh,” “Sugar” and most recently “Bake,” Canadian chef Anna Olson demonstrates how to make both simple and complex dishes: cinnamon buns, for instance, or French meringue and the Canadian holiday beef pie called tourtiere.

With her friendly demeanor balancing an air of authority, Olson makes the recipes look not only appetizing but also doable.

But while most of her shows focus on Western cuisine, Olson is also very much interested in Oriental cooking and ingredients. After just a few trips to the Philippines, she has concocted a recipe for calamansi cheesecake, incorporating the local baby limes with sweetened flaked coconut, lime zest and cream cheese.

Likewise, she has managed to merge the exotic flavors of coconut milk and ginger with sweet potatoes and chicken stock to create a smooth, sultry soup. She’s also fascinated by the lightness of the Filipino ensaymada, which she has tried during her visits to Manila.

At a recent dinner in Pepita’s kitchen in Magallanes Village, Anna and her husband Michael were adventurous enough to try the iconic Filipino dish lechon. But it wasn’t the ordinary, garden-variety type of roasted pig. Host Dedet de la Fuente Santos prepared three kinds of lechon, and while all of them had the crisp, crackling skin so prized in a roasted pig, each one was made more special with its own stuffing.

There was sisig rice stuffing for the first lechon, marble potatoes and garlic bulbs for the second lechon and for the third lechon, stuffing infused with the fragrance and flavor of truffles.

Unlike other Westerners, Michael and Anna didn’t think including the pig’s head in the presentation of the lechon was a big deal. They were also game enough to try the balut salpicao served as an appetizer, as well as other Filipino delicacies such as the dessert dubbed Super Suman—a humongous sticky rice cake sprinkled with bits of Chocnut, yema, pastillas and macapuno.

Here’s one of Anna’s recipes: salmon fillets encrusted with a mixture of bread crumbs, fresh dill and butter. Her recipe comes with its own side dishes of balsamic-glazed onions and herbed risotto, but you can also serve the salmon with just plain rice and a salad of vegetable greens.


HORSERADISH Crusted Salmon

4 Servings

¼ c bread crumbs

¼ c chopped fresh dill

2 tbsp butter, melted

½ tsp fine salt

1½ tsp horseradish

1 lemon (zest and juice)

4 salmon fillets (or other suitable fish)

Dill sprigs and lemon wedges for garnish

Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Line a baking tray with parchment paper. In a bowl, mix together bread crumbs, dill, butter, salt, horseradish, lemon zest and lemon juice. Pack the mixture into each salmon fillet, dividing equally. Arrange the salmon fillets on the parchment paper.

Bake in preheated oven for around 12 minutes. If desired, garnish with fresh dill sprigs and lemon wedges.

(Anna Olson’s shows are aired on the Asian Food Channel. Check local listings for the schedule.)

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog: www.normachikiamco.com and Facebook fanpage: www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco

Cook’s tips:

Horseradish is available in the condiments section of large supermarkets (usually in the same shelf as mustard).

For a stronger flavor, you can use more horseradish.

Sam Miguel
12-13-2012, 08:57 AM
Easy-serve ice cream you can make from leftover fruits

By Reggie Aspiras

Philippine Daily Inquirer

11:21 pm | Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

Fruits and ham have always been the stars of the Noche Buena table, but each year, there always seems to be something new—a new fruit, a new ham, or a new way of serving fruit or cooking ham.

But, after all the festivities, have you ever wondered what to do with all the fruits you bought so much of? Have you ever felt bad about having to throw them away because the only ones enjoying them are the fruit flies?

If you answered yes to both questions, the Yonana Machine is the solution to your problem.

What a toy this is. Finally, all the overripe fruits can be put to good use, with the machine instantly turning them to soft-serve ice cream. The ice cream really does have that smooth, silky consistency, especially if you use fleshy, creamy fruits such as bananas and avocados. With mangoes and berries, it comes out more like a sorbet.

The product is 100-percent pure fruit you can mix and match to your heart’s content. Healthy desserts in an instant!

I have tried the machine with mangoes, strawberries mixed with bananas, melons, guyabano, papaya. My favorites are avocado drizzled with condensed milk; bananas with crushed Choc-Nut, tres-oras or salted caramel spooned over them; frozen US pears with crumbled blue cheese and melon with a piece of prosciutto to nibble on!

I’m hoping to use the gadget on durian soon.

The machine is so easy to use. Simply peel your fruit (those that are a bit overripe are the tastiest), then freeze the fruits for 24 hours or at least overnight. Then place them on the chute and push down with the plunger. Under the spout, position a bowl to catch your fruity soft-serve ice cream.

The Yonana machines are available at the Dizon Farms Stall at Market! Market!

Last week, by the way, I received my Christmas Bone-in Fiesta Ham from Purefoods, but to my surprise, it was with a twist: It was spiral sliced! I was told the ham was created this way to ensure that we enjoy as many slices out of it as possible.

Like a child, I was so excited when I saw that it was something new and different. I cooked it the day after to share with my students. This is the recipe we did in class.

Spiral Christmas ham

In a baking dish deep enough to hold the ham, combine: 1 liter of pineapple juice, the juice and shells of 3 oranges (do not throw away the shell of the squeezed orange, combine it with the marinade), 2 tsp salt, 1 tsp ground coriander seeds, ½ tsp cumin, 1 tsp allspice, 1 tsp black pepper, 2 tsp. mixed herbs (combination of thyme, marjoram, rosemary), 2 bay leaves, and 2 tbsp sugar.

Put ham fat side up on the baking pan. The ham doesn’t have to be completely submerged in the liquid.

Bake the ham 30 minutes in pre-heated 350 ºF oven.

Open the oven door and with a ladle, bathe the un-submerged portion of the ham with the juices. After bathing, bake for another 15 minutes.

Remove the ham from the pan and allow to cool to room temperature on a rack. At this time, it will be very tender; since it is pre-sliced, be extra gentle in handling it.

When the ham has cooled, brush the fat side generously with yellow mustard (about ½ c) and after, with about ½ c of orange marmalade.

Pat the ham with light brown sugar and insert a dozen cloves at 2-inch intervals to form diamonds.

Put the ham back in the oven, again at 350 ºF, and bake until the sugar melts to form a crust, about 25-30 minutes.

For sauce, combine the following in a saucepan and bring to a boil: ¾ c sugar, ½ c fresh orange juice, 2 tbsp white-wine vinegar, 1½ salt, 4 c ham juice/stock, 1 tbsp butter, the zest 1 orange, 3-4 tbsp orange liquor (optional); if you don’t have any, you can use Tanduay rum.

Simmer the sauce for 15 minutes and thicken with cornstarch water (1 tbsp cornstarch + 1 tbsp water).

Season to taste with salt, sugar and pepper.

My first Christmas Ham for 2012 was gone faster than I expected; it was devoured in minutes. I find that the spiral variant tastes a lot like the classic Fiesta bone-in ham—smoked, sweet and salty, but only this time, more tender, juicy and tasty. We all loved it.

That it was sliced into a spiral made it more delicious since the slits in the meat absorbed all the flavors. Each piece of ham had hints of the fruits, herbs and spices that we baked it with. Even better, everyone can now carve ham with no fear. No more complaining why one’s piece is thicker than the other, or if there will be enough ham for everyone.

The spiral ham is not just easy to eat, but even easier to serve.

Purefoods Fiesta Spiral Hams are now available in all leading supermarkets in Metro Manila.

Sam Miguel
01-10-2013, 09:42 AM
Upscale grilled cheese sandwich

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:24 am | Thursday, January 10th, 2013

A very dear relative, who was here recently for the Christmas holidays, gave me this recipe for an upscale grilled cheese sandwich. Upscale, perhaps, is the operative word here. Unlike the classic grilled cheese sandwich which uses plain cheddar, this one is made with mozzarella and Gruyère, Italian and Swiss cheeses. But the real surprise in the sandwich is the mango jam. Tart and sweet, it harmonizes with the cheeses to create a perfectly balanced and delectable flavor.

Upscale Grilled Cheese Sandwich

Makes 2 sandwiches

4 slices white bread

¼ c butter

2 tbsp mango jam

¼ c grated mozzarella cheese

¼ c grated Gruyère cheese

If desired, trim the crusts from the bread. Spread about one tablespoon butter on one side of a bread slice. Spread one tablespoon mango jam on the unbuttered side of the same bread slice. Spoon two tablespoons each of the mozzarella and Gruyère cheeses over the mango jam. Spread one tablespoon butter on a second bread slice and position it over the cheeses, buttered side up. Repeat with remaining bread slices, butter, mango jam and the cheeses.

Heat a nonstick skillet to medium-low. Put the prepared sandwiches, buttered side down, on the skillet and press their tops with a heat-proof spatula or a wooden spoon to flatten the sandwiches slightly.

Heat until the cheeses start to melt and the bottom sides of the bread become golden brown, about 30 seconds to one minute. Flip the sandwiches over to brown the other side. Remove from skillet and serve.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog: www.normachikiamco.com and Facebook fan page: www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco

Cook’s tips:

Good quality bread is key to making flavorful sandwiches. For this recipe, use bread that’s fresh and of high quality. Try those in specialty shops like the French Baker, Ji-Pan and hotel bakeshops.

You can also use sourdough or a loaf of French baguette instead of sliced bread. If using baguette, cut the loaf on the diagonal so you get bigger slices of bread.

For easier spreading, make sure the butter is at room temperature. Remove it from the refrigerator around 30 minutes before you start to cook.

You can grill the sandwich in a sandwich maker or, better yet (if you’re lucky enough to have one), use a Panini maker.

To make a complete meal, serve the sandwich with soup and a vegetable or potato salad.

Sam Miguel
01-10-2013, 09:44 AM
Serradura

Step By Step

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:31 am | Thursday, January 10th, 2013

Check your fridge and see if you still have leftover biscuits, cookies, food for the gods, brownies, etc. What to do with them? Transform them into a delicious no-bake dessert called Serradura.

Serradura, also known as Macau Sawdust Pudding, is a Portuguese dessert consisting of sweet cream and crushed biscuits or cookies. It’s usually presented in a glass layered with the cream and biscuits and topped with fruits.

Chef KC Jardin of San Miguel Food Inc. demonstrates how this easy-to-do dessert is prepared with only few ingredients needed.

“Serradura is like our local refrigerator cake,” says Jardin. “You can use any biscuits or cookies like chocolate chip cookies, Oreo, Marie, otap, galletas de patatas, etc. For the bars like brownies and food for the gods, you need to dry them up first or toast them in the oven for easy crushing.”

To whip the cream, either use an electric mixer (5-10 minutes) or a hand mixer (15-20 minutes). You can top the desserts with any fruits, such as leftover fruit cocktail (drained), apples, kiat-kiat and strawberry.

Use a nice shot glass or martini glass for this sweet delight.

Makes 8-12 servings.

Ingredients

0.5 l all-purpose cream

¼ c Magnolia Pure Fresh Milk

RICH and creamy Serradura

1 can condensed milk

1 c leftover biscuits or cookies

Mint leaves for garnish or leftover fruits

E-mail the author at vbaga@inquirer.com.ph.

Sam Miguel
01-17-2013, 09:38 AM
‘Sinigang na baboy sa katmon’–altogether different from the one made with ‘sampalok’

By Reggie Aspiras

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:58 am | Thursday, January 17th, 2013

My love for trees and for plants in general is something I have proudly inherited from my dad, who, throughout his lifetime, planted thousands of them.

When I saw the book “Philippine Native Trees 101,” I couldn’t help but marvel at the many species endemic to us. I was delighted by the many stories of the contributors, who recounted memories of their childhood, back when trees were abundant and how these towering masterpieces of nature played a significant part in their lives.

Happy as I was browsing through the pages and learning about our local trees, I was also deeply saddened to discover that quite a number of our local species have become endangered.

I immediately called Tita Imelda Sarmiento of Hortica Filipina Foundation (who wrote the book intro) to ask if she knew anyone who knew about trees, specifically their culinary uses, in the hope that if we were further educated on the subject, more trees will be saved somehow.

She gave me a list of people to get in touch with. But for some strange reason, none of those conversations bore fruit, until six months after, when another Imelda, Imelda Go, walked into my kitchen and gave me with what I now fondly call the katmon (elephant apple) gift set: a plant, a basket of its fruits and flowers. She said that the fruit is a must-try as a souring agent for sinigang in place of sampalok, and to blend with sugar and ice to make a refreshing shake.

She then proceeded to show me how to cook with it, slowly removing a couple of layers of its peel, until we got the heart of it—a light-green interior that looked like it was hand-carved to an angled sphere, with a spider-like pink flower right in the center.

The katmon tree is not a very tall one; the ones I saw had a straight trunk with leaves that grew naturally into a round topiary. It bears fruit abundantly and is splashed here and there with huge showy white blooms.

The katmon belongs to that special group of random things that pop up before your very eyes and create an “aha” moment, the type that makes you stop and say, yes, there is a God, and he must have created this splendid tree during one of those days that he awoke even more creative than usual.

It was time for me to try and cook with it.

‘Sinigang na baboy sa katmon’

1 k pork liempo, bone-in, skin on, cubed 1 inch

2 onions, peeled and quartered

10-12 katmon fruits depending on how sour you want your sigang to be (outer layers of skin removed until the pulp and the pink flower-like fibers are exposed), quartered

3 green chilies, pang-sigang

Fish sauce, to taste

1 tsp whole peppercorns

Salt, to taste

1 large eggplant, sliced

1 small radish, sliced

Few strings of long beans

Half a bunch of kangkong (water spinach)

Wash liempo without drying it completely; the water on the meat will help extract more oil.

On a hot thick-bottomed soup pot, put the liempo, stirring every so often, allowing the meat to brown and extract its own fat (if your meat does not extract enough fat and starts sticking to the bottom of the pan, add a tablespoon of vegetable oil).

Once the meats are seared, add the onions, the katmon and the chilies to the meat.

Add a tablespoon or two of patis and peppercorns; continue to mix until the onions and katmon are soft and the fish sauce fragrant, about 5 minutes.

Add water, enough to cover the meat without drowning it.

Bring the mixture to a boil then lower the heat, leaving it to simmer until tender.

Season to taste with salt and patis; seasoning with both makes for a more balanced dish than just using one over the other.

Add the vegetables.

Serve.

Rich, tart broth

Everyone I made this sinigang for loved it! It is very different from the one made with sampalok, which is another dish altogether. For starters, the fruit is a cross between kamias (though not as sharp and as tart), balimbing and green tomatoes. The combination makes for a broth that is tart but rich, well-rounded, full-bodied and thick (as the katmon cooks, it turns to mush, thus thickening the soup as gabi does, but with no starchiness).

The soup it makes is the kind that leaves you wanting for more. The taste and flavors are clean with no sharp or tangy spike on the palate. It goes down smoothly and leaves no aftertaste.

The katmon is as beautiful as it is delicious, a tree worth planting, propagating and saving (the tree’s current status is vulnerable) for the sinigang of our future generations.

Other katmon uses, according to the “Native Trees 101” book: “Fruit is eaten fresh or made into jellies or sauces; fleshy sepals of fruit also eaten and used to make cough syrup and hair shampoo; bark yields red dye; wood used for general construction.”

I wish to laud Mang Morlinie for his effort to save and propagate the katmon.

Sam Miguel
01-17-2013, 09:39 AM
Mediterranean-style ‘tilapia’ fillet

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:52 am | Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Perhaps this is what some would jokingly call sosyal na tilapia, or tilapia for society’s upper crust. Cut into fillets, stuffed with olive tapenade and served on a pool of tomato sauce that’s been infused with wine and saffron, it’s a far, far cry from inihaw na tilapia or some such dish.

But, after all, this dish is served in the posh InterContinental Hotel Paphos, a five-star luxury hotel in the Aphrodite Hills of Cyprus, a favorite vacation spot of the rich and famous. It’s one of the dishes currently on the a la carte dinner menu of InterContinental Manila’s Prince Albert Rotisserie, along with other signature dishes from its sister hotels worldwide.

When I first saw the dish, I was surprised at how fat the tilapia looked. But it was only because it was two tilapia fillets bound together, with a filling of sautéed spinach between them. InterCon executive chef Alisdair Bletcher said they wrap the fish in pig’s caul to hold its shape and prevent the filling from spilling out during the cooking process.

Pig’s caul is actually the lining of a pig’s abdominal cavity and is known in Tagalog as sinsal or panyo-panyo. Sometimes used for binding embutido, sinsal needs to be washed very well before being used, but it has the added advantage of basting the food with fat, thereby adding a bit of flavor.

Pig’s caul is not readily available in the market; you’ll probably have to order it in advance from your favorite meat vendor. One alternative is to just bind the fillets together with a kitchen twine. It will do the job acceptably, though the basting of fat will be missing.

Aside from the sosyal na tilapia, InterCon is also serving, for its Kitchen Tour promo, pan-fried duck foie gras with rosemary infused duck jus and couscous (from its Lebanon hotel), pumpkin and ginger soup with seared scallops from InterContinental Berlin, and strawberry mille-feuille with vanilla goat cheese mousse, a signature dish of its London hotel.

Making this Mediterranean-style tilapia can be quite challenging as it involves several steps. But here I’ve simplified it for the home cook. It’s worth the effort, if only to have a taste of what guests in InterContinental’s Cyprus branch are eating.

(From Jan. 10-31, Hotel InterContinental’s Prince Albert Rotisserie is serving a special a la carte menu of signature dishes from its sister hotels. Available for dinner, Mondays-Saturdays. For reservations, call tel. 7937000.)

Mediterranean-Style Tilapia Fillet

Makes three servings

For the tomatoes:

¼ c extra virgin olive oil

280 g tomatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch squares

¼ c balsamic vinegar

1 tbsp white sugar

¼ c white wine

1 pinch saffron threads

2 stems spring onions, sliced

Salt and pepper

For the tilapia:

¼ c unsalted butter

3 medium onions, chopped

3 cloves garlic, chopped

225 g spinach leaves

Salt and pepper

6 tilapia fillets, with skin on

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

¼ c olive tapenade (see tips)

Garnish:

Caper berries, fried

3 sprigs flat leaf parsley or fresh rosemary

Melon balls

Prepare the tomatoes:

Heat a large shallow pan and pour in olive oil. Add the tomatoes and sauté for one minute. Add the balsamic vinegar, sugar, wine and saffron threads. Bring to a boil. Simmer until tomatoes are tender.

Stir in spring onions and season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and set aside.

Cook the tilapia:

Melt the butter in a pan and sauté the onions and garlic until fragrant. Stir in the spinach and mix well. Season with salt and pepper. Cook until spinach leaves are wilted. Remove from heat and allow to cool.

Brush the tilapia fillets with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange one fillet skin side down on a cutting board and spread some tapenade on the surface. Spoon in some of the spinach. Spread some tapenade on inner surface of another fillet and arrange it on top of the first fillet, skin side up. Tie the fillets with kitchen twine so the filling doesn’t spill out.

Repeat with remaining fillets, olive oil, tapenade and spinach.

Wrap the fillets in aluminum foil and cook in a turbo broiler at 180°C (or 350°F) for about 20-25 minutes, or until fully cooked. Unwrap the fillets and remove the twine. Spoon some of the prepared tomatoes on three large pasta or dinner plates, dividing equally. Arrange fillets over the tomatoes and garnish with capers, parsley or rosemary and melon balls.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog, www.normachikiamco.com, and Facebook fan page, www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco.

Cook’s tips

Olive tapenade is sold in specialty shops, but you can also make your own. In a blender, combine: 4 cloves peeled garlic; 1 c pitted kalamata olives; 1 tbsp well-drained capers, 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley; 3-4 fresh basil leaves, cut into thin strips; 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice; 2 tbsp olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Process in the blender until of pasty consistency.

Set aside any extra olive tapenade and use as a spread for crackers or thinly sliced baguette.

You can have the fish vendor fillet the tilapia for you. Be sure to ask them to leave the skin on. If desired, before preparing the fish, remove any sharp pins or bones (tinik) that may be embedded in the fish.

Sam Miguel
02-20-2013, 11:00 AM
Cocido/pochero – Manila style

TURO-TURO

By Claude Tayag

(The Philippine Star) | Updated February 14, 2013 - 12:00am

Sauces of contention: The berenjena/eggplant and tomato sauces are a Filipino invention to accompany our cocido and pochero. The sauces are born out of the Tagalogs’ penchant for adding sour (i.e., vinegar, kalamansi and kamias) as a counterpoint to a cloyingly rich dish (pampaalis suyâ).

In my column last week, “Spanish Cuisine 101,” my lesson plan (if you will) was tracing the origins, similarities and differences between our cocido/pochero and that of its progenitor, cocido madrileño. As is the tradition in Spain, the kind of meats and vegetables may vary from house to house, region to region, or what is preferred or afforded. But what separates us mainly is the manner of eating it and the condiments that accompany our version.

I received several reactions from readers, basically agreeing with what I wrote, but all were wondering where our berenjena (Spanish for eggplant) sauce that goes with our cocido/pochero came from. The tomato sauce is easily ingestible (pun intended); the Spaniards have their pan con tomate (pa amb tomaquet in Catalan), which is basically a mash of ripe tomatoes, garlic, olive oil and salt, slathered over a slice of toasted bread, and also we’ve borrowed their way with sofrito or sautéing with garlic, onion and tomato, but have parted ways with our addition of ginger and bagoong alamang/shrimp paste, bagoong isda/anchovy paste, or patis/fish sauce.

By the way, in the Philippine context, cocido generally refers to the soup-based boiled meats and vegetable dish, while pochero is the tomato-based stew of the same meats and veggies (though interchangeable at times), and both are served with the berenjena sauce. But wait! In Legazpi City, Albay, cocido refers to their clear broth fish head soup (quite similar to sinigang but not as sour), while in Cebu, pochero is boiled beef shank, more popularly known as bulalo by the rest of us. Confusing enough? I’m just testing if you’re still with me (wink, wink).

Going back to the berenjena sauce. Cultural anthropologist Dr. Butch Zialcita of Ateneo de Manila University theorizes that Tagalogs love to counter cloyingly rich (suyâ, surfeit) dishes by adding a sour sawsawan (dipping sauce, i.e., vinegar, kalamansi, kamias). My co-author in the Kulinarya cookbook, former restaurateur-chef Conrad Calalang, attests that our berenjena sauce is a uniquely Tagalog concoction. He said it is nowhere to be found in Madrid, not even in his personal favorite restaurant Taverna La Bola (a Madrid institution since 1870, mentioned in my column last week); he also asked his friends residing there. Writer Chit Lijaoco of Sta. Rosa, Laguna, informed me they have la-oya, quite similar to berenjena sauce but with the addition of mashed boiled sabá and kamote to accompany their pochero. My sister-in-law Tessa Marquez, who grew up in a Spanish-speaking household in San Juan, says their family’s cocido is the tomato-based stew (guiso in Spanish), served with boiled saba, pechay Tagalog, olive oil, and a clear soup on the side.

Incidentally, it was a great privilege to have been invited by the Spain Tourism Board to attend the food conference Madrid Fusion last Jan. 21-23, which has afforded me the time and opportunity to investigate the origins of such iconic Filipino dishes bearing Spanish names that are generally believed to have come from madre España, like the adobo, estofado, escabeche, embutido, and yemas, to name a few. I have come home from the 10-day trip with a wealth of information, though a little squeaky in the joints from having my fill of the jamon iberico and quezos y vinos they feted me with everywhere I went.

To paraphrase an idiomatic expression: “There’s more to eat than meats the eye in Spain.” I got more than I bargained for.

Here’s a recipe for cocido, Manila-style, adapted from the Kulinarya cookbook (serves 6 to 8). Meats, meat cuts and vegetables are variables depending on one’s preference. .

Cocido, Manila-style

Ingredients: 2 stalks leeks, clean and cut diagonally into 2-inch pieces; 3 pcs celery ribs, clean by removing leaves and wash; 3 pcs medium-sized onions, peel, separate 1 piece and quarter, chop the other 2 pieces; 4 pcs medium-sized carrots, peel, leave 1 piece whole, quarter the 3 carrots lengthwise and cut each piece into 2; 1 tsp. whole black peppercorns; 1 whole medium-sized cabbage, cut into 4 along its core to keep the quarters whole, wash; 1/4 kilo Baguio beans, wash and trim; 5 stalks pechay Tagalog (or bok choy), wash but leave pieces whole; 1 can (225 gms.) garbanzos, open the can, discard liquid, peel each piece and discard the skin; 4 pcs saba bananas, peel and cut into 2 diagonally, discard peel; 2 pcs medium-sized potatoes, peeled, washed and quartered; 3 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped finely; 3 pcs of 1/2 kilo each medium-sized beef shank (kenchi) with bone marrow intact; 1/2 kilo beef brisket; 2 pcs chicken breasts with bone, fillet and set aside bones to make stock; 200 gms. thick bacon slab; 200 gms. ham hock; 2 pcs Spanish chorizo (known locally as chorizo de Bilbao), cut into 1/4” slices; enough water to cover meat in stock pot; 3 tbsps. olive oil.

Procedure:

1. Put beef shanks, brisket, chicken bones, bacon slab, salted pork or ham hock and chorizo in a large casserole with the quartered onion, whole carrot and celery stalks.

2. Cover with enough tap water and bring to a boil. After about 10 minutes, remove the beef shanks from pot. Using a toothpick, prick the marrow around the inner wall of the bone in a circular motion. This is to loosen and then extract it off the tubular bone. Set aside. Note: if one allows the shank to boil till tender without extracting the morrow, it will just melt away like oil.

3. Lower heat and simmer until meats are tender. Take out pork, chicken bones, chorizo and bacon slab first as these will cook ahead and set aside.

4. Take 3 cups/ 720 ml of the broth and pour into a separate pot. Put in the quartered cabbage, sliced carrots, Baguio beans, pechay, bananas, and the garbanzos. Bring to a boil. Season the broth with salt and pepper. When the vegetables are cooked, remove from the pot and place on a platter.

5. Using the same broth where the veggies were cooked, heat to a rolling boil. Dunk the chicken breast and let boil for 1 minute covered with a lid. Turn off heat and let the chicken submerge in the broth for about 3 minutes. Remove from pot with a strainer and dip in a bowl filled with iced water. This is to stop the cooking process, just like in making Hainanese chicken. You want a moist, tender chicken breast, not a dry overcooked one.

6. Place the meats that were set aside into the casserole where the vegetables were cooked and keep there until ready to serve.

7. In a preheated pan with the olive oil, sauté the chopped onions and garlic. Add the drained vegetables. Remove vegetables to a platter.

8. Remove the chorizos, brisket and bacon slab from the casserole. Slice into serving sizes. Set aside.

9. When the beef shank is fork-tender, remove from pot with a strainer. Place in a serving platter and put back its marrow.

10. Cut the brisket, pork belly, chicken breast, salted pork/ ham hock into serving pieces and arrange on the platter together with the shank; likewise with the vegetables. Accompany with tomato sauce and berenjena (eggplant) sauce placed in separate bowls.

Cocido tomato sauce:

Ingredients: 1 pc small onion, peel and chop finely; 2 cloves, garlic, crush, peel and mince; 1/2 kilo tomatoes, blanch in boiling water for 30 seconds, peel when cooled, cut into halves crosswise to remove seeds and then chop finely; 4 tbsps. olive oil; 1 pc bay leaf; 1 sprig parsley; 1/2 cup water; salt and pepper to taste.

Procedure:

1. In a preheated pan with olive oil, sauté onions and garlic, then add tomatoes. Add bay leaf and sprig of parsley and the water. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

2. Discard bay leaf and parsley sprig.

3. Add salt and pepper according to taste.

Berenjena (eggplant sauce):

Ingredients: 2 pcs long eggplants, roast over stove flame till skin is charred, peel and discard peel; 2 cloves garlic, peel then mince; 2 tbsps. vinegar; 2 tsps. salt; 1 tsp. pepper.

Procedure: Mash broiled eggplants and add minced garlic and vinegar. Add salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Sam Miguel
02-21-2013, 09:57 AM
Four recipes using preserved pork and shallot sauce

By Reggie Aspira

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:30 am | Thursday, February 21st, 2013

I have been obsessed with preserved pork ever since I tried Tao Yuan’s cabbage with the cured meat. I am in awe of how cabbage can taste so good and not in a vegetable-side dish kind of way.

When my friend Vivian got hold of Chinese-style preserved pork from Jash Mart along Wilson St. in Greenhills and shared her pack with me, I came up with many instant dishes that are perfect for impromptu dinners.

The recipes are easy to cook for busy days, when you crave for something tasty without spending hours cooking. A little bit of the preserved pork goes a long way, enhancing the dish both in aroma and flavor.

Another wonder ingredient that I have recently added to just about every Asian dish I cook is shallot sauce, sold at Little Store (2 Jose Abad Santos St., Little Baguio, San Juan City). What it really is are fried shallots preserved in the oil they were fried on. Just a bit of the sauce makes any dish smell so good.

Preserved Pork Rice with Chinese Sausage

4 tbsp vegetable oil

1/3 c preserved pork, chopped

150 g liempo, sliced into thin strips

2 chinese sausages, sliced

2 tbsp shallot sauce

2 tbsp garlic

6 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked and sliced (soaked in warm water, reserve water)

1/3 c small shrimps, peeled

4 c jasmine rice, uncooked, washed

4 c chicken stock

2 c mushroom water (water where shiitake mushrooms were soaked)

3 tbsp light soy

1 tbsp dark soy

Pepper

1 c sliced cabbage or ½ c cabbage and ½ c sliced bok choy

On a clay pot, heat oil and brown the liempo, add the chorizo and preserved pork.

Add shallot sauce, garlic, mushrooms and shrimps.

Add rice and all the liquid ingredients except the cabbage.

Bring to boil and immediately lower heat. Simmer. When rice is almost cooked, mix the cabbage leaves.

Season to taste.

Garnish and serve.

Note: Remember to use the same measuring cup for the rice, the stock and mushroom water. This recipe can be made on a rice cooker, too.

Garnish:

¼ c fried shallots (you can make your own or heat ¼ c of shallots from the shallot sauce and drain them on a paper towel)

Coriander stalks coarsely chopped with stems

3 fresh red Thai chilies

Fine chili or Sriracha sauce, serve on the side

Chicken ‘Adobo’ with Preserved Pork and Shallot Sauce



3 tbsp oil

1 k chicken thigh quarter, cut each thigh into 3

2 tbsp coarsely chopped preserved pork

1-2 heads native Ilocos garlic, peeled and pounded, adjust garlic to taste

2 tbsp shallot sauce

1 tsp whole black pepper

4 tbsp vinegar

1 bay leaf

Pinch of sugar

Salt

Patis to taste

Heat oil and brown chicken. Add preserved pork, garlic, shallot sauce, peppercorns, bay leaf and cook until fragrant.

Add vinegar and water just enough to submerge chicken. Put a small pinch of sugar. I find that doing so enhances the preserved pork.

Simmer over low heat until liquid has reduced and the chicken, tender.

Season to taste with salt and a bit of fish sauce, the use of both gives depth to the adobo.

Serve garnished with fried garlic and shallots.

Cabbage with Preserved Pork

The Tao Yuan chefs shared the recipe but did not include the measurements, so I am sharing what I did with my cabbage. This recipe works well with 250-300 grams of assorted vegetables, too, such as zucchini, cherry tomatoes, French beans, blanched broccoli, thinly sliced carrots.

1 tbsp vegetable oil

1 onion, sliced

2 tsp garlic

Pinch of dried chili

2 tsp dried shrimp, soaked

1½ tbsp preserved meat, chopped

3-4 tbsp stock

1 tsp light soy

Cabbage, coarsely chopped, 250-300 g

Heat oil in a wok. Add dried chili. Add onions and garlic. Add preserved meat and dried shrimps and cook until fragrant.

Add stock, light soy and cabbage. Cook cabbage through. Season to taste

Oatmeal Congee

I cooked this for my Healthy Heart seminar at St. Luke’s Global. Of course, when I did it there, I did not use preserved pork!

2 tsp sesame oil

2 thin slices of ginger

1 tbsp shallot sauce

1 c rolled oats or brown rice (do not use instant oats)

6-8 (+/-) c chicken stock (adjust according to preferred consistency)

Pinch of sea salt

Heat sesame oil, add ginger and shallot sauce. Combine the rest of the ingredients.

Simmer over low heat until oats or rice grains are tender and the porridge thickened to your desired consistency.

Serve with condiments.

Note: I use Australia Harvest for my oats and if I use brown rice, it is Dona Maria—Japonica or Miponica, whichever I have.

Condiments: Arrange individually on serving bowls.

Green onion, chopped

Preserved pork, chopped and heated in a pan, drained from extracted fat

Chicken, cooked and flaked

Fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced and sautéed in oil

Coriander, chopped

Century egg

Fried wanton

Light soy sauce

Sesame oil

‘Sinangag’ with Preserved Pork and Shallots

2 tbsp preserved pork, chopped

2 tbsp oil

1 tbsp garlic

1 heaping tsp shallot sauce

4 c rice, day-old preferred

2 tsp light soy sauce

Salt

Green onions for garnish

Heat pan. Add oil and slightly brown garlic. Add preserved pork and cook for a few seconds to extract fat.

Add shallots. Add in rice and soy sauce. Mix and toss until rice is heated through. Season to taste with salt. Garnish with green onions

Sam Miguel
02-21-2013, 10:00 AM
The smart cheater’s guide to cooking well

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:23 am | Thursday, February 21st, 2013

I never imagined I would see it happen—a cookbook which I can’t hold, whose pages I can’t turn, and which weighs practically nothing. And yet it accompanies me everywhere.

I can browse through it anywhere, pick out a recipe for dinner any time, and check out the ingredients while in the supermarket. And, even more to my surprise, it’s a cookbook I happen to have written.

In case you haven’t guessed, it’s an e-cookbook, one of those electronic books that can be read only onscreen—through the iPhone, the iPad, Kindle, Android phones, tablets, Windows and Macintosh computers, and all mobile devices.

You can’t really hold it per se, because it’s a virtual cookbook, existing only in electronic files. But you can download it and read it in your electronic device, any time, anywhere you choose, without having to carry a heavy book.

Called “Eat Rich Quick: The Smart Cheater’s Guide to Cooking Well,” it’s a cookbook for cooks in a hurry. In this busy, fast-paced world, we all have to get things done quickly, yet without compromising quality. That was the inspiration for my e-cookbook.

The recipes can all be done in 30 minutes or less, making them not just shortcuts, but short-shortcuts to good cooking. Some of them are the easy way to classic favorites. Fabada, gazpacho, pigs in a blanket—with “Eat Rich Quick,” you can have close approximations of these dishes, using readily available ingredients, in no time at all. In fact, by using store-bought ingredients to your advantage, you can serve fantastic dishes without having to make them from scratch.

While I believe in slow cooking (and often do it at home), there just are times when fast, simple and easy cooking may save your day. That’s when “Eat Rich Quick” can really come in handy.

Published by Flipside Publishing Services, “Eat Rich Quick” is now available at a very reasonable price through: Amazon Kindle: www.amazon.com/dp/B00BBEIKO2

Kobo: www.kobobooks.com/ebook/Eat-Rich-Quick/book-OBXitsjvaEaRYVyX2tzlsg/page1.html

Flipreads: flipreads.com/eat-rich-quick. It can also be downloaded through Apple iTunes’ iBookstore and Barnes & Noble’s website.

Here’s a sample recipe from “Eat Rich Quick.” Try it and you’ll see why this e-cookbook really is “the smart cheater’s guide to cooking well.”

Chicken Alfredo in Bread Cups

Four to six servings

This is a great way to make leftover chicken (or even turkey) look special. Trimmed off their crusts and shaped with a biscuit cutter, the bread cups look like pastry shells. No one will ever guess you didn’t make them from scratch.

12-18 pieces sliced Pullman bread

¼ c butter

2 c bottled classic Alfredo sauce

2 c cooked chicken or turkey, cut into bite-size pieces (may use leftovers)

¼ c snipped parsley

Salt and pepper, to taste (optional)

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Trim crusts from bread. Pass a rolling pin over each slice of bread to flatten bread. With a biscuit cutter, trim bread into desired shapes (scalloped edges, circles, etc.). Make sure the trimmed bread is big enough to fit into muffin or cupcake pans.

Butter each bread on one side. Press each bread into the muffin pans, buttered side out, so they are shaped into cups. Set aside.

Heat Alfredo sauce in a saucepan or large skillet. When sauce starts simmering, add the chicken (or turkey) and the parsley. Taste a spoonful of the sauce. If needed, season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir and heat through.

Spoon into prepared bread cups. Bake in preheated oven for about 15 minutes or until edges of bread are toasty brown.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit the author’s blog www.normachikiamco.com, and Facebook fan page www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco.

For questions on “Eat Rich Quick,” e-mail author at normachiki@gmail.com.

Cook’s tips:

If using leftover chicken or turkey, make sure they’re still good (not stale).

You can also use store-bought roast chicken or cooked turkey breast.

Sam Miguel
02-28-2013, 10:03 AM
‘Adobong baka’

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:04 am | Thursday, February 28th, 2013

As I write this, the mouthwatering aroma of slowly cooking meat is wafting from my kitchen. It’s the beef adobo recipe of Glenda Barretto—chef, restaurateur, cookbook author and the culinary genius behind Via Mare Restaurant.

I learned the recipe from her last Saturday at the Maya Kitchen Culinary Center in Makati City where, together with Via Mare F&B director Bea Bautista Nitard and her team of chefs, Glenda shared her recipes for Filipino dishes such as tinola flan, ube rice, pitsi-pitsi, three fresh salads and the aforementioned beef adobo.

Glenda’s beef adobo recipe is a fine example of slow cooking. And when she says “slow,” she’s not kidding. The beef has to be steamed for four long hours, while the sauce has to be simmered for two. In other words, it’s not exactly for the hurried cook, requiring as it does copious amounts of time, planning, effort and infinite patience.

But the results—which we tasted after the cooking demo—are all worth it. Subjected to four lengthy hours on the stove, the beef was steamed into tenderness, pliant and yielding to the bite. Served with the velvety sauce and a cone of ube rice, it was comfort food elevated to the next level.

Glenda also showed us how they would plate the dish in Via Mare. Instead of serving the adobo with chopped tomatoes and red eggs as is often done by the home cook, she threaded cherry tomatoes and hard-boiled quail eggs into a cocktail skewer and speared this on top of two evenly sliced beef. Along with the ube rice and vegetables wrapped in a pouch of lumpia wrapper, the presentation was one pretty, appetizing dish.

Here’s Glenda’s recipe for beef adobo. (She used US beef belly, the closest equivalent of which would be the cut known locally as camto.)

Slow-cooked beef belly

For the beef:

2 k beef belly (one whole piece) or camto

6 cloves/ 30 g garlic, peeled and minced

½ tbsp/ 5 g black peppercorns

½ c/ 120 ml vinegar

2 tbsp/ 30 ml soy sauce

2 bay leaves, crushed

1 tsp/ 5 g salt

For the sauce:

1 k beef bones

30 g garlic

1 tsp black peppercorn, cracked

2 bay leaves

2 tbsp soy sauce

¼ c vinegar

4 c water

Cook the beef:

Put the beef in a marinating pan. In a bowl, combine the garlic, peppercorns, vinegar, soy sauce, bay leaves and salt. Pour over the beef. Cover the bowl and marinate overnight in the refrigerator.

When ready to cook, wrap the beef tightly in two layers of aluminum foil. Steam over low heat (120°C) for about four hours or until beef is tender.

Meanwhile, prepare the sauce.

Make the sauce:

Put all the ingredients for the sauce in a casserole and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a bare simmer and cook for about two hours. Strain the liquid and discard the solids. Pour the liquid into a small saucepan. Taste it and, if needed, adjust the seasoning to taste (may add more vinegar, salt or soy sauce). If desired, heat the sauce further until it thickens.

Cook’s tips

Put the meat into the steamer only when the water is already boiling. Start counting the cooking time from the time you’ve put the meat into the steamer (with the water already boiling).

The heat temperature during the steaming process should be very low. Glenda Barretto says it should be only 120°C (measure with a kitchen thermometer if you have one), or just make sure the heat on the stove is turned to a very low flame.

To find out if the meat is tender enough, Glenda suggests using a barbecue stick. If you can insert the stick into the meat with only the lightest touch, then the meat is already tender.

Or, use a meat thermometer. It should register 165°C in the thickest part of the meat.

Sam Miguel
03-07-2013, 08:51 AM
Perfect for Holy Week–three ways to cook authentic Portuguese ‘bacalao’

By Reggie Aspiras

Philippine Daily Inquirer

12:27 am | Thursday, March 7th, 2013

In the season of Lent, bacalao is the ultimate indulgence. So, when I received a text message from Chingling Tanco saying that she finally had slightly salted bacalao (Atlantic cod premium loins, the type that needs no overnight soaking and behaves more like a meaty, juicy fish steak when left whole and soft and supple when flaked), I was overly excited. More so when I found out how much they were being sold for.

I asked João Branquinho (who, by being Portuguese, has earned the right to be a bacalao whiz) to share his recipes with us. My personal favorite dish of his is the homey Bacalhau al Bras. João also happens to roast the finest chicken with piri-piri sauce (the thought alone makes my mouth water) and imports excellent yet reasonably priced Portuguese wines of distinct character.

João says his recipes are good for four, and best eaten with bread, boiled or baked potatoes, or rice. Note: If you are using regular salted bacalao instead of loins for these recipes, soak the fish overnight with several water changes.

Bacalhau a Bras (codfish with fried potatoes and eggs)

This is one of the most popular ways to prepare codfish in Portugal. Wine suggestion: a full-bodied red wine. The intensity of the flavors of the dish needs a strong balance. Guadalupe Red is an excellent wine to pair with this dish.

500 g salted codfish

750 g freshly fried potatoes (shoestring cut)

6 eggs

150 ml white wine

3 medium onions

3 tsp extra virgin olive oil

2 bay leaves

6 garlic cloves

2 tsp chopped parsley

Salt

Black pepper

Nutmeg

12-18 black olives (not chopped)

Fry potatoes until golden. Do not brown. Drain.

Bring water to a boil and add the codfish; cook for 7-10 minutes. Usually, when you start smelling the fish, it is time to take it out. Leave to cool.

Flake fish.

Drizzle pan with olive oil.

Add bay leaves and onion. Cook until golden but not caramelized.

Add garlic.

Two minutes later, add fish.

Season with pepper and nutmeg.

Cook for 3 minutes, mixing gently and not allowing it to stick to the bottom of the pan.

Add shoestring fried potatoes.

Add wine.

Add half of the olives and half of the parsley, the whole time mixing gently.

Add eggs over low fire.

Stop cooking while eggs are still slightly wet.

Garnish with remaining olives and parsley.

Serve immediately.

Bacalhau Com Natase Espinafres (codfish with cream and spinach)

The secret to this recipe is good spinach. If unsure, best to cook it with frozen spinach. Wine suggestion: Pair with wine that is full-bodied, very round and oak-aged, like Herdade da Figueirinha Reserva 2008. The wine is not too heavy and the acidity level is low.

500 g codfish

650 gr freshly fried potatoes (medium-size cubes)

50 ml white wine

2 medium onions, julienned

1 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1 bay leaf

6 garlic cloves

600 ml milk

200 ml cream

30-50 g shredded cheese (Emmental)

200 g frozen spinach

2 tbsp all-purpose flour

Salt

White or black pepper

½ tsp nutmeg

Fry potatoes until lightly golden but not brown; drain well.

Put milk in a pot and add the codfish.

Simmer for 7-10 minutes.

Remove mixture from heat and leave to cool.

Flake fish.

In a bowl, combine 2 tbsp flour with ½ cup of water, whisk well, add to milk. Then add cream and nutmeg to the mixture. Whisk milk over low heat, until slightly thickened.

In a pan, add olive oil, bay leaf and onions. Cook until golden but not caramelized.

Add garlic and, 2 minutes later, add flaked codfish. Season with pepper. Add wine, reduce, stir gently.

Line potatoes on an oven-proof dish.

Top with flaked bacalhau.

Add a thin layer of spinach.

Finish the dish with a layer of white sauce.

Top with grated cheese

Bake in 350ºC oven for 10-15 minutes, or until cheese is melted.

Bacalhau com Ameijoas (codfish with clams)

Wine suggestions for this excellent dish: Vinho Verde or Alvarinho.

These are wines with character and aroma—perfect with seafood and hot spices.

500 g codfish loin (about 4)

500 g clams

200 ml Vinho Verde (Casa do Valle is the one I use)

3 medium onions, diced

4 medium tomatoes, peeled and diced

3 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1 bay leaf

12 garlic cloves, finely chopped

½ bunch each of flat leaf parsley and coriander, chopped

Diced red bell pepper

Diced bird’s eye labuyo (to taste)

1 tsp butter

Salt

Black pepper

2 tsp lemon juice

In a pot, put 2 tbsp of olive oil; when hot, add 2 sliced onions. Let it cook in low fire for 5 minutes before adding 8 cloves of garlic. Let it cook for 2 minutes.

Add 2 tbsp bell pepper and labuyo to taste.

Add clams and cover the pot. Let it cook for 2 minutes.

Add parsley and coriander.

Add 150 ml of wine and cover. Let the clams open and add butter. Turn off heat.

Season to taste and add lemon.

In another pan, heat 1 tbsp olive oil, add bay leaf, onion and diced tomatoes.

Add 50 ml wine, 4 cloves of garlic, black pepper and mix gently. Let it cook in low fire.

Add codfish and slow-cook for 5 minutes; turn the loins carefully and cook another 5 minutes.

Arrange on a serving platter

Contact Mida Food Distributors Inc., tel. 5240006, 5265136. The same bacalao will be available in leading supermarkets under the Pacific Bay brand soon. By the way, fantastic barramundi collars for sinigang are also available.

Visit João Branquinho at his chicken stall at Legazpi Market on Sundays, or e-mail him for his wines at brankinhotrading@gmail.com

Sam Miguel
03-14-2013, 01:10 PM
Celebrating the great Ed Quimson with his most revered creation - - -

Ed Quimson’s ‘Paella Tinola’

Philippine Daily Inquirer

12:50 am | Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Ingredients:

¾ c vegetable oil
100 g (1 medium) red onion, chopped
100 g (1 medium) white onion, chopped
20 g (½ head) garlic, chopped
50 g (about 2 inches) ginger, cut into fine strips
1 whole chicken (1.2 k), cut into 10 pcs
½ tbsp rock salt
2 c dinorado rice (uncooked)
3 c chicken stock
200 g (1 small) green papaya, sliced lengthwise into serving pieces
½ c sliced button mushrooms
250 g (around 2½ medium) carrots, sliced into rounds
2 tbsp patis
1 c sili leaves

In a medium-sized paellera (or a large, shallow round cooking pan), heat vegetable oil and sauté onions, garlic and ginger for two to three minutes or until onions are translucent and mixture becomes fragrant.

Add chicken pieces and season with rock salt. Sauté chicken until lightly browned, then remove from the pan and set aside.

Pour rice into the pan and mix well until the rice grains are coated with the oil. Pour in half of the chicken stock and continue mixing for about 1 minute, then use a sandok or a heat-proof spatula to arrange the rice evenly around the pan.

Pour in remaining stock then return the chicken pieces into the pan. Add the papaya, mushrooms and carrots, and season with patis. Let simmer for another minute.

Place sili leaves on top. Cover pan with foil (or use a pan cover) and simmer at medium-low heat for about 20-25 minutes or until rice has absorbed all of the liquid and chicken pieces are fully cooked.

Makes 4-6 servings.

Sam Miguel
03-14-2013, 01:11 PM
The spice of life via Indonesian cuisine

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

12:52 am | Thursday, March 14th, 2013

As if the buffet in Heat, Edsa Shangri-La’s all-day dining restaurant, isn’t sumptuous enough, the hotel is spicing up its already extensive smorgasbord with some well-loved Indonesian dishes.

Spicing up, in this case, can be taken literally because Indonesian dishes are anything but bland. Hot chilies being a mainstay in Indonesian cuisine, nearly every dish spews fiery flavors on the taste buds—from the mango pickles to the fried beef to the grilled squid with green chili.

Even the mixed fruits with brown sugar sauce, which we tasted at the opening of the ongoing Indonesian food fest, was not only sweet; it also held its own by delivering its share of blazing heat.

After all, Indonesia is the original Spice Islands, the elusive source of exotic spices that Portuguese explorers desperately set sail to find centuries ago. It’s because of these spices that the West discovered the East, and the course of history changed forever.

Not that there’s no diversity in Indonesian cuisine. According to guest chef Didin Saepudin of Shangri-La Hotel Jakarta, there are gradations of heat among the 18,307 islands that comprise the Indonesian archipelago. While they all use hot chilies, the dishes in Java, for example, are a little bit sweet, while those in Sumatra are spiked with a lot more chilies. Other condiments widely used in Indonesian cuisine include lemon leaf, nutmeg, garlic, candlenuts, galangal, sambal and cumin.

Here’s a recipe for one of the tamer Indonesian dishes: pisang goreng (fried banana). There are variations in cooking it, with some recipes using whole bananas. This recipe from Edsa Shangri-La, however, uses mashed bananas, making it similar to our own maruya. And, true to the spirit of the Spice Islands, it’s sprinkled not just with sugar but also with cinnamon.

Berjalan-Jalan, the buffet of Indonesian food, will be part of Edsa Shangri-La’s lunch and dinner buffets until March 20. For reservations, call tel. 6338888, local 2777.

Pisang Goreng (Indonesian-style Banana Fritters)


5 ripe bananas (lakatan variety)
2 eggs
1 c all-purpose flour
½ c water
3-4 c cooking oil
¼ c sugar
1 tsp cinnamon powder

Mash the bananas coarsely, using a fork or a potato masher. Set aside.

Beat the eggs lightly. In a mixing bowl, combine the beaten eggs with the flour and the water. Stir until smooth. Blend in the mashed bananas.

Heat the cooking oil in a frying pan. Pour the banana mixture by ¼ c measures into the hot oil. Cook over medium heat until the bottom sides are golden brown; then turn over and cook the other side similarly. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels (or absorbent paper).

Combine sugar and cinnamon powder and sprinkle on the banana fritters before serving. Makes around 10 fritters.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog: www.normachikiamco.com and facebook fan page: www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter@NormaChikiamco.

Cook’s tips:

To maximize the cooking oil, you can double the recipe, using twice the amount of bananas, flour, eggs and water. This will yield around 20 banana fritters.

Make sure the oil is hot enough before frying the fritters. To test the oil, drop a small piece of bread on the oil. If it sizzles, the oil is ready to be used for frying.

Sam Miguel
03-14-2013, 01:11 PM
The spice of life via Indonesian cuisine

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

12:52 am | Thursday, March 14th, 2013

As if the buffet in Heat, Edsa Shangri-La’s all-day dining restaurant, isn’t sumptuous enough, the hotel is spicing up its already extensive smorgasbord with some well-loved Indonesian dishes.

Spicing up, in this case, can be taken literally because Indonesian dishes are anything but bland. Hot chilies being a mainstay in Indonesian cuisine, nearly every dish spews fiery flavors on the taste buds—from the mango pickles to the fried beef to the grilled squid with green chili.

Even the mixed fruits with brown sugar sauce, which we tasted at the opening of the ongoing Indonesian food fest, was not only sweet; it also held its own by delivering its share of blazing heat.

After all, Indonesia is the original Spice Islands, the elusive source of exotic spices that Portuguese explorers desperately set sail to find centuries ago. It’s because of these spices that the West discovered the East, and the course of history changed forever.

Not that there’s no diversity in Indonesian cuisine. According to guest chef Didin Saepudin of Shangri-La Hotel Jakarta, there are gradations of heat among the 18,307 islands that comprise the Indonesian archipelago. While they all use hot chilies, the dishes in Java, for example, are a little bit sweet, while those in Sumatra are spiked with a lot more chilies. Other condiments widely used in Indonesian cuisine include lemon leaf, nutmeg, garlic, candlenuts, galangal, sambal and cumin.

Here’s a recipe for one of the tamer Indonesian dishes: pisang goreng (fried banana). There are variations in cooking it, with some recipes using whole bananas. This recipe from Edsa Shangri-La, however, uses mashed bananas, making it similar to our own maruya. And, true to the spirit of the Spice Islands, it’s sprinkled not just with sugar but also with cinnamon.

Berjalan-Jalan, the buffet of Indonesian food, will be part of Edsa Shangri-La’s lunch and dinner buffets until March 20. For reservations, call tel. 6338888, local 2777.

Pisang Goreng (Indonesian-style Banana Fritters)


5 ripe bananas (lakatan variety)
2 eggs
1 c all-purpose flour
½ c water
3-4 c cooking oil
¼ c sugar
1 tsp cinnamon powder

Mash the bananas coarsely, using a fork or a potato masher. Set aside.

Beat the eggs lightly. In a mixing bowl, combine the beaten eggs with the flour and the water. Stir until smooth. Blend in the mashed bananas.

Heat the cooking oil in a frying pan. Pour the banana mixture by ¼ c measures into the hot oil. Cook over medium heat until the bottom sides are golden brown; then turn over and cook the other side similarly. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels (or absorbent paper).

Combine sugar and cinnamon powder and sprinkle on the banana fritters before serving. Makes around 10 fritters.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog: www.normachikiamco.com and facebook fan page: www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter@NormaChikiamco.

Cook’s tips:

To maximize the cooking oil, you can double the recipe, using twice the amount of bananas, flour, eggs and water. This will yield around 20 banana fritters.

Make sure the oil is hot enough before frying the fritters. To test the oil, drop a small piece of bread on the oil. If it sizzles, the oil is ready to be used for frying.

Sam Miguel
03-20-2013, 11:02 AM
Fish in the slow cooker goes swimmingly

By Martha Thomas, Mar 12, 2013 09:40 PM EDT

The Washington Post Published: March 13

If Phyllis Pellman Good could do it all over again, she would certainly rethink the fish soup recipe. As the author of half a dozen books packed with dishes for the slow cooker — that minivan of kitchen appliances — Good develops recipes with multiple ingredients and mostly just two steps:

● Put everything in the cooker.

● Set the timer for six or eight or 10 hours.

Her fish chowder is more complicated. There’s a third step, sauteing an onion, and another calls that for adding half-and-half during the last hour of cooking.

But if she were writing the recipe today, says Good, who with her husband, Merle, owns Good Books Publishing based in Intercourse, Pa., “I’d add the fish at the end.” Good’s “Fix it and Forget It” series of slow-cooker books has sold more than 11 million copies.

Fish in the slow cooker seems counterintuitive, doesn’t it? Fillets cook quickly — albeit with a narrow window between done and dry, especially when they are baked. The most common reaction to my recent kitchen experiments has been: What’s the point?

In our house, fish is often an afterthought. My fussy teenage daughter won’t eat the stuff, but my partner, Dan, doesn’t eat terrestrials. So if the menu I’m preparing for my kid has meat, he’ll coat a hunk of fish with packaged breading and slap it in a frying pan a few minutes before dinnertime, leaving a crusty surface and a lingering odor.

In the meantime, I’ve fallen hard for my slow cooker. Around Christmas, wooed partly by the surge of special recipes that kept wandering into my inbox and by the beautiful cookbooks displayed at tony kitchen stores, I gave away the old white model that had been moldering in the basement and treated my kitchen to a new stainless-steel slow cooker.

Preparing meals just seemed too easy. A chicken thrown into the pot before I head out for the day is fall-off-the-bone succulent several hours later; lamb stew simmers all day. I even made a lasagna that emerged with its layers intact. The cooker uses little energy and doesn’t require anyone to stand over it. I was so enchanted, I wanted to share the love with Dan.

My first attempt at slow-cooker fish was alarmingly successful: a drizzle of oil in the ceramic insert, some coarsely chopped shallots and smashed garlic, a hunk of farm-raised salmon. I squeezed lemon juice over the fish and set the cooker to low. An hour later, a creamy, kind-of-poached salmon emerged. With a smattering of chopped fresh dill, it was dinner.

A similar preparation appears in “The New Slow Cooker,” Brigit Binn’s book for Williams-Sonoma. She sets her salmon in a tarragon-and-white-wine-based broth that has already heated for 30 minutes. Yet the results are the same: “The texture is amazing,” she says. The low-and-slow method of cooking fish, she adds, “kind of approaches sous vide.”

Since the publication of Binn’s cookbook in 2010, one of her most frequent reader inquiries has been about fish. (She says another is, “Does it matter which crockpot I have?”)

Today’s slow cookers are more sophisticated than their forebears, with removable inserts for easy cleaning and serving, plus digital timers that shift to “warm” when the cook period ends. Some even boast of stove-top-safe inner receptacles, for browning meat or sauteing an onion in the same pot. (Such savers of dirty pans, alas, are not recommended, as the awkwardly shaped inserts don’t do the job a good old fry pan can do.)

Technique has evolved, as well. “You can’t just dump and go,” says Julia Collin Davison, executive food editor at America’s Test Kitchen, which publishes Cook’s Illustrated and a raft of cookbooks. The more hands-on approach is what most slow-cooker fish recipes call for.

“To me, slow cookers were a gimmicky appliance,” Davison says. But after working on both “Slow Cooker Revolution” (2011) and “Slow Cooker Revolution Volume 2: The Easy-Prep Edition,” coming out in September, she has changed her opinion: “With the right recipe, you can produce a well-crafted meal.”

Davison says she had an “aha” moment while experimenting with fish: “Not only is it incredibly easy in the slow cooker, but it’s good.” For one thing, she points out, “there’s more of a window to catch the fish at the correct doneness.” And further, slowly bringing up the temperature of a protein retains moisture, so the result is more delicate. “In the end, it has a silky texture and is tender and moist,” she says.

Even so, ATK’s 2011 book offers no fish recipes (one does contain anchovies). The newer edition has six, including old standbys such asYou chowders, stews and poached salmon.

“We’re a little behind the curve on this,” Davison admits.

Adding fish to the anthology means shifting the slow-cooker mind-set to the idea of cooking in stages.

For example, she gave me an early look at a recipe for garlicky shrimp that appears in the upcoming ATK book. “You start by poaching garlic in oil and pepper for 30 minutes,” so flavors are infused, Davison says. Then the shrimp is added to cook on high for another 20 minutes.

I shared with her my failed experiment with mussels. I had put two pounds of them in the slow cooker, along with garlic, white wine and stewed tomatoes. After half an hour on high, the shells had opened, but their innards were still glossy wet. I waited a while more, checking occasionally, until they looked done. But the cooked meat was rubbery and tasteless.

Davison, whose thoughtful analysis reflects the scientific approach that is an ATK hallmark, wondered whether the acid from the tomatoes might have affected the outcome. My theory was that the mussels spent too much of their cooking time exposed to the air in the slow cooker instead of nestled in their moist little shells. Davison, who has tested hundreds of recipes in dozens of cookers, says she has never tried mussels or clams.

My third fish experiment was more successful. I started with red Thai rice and cubes of sweet potato. In went stewed tomatoes (I have lots of jars from a summer canning binge), plenty of garlic and enough water to cover. Once the rice was nearly cooked and the sweet potatoes became fork-tender, I added coconut milk and dollops of Thai curry paste. When it had heated through, I carefully submerged four tilapia fillets in the stew. It took about 20 minutes for the fish to reach an opaque flakiness. The tilapia was tough to remove intact, so the dish became a kind of Thai curry hash, which I finished with ribbons of fresh basil. That, of course, affirmed another truth about slow-cooker food: Don’t expect it to be pretty.

At least, that’s the way it has always been. When Andrew Schloss began work on his book “Art of the Slow Cooker” (Chronicle, 2008), he says, “I started out by cooking recipes from other books. It was all mush.” He developed dishes with staggered cooking times, and tricks like suspending fish in an aluminum-foil sling to moderate their cooking. His bouillabaisse recipe calls for cooking the base mixture for several hours, then adding the fish.

Like Binn’s book for Williams-Sonoma, Schloss’s slow-cooker book is lush with photography of beautiful plated meals topped with fresh herbs, drizzled with sauces or sprinkled with gremolatas. And, as you can imagine, most of the recipes have more than two steps.

Thomas is a Baltimore freelance writer and editor.

Sam Miguel
04-04-2013, 09:00 AM
Bulalo’ steak in coconut cream

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:00 am | Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Ever since tourists discovered Boracay, the province of Aklan has been known for the powdery white sand and the pristine beauty of its beaches.

Yet there’s so much more to this Visayan province. There are the mountain ranges, wild rivers and natural springs of Libacao, for instance, where visitors can go hiking, kayaking and bamboo rafting. There’s Salimono Falls in the town of Makato, Agnaga Falls in Malay and, scattered in various parts of the province, mysterious caves to be explored, verdant rolling hills, lush forests, eco-parks and centuries-old churches.

Located in Panay Island, Aklan is also known for its expert weavers, who can turn pineapple fiber into elegant fabric and abaca into native handcrafts. The province can, likewise, lay claim to hosting the mother of all festivals, the yearly Ati-Atihan, where revelers honor the Sto. Niño with street dances and the rhythmic beating of drums.

And then there’s the cuisine. Aklan food recently took center stage in Café Jeepney when Hotel InterContinental partnered with the provincial government of Aklan and Aklan Provincial Tourism Council to showcase the cuisine of this Western Visayan province.

Like all regions, Aklan takes pride in its specialties, among them suman sa ibos (rice cakes) ampao (crispy pop rice), inday inday (sticky rice patties topped with sugar) and tinuom (fish roe wrapped in banana leaves). With coconut trees growing so abundantly, many of their dishes are enriched with coconut milk.

The bulalo steak (beef shanks) served in Café Jeepney, for instance, was simmered in a combination of thick coconut cream and coconut milk. Similarly, a dish of shrimps that was rolled in taro leaves was cooked with coconut milk.

“Aklanons are very fond of gata (coconut milk),” said Arlene Conanan who, along with Jona Bornales and Mylyn Gonzales, helped to prepare the buffet. “Even our vegetables are cooked in gata. It has become a tradition.”

Other flavor enhancers in Aklanon cuisine are lemongrass (used for stuffing lechon) and batuan, a sour fruit incorporated in their version of dinuguan (pork blood stew).

Here’s the Aklanon recipe for bulalo steak in coconut cream.

1 k beef shanks, bone-in (bulalo/beef bone marrow)
8-10 c water
1 medium onion, diced
3-4 pcs ginger
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 stalk lemongrass, white ends smashed (optional)
1 c coconut cream
3 c coconut milk
Salt and pepper

Put the shanks in a deep pot and pour in water. Add diced onion, ginger, garlic and lemongrass. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Let simmer over very low heat for two to three hours or until beef is tender. Make sure there’s always enough water in the pot so beef doesn’t burn.

Remove beef from the broth and set aside. In a large casserole, pour in coconut cream and coconut milk. Bring to a simmer while stirring so mixture becomes smooth. Add the tenderized beef shanks. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Simmer until liquid thickens and beef shanks are heated through. Transfer to a serving dish and serve immediately.

Cook’s tips:

Simmer the beef over very low heat so that the marrow doesn’t separate from the bones.

You can also tenderize the beef shanks in a pressure cooker. Follow manufacturer’s directions.

If tenderizing the beef shanks in water, skim off the scum that floats on the surface of the water during the tenderizing process.

Coconut cream is known locally as kakang gata and is obtained from the first pressing of matured coconut meat. Coconut milk is thinner and is obtained from the second or third pressing of coconut meat.

You may also use canned coconut cream and coconut milk.

Sam Miguel
04-12-2013, 10:39 AM
‘Fabada Asturiana’

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

11:59 pm | Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

After I was able to cook Señor Anastacio de Alba’s recipe for croquetas de bacalao (see Inquirer Lifestyle, March 28), I felt challenged to try his recipe for fabada, which his son Miguel Angel demonstrated at the Maya Kitchen Culinary Center a few weeks ago. Challenge is the word because it takes a lot of time and patience to cook this Spanish bean stew. Shopping for ingredients alone could be time consuming, considering the recipe requires an assortment of Spanish meats. Luckily they’re all available in Alba’s restaurants, which make these Spanish sausages.

Though often associated with the Asturias region, fabada is cooked and served in other regions of Spain, as well as in Spanish restaurants all over the world. It’s popular in the Philippines, too, being one of the dishes Filipinos learned from the Spanish colonizers.

This recipe of Anastacio de Alba is very rich and flavorful. Slowly cooked and rustic, it’s comfort food at its best. Serve it with a thick, crusty bread to make a complete meal.

Alba’s restaurants: 38 Polaris St., Bel-Air, Makati (tel. 8966950; Tomas Morato cor. Scout Lozano, Quezon City (tel. 9251912); Westgate, Alabang

Fabada Asturiana

Makes 5-6 servings

500 g uncooked white beans
Water, for soaking the beans
Few strands of saffron
200 g ham hock or ham bone (may use Majestic ham bone)
60 g thick-slice jamon Serrano
200 g bacon slab
300 g whole chorizo de Bilbao
200 g morcillas (Spanish blood sausage)
½ tsp whole paprika picante
2 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
4 cloves garlic, mashed
2 bay leaves
2 sprigs fresh thyme (or ½ tsp dried thyme)

In a large bowl, soak the beans in enough cold water to cover for not more than 8 hours. Drain the beans then transfer them to a wide shallow cooking pan. Pour in enough water to cover the beans with an inch of water over all. Bring the beans to a slow boil over medium heat, skimming off any foam that rises to the surface.

Stir in saffron, ham hock, jamon Serrano and bacon slab, making room for them at the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan and cook for 5 minutes.

Skim off any foam, add the chorizo, morcillas, paprika, olive oil, onion, garlic, bay leaves and thyme. Let boil for another 5 minutes.

Lower the heat to a simmer. Check to be sure there’s ½ inch of liquid over the beans. If liquid becomes less, add more water.

Cover the pan and cook the fabada slowly for 1 to 2 hours, or until the beans become tender but not mushy. Make sure there’s always ½ inch of liquid over the beans. Stir mixture occasionally so beans don’t stick to the bottom of the pan. Taste the beans and, if needed, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Ladle the beans into a serving bowl. Transfer the sausages to a plate and slice them diagonally. Serve the sausages with the beans.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit author’s blog www.

normachikiamco.com and Facebook fan page www.facebook.

com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco

Cook’s tips:

Do not soak the beans too long or they will become mushy.

Chef Miguel recommends adding the meats to the beans (the chorizo, bacon, jamon Serrano and morcillas) whole (not sliced). That way they will be better able to retain their flavor.

If the cooked dish seems too thin (malabnaw), remove five to six beans from the stew and mash them with a little of the cooking liquid. Then stir the mashed beans into the stew. Bring the dish to a simmer and cook until the mashed beans are incorporated and the liquid has thickened.

If you can’t find paprika picante, you can use any other kind of paprika

Sam Miguel
07-11-2013, 08:36 AM
She whips up ‘adobo’ with coconut milk, ‘adobo’ flakes, twice-cooked ‘adobo’–even ‘adobo’ with ketchup

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

12:40 am | Thursday, July 11th, 2013

She doesn’t miss a week without cooking adobo in the house. Whether it’s adobo with coconut milk or adobo with ketchup or adobo flakes or twice-cooked adobo, Offie Quiazon Benavides makes sure she serves the family’s comfort food on a regular basis.

“My children love my adobo,” says 60-year-old Benavides, who has four kids and three grandkids. “And, they would tell me if they want either wet or dry adobo.”

If it’s wet adobo, Benavides simply whips up a regular adobo consisting of vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, bay leaf and peppercorn. She first boils all the ingredients in a pan before dropping in the pork or chicken without mixing the dish, to allow the vinegar to cook through thoroughly.

She then removes the sauce from the pan. Coconut milk is mixed with the sauce before it is poured over the meat and allowed to simmer. The sauce turns out thicker and creamier, perfect with a mound of rice on the plate.

Sometimes, she adds chopped siling labuyo to give the dish that extra kick.

If it’s dry, Benavides prepares a regular adobo, then separates the meat from the sauce. The meat is left to dry first and then deeply fried. The adobo sauce is served on the side with adobo rice.

Benavides usually cooks about three kilos of pork and chicken for her adobo. She pairs her adobo with boiled tomato and fiddlehead fern salad.

Crispy and crunchy

When she or her family is in the mood for something really dry and fried, Benavides dishes out her all-time favorite adobo flakes.

“I use chicken instead of pork, because pork meat comes out too dark when you deep-fry it,” she explains.

Benavides uses chicken breast to make her flakes. She cooks the adobo with the chicken breast, takes out the meat and shreds it thinly, adds a bit of salt because chicken is quite bland, and deep-fries it. She serves the adobo sauce on the side.

Mother’s recipes

Most of Benavides’ adobo recipes were passed on to her by her mom, Bella, now 84 years old.

“It was my mom who taught me my first adobo when I was already an adult,” says Benavides. “She’s known for her gourmet food and cooking among family and friends. But, she has no formal training. In fact, my mom taught me how to cook via the telephone!”

Benavides, whose mom is from Nueva Ecija and whose father is from Pampanga, got married at 20. When she became pregnant with her first child and had nothing else to do at home, she would call her mother on the phone.

“I asked her to teach me how to cook because I was bored and I had to serve something when my husband came home,” she says.

Aside from adobo, she learned to cook sinigang, dinuguan, pakbet and other Pinoy dishes. Eventually, her kitchen repertoire grew bigger and better. She now serves her family and friends her Filipino, Thai, Japanese and Italian cooking, which she has mastered through the years from recipe books, cooking demos on TV and lessons from culinary expert Beth Romualdez.

She cooks salmon head in Japanese sauce, salmon fillet with oyster sauce, tenderloin steak, salmon salad, salmon steak and bacalao.

She can also serve Oriental and Continental cuisines. A lot of Italian dishes are also in her specialty list. She concocts very light sauces for pasta. Her Pasta Vongole simply uses clams, olive oil, herbs and other spices. It’s a meal that is light enough for a second serving.

She can also whip up puttanesca and pasta using an olive-paste sauce. The latter she does by osterizing black olives, capers, olive oil, garlic, basil and parsley into a thick paste. Another interesting Italian entrée is her Osso Buco, a dish of tender veal shanks with a heavy sauce of Italian tomatoes, olive oil, parsley and loads of chopped carrots, garlic and celery. The sauce can be a viand in itself.

More ‘adobo’ recipes

Her interest in discovering new dishes never stops. A few years ago, Benavides learned to cook adobo with ketchup.

“I learned it from my uncle in the US,” says Benavides, who now runs her own restaurant and catering business, O Kitchen (188 E. Rodriguez Jr. Ave., Libis, QC).

“He would first make regular adobo, put ketchup and then bake it. It’s really delicious and very tasty. The color is orangey because of the tomato ketchup. It’s tangier and a bit sour. The sauce is really thick.”

Even with her busy schedule, Benavides makes it a point to cook the family meal every day, especially adobo.

“After I cook adobo, I cool it first, store in plastic containers and keep it in the ref,” she says. “If my husband or children have a craving for it and I’m not at home, they just take it out and reheat it.”

‘Ginataang Adobo’

1 k pork
½ c vinegar
2 c water
2 c soy sauce
1 clove garlic
Bay leaf
Peppercorn
1½ c coconut milk (gata)
Pandan leaves (optional)

In a deep pan, boil together water, vinegar, garlic, peppercorn, bay leaf and soy sauce. Then add pork. Don’t mix. When pork is tender, pour the gata. Mix. Add pandan leaves for extra aroma. Serve warm.

‘Adobo’ Flakes

1 k chicken breast
½ c soy sauce
½ c water
½ c vinegar
1 clove garlic
Peppercorn
Salt to taste

In a pan, boil together water, vinegar, soy sauce, garlic and peppercorn. Add chicken breast and cook for a few minutes. Take out chicken and let it cool. Then flake meat into thin strips. Season with salt. Deep-fry meat in hot oil. Strain meat. Serve adobo flakes with scrambled egg and veggies.

Joescoundrel
08-01-2013, 02:05 PM
From Yahoo food section ___

Adam Rapoport's Skirt Steak with Chimichurri Sauce

Forget A1, this herb-flecked steak sauce from Argentina is grilled steak's new best friend.

Take a look at steak-laden tables around the world, and you'll notice a trend: many feature herbaceous sauces alongside the beef. In Italy, salsa verde made with parsley, capers, and anchovy is a vibrant counterpoint to the rich meat. In France, no plate of steak frites is complete without a boat of tarragon-infused béarnaise. In Argentina, chimichurri's the only game in town.

Similar to salsa verde, chimichurri relies on acidity (in the form of red wine vinegar) and minced herbs (often some combination of fresh parsley, fresh cilantro, and dried oregano) to perk up grilled meat. The sauce also typically includes red pepper flakes and garlic for extra punch, and oil to soften the blow.

This recipe, from Bon Appétit Editor-in-Chief Adam Rapoport's new tome, The Grilling Book, is our new favorite version of this classic sauce, striking the perfect balance between acidity, herbs, and spice. When it comes to grilled steak, there's no better complement.

Skirt Steak with Chimichurri Sauce

From The Grilling Book by Adam Rapoport, Editor in Chief of Bon Appétit

Serves 4

Skirt Steak:

One 1 1/2-pound skirt steak (about 1/2-inch thick), cut in half crosswise
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable oil, for brushing
1/2 cup Chimichurri Sauce

1. Season skirt steak lightly with salt and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Pat dry with paper towels and season again with salt and pepper.

2. Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high. Brush grill grate with oil.

3. Cook until meat is nicely charred and medium-rare, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer steak to a work surface; let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Slice thinly against the grain and serve with Chimichurri Sauce.

Chimichurri

1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt, more as needed
3 to 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced or minced
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 Fresno chile or red jalapeño, finely chopped
2 cups minced fresh cilantro
1 cup minced flat-leaf parsley
1/3 cup finely chopped fresh oregano
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1. Combine vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt, garlic, shallot, and chile in a medium bowl and let stand for 10 minutes.

2. Stir in cilantro, parsley, and oregano. Using a fork, whisk in oil. Transfer 1/2 cup chimichurri to a small bowl, season with salt to taste, and reserve as sauce.

3. To use as a marinade with beef or lamb: Put beef or lamb in a glass, stainless steel, or ceramic dish. Toss with remaining chimichurri. Cover and chill for at least 3 hours or overnight.

4. Remove meat from marinade, pat dry, and grill. Serve with reserved sauce.

Sam Miguel
08-12-2013, 10:46 AM
The secret to this hit ‘adobong alimango’ and its finger-licking sauce

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

3:30 am | Thursday, August 8th, 2013

In cooking Adobong Alimango, Mila Aquende Banzon shares the secret of its finger-licking sauce—garlic, lots and lots of garlic.

She uses about six to seven bulbs of garlic for every two to three large pieces of crabs.

The heady aroma and taste of sweet garlic, plus the salty-than-sour flavor of her adobo, seep nicely into the tender crab meat. The marinated aligue (crab fat) makes the adobo extra-luscious.

Banzon’s version contains no vinegar, pepper or bay leaf, only calamansi juice and fish sauce (patis) to seal the deal.

“This adobo is so easy to cook,” says Banzon, 62. “You’re done in 15 minutes or less.”

Adobong Alimango, one of Banzon’s kitchen specialties, has never failed to stimulate her family’s appetite. They enjoy their adobo with mounds of rice gently smothered with adobo sauce. No need for butter to add richness to the dish. The sharp sourness of the calamansi juice and the saltiness of fish sauce in the adobo are enough.

The aligue is extracted from the crab, then marinated for a few minutes in calamansi juice and fish sauce. The rest of the crab is sautéed in garlic.

She says it’s best to get mud crabs, still alive right up to when they’re cooked. Pick those that feel heavy. Crabs should smell briny fresh; they should look bright and clean.

Cooking for the family

Banzon has been serving Adobong Alimango for years now, even passing on the recipe to the house help.

“I learned the recipe from a good friend,” she says. “Every time we have special occasions in the house, I would prepare it. These days, it’s my long-time kasambahay Saling who cooks it for the family.”

Banzon hails from Albay, but she’s one Bicolano who’s not into spicy food. She doesn’t like dishes with gata (coconut milk) as well.

“My friends and relatives would tease me about it, but I just prefer simple home-cooked Pinoy meals like sinigang for my family,” she explains.

She used to attend baking and cooking classes, where she learned more Filipino and Chinese dishes.

“I enjoyed those things because I enjoyed the company of friends,” Banzon recalls.

Apart from her crabs, the family likes her potato salad and grilled seafood and meat dishes.

Busy woman

These days, Banzon is busy as a bee running the family businesses in Bataan. She used to run a pawnshop before joining her husband, Oscar, in the family construction business (Abesco), and is now running the family’s own hotel, Crown Royale Hotel (Capitol Drive, San Jose, Balanga, Bataan), and resort, La Vista Balanga Inland Resort (Barangay Central Roman Superhighway, Balanga, Bataan).

They also recently acquired the franchise for a Chinese restaurant, a spa and a salon.

Banzon has four children, who all help out in the businesses—Maria Carmela (also a pediatrician); Candice Anne (chef and head of food and beverage); Bryan Joseph (Abesco company); and Crizelda Marie (handles the hotel room division). She has five grandchildren.

When her kids were growing up, Banzon would juggle her time between the family business and domestic life.

“Good thing, our office was just across our house so I could check on my kids every now and then,” she says. “When you have a family, you really need to know how to cook. Funny, none of my kids (except for my chef daughter), who all have their own family now, knows how to cook.”

Still, the family’s foremost bonding moment is eating.

“My family loves to eat. We enjoy eating as much as we enjoy traveling altogether,” says Banzon.

Banzon shares her recipe for Adobong Alimango and Bataan’s version of Chicken Pork Adobo, which is a bit sweeter than usual.

Adobong Alimango (Stewed Mud Crabs)

3 pc large crabs (mud crabs)
6 bulbs of garlic, chopped
1/3 c calamansi juice
½ c fish sauce
1 c water
½ c oil

Clean crabs thoroughly. Cut crabs in half. Remove the crab fat (aligue) and set aside. Marinate fat in calamansi juice and fish sauce. Meanwhile, heat oil in a pan and sauté garlic until brown. Remove garlic from pan and set aside. Add crabs from the same pan and cook until almost reddish in color. Set aside.

Quickly sauté the reserved crab fat with calamansi juice and water. Blend in the fried crabs. Season with salt and pepper. Simmer over medium heat until crabs are fully cooked. Garnish with fried garlic. Served with garlic rice.

Bataan Chicken-Pork Adobo

½ k pork liempo
½ k chicken
¼ c oil
100 g onion
6 bulbs of garlic
½ c soy sauce
2 tbsp sugar
½ c vinegar
Ground pepper
2 tbsp cornstarch
Sliced onions
5 leaves laurel
½ c water

Sauté garlic and onion in cooking oil. Add chicken, pork and soy sauce. Add vinegar and water. Allow to boil. Add sugar and ground pepper. Add laurel leaves. Simmer and season to taste.

Add cornstarch to thicken the sauce. Garnish with sliced onions.

Joescoundrel
09-19-2013, 10:44 AM
‘Pininyahang manok’

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

4:06 am | Thursday, September 19th, 2013

One of the richest provinces in the Southern Luzon region, Batangas is known for its cattle ranches, its pineapple and coconut plantations, and vast hectares of sugar plantations. Because it’s along the coastline, it has access not only to beautiful beaches but also to the harvests of the sea.

As a result, Batangas’ cuisine is rich and varied. Among the dishes it’s known for is beef bulalo, a hearty soup of beef shanks and beef bone marrow patiently simmered to tenderness. Maliputo, found in the waters of Taal Lake, is a highly prized fish because of its delicate flavor. And with sugar being a major product, specialties of the province include delicacies such as suman made with panotsa.

These and other Batangas dishes will be part of the lunch and dinner buffet of Hotel InterContinental’s Café Jeepney until September 30. The crabs cooked in coconut milk is a must-try. For this dish, Hotel InterCon uses the special crabs found in the brackish waters of the river in Nasugbu. Because the river is near the sea, its water is salty, giving the crabs a salty-sweet flavor, according to Batangueño chefs Tats Azarcon Jr. and Randy Capule, who are assisting the Intercon chefs in preparing the buffet.

Here’s the chefs’ recipe for a dish that makes good use of Batangas’ abundant coconut and pineapple harvests: pininyahang manok, or chicken with pineapple.

Simmered in thick coconut milk that comes from the first pressing of coconut meat, the chicken is enhanced by the flavor of sweet, fresh chunks of pineapple. This dish is best served as soon as it’s cooked.

(The cuisine of Batangas will be part of Café Jeepney’s lunch and dinner buffet until Sept. 30. For reservations, call tel. 7937000.)

Pininyahang Manok

1 ½ kg chicken
2 tbsp cooking oil
onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped
carrot, sliced into rounds or wedges
potatoes, cut into cubes or wedges (see tips)
whole fresh pineapple, peeled and cut into chunks (see tips)
Salt and pepper, to taste
c thick coconut milk (kakang gata)
c chicken stock or water (only if needed)
red bell pepper, sliced into thick strips
green bell pepper, sliced into thick strips

1. Slice the chicken into serving pieces. In a large, deep casserole, heat the cooking oil to medium, then sauté the onions and garlic. Add the chicken and cook, stirring occasionally so the chicken browns lightly on all sides, about five to 10 minutes. Add the carrots, potatoes and pineapples. Season with the salt and pepper.

2. Pour in the coconut milk. Turn up heat. When the liquid boils, lower the heat to a simmer. Let simmer until the chicken is fully cooked and the vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes.

3. If the liquid seems too thick, add the chicken stock or water as needed. Stir in the bell peppers. Simmer for two to three more minutes. Adjust seasonings to taste. Serve with rice.

Thick coconut milk or kakang gata is the liquid from the first pressing or first squeezing of coconut meat. You can use freshly squeezed coconut milk or the canned variety. Usually, cans of thick coconut milk are labeled coconut cream.

When cooked, the potatoes and the pineapples look similar because of their yellowish color. So diners will know which one is which, cut them into dissimilar pieces. For example, you can cut the potatoes into scalloped wedges and the pineapple into triangular chunks.

When adding water or chicken stock to the simmering chicken, stir it well into the mixture so the liquids blend evenly. Add only as little as possible so as not to dilute the coconut milk.

Instead of a whole chicken that’s cut up, you can use slices of your favorite parts, e.g., chicken legs, wings or thighs, etc.

Sam Miguel
10-24-2013, 08:07 AM
Adobo Corner

‘Adobong bagnet’ with ‘sugpo at taba ng talangka’–aka please be careful with your heart

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

3:43 am | Thursday, October 24th, 2013

He first visualized the taste in his mind, then the look on the plate. Next, Boni Pimentel blended spices for that lingering aftertaste. Then he went to work.

The result? Adobong Bagnet with Sugpo at Taba ng Talangka.

While it may sound too rich and too intense, with heart-attack-inducing flavors, Pimentel’s stewed dish is nonetheless a uniquely delicious experience.

“I just thought of mixing all the good stuff in one dish,” says Pimentel, owner of Ilustrado Restaurant in Intramuros, Manila. “It’s perfectly matched with a heaping mound of steaming hot rice or garlic rice.”

Pimentel says he got the inspiration for his adobo on one of his trips to Pampanga, when he tasted adobong lechon kawali with taba ng talangka (crab fat).

He thought of recreating the dish, but this time using Ilokano bagnet for a tastier bite, then cooking it adobo-style with the usual vinegar, soy sauce, pepper, garlic and bay leaf. He mixed it with prawns and finished it off with taba ng talangka for a richer crustacean relish.

“I know it’s very rich, but you can enjoy it once in a while,” says Pimentel. “It’s like eating bagnet. You don’t eat bagnet everyday. Same thing with lechon.”

With the addition of crab fat and bits of garlic, the adobo sauce comes out thick and orangey in color.

As is done in Pimentel’s restaurant, the bagnet is marinated for 24 hours in sukang Iloko, pepper and garlic, then boiled the following day with the marinade.

After the marinade is disposed of, the meat is half-roasted and left in room temperature. The bagnet is then sliced into chunks and fried to perfection whenever an order is placed.

For the adobo, the bagnet used is precooked while the sugpo is pre-grilled, seasoned with just salt and pepper.

The clincher is the addition of crab fat, which just melts into the rest of the sauce.

“I always want some combinations in my pork adobo,” Pimentel adds. “So I added sugpo for those who do not eat pork. Everybody loves prawns.”

Bestseller

Pimentel’s adobo was an instant hit among friends and family, which gave him the idea of including it on his restaurant menu. It has become one of the resto’s bestsellers.

Even his foreign guests look for his adobo.

The taba ng talangka is available in major supermarkets; Pimentel gets his stash of bottled crab fat from the food stalls in Market! Market! in Taguig.

Don’t get the salmon-colored ones; get those with oil that looks more orangey in color, because it has the real taste of taba ng talangka.

Pimentel, who hails from Pangasinan, grew up eating the typical adobo with spices and seasonings. But he preferred his adobo dry. So, he would cook his own version of adobo, marinating the liempo or pork ribs in vinegar and seasoning overnight.

He would then boil the meat the next day, fry the meat separately with more garlic to keep the powerful aroma and flavor of the garlic intact, and simmer it with the marinade until totally reduced.

“I want it nagmamantika na,” says Pimentel. “I really love to eat and cook. For me, if you love to eat, cooking will just come naturally. And exposure to different kinds of food will help you a lot in preparing good food in the kitchen.”

“I get to visualize the food and imagine the taste even without tasting the actual food. It’s all because of exposure,” he adds.

Hands-on experience

Pimentel started Ilustrado in 1989 with wife Rose. Neither of them had any professional culinary background, but they learned the rudiments of running a food business on the job. Now,

Pimentel is assisted by children Betina, Beatrice, Bernice and RJ.

When Rose died four years ago, Pimentel became both father and mother to his children: doing the groceries; getting the fresh produce from the wet market for the family’s meal; preparing the week’s lunch and dinner menu for the house help to follow.

The family eats breakfast and dinner all together at home. On Sundays, Pimentel makes sure every member of the family is complete for lunch or dinner after he plays golf in Alabang.

He cooks mostly on weekends. The children love his kalderetang baka, baked bangus belly (flavored with calamansi, garlic, soy sauce and leeks) and adobo. Pimentel pairs his adobo with fried fish.

“My children love everything I cook for them. They like it when I cook, because they know they will have a good meal,” says Pimentel.

Adobong Bagnet with Sugpo at Taba ng Talangka

Bagnet:

1 kg pork belly
1 c vinegar (white)
½ c fish sauce
1 whole garlic clove
10 pcs whole black pepper
3 pcs laurel leaf
Vegetable oil

Marinate pork belly in soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, laurel leaves and pepper for 30 minutes to a full hour. (Depending on your flavor profile, the more flavorful you want it to be, the longer the marinade should stay.) Drain and set aside. Slice into pieces. Fry the pork belly in a pan on high flame.

Adobo:

¼ c vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic
½ c vinegar
½ c soy sauce
½ tsp black pepper, cracked
2 pcs laurel leaf
1 c chicken stock (or 1 pc chicken cube)
8 pcs sugpo
½ c taba ng talangka
3 pcs sili sigang

Sauté garlic in oil until brown. Add the slices of bagnet. Then, add remaining marinade, soy sauce, vinegar, laurel leaves, peppers and chicken stock. Lower the heat and simmer until pork is soft and tender (about 45 minutes to, roughly, an hour). Add sugpo. Cook for about five minutes. Do not overcook the sugpo. Add the taba ng talangka and sili sigang. Cook for another 10 minutes.

Ready to serve. Serves four.

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 10:14 AM
Pork trotters ‘adobo’–the quintessential Pinoy dish given the French touch

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:21 am | Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Who says adobo can never be classy and served with sophistication?

Here’s a gourmet take on the pork adobo, made sosyal with a bit of French and Chinese influences. It’s a freestyle kind of stew but combined with the important adobo components—vinegar, salt, garlic, bay leaf and pepper.

Annie Lichaytoo Tanco’s upscale version takes adobo to the next level with its blend of complementary flavors, including beer, pineapple juice, star anise, fresh oregano and cumin.

For more texture and mouth feel, she also puts in sausage, Vigan longganisa, bacon lardons and white beans.

The taste comes out more pronounced, sharp and heady, with a nice sweetish aftertaste.

But, the most striking part of this quintessential dish is the use of pork trotters, instead of the typical pork belly.

Pork trotters or pig’s feet are cooked slowly over low fire for a long period to guarantee tender meat. Once the meat falls off the bone, it’s ready to be served.

“I use pork trotter in my adobo because once it’s cooked, it becomes sticky and gelatin-y and helps thicken the sauce delightfully,” says Tanco of the famous Bizu Patisserie.

If you like to dish out the stickiest, tastiest, oiliest and fattest kind of adobo, use pork trotters, says Tanco. You may also use trotters alongside other pork meat for a rich, thick sauce.

“That’s the real secret of a tasty, thick adobo sauce,” says Tanco. “I like it when I’m eating adobo and my lips get stuck because it’s so sticky and tasty at the same time.”

French casserole

Pork Trotters Adobo is prepared like a French casserole, served in a large, deep saucepan with pieces of meat, various herbs and spices, liquid (beer) and crunchy topping (breadcrumbs).

It’s then simmered over low flame for hours. Tanco says four to five hours of simmering will do until the meat is tender and juicy.

The sauce and beer reduction method is very French.

“As a Chinese, I got the technique from my mom the way she would cook the patatim, but I did a little tweaking. I cook it in beer and pineapple juice, and simmer with onions, garlic, allspice and star anise. It’s more like adobong pata casserole,” she says.

Instead of wine, she adds Pale Pilsen to neutralize the overall tangy flavor of the casserole. And Tanco suggests adding dried Szechuan chili pepper to give the dish more kick.

This adobo calls for no soy sauce. The dark color comes from the caramelization of white sugar just before all the ingredients are put together, lending the dish a nice burnt-sugar tang.

Tanco encourages cooks to be more resourceful and adventurous with ingredients—chorizo or sausage, mushrooms, beans, bacon and longganisa.

“It’s a very rich food,” she says. “You can eat it with rice or bread. Or you can make cuapao with adobo filling. It’s a complete meal in itself. The pork trotters are so rich that you would want to tone it down a bit with the breadcrumbs.”

Messy but delicious

With the thick, sticky sauce, this adobo is pretty messy to eat because you have to use your hands to eat the knuckles. But it’s worth it. Trotters are very tasty because that’s where all the flavors go.

If you have leftover adobo sauce, Tanco suggests you turn it into pancit sauce.

“You wash the pancit bihon, put a little water in a pan and let it boil,” she says. “Then add adobo sauce and mix well. That’s another dish.”

You can make a big batch of Pork Trotters Adobo and store in the freezer. As everyone knows, the longer you keep adobo, the better it tastes.

Summer classes

Tanco started cooking when she was in third grade. Every summer with her older twin sister and two other sisters, they would enroll in cooking classes conducted by an Italian lady in Bel-Air, Makati City. They learned how to make different kinds of pasta from scratch—ravioli, fettuccini, etc.

They also attended classes by Sylvia Reynoso-Gala.

Tanco took up Communication Arts in college and got married afterwards. In 2000, she enrolled at the Center for Culinary Arts, Manila simply because cooking was her first love.

“I used to have a garments factory which I closed down,” she says. “Then, I realized I had nothing else to do. So, I started cooking, because it was really what I love. It’s like second nature to me.”

She also took up Entrepreneurship at the Asian Institute of Management, “which helped place things together,” she says, including the birth of Bizu Patisserie.

Pork Trotters Adobo

1 bottle beer, Cervesa Negra or Pale Pilsen

1 can pineapple juice

5 cloves garlic, peeled

1 pc onion, peeled

1 tbsp fresh oregano

1 tbsp cumin, dried

2 tbsp rock salt

¼ tsp black pepper

1 tbsp dried chili

In a blender, place all ingredients and blend until well-combined. Set aside.

2 c grapeseed oil

½ c white sugar

2 whole or 800 g pork trotters (ask your butcher to chop to 2.5 inches thick)

In a sauté pan, heat oil and add sugar. Allow sugar to slowly caramelize. Once light brown in color, add pork and constantly stir until well-coated with the caramelized sugar and meat has browned a bit.

5 cloves allspice

1 pc star anise

Transfer caramelized pork trotters to a casserole and add the blended liquid mixture. Add in allspice and star anise. Add a little water to cover the pork trotters. Top casserole with a lid and allow to simmer in low heat for about four hours.

¼ c grapeseed oil

3 pcs sausage, Vigan longganisa

½ c bacon lardons

¼ c white vinegar

½ c white beans (canned, discard liquid)

¼ c fresh parsley, chopped

Bread crumbs (optional)

In a sauté pan, heat oil and sear longganisa and bacon. Transfer to the casserole and finally add vinegar and white beans. Remove lid and allow to simmer until sauce has thickened. You may adjust the seasoning by adding a bit more sugar, salt and/or pepper. Finish with chopped parsley and bread crumbs.

Serves six persons.

Sam Miguel
11-28-2013, 10:21 AM
Cooking tips from a Chinese chef

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:51 am | Thursday, November 28th, 2013

It’s such a joy to attend a cooking class. No matter how much one already knows, one always learns something new. The class becomes even more interesting if the chef-teacher is jolly and willing to share a lot of cooking tips.

Such was the case when executive Chinese chef Richard Thong conducted his first cooking demonstration at the Shang Palace, Shangri-La Hotel Makati’s premier Chinese restaurant. A master of Cantonese cuisine, the Singaporean-born Thong has had 25 years cooking experience in top hotels and restaurants. During his class he dished out tips and techniques while cracking jokes and deftly handling the prawns, lapu-lapu, vegetables and a myriad other ingredients.

For instance, we learned that there’s no need now to go hunting in Chinatown for lotus paste. With his charm and sense of urgency, he was able to convince some suppliers to make lotus paste available in supermarkets. Now one can find this ingredient, which is used for making chilled mochi, in Landmark and SM supermarkets.

Chef Thong also taught us to add Chinese red dates when steaming fish. Moreover, he didn’t even use a conventional steamer for making the Guangzhou-style live lapu-lapu. Instead he used a clay pot.

Other tips from Chef Thong:

It’s always best to use fresh fish. To tell if fish is fresh, check the gills. They should be a bright red.

However, if you must use frozen fish, follow these steps before cooking it: 1) Thaw the fish; 2) Rub the fish with salt; 3) Rinse the fish well; 4) Drizzle with Chinese wine.

Before using a new clay pot, soak it in water overnight.

When steaming fish, the temperature should not reach boiling point. It should reach only 98ºC (just below boiling point).

After the cooking demo, the whole class enjoyed a sumptuous lunch at Shang Palace, which included the dishes Chef Thong taught us to prepare: hot prawn salad, Guangzhou-style steamed lapu-lapu and chilled mochi, as well as double-boiled fish maw with cabbage, mushrooms and red dates, sautéed scallops with wolfberries, egg whites and asparagus, Shang Palace roasted duck, braised e-fu noodles with seafood and mushrooms, and chilled sago with diced mangoes.

Here’s Chef Thong’s recipe for hot prawn salad. Not only is it delicious, it’s also very simple to do. You can serve this as a first course or as part of a dinner buffet.

For more information on Shangri-La Hotel’s cooking class, call 8138888.

Hot Prawn Salad

1 can (about 850 g) fruit cocktail

600 g large prawns (about 12 pieces)

2 large egg yolks, well-beaten

½ c cornstarch

3 c cooking oil (or use soya oil)

1/3 c mayonnaise

Shredded carrots and radish, for garnish (optional)

Pour the fruit cocktail into a large sieve to drain. Let the fruits drain for one to two hours. Pat the fruits dry with paper towels.

Remove the shells, heads and tails from the prawns. Rinse prawns well and pat dry.

Dip the prawns in the egg yolks then dredge in cornstarch. In a wok or frying pan, heat the cooking oil or soya oil to about 170ºC. Fry the prawns in the hot oil until golden brown. You may have to do this in batches. As the prawns get cooked, remove them from the hot oil and drain on trays lined with absorbent paper or paper towels. Let cool slightly.

Coat the prawns with the mayonnaise. Arrange the prawns on a serving platter. Spoon the drained fruits on top and around the prawns. If desired, garnish with shredded carrots and radish. Makes four servings.

Cook’s tips

Coat only the prawns with the mayonnaise. Do not mix the mayonnaise with the fruits so they don’t become watery.

If using a deep fryer to fry the prawns, heat the oil to around 160ºC-180ºC.

If using a wok or frying pan instead of a deep fryer, put the prawns into the hot oil with the top (head) part first so the prawns don’t stick to the frying pan.

Though the recipe is called “hot prawn salad,” this dish should be served not hot but just warm.

Joescoundrel
12-10-2013, 10:00 AM
A fancy holiday meal that requires no fancy skills

By Sara Moulton

(Associated Press) | Updated December 10, 2013 - 5:24am

Looking to dazzle your guests during the holidays? I've got the perfect "fancy" dish for you. And I promise it requires no advanced culinary skills.

I've adapted this from a recipe that first appeared in Gourmet magazine. It boasts a secret ingredient, what the French call a "farce," but we call it forcemeat. It's what makes this chicken ridiculously moist and flavorful.

A forcemeat is a mixture of well-seasoned meat, poultry, fish or vegetables, that is finely chopped or ground, then cooked and served alone or used as a stuffing. Some fat usually is added to ensure the forcemeat has a smooth texture. Forcemeat is the base of many charcuterie products, including pates, terrines and sausages.

But in this recipe, it doesn't just add delicious flavor. It also insulates the chicken from the intensity of the heat in the oven, making it almost impossible for the meat to dry out.

For my forcemeat, I've used a mixture of chicken, spinach, low-fat sour cream (in place of the original recipe's heavy cream), and Mediterranean flavorings, including lemon zest, nutmeg (often paired with spinach) and fennel seed. I'd advise those of you who think you hate fennel (which tastes vaguely of licorice) to give this combo a chance. It's a delicious blend of flavors and you won't even notice the fennel.

But before you get going, a few kitchen notes.

We'll start with the tools. Your best bet for grinding the fennel seeds is a spice or coffee grinder, but you also can crush them with the bottom of a heavy saucepan. As for grating the lemon zest and nutmeg, get yourself a wand-style grater, which makes quick work of both.

If you're using dry pre-washed spinach, throw a little water into the skillet with it to help it wilt, then stir it often. Don't be surprised when it cooks down to almost nothing. You'll notice then that the spinach has generated water of its own in excess. The best way to lose the water is to wrap batches of the spinach in a dish towel and squeeze hard.

You may wonder whether all the stuffing will fit under the chicken's skin, or whether the excess will ooze out when you saute the meat. Don't worry. Chicken skin is remarkably elastic. And the forcemeat firms right up during cooking and won't slide out.

Wait a minute! Doesn't that skin contain a lot of fat? It does. But I figure that the holidays are one time of the year you can splurge a little.

And by the way, there's no reason to confine the enjoyment of this dish to the holidays. You can customize the seasonings or flavorings as you like as long as you keep the amounts of the core ingredients — chicken, sour cream and ice — untouched. That said, this is indeed a perfect dish for entertaining because you can make it ahead and keep it in the refrigerator until about 40 minutes before you want to serve it.

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SPINACH-STUFFED CHICKEN THIGHS

Start to finish: 1 hour 55 minutes (30 minutes active)

Servings: 6

5 ounces baby spinach

2 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (8 thighs)

2 tablespoons crushed ice

1/3 cup low-fat sour cream

Kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds, crushed

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Ground black pepper

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil.

In a large skillet over medium heat, wilt the spinach until completely reduced. Let cool until easily handled, then squeeze any moisture from the spinach. Finely chop the spinach. You should have about 1/3 cup. Set aside.

Using a paring knife, remove the skin and bone from 2 of the chicken thighs. Place them in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add the ice and process until absorbed. Add the sour cream and pulse again until well mixed. Add the spinach, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, fennel seeds, lemon zest, nutmeg and 1/8 teaspoon of black pepper. Pulse, scraping down the sides, until well mixed. Set aside.

Arrange the remaining thighs on a cutting board, skin side up. Carefully pull back the skin, leaving it attached on one end. Divide the ground chicken and spinach mixture evenly between the 6 thighs, spreading it evenly over the meat. Stretch the skin back over the filling on each thigh. Arrange the stuffed thighs on a plate, cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least 1 hour and up to overnight.

When ready to cook, heat the oven to 400f.

In a large oven-safe skillet over medium-high, heat the oil. Season the chicken skin lightly with salt and pepper, then add the chicken to the skillet, skin side down. Cook until the skin is golden brown, then use tongs to turn the thighs skin side up. Place the skillet in the oven and roast for 25 minutes, or until the thighs reach 160 F.

Remove the skillet from the oven and cover with foil. Let rest for 5 minutes before transferring each thigh to a serving plate. Spoon any juices from the skillet over the thighs just before serving.

Nutrition information per serving: 310 calories; 200 calories from fat (65 percent of total calories); 23 g fat (7 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 110 mg cholesterol; 3 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 22 g protein; 370 mg sodium.

Sam Miguel
12-17-2013, 10:28 AM
Skillet pasta with tomatoes and mushrooms

By Norma O. Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

2:18 am | Thursday, December 12th, 2013

It was great to finally meet Michelin-star chef Nicolas Isnard during his recent stint at The Tivoli, Mandarin Oriental’s fine dining restaurant. Previously we had only “met” him while he was still in France, via Skype, when we interviewed him before his arrival in Manila.

Aside from preparing degustation and a la carte menus for The Tivoli, which included foie gras façon carbonara, bouillabaisse with saffron, fillet of beef with escargots de Bourgogne and tiramisu au chocolat, the effervescent chef also conducted a cooking demonstration the Saturday before he left Manila.

Chef-owner of the award-winning L’Auberge de la Charme Restaurant near France’s Dijon region, Isnard is known for mixing tradition with innovation. He gives the classic French onion soup, for instance, a contemporary look by deconstructing the main ingredients and serving them in a stark white soup bowl, while his bouillabaisse is prepared with saffron and eggs, which he says is the universal food.

During his cooking demonstration, Isnard showed us how to cook foie gras Carbonara style (with Parmesan foam and mushrooms), Chilean sea bass with lemon-ginger broth and tiramisu au chocolat.

Because there was still some time left, he also showed us how to cook pasta in a tomato-mushroom sauce—without having to pre-boil the pasta. It looked like an amazing dish—and an easy one to recreate at home. With this technique, you save a lot of time since you don’t have to boil the pasta separately.

The pasta also acquires the flavor of the tomatoes (and the chicken stock or broth), since they’re cooked together, Isnard pointed out. Moreover, the pasta becomes creamy, even though no cream has been added to it.

Now that the Christmas season is here, you may want to try cooking this easy pasta dish for your family gatherings.

Skillet Pasta with Tomatoes and Mushrooms

¼ tbsp butter
¼ tbsp olive oil
500 g penne pasta
1 ½ c coarsely chopped tomatoes
½ c chopped black olives
1 ½ c halved cherry tomatoes
½ c halved button mushrooms
3 c chicken stock or chicken broth or water
Salt, to taste
Grated Parmesan cheese

Optional:

Shaved Parmesan cheese
Sun-dried tomatoes
Basil leaves

Heat the butter and olive oil in a large, deep skillet. Add the uncooked pasta and the coarsely chopped tomatoes. Let simmer for one to two minutes then stir in olives, cherry tomatoes and mushrooms.

Pour in chicken stock or chicken broth or water. Season with salt. Continue simmering until pasta becomes al dente, about 8-10 minutes. Grate cheese on top of the pasta then mix gently. Remove from heat.

If desired, add shaved Parmesan cheese and sun-dried tomatoes on top. Garnish with basil leaves. Serve immediately.

For more tips, recipes and stories, visit the author’s blog www.normachikiamco.com and Facebook fan page www.facebook.com/normachikiamco. Follow on Twitter @NormaChikiamco

Cook’s tips

Stir the pasta frequently while it’s simmering so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.

You can also cook the pasta beyond the al dente stage—to a softer texture. Just add more chicken stock or chicken broth or water so it doesn’t dry out.

To shave Parmesan cheese, use a vegetable peeler.

Sam Miguel
01-09-2014, 09:47 AM
Spaghetti frittata and apple topping

By Vangie Baga-Reyes

Philippine Daily Inquirer

4:48 am | Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Leftover food from the holiday spread shouldn’t go to waste. They can be served anew with just a little creativity and a twist here and there.

If you have excess spaghetti or macaroni pasta in the cupboard and leftover meat like ham, pot roast or roast chicken in the fridge, plus lots of eggs, put them all together to create delicious spaghetti frittata.

“It’s a whole new festive meal for the family,” says chef Dorothy Ferreria. “It’s easy and flavorful and can be done in less than 15 minutes.”

Frittata is like a glamorized omelet you can dump in any cooked food you fancy.

One secret technique in making perfect frittata is to use a parchment paper over the pan. The mixture won’t stick to the bottom even if you use a nonstick pan, and you can easily flip the frittata over.

“It’s ideal for brunch and you can even put in your leftover adobo or turkey for the frittata,” adds Ferreria.

Now, if you don’t know what else to do with your baskets of apples, slice them into thin wedges, cook them in sugar and serve them as your toppings to dress up your afternoon snack.

“You can use the sweetened apples as sidings or toppings for hotcakes, waffles, or over toasted raisin bread,” says Ferreria, who runs her own private cooking and baking classes (tel. 0919-5669977).

This apple dish takes only about five minutes to cook and comes out as another unique dessert.

Spaghetti Frittata

2 eggs
2 tbsp all-purpose cream
salt and pepper to taste
¼ c chopped spring onions or leeks
1 ¼ c cooked spaghetti noodles
½ c sliced button mushrooms
½ c diced or shredded leftover pot roast, ham or roast chicken
50 g or ¼ of a 200-g bar of quick-melt cheese
2 tbsp olive oil or corn oil

Apple Topping in a Jiffy

3 pcs apples, peeled and sliced into thin wedges
2 tbsp butter
½ c white sugar
¼ c brown sugar
1 ½ to 2 tsp cinnamon powder
1 tsp calamansi juice

E-mail the author at vbaga@inquirer.com.ph

1. In a bowl, combine eggs, cream, salt, pepper and onion. Beat with wire whip until blended.

2. Add cooked noodles, mushrooms and desired cooked meat. Set aside.

3. Line the bottom and sides of nonstick frying pan (6 or 8 inches diameter) with baking parchment. Place over low heat and pour in olive oil.

4. Add the egg mixture.

5. As soon as the sides of the frittata are done (center will be wet), cover the frittata with a sheet of baking parchment and invert the frittata to another nonstick frying pan.

6. Remove paper and cover the surface of frittata with grated cheese and continue to cook until the frittata is done. To check for doneness, the center must spring back when touched and the bottom color of frittata must be light golden brown.

7. For the apple topping, heat butter in frying pan. Add apples and sauté until glossy.

8. Add white and brown sugar. Continue to cook until sugar is melted. Add cinnamon and calamansi juice. Mix well and remove from heat.

9. Place apple slices on top of pancakes.

Sam Miguel
02-20-2014, 09:57 AM
Beef with ‘ampalaya’

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

3:38 am | Thursday, February 20th, 2014

My friend Corito Llamas has successfully lowered her blood sugar to a level where she no longer has to take her antidiabetic medicine. A writer and co-founder of a culinary magazine, Corito attributes this amazing feat to a common yet nutritious vegetable—the ampalaya.

For months Corito has been taking ampalaya in all its unpalatable bitterness, and for this she has been rewarded with better health and a slimmer figure. Of course, in tandem with her ampalaya diet, she has also been exercising and eating healthier meals. But she believes it’s the ampalaya that really clinched the deal.

Corito based her ampalaya regimen on the book written by former Health Secretary Dr. Jaime Z. Galvez Tan and Ma. Rebecca M. Galvez Tan titled “Medicinal Fruits and Vegetables.” In this book, the authors detail the nutritional benefits of Philippine-grown fruits and vegetables.

Of the ampalaya, they cite a 10-year trial study made by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development that showed that the Makiling variety of ampalaya leaves “has the same therapeutic property and action as the known oral antidiabetic drug Glibenclamide.” Results of the trial showed that 100 mg per kilo dose per day of ampalaya is comparable to 2 mg of the antidiabetes drug Glibenclamide, the authors write.

Also known as amargoso, bitter gourd and balsam apple, the ampalaya and its leaves are likewise a good source of iron, calcium, phosphorous, and vitamins C and B.

Those of us with high blood sugar or are on the verge of being diabetic may do well to emulate Corito’s example. But we may have to ease into her regimen. A bitter vegetable, after all, may not be so easy to like. It will take some sacrifice, steely nerves and some getting used to if we are to make ampalaya a part of our daily diet.

Here’s a recipe that can help ease us into the ampalaya habit: beef with ampalaya. In the beginning, we may find ourselves eating more of the beef than the ampalaya. But as days go by and we become accustomed to its bitterness, the ampalaya may take up more and more of our consumption.

It may also seem contradictory to add two spoonfuls of honey to a dish that can help lower blood sugar. But honey in itself has curative powers. Moreover, it makes the dish a little more palatable for the non-diabetics in the family, thereby encouraging them to eat the unassuming but nutrient-rich ampalaya.

Here’s to better health in the year 2014.

Beef with ‘ampalaya’

medium ampalaya
tbsp cooking oil
½ small onion, chopped
cloves garlic, chopped
½ kg beef sirloin, cut into strips around ¼-inch thick and 2 inches long
Salt and pepper
tbsp cornstarch
tbsp honey
tbsp soy sauce
c water

Cut the ampalaya in half lengthwise and remove the seeds. Cut both halves of the ampalaya diagonally into about 1-inch pieces. Set aside.

Heat the cooking oil in a skillet and sauté the onions and garlic. Season the beef sirloin with salt and pepper, then add to skillet and cook just until the beef turns brown.

Combine the cornstarch, honey, soy sauce and water in a bowl, then stir to dissolve the cornstarch. Pour the mixture into the skillet. Bring to a simmer. Simmer until the beef is tender.

Add the ampalaya and cook until ampalaya is crisp-tender, around one to two minutes. If desired, serve with brown rice. Makes four to five servings.

Cook’s tips:

For best results, use a tender cut of beef such as sirloin or tenderloin. If using a less tender cut of beef, you may have to simmer the beef for a longer time. Or, you can pound the beef with a meat tenderizer before cooking.

You can serve this dish in a platter, family-style, or as a rice topping, as they do in some restaurants.

If desired, lessen the amount of honey to one tablespoon.

Joescoundrel
02-26-2014, 11:09 AM
Making Mardi Gras taste a little more like home

By Alison Ladman

(Associated Press) | Updated February 21, 2014 - 6:00am

The sad fact of the matter is, most of us won't make it to New Orleans to celebrate Mardi Gras. But that's no reason to forsake some of the city's classic cuisine.

This year, honor Mardi Gras by making jambalaya at home. It's the perfect dish for out-of-towners; it's easy, it's weeknight- and kid-friendly, and it's extremely versatile. Because while there are several basic approaches to jambalaya — Creole and Cajun among them — there really are endless variations on this dish of rice, meat and seafood.

So we decided to put a local spin on jambalaya, with variations playing up ingredients drawn from New England, the Southwest and the West Coast. Just follow the base recipe, adding in the local ingredients of your choice (see the variations below the recipe). And don't hesitate to mix and match. The beauty of a dish like this is that it will be delicious pretty much whichever direction you head.

___

JAMBALAYA ACROSS THE COUNTRY

This is a have-it-your-way approach to jambalaya. Follow the base recipe below, adding the local variations where indicated. Our suggestions for those variations are listed below the base recipe, but feel free to substitute the ingredients of your choice.
Lifestyle Feature ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch:

Start to finish: 1 hour

Servings: 12

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 large yellow onions, diced

1 large green bell pepper, diced

2 stalks celery, diced

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 pound sausage (see below)

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 2-inch pieces

2 cups crushed fire-roasted tomatoes

Regional variation of vegetable and seasonings (see below)

2 cups long-grain white rice, such as basmati

2 quarts low-sodium chicken broth

3 bay leaves

1 pound seafood (see below)

Salt and ground black pepper

In a large Dutch oven, preferably cast-iron, over medium-high, heat the vegetable oil. Add the onions, green pepper, celery, red pepper flakes and sausage (see below). Cook, stirring, until browned, about 10 minutes.

Add the chicken, tomatoes, vegetable and seasonings (see below), rice, chicken broth and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes, or until the rice is tender, stirring occasionally. Add the seafood and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the seafood is cooked through. Season with salt and pepper. Remove and discard the bay leaves before serving.

NEW ENGLAND VARIATION:

Use bulk breakfast-style sausage. For the vegetables and seasonings use 2 tablespoons minced fresh sage, 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley, 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced, and 1/2 bunch of Swiss chard, chopped. For the seafood, use lobster meat if available, otherwise use peeled and deveined raw shrimp.

Nutrition information per serving: 360 calories; 100 calories from fat (28 percent of total calories); 11 g fat (2.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 85 mg cholesterol; 36 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 26 g protein; 500 mg sodium.

SOUTHWEST VARIATION:

Use a diced spicy sausage, such as chorizo. For the vegetables and seasonings use 1 tablespoon chili powder, 2 teaspoons cumin, 1 cup frozen or canned corn kernels, 1 minced chipotle pepper plus 1 tablespoon adobo sauce from a can of chipotles in adobo, and a 3.8-ounce can sliced black olives. Omit the seafood and instead use a 15-ounce can of drained and rinsed black beans. Finish with 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro.

Nutrition information per serving: 450 calories; 180 calories from fat (40 percent of total calories); 20 g fat (6 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 65 mg cholesterol; 42 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 24 g protein; 810 mg sodium.

WEST COAST VARIATION:

Use 12 ounces of an herbed chicken or turkey sausage, along with 4 ounces chopped prosciutto. In place of the crushed tomatoes, use a 6.35-ounce container of prepared pesto and a 14-ounce can of artichoke hearts (drained), the zest and juice of 1 orange and 1 lemon, and 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon. Use lump crabmeat for the seafood. Serve topped with sliced avocado.

Nutrition information per serving: 450 calories; 170 calories from fat (38 percent of total calories); 18 g fat (4 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 105 mg cholesterol; 39 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 31 g protein; 1,050 mg sodium.

Joescoundrel
02-27-2014, 11:22 AM
Ramen soup base

By Norma Chikiamco

Philippine Daily Inquirer

1:47 am | Thursday, February 27th, 2014

In one popular Makati restaurant, the story goes, the staff will serve their rich, delectable ramen only if they still have the soup stock that goes with it. Once they’ve ran out of their soup stock (which could happen late in the evening), they won’t serve ramen to any customer. Not even, it has been rumored, if the customer is a political bigwig.

While that may sound petulant, it’s understandable, considering the time and effort that go into the making of the soup base for ramen. It takes hours of patient, slow simmering to make a good ramen soup base, and the above-mentioned restaurant probably doesn’t want to serve its ramen without the substantial, flavorful broth it is known for.

At a cooking class held recently at The Maya Kitchen Culinary Center, chef Seiji Kamura demonstrated the complexities of making ramen soup base. A longtime resident of the Philippines, Kamura attended the Tokyo Cooking Academy and trained in Lyons, France.

Aside from being a culinary consultant and chef-demonstrator, he has written two popular cookbooks: “Japanese Cookbook for Filipinos” and “Secrets of Japanese Cooking.”

It takes three hours to simmer the stock for ramen soup, we learned from Kamura that day. Factor in the hours spent shopping for and preparing the ingredients and you’ll have practically a whole day’s work.

And that’s just for the soup base. You’ll also need to prepare the other ingredients needed for the soup, such as the noodles, the shoyu or miso base and the toppings.

No wonder there’s been such a craze in Manila for this much-loved Japanese noodle dish. If it takes that much time and effort to make good ramen stock, we’re probably all better off ordering ramen in a restaurant, where a well-trained kitchen staff has already done the job of extracting the rich flavors from the pork and chicken bones and all the attendant ingredients.

Still, for those who are feeling adventurous, here’s Kamura’s recipe for the ramen soup base. It’s the foundation for making the two kinds of ramen: shoyu and miso.

As with my other DIY recipes, I’ve kitchen-tested this—and it’s probably one of the most challenging recipes I’ve tried. Note that this is just the soup base. Although already flavorful as it is, you’ll need to add other ingredients to make either the shoyu or miso ramen.

Next week, DIY will feature the recipe for the shoyu ramen, using this basic soup base. Meantime, you can have a foretaste of this delightful, full-bodied soup base by using it to prepare any ramen or noodle soup. Just season the soup base to taste with soy sauce and dish it out in a bowl of cooked noodles, then add your choice of toppings (eggs, vegetables, etc).

The Maya Kitchen Culinary Center is at 8/F, Liberty Bldg., 835 A. Arnaiz Ave., Makati City; tel. 8921185, 8925011 local 108, 0947-8352290. For more information on other courses, visit www.themayakitchen.com or e-mail contactus @themayakitchen.com.

Ramen Soup Base

1 ½ k pork bones (the leg part), cut into large pieces
1 ½ k rib bones, cut into large pieces
½ k chicken bones, cleaned
Water, for the first boiling
20 c (5,000 ml) water, for simmering (see tips)
100 g sliced ginger
2 white onions, quartered
3 stems onion leeks
1 carrot, thinly sliced
50 g kombu (dried Japanese seaweed)
150 g garlic, crushed

Put all the pork, rib and chicken bones into a large cooking pot and add enough water to cover. Bring to a fast boil, then discard all the water.

Add the 20 cups of water plus all the other ingredients to the bones in the pot. Bring to a rolling boil, removing all the scum that rise to the surface.

Lower heat to a simmer and continue cooking for three hours. Put a strainer over a large pot and strain the resulting liquid (discard the solids).

This is the basic ramen soup base. You can use this to make miso ramen and shoyu ramen. If needed, strain the liquid again, using a very fine sieve to make sure there are no bits of pork or chicken bone in the liquid.

You can also use this as soup base for any ramen noodles you might have in your kitchen. Just ladle about 1 cup soup base into a bowl. Season to taste with soy sauce. Add some cooked ramen noodles and toppings such as eggs, vegetables and cooked sliced pork, beef or chicken. Store any remaining soup base for later use in the refrigerator or freezer (see cook’s tips).

Cook’s tips:

Kamura recommends using bottled water for simmering the soup bones since tap water sometimes has an aftertaste.

Kombu (dried Japanese seaweed) is available in Japanese groceries such as those in Cartimar Market, located on Taft Avenue, Pasay City.

If not using the stock immediately, store it in the refrigerator and use within a few days. For longer storage, keep the stock in a tightly covered container in the freezer. Thaw well before using.

Sam Miguel
08-29-2014, 09:45 AM
Authentic fish and chips, straight from a British chef

By Reggie Aspiras |

Philippine Daily Inquirer 11:00 am |

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

I seek out British chef Matthew Hornsby-Bates whenever I crave classic English food. His Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding with all the side dishes is my favorite indulgence, along with his Fish and Chips.

Recently, Matthew and his Filipino wife, chef Meg Tansiongco, visited me with their newborn, Kane. While Meg and I chatted away, Matthew so kindly went to work and cooked delicious fish and chips.

I love mine lightly battered and crisp on the outside, with the fish still moist and delicate on the inside, served with golden fries, just as chef Matthew does it.

He reminded us that fish and chips has been the “undisputed national dish of Great Britain for around 150 years.” It has become “a cultural and culinary symbol of our country, instantly recognized as British all over the world.”

Fond memories

“The love for it,” he added, ranks alongside “our love for roast beef and Yorkshire puddings and the recently nominated Chicken Tikka Nasala as the English national dish.”

“When I was a child,” said Matthew, “one of my fondest memories would be sitting on a pier on a cold day eating fish and chips from a greasy paper bag wrapped in newspaper, with the wooden chip fork, of course!”

Today, he declared, “fish and chips are divided between the classic chip shop (the batter made mainly from flour, water and yeast) and the experimental modern chef, with so many adaptations on batter, sides and serving styles.”

His favorite is beer-battered fish: “Beer will give [the fish] that unique crisp texture once fried due to its high carbon dioxide content and foamy consistency.”

As for the chips, he said the “correct potato” should be used: “A King Edward or Maris Piper would be just perfect due to its texture.”

While fish and chips is traditionally enjoyed dusted with salt and a splash of malt vinegar, he added, it’s also commonly served with side dishes such as pickled onions, pickled gherkins, tartar sauce, curry sauce and everyone’s favorite, the mushy peas. “Nothing works better with crispy piece of battered fried fish than a generous ladle of overcooked peas,” he said.

Here’s exactly how the chef cooked his beer-battered fish and chips for us. He included mushy peas and tartar sauce to complete the experience. He also gave personal tips and tricks.

Thanks Matthew! (You may reach him at 0917-5825441.)

Fish

4 pcs approximately 180 g each of Cod or Haddock fillets, the fresher the better. The tail end of the fish is best to use since there are less bones. (We used the Pacific Bay brand of Atlantic Cod, available at all major supermarkets.)

100 g flour, seasoned with a pinch of salt and pepper

Batter

200 g all-purpose flour
300 ml San Miguel Pale Pilsen
5 g salt
5 g pepper
Pinch of turmeric for a beautiful golden color
1.5 liters ground nut or canola oil, for frying. (Both oils are good for frying as either can reach high temperatures without smoking. Note that the same oil will be used to fry the chips.)

Method:

For the batter: Whisk all the ingredients except the oil to make a smooth batter.
Let batter rest for 20-30 minutes.

Heat oil to 180 degrees Celsius.
Wipe fish dry and lightly dredge them in seasoned flour.
Dip the fish fillets into the batter before slowly submerging them into the hot oil.
Cook for 6-8 minutes until crisp and golden.
(Note: Prepare everything else first. Fry the fish last, just before serving.)

Mushy peas

2 shallots, diced
1 garlic clove, crushed
50 g butter
400 g peas
1 chicken stock cube
1 medium-sized potato (peeled and diced)
1 medium onion (diced)
Combine all the ingredients for the mushy peas and simmer until thick and mushy.
Season to taste.

Chips
6 potatoes (use the right potatoes, if available)
Pinch of rock salt
Cut potatoes into 1-cm sized chips and wash thoroughly to remove any starch.
Dry the potatoes.
Heat oil to 140 degrees Celsius.
Fry the chips for 7-8 minutes until soft.
Lift out and drain.

Reheat the same oil to 180 degrees Celsius and return the chips to refry, cooking this time, until they are crispy and brown.
Drain well and season with salt.

Lemon tartar sauce

2 shallots, diced
50 g cornichon/gherkins
50 g capers
25 g chives
10 g tarragon
1 tsp lemon zest
1 c mayonnaise, preferably homemade

Finely chop all of the above ingredients and mix with the mayonnaise. Season to taste.

(The Fish and Chips Cone Stand used in the photo is courtesy of Urban Kitchen. For a catalog of Urban Kitchen products, e-mail charmaine.chua729@gmail.com or call tel. 0917-5822809.)

Unbelievable

Here’s a useful tip:

My friend Sofia Co had told me that if ever I found myself with a fish bone stuck on my throat, I should keep quiet and turn my plate clockwise three times. The plate must make three complete turns, but you can also keep turning the plate until the bone comes out.
I looked at her in disbelief and said, “Oh?” And I left it at that.

A month after, a hito bone stuck on my throat. I remembered what Sofia told me and did exactly as she said.

Guess what? Immediately after the third rotation of my plate, the bone just came out.

Don’t ask me how, it just did! The people watching me do it gave me a real strange look; then after I announced the successful disentangling of the bone, we were all just amazed.

Well, you don’t have to swallow a fish bone just to prove or disprove this theory. But in case you find yourself in such a predicament, do as I did.

Sam Miguel
08-29-2014, 09:45 AM
Authentic fish and chips, straight from a British chef

By Reggie Aspiras |

Philippine Daily Inquirer 11:00 am |

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

I seek out British chef Matthew Hornsby-Bates whenever I crave classic English food. His Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding with all the side dishes is my favorite indulgence, along with his Fish and Chips.

Recently, Matthew and his Filipino wife, chef Meg Tansiongco, visited me with their newborn, Kane. While Meg and I chatted away, Matthew so kindly went to work and cooked delicious fish and chips.

I love mine lightly battered and crisp on the outside, with the fish still moist and delicate on the inside, served with golden fries, just as chef Matthew does it.

He reminded us that fish and chips has been the “undisputed national dish of Great Britain for around 150 years.” It has become “a cultural and culinary symbol of our country, instantly recognized as British all over the world.”

Fond memories

“The love for it,” he added, ranks alongside “our love for roast beef and Yorkshire puddings and the recently nominated Chicken Tikka Nasala as the English national dish.”

“When I was a child,” said Matthew, “one of my fondest memories would be sitting on a pier on a cold day eating fish and chips from a greasy paper bag wrapped in newspaper, with the wooden chip fork, of course!”

Today, he declared, “fish and chips are divided between the classic chip shop (the batter made mainly from flour, water and yeast) and the experimental modern chef, with so many adaptations on batter, sides and serving styles.”

His favorite is beer-battered fish: “Beer will give [the fish] that unique crisp texture once fried due to its high carbon dioxide content and foamy consistency.”

As for the chips, he said the “correct potato” should be used: “A King Edward or Maris Piper would be just perfect due to its texture.”

While fish and chips is traditionally enjoyed dusted with salt and a splash of malt vinegar, he added, it’s also commonly served with side dishes such as pickled onions, pickled gherkins, tartar sauce, curry sauce and everyone’s favorite, the mushy peas. “Nothing works better with crispy piece of battered fried fish than a generous ladle of overcooked peas,” he said.

Here’s exactly how the chef cooked his beer-battered fish and chips for us. He included mushy peas and tartar sauce to complete the experience. He also gave personal tips and tricks.

Thanks Matthew! (You may reach him at 0917-5825441.)

Fish

4 pcs approximately 180 g each of Cod or Haddock fillets, the fresher the better. The tail end of the fish is best to use since there are less bones. (We used the Pacific Bay brand of Atlantic Cod, available at all major supermarkets.)

100 g flour, seasoned with a pinch of salt and pepper

Batter

200 g all-purpose flour
300 ml San Miguel Pale Pilsen
5 g salt
5 g pepper
Pinch of turmeric for a beautiful golden color
1.5 liters ground nut or canola oil, for frying. (Both oils are good for frying as either can reach high temperatures without smoking. Note that the same oil will be used to fry the chips.)

Method:

For the batter: Whisk all the ingredients except the oil to make a smooth batter.
Let batter rest for 20-30 minutes.

Heat oil to 180 degrees Celsius.
Wipe fish dry and lightly dredge them in seasoned flour.
Dip the fish fillets into the batter before slowly submerging them into the hot oil.
Cook for 6-8 minutes until crisp and golden.
(Note: Prepare everything else first. Fry the fish last, just before serving.)

Mushy peas

2 shallots, diced
1 garlic clove, crushed
50 g butter
400 g peas
1 chicken stock cube
1 medium-sized potato (peeled and diced)
1 medium onion (diced)
Combine all the ingredients for the mushy peas and simmer until thick and mushy.
Season to taste.

Chips
6 potatoes (use the right potatoes, if available)
Pinch of rock salt
Cut potatoes into 1-cm sized chips and wash thoroughly to remove any starch.
Dry the potatoes.
Heat oil to 140 degrees Celsius.
Fry the chips for 7-8 minutes until soft.
Lift out and drain.

Reheat the same oil to 180 degrees Celsius and return the chips to refry, cooking this time, until they are crispy and brown.
Drain well and season with salt.

Lemon tartar sauce

2 shallots, diced
50 g cornichon/gherkins
50 g capers
25 g chives
10 g tarragon
1 tsp lemon zest
1 c mayonnaise, preferably homemade

Finely chop all of the above ingredients and mix with the mayonnaise. Season to taste.

(The Fish and Chips Cone Stand used in the photo is courtesy of Urban Kitchen. For a catalog of Urban Kitchen products, e-mail charmaine.chua729@gmail.com or call tel. 0917-5822809.)

Unbelievable

Here’s a useful tip:

My friend Sofia Co had told me that if ever I found myself with a fish bone stuck on my throat, I should keep quiet and turn my plate clockwise three times. The plate must make three complete turns, but you can also keep turning the plate until the bone comes out.
I looked at her in disbelief and said, “Oh?” And I left it at that.

A month after, a hito bone stuck on my throat. I remembered what Sofia told me and did exactly as she said.

Guess what? Immediately after the third rotation of my plate, the bone just came out.

Don’t ask me how, it just did! The people watching me do it gave me a real strange look; then after I announced the successful disentangling of the bone, we were all just amazed.

Well, you don’t have to swallow a fish bone just to prove or disprove this theory. But in case you find yourself in such a predicament, do as I did.

Sam Miguel
10-24-2014, 08:34 AM
PULLED PORK SANDWICH RECIPE

You can make Michael Mina's pulled-pork sandwiches a day in advance, then spend the rest of the time buying napkins for when you eat 'em.

By Francine Maroukian on June 4, 2008 0 0 0

It's not just the flavors that make a dish but the layering of textures. I love pulled pork because of the contrast between the crispy exterior and the tender, almost-melting inside. You start with a pork "butt" (actually a pig's shoulder), a cheap but flavorful cut with a good amount of fat that renders out during the long, slow cooking and bastes the meat to give it a caramelized crust.

A pulled-pork sandwich should be messy; that makes it perfect summer-by-the-pool food at my house. I recently added an outdoor party kitchen with a rotisserie, and I roast all kinds of things, including birds and prime ribs. It works great for pork butt, too. Or if you have a smoker, this is also an awesome piece of meat to smoke. (Just follow the same recipe using the smoker instead of the oven.)

This is a dish you can make a day ahead with no hassle; just reheat it with some of your favorite barbecue sauce and serve it on plain soft white rolls. (You don't want a real serious roll that is going to interfere with the flavor of the meat.) Because it can even be served at room temperature, I bring this to our tailgates before 49ers games. A little extra barbecue sauce or hot sauce and maybe some mustard, and you're all set.

Ingredients

1/4 cup dark brown sugar, lightly packed
2 tbsp kosher or coarse salt
2 tbsp paprika
1 tbsp ground black pepper
1/2 tbsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp dry mustard (found in spice section)
1/2 tsp onion powder
1 boneless pork butt, about 3 pounds
1 1/2 cups apple juice
1/2 cup water
1 package plain soft white rolls or other bread

Tip: You can buy bone-in or boneless pork butts. Both have their benefits: Cooking bone-in will contribute some flavor (and increase the cooking time slightly). But if you have your butcher take out the bone, you can rub the spice mix into the incisions where the bone was removed — a great way to get the flavor deep inside the meat.

Instructions

Mix brown sugar and dry spices together in a small bowl. Rub all over pork, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for as long as you have time for (as little as 1 hour or up to overnight). Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Lay pork on a rack insert fitted inside a roasting pan. (The rack should be high enough so the entire spiced butt is sitting above the cooking liquid.) Pour in apple juice and water, cover pan tightly with foil, and slow roast for 5 hours. Remove foil and cook for another 30 minutes, until pork is brown outside and meat is very tender, basically falling apart.

Remove from oven, transfer to large platter, and allow meat to rest for about 10 minutes. While still warm, shred pork into small pieces using 2 forks or 10 fingers. Transfer to bowl for serving, or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. To reheat, just transfer to shallow baking dish, bring to room temperature, and place in preheated 350 degree oven for 15 minutes.

Tip: If the pan drippings aren't burned, discard fat and mix drippings back into the pulled pork, which will make it even more moist and flavorful.

Esquire's note: We used a roasting pan that wasn't much bigger than the meat itself, so the drippings didn't spread out and burn.

To serve: Sandwich between rolls and partner with classic barbecue side dishes like bourbon-baked beans or jalapeño creamed corn. Esquire's note: We ended up with six sandwiches.

Sam Miguel
10-24-2014, 08:34 AM
PULLED PORK SANDWICH RECIPE

You can make Michael Mina's pulled-pork sandwiches a day in advance, then spend the rest of the time buying napkins for when you eat 'em.

By Francine Maroukian on June 4, 2008 0 0 0

It's not just the flavors that make a dish but the layering of textures. I love pulled pork because of the contrast between the crispy exterior and the tender, almost-melting inside. You start with a pork "butt" (actually a pig's shoulder), a cheap but flavorful cut with a good amount of fat that renders out during the long, slow cooking and bastes the meat to give it a caramelized crust.

A pulled-pork sandwich should be messy; that makes it perfect summer-by-the-pool food at my house. I recently added an outdoor party kitchen with a rotisserie, and I roast all kinds of things, including birds and prime ribs. It works great for pork butt, too. Or if you have a smoker, this is also an awesome piece of meat to smoke. (Just follow the same recipe using the smoker instead of the oven.)

This is a dish you can make a day ahead with no hassle; just reheat it with some of your favorite barbecue sauce and serve it on plain soft white rolls. (You don't want a real serious roll that is going to interfere with the flavor of the meat.) Because it can even be served at room temperature, I bring this to our tailgates before 49ers games. A little extra barbecue sauce or hot sauce and maybe some mustard, and you're all set.

Ingredients

1/4 cup dark brown sugar, lightly packed
2 tbsp kosher or coarse salt
2 tbsp paprika
1 tbsp ground black pepper
1/2 tbsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp dry mustard (found in spice section)
1/2 tsp onion powder
1 boneless pork butt, about 3 pounds
1 1/2 cups apple juice
1/2 cup water
1 package plain soft white rolls or other bread

Tip: You can buy bone-in or boneless pork butts. Both have their benefits: Cooking bone-in will contribute some flavor (and increase the cooking time slightly). But if you have your butcher take out the bone, you can rub the spice mix into the incisions where the bone was removed — a great way to get the flavor deep inside the meat.

Instructions

Mix brown sugar and dry spices together in a small bowl. Rub all over pork, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for as long as you have time for (as little as 1 hour or up to overnight). Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Lay pork on a rack insert fitted inside a roasting pan. (The rack should be high enough so the entire spiced butt is sitting above the cooking liquid.) Pour in apple juice and water, cover pan tightly with foil, and slow roast for 5 hours. Remove foil and cook for another 30 minutes, until pork is brown outside and meat is very tender, basically falling apart.

Remove from oven, transfer to large platter, and allow meat to rest for about 10 minutes. While still warm, shred pork into small pieces using 2 forks or 10 fingers. Transfer to bowl for serving, or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. To reheat, just transfer to shallow baking dish, bring to room temperature, and place in preheated 350 degree oven for 15 minutes.

Tip: If the pan drippings aren't burned, discard fat and mix drippings back into the pulled pork, which will make it even more moist and flavorful.

Esquire's note: We used a roasting pan that wasn't much bigger than the meat itself, so the drippings didn't spread out and burn.

To serve: Sandwich between rolls and partner with classic barbecue side dishes like bourbon-baked beans or jalapeño creamed corn. Esquire's note: We ended up with six sandwiches.

Sam Miguel
11-07-2014, 09:15 AM
YOU SHOULD BE EATING CHICKEN

By Pat LaFrieda on November 3, 2014

America’s known for its meat—it’s one of our greatest resources—with beef garnering top attention. But as gorgeous porterhouses, New York strips, and rib steaks glisten in the showcase light, the quiet giant in the room is the pterodactyl, commonly known as chicken. I love beef more than most, but in a world where cash is king, poultry dominates the market in terms of weight and inexpensive prices.

The United States is the largest producer of poultry in the world, exporting on average 18% of its harvest. It only takes six to ten weeks to grow a broiler chicken from hatching to slaughter, and with the recent spike in corn production, the poultry industry has thrived on the decrease in corn pricing, compared to the pork industry, which was decimated by the pork plague, and beef inventories, which continued to decline last year. This left an even larger abundance of corn, and plenty of anxious poultry growers have jumped to action, benefitting from the low feed pricing.

This may sound contrary to many recent reports claiming that the cost of poultry has risen dramatically in the last few years. Those reports are very much exaggerated. To put prices in historical prospective, a boneless, skinless chicken breast costs 20 cents a pound less now than it did on the first day that I joined the family business in 1994, and that’s without adjusting for inflation.

If poultry prices rose faster than normal in the last few years, it still hasn’t risen at the rate of beef. Let’s take a look at the numbers from the USDA. In August of 2012, New York strips cost $6.81 a pound as compared to boneless, skinless chicken breasts at $3.36 a pound. Fast-forward more than two years and the New York strips are at $8.25 a pound compared to boneless, skinless breasts at $3.47 a pound. As beef pricing rose 21 percent, poultry only rose three percent. So when you read headlines like, “Meat Prices Continue to Rise, but Corn and Soybeans Slip,” in The New York Times, keep in mind that the lower priced corn and soybeans will be used in the next cycle of poultry and beef production. With beef taking 24 months to grow and poultry only 2 months, it’s clear which price will drop first.

As a meat purveyor, a huge part of my job is to keep my customer’s food costs low. With the increase in price for most other proteins, chicken is a great way to cut down costs. And I have to say, some of the best dishes I’ve ever eaten are chicken based, like the Tuscan Fried Chicken with Lemon from none other than Cesare Casella. He dredges the chicken in flour first, then dips it in egg and fries it. The crispy exterior simply comes from the skin. With some lemon squeezed over the top, it’s chicken perfection. Another favorite is from the legendary L & B Spumoni Gardens in Brooklyn. That’s where I go for Lenny’s classic Chicken and Eggplant Sicilian. Peeled, fried eggplant dressed over fried chicken cutlets and then broiled with plum tomato sauce, olive oil, white wine, and long green hot peppers. Fresh melted mozzarella seals it all together and the result is a comfort food that hits a soft spot in my food memory.

As for every day consumption, I stand by the chicken sandwich. Simple and addictive. Fried boneless, skinless chicken cutlets, on crusty, sesame seeded, toasted Italian bread with baby arugula and mayo. It’s all I ever travel with.

Now that’s a lot of poultry for a butcher with access to any type of meat.

TUSCAN FRIED CHICKEN WITH LEMON

2 whole broiler chickens (about 3 pounds each), cut into 8 pieces each
2 tablespoons kosher salt plus more for seasoning
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper plus more for seasoning
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice plus more for seasoning
2 quarts vegetable oil, or as needed
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 large eggs
6 sprigs fresh thyme
6 sprigs fresh sage
6 sprigs fresh rosemary
6 cloves garlic, crushed

1. Lay the chicken pieces out on a baking sheet and season with the salt and pepper and the lemon juice. Cover the chicken with plastic wrap and set aside to marinate at room temperature for 1 hour.

2. Preheat the oven to 200°F. Put a wire cooling rack inside a rimmed baking sheet.

3. Pour enough oil into a large pot or Dutch oven to come up 2 inches. Fasten a deep-fry thermometer to the side of the pan and heat the oil over high heat to 375°F.

4. Place the flour in a medium bowl. Beat the eggs in another medium bowl. Dredge the chicken in the flour, dip it into the beaten eggs, and carefully slide it into the hot oil, starting with the larger pieces, and making sure not to crowd the pot. Fry the chicken until it is golden brown and crunchy, 15 to 20 minutes, flipping the chicken halfway through the cooking time using tongs; keep the temperature of the oil between 325° and 350°F (the oil temperature will drop when you add the chicken). Remove the chicken as it is done to the rack in the baking sheet to drain. Season the chicken liberally with salt and pepper, squeeze the lemon juice over it, and put it in the oven to keep warm. Add more chicken to the pot as there is room and fry it and season it in the same way.

5. After you’ve fried all the chicken, add the thyme, sage, rosemary, and garlic to the oil and fry them until they’re crisp, about 10 seconds. Remove the chicken from the oven, scatter the garlic and herbs over the chicken and serve. Serves 4.

Sam Miguel
03-27-2015, 08:22 AM
Wonkblog

Scientists have discovered a simple way to cook rice that dramatically cuts the calories

By Roberto A. Ferdman

March 25

Rice, the lifeblood of so many nations' cuisines, is perhaps the most ubiquitous food in the world. In Asia, where an estimated 90 percent of all rice is consumed, the pillowy grains are part of almost every meal. In the Caribbean, where the starch is often mixed with beans, it's a staple too. Even here in the United States, where people eat a comparatively modest amount of rice, plenty is still consumed.

Rice is popular because it's malleable—it pairs well with a lot of different kinds of food—and it's relatively cheap. But like other starch-heavy foods, it has one central flaw: it isn't that good for you. White rice consumption, in particular, has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes. A cup of the cooked grain carries with it roughly 200 calories, most of which comes in the form of starch, which turns into sugar, and often thereafter body fat.

But what if there were a simple way to tweak rice ever so slightly to make it much healthier?

An undergraduate student at the College of Chemical Sciences in Sri Lanka and his mentor have been tinkering with a new way to cook rice that can reduce its calories by as much as 50 percent and even offer a few other added health benefits. The ingenious method, which at its core is just a simple manipulation of chemistry, involves only a couple easy steps in practice.

"What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil—about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you're going to cook," said Sudhair James, who presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Monday. "After it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator for about 12 hours. That's it."

How does it work?

To understand what's going on, you need to understand a bit of food chemistry.

Not all starches, as it happens, are created equal. Some, known as digestible starches, take only a little time to digest, are quickly turned into glucose, and then later glycogen. Excess glycogen ends up adding to the size of our guts if we don't expend enough energy to burn it off. Other starches, meanwhile, called resistant starches, take a long time for the body to process, aren't converted into glucose or glycogen because we lack the ability to digest them, and add up to fewer calories.

A growing body of research, however, has shown that it might be possible to change the types of starches found in foods by modifying how they are prepared. At the very least, we know that there are observable changes when certain foods are cooked different ways.

Potatoes, for instance, go from having the right kind of starch to the less healthful kind when they are cooked or mashed (sigh, I know). The process of heating and cooling certain vegetables, like peas and sweet potatoes, can also alter the amount of resistant (see: good) starches, according to a 2009 study. And rice, depending on the method of preparation, undergoes observable chemical changes. Most notably, fried rice and pilaf style rice have a greater proportion of resistant starch than the most commonly eaten type, steamed rice, as strange as that might seem.

"If you can reduce the digestible starch in something like steamed rice, you can reduce the calories," said Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah, a professor who is supervising the research. "The impact could be huge."

Understanding this, James and Thavarajva tested eight different recipes on 38 different kinds of rice found in Sri Lanka. What they found is that by adding a lipid (coconut oil in this case, because it's widely used in Sri Lanka) ahead of cooking the rice, and then cooling the rice immediately after it was done, they were able to drastically change its composition—and for the better.

"The oil interacts with the starch in rice and changes its architecture," said James. "Chilling the rice then helps foster the conversion of starches. The result is a healthier serving, even when you heat it back up."

So far they have only measured the chemical outcome of the most effective cooking method for the least healthful of the 38 varieties. But that variety still produced a 10 to 12 percent reduction in calories. "With the better kind, we expect to reduce the calories by as much as 50 to 60 percent," said James.

Cooking that can change the world

The prospect of lower calorie rice is a big deal. Obesity rates are rising around the world, particularly in the developing world, where people rely more heavily on cheaper food staples. China and India, which are already seeing rising obesity problems, are huge consumers of rice. Rice, of course, is not the sole cause of weight gain. But reducing the amount of calories in a cup of rice by even as little as 10 percent could have an enormous impact for future generations.

"Obesity has been a problem in the United States for some time," said Thavarajah. "But it's becoming a problem in Asia, too. People are eating larger and larger portions of rice, which isn't good."

The researchers still have to test the remaining varieties of rice, including Suduru Samba, which they believe will produce the largest calorie reduction. They also plan to experiment with oils other than coconut oil, like sunflower oil.

A world where commercially sold rice comes pre-cooked and with much fewer calories might not be that far off. People should already be able to replicate the process at home, although James warns the results might vary depending on the type of rice used. And there's good reason to believe the chemistry could be applied to many other popular but less-than-healthy foods.

"It's about more than rice," said Thavarajah. "I mean, can we do the same thing for bread? That's the real question here."

Roberto A. Ferdman is a reporter for Wonkblog covering food, economics, immigration and other things. He was previously a staff writer at Quartz.

Sam Miguel
02-10-2017, 09:53 AM
From Esquire online - - -

Chef Adrian Cuenca's Creamy Carbonara Recipe

Purists may scoff at this quick recipe for carbonara. Frankly, we don?t care, because it tastes great and goes well with our beer.

By ADRIAN CUENCA | 5 days ago

When I was a young boy in the ?70s, my foodie uncle made me try spaghetti carbonara for the very first time?cue angelic choir; revelation. The premise was simple: bacon, cheese, eggs, cream and mushrooms on spaghetti. How could a kid not like this dish?

After I pestered my mom as any good son would, she started making it using quick-melt cheese, evaporated milk and canned mushrooms?certainly rudimentary, but it did the job of pacifying me.

At around 12, my interest for cooking took form, and I decided to give my mom a break and do the handy work myself. We had a whole bookshelf full of cookbooks, which I rummaged expectantly through to find an Italian one and a pasta edition (both pretending to be authentic). The books? recipes for carbonara included pancetta, cream, parmesan and egg yolks. These being the days before Santi?s, we were limited to a wasteland of processed American goods: Kraft and all-purpose cream. Yum. It?s because of this ingredient oppression that most restaurants still get the dish wrong.

My thirst for information was quenched and my eyes opened by the advent of the Internet. However, I was shocked to find out that the use of cream in this dish is a sin that the pork element is guanciale (unsmoked Italian bacon from the pig?s jowls and not the belly) and that cheese was optional. Oops.

After several attempts, I?ve made a version that will probably leave the purist feeling insulted. Adding 1 to 2 teaspoons of cream per yolk gives the sauce the extra slurp, and let?s face it, pasta without a slurp isn?t worth the effort. If you can?t find guanciale or pancetta, don?t bother making the dish, as it will not retain its flavor profile. However, the real stars here are the eggs?the yolks are used to bind the sauce and ingredients together, which is why it?s important to opt for the richer and thicker organic egg yolks.

This is my go-to dish after a grueling night behind the stoves at the restaurant: it?s simple, straightforward, and pairs great with the bitter flavors of a Cerveza Negra. Beer and Pasta is the new Beer and Pizza.

Quick Carbonara

From Chef Adrian Cuenca, Elbert?s Steak Room, Makati

Serves 2

Ingredients

200 grams uncooked DeCecco Spaghetti (I won?t use any other brand)

4 organic eggs, yolk and white separated

Around 100 to 200 grams pancetta (or guanciale if available)

Lots of freshly grated Pecorino Ramno or Parmegiano Regiano (around 3/4 cup)

Minced garlic (optional)

4 tsps of whipping cream (I?m cheating)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to season

Chopped flat-leaf parsley to garnish

Instructions

Bring out the eggs, cream, and cheese from the refrigerator and bring to room temperature.

Slice the pancetta to desired thickness. I prefer mine not too thin, to keep the texture and flavor of the bacon.

Cook the pasta in salted boiling water until al dente.

While the pasta is cooking, saut? pancetta in medium to low heat. Leave the fat that is rendered in the pan. Set aside.

Beat the egg yolks with the cream. Add a bit of salt (remember, the cheese and the bacon are already salty so take it easy, chef). You can add the optional crushed/minced half garlic clove.

Add the freshly cooked pasta to the pancetta and the fat (off fire). Beat two of the egg whites and the grated cheese and add to the pan. The remaining heat of the pan and of the pasta will slightly cook the egg whites and melt the cheese.

Add the egg yolks. At this point, you may have to turn on the heat just a little bit if the yolks don?t start cooking ever so slightly. This is why it is important to bring the eggs and cream to room temperature. If they are cold, the dish will not cook properly. Do not overcook, or the sauce will dry out and you?ll be left with a pasta omelette.

Serve and garnish with more cheese, parsley, and black pepper.