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pachador
08-28-2008, 05:59 AM
Regarding the hiring of a foreign coach for the RP national team:

The SBP should refer to the job position as "consultant" even though they are hiring a coach because it will be good 'PR' or public relations, secondly, the 'consultant' will not only coach but conduct seminars for local coaches in-between tournaments. If the the local coach group of Narvasa is worried about job loss then the SBP can hire two or three of the local coaches as the 'symbolic' or figurehead coach of the national team while the 'consultant' will be the real coach. These 2 or 3 'symbolic' local coaches should ideally be someone who would be the replacement later on of the foreign consultant as they will be learning coaching from this foreign consultant 'on the job' while assisting the foreign consultant so basically these 2 or 3 'symbolic' coaches real job will be assistant coaches to the foreign consultant at the same time they are learning coaching from the foreign guru. ;)

insulares
09-09-2008, 01:57 AM
Paging the "patriotic" Chito Narvasa.... ;D

Serbian to coach RP five?

By Joaquin Henson
Tuesday, September 9, 2008


The Serbian who piloted Iran to the FIBA-Asia title in Tokushima last year for a ticket to the Beijing Olympics may soon coach the Philippine national basketball team.

SBP executive director Noli Eala said yesterday he broached the idea to Rajko Toroman during the recent FIBA-Asia Youth Championships in Tehran.

“Toroman confirmed that his contract to coach Iran has expired and he’s not renewing,” said Eala. “He’s definitely coming to Manila late this month but at the moment, all he wants is a break from basketball. He’s now in Serbia visiting his grandson for three weeks. He hasn’t been home for 10 months.”

Eala said Toroman was offered a non-guaranteed contract to work for the Memphis Grizzlies in the NBA but he’s not inclined to accept. The contract is probably contingent on Iran ’s 7-2, 254-pound center Hamed Hadadi making the team. The Grizzlies signed Hadadi to a contract after he averaged 16.6 points and 11.2 rebounds in five games for Iran at the Beijing Olympics. Whether Hadadi cracks the lineup depends on how he performs in tryouts.

Eala invited Toroman to fly to Manila last weekend but he declined. Toroman, however, has confirmed he will come over late this month to watch the NCAA and UAAP finals.

“I wanted him to witness the Ateneo-La Salle game last Saturday and see for himself how popular the game is among Filipinos,” continued Eala. “I told him we average about 10,000 fans for a PBA game and 23,000 fans watched Game 7 of the last finals. He couldn’t believe it. He’s excited to work in a country where basketball is the No. 1 sport.”

Eala said he has briefed SBP president Manny Pangilinan on Toroman and got the go-signal to negotiate a deal.

Although Toroman appears to be the leading candidate for the job, other options are Vlade Djurovic of Serbia , Bernardo Murphy of Argentina, Alan Richardson of England and Jonas Kazlauskas of Lithuania.

Eala said Kazlauskas, who coached China in the last Olympics, will likely be scratched from the list because of his hefty asking price of $500,000 a year.

“Toroman is perfect for the job because of his credentials, temperament and attitude,” continued Eala. “He’s calm and collected. He seems to be very patient, isn’t demanding. Besides, the results of his work prove his capability.”

A foreign coach is what the SBP is considering for the national team that will compete in the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships for a slot in the London Olympics the next year. Before 2011, the PBA will take charge of the national squad with its own coach for the 2009 FIBA-Asia Championships to qualify the top three finishers for the 2010 World Championships in Turkey.

Toroman, 53, was the coach when Iran beat the Philippines, 75-69, in Tokushima last year. Kerby Raymundo and Jimmy Alapag were the only nationals in double figures.

“He remembered the Philippine team and told me he was scared of us,” related Eala. “He respects Asi (Taulava) and is very impressed with our guards, particularly Jimmy. With a few more inches, Jimmy could’ve dominated the tournament, he mentioned.”

Toroman also singled out Mark Caguioa for his offense.

“He thinks Mark’s running shot is one of the best in the world,” continued Eala.

Toroman, whose son Denis plays professional basketball in Slovenia, was an assistant coach with the Yugoslavian national team from 1991 to 1995. He coached the Yugoslavian under-22 team to the European crown in 1996. Before taking the job in Iran, Toroman coached teams in Hungary, Cyprus, Holland and Belgium.

Eala said he will recommend a young coaching staff to backstop the foreign coach.

“At the start, we’ll ask Chot (Reyes) to work with Toroman or whoever is our foreign coach,” said Eala. “But to prepare for the future, we’ll look to fill the staff with young coaches like Allan Gregorio, Mike Reyes or Beaujing Acot. Mike, for instance, is showing a lot of potential as Yayoy Alcoseba’s chief assistant with Cebu in Liga Pilipinas. He also happens to be Chot’s brother.”

http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Sports&p=49&type=2&sec=30

D_I_A
09-09-2008, 02:30 AM
Paging the "patriotic" Chito Narvasa.... ;D





antayin natin ang pagsulpot na parang kabute ng BCAP..lalo na itutulak nito si Yeng Guiao para as National Coach.

this is CRAB MENTALITY at its disgusting state!!! :(

Mukhang ang BCAP at BAP magkaisa para lalong guluhin ang Philippine Basketball!!!

Down with the BAP!!!

Never to CRAP BCAP!!! :( :( :(

durden_tyler
09-10-2008, 11:51 AM
Sa tingin ko ang magigiging problema nito ay ang mga ningas-cogon sa Philippine basketball ay magsusulputan na naman. (Narvasa and the likes).

First, they will demand a local coach. Tapos if ever di matupad yun, at nakakakuha na nang foreign coach, they will demand results na naman.

Results like winning FIBA Asia or even qualify for the worlds--- which is not not easy! So, by the time we finish 6th or 7th next year, lahat ng mga critico ay magsusulputan ulit at sasabihin mali ang pagkuha ng foreign coach!!!--- without considering na nasa transition period tayo and this is a LONG TERM deal.

insulares
09-10-2008, 12:37 PM
Here comes the tidal wave of "nationalistic" opposition...

No to Serbian coach, says Guiao

by Rey Joble

LOCAL coaches collectively expressed their views opposing the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas’ plan to hire a foreign coach that will handle the Philippine men’s basketball squad seeing action in the 2011 FIBA Asia Men’s Basketball Championship, a qualifying event for the 2012 London Olympics.

Red Bull coach Yeng Guiao, Nokia Pilipinas Youth and La Salle Green Archers mentor Franz Pumaren and former Welcoat coach and now Adamson Falcons mentor Leo Austria disagreed with the SBP’s plan on tapping the services of Serbian coach Rajko Toroman.

Toroman steered the Iranian squad to the FIBA Asia Men’s Basketball Championship in Tokushima, Japan last year.

But Pumaren, Guiao and Austria unanimously agreed that the Philippine team that will compete in major Asian basketball tournaments and possibly in the Olympics should be handled by no less than our very own.

“There are many competent coaches here and I believe success comes within the program,” said Pumaren, also the head of the Philippine Basketball Association’s Players Union.

Guiao, the top candidate for the head coaching post for the national team that will see action in the 2009 FIBA Asia Men’s Basketball Championship, is not convinced about the need to get a foreign coach.

“Why hire a foreign coach? Will he cry alongside the players everytime we suffer a setback? Or how compassionate he is compared to a Filipino coach while handling the Philippine team? I mean, there are a lot of talented coaches here who will stick to the team win or lose. ’Yang foreign coach na ’yan, uwi na agad yan pagkatapos ng contract niya,” said Guiao.

“We have tried it before and we saw Bill Bayno, Paul Woolpert and John Moran and wala rin namang something special na nangyari. For me, I think they should give it to a local coach,” he added.


http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/?page=sports1_sept10_2008

pachador
09-10-2008, 02:02 PM
the Serb should be hired as a consultant to give seminars to local coaches and secondly to give skills training to young players. This is the only way to hire a foreigner without hurting the feelings of the local coaches ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Nike Air
09-10-2008, 04:08 PM
paano naging head ng pba players union si franz? baka naman former head siya dun. gusto ko din si yeng guiao to handle the seniors national team with his system na walang star players na kailangan. he can win games kahit na puro hardworking role players yung gagamitin niya.

possible din yung suggestion ni pachador na consultant muna si toroman and to play behind the scenes kay yeng guiao pero sana pumayag yung mga pinoy coaches dito because admittedly nba-style of play pa rin ang namamayani sa atin dito. maganda yung magkaroon tayo ng input from a european perspective.

pio_valenz
09-10-2008, 04:38 PM
I am all for this. We can always use a fresh perspective. Look at China: they are certainly better than us. And they have been hiring foreign coaches for a long time. They had a Lithuanian coach during the Beijing Olympics and int eh past they even hired former NBA coach Del Harris. If we're serious about becoming an Asian power again, the BCAP should be more open-mided about this.

Nike Air
09-10-2008, 04:43 PM
bcap being open to foreign coaching? para na ring sinabi mong pagputi ng uwak at pagitim ng tagak (tama ba?). masyadong matataas pride ng mga pinoy sa basketball kaya ganito ang nangyayari sa atin.

Dark Knight
09-10-2008, 06:23 PM
Even if you put an alien to coach our national team, it will still be worthless. What we need is discipline, put aside politics and more money for training.

Only Ron Jacobs stirred the aour national team to championship in the Jones Cup but we have two imports to reinforce our team.

Filipinos will never learn.

D_I_A
09-10-2008, 07:03 PM
Even if you put an alien to coach our national team, it will still be worthless. What we need is discipline, put aside politics and more money for training.

Only Ron Jacobs stirred the aour national team to championship in the Jones Cup but we have two imports to reinforce our team.

Filipinos will never learn.


nothing wrong with patriotism and nationalism, only those people who cloak their vested interests in the guise "countrymen first policy"

luma ng tugtugin yan wala na bang ibang alibi na maisip ang BCAP?

ganun na lang ba ka-insecure si Coach Yeng kay Toroman? Di naman siguro nito aagawin ang National Coaching chores ng PBA sponsored RP Men's Team at mas lalo di rin nito aagawin ang Governor's post ng Pampanga. ;)

for Coach Franz, i believe his a good coach, but i don't think he's credible enough of pushing the nationalistic pride of BCAP after he left his players in Iran.

pachador
09-10-2008, 10:32 PM
Some of our coaches and players are greedy because for them its ok for filipino coaches to work in the middle east, indonesia, brunei , etc , but its not ok for foreign coaches or players to work in the philippines. what do you call that? its called greediness ,selfishness and narrowmindedness. mga bulok ang utak ! i hope you burn in hell for your unchristian and xenophobic attitude !

D_I_A
09-11-2008, 01:56 AM
Some of our coaches and players are greedy because for them its ok for filipino coaches to work in the middle east, indonesia, brunei , etc , but its not ok for foreign coaches or players to work in the philippines. what do you call that? its called greediness ,selfishness and narrowmindedness. mga bulok ang utak ! i hope you burn in hell for your unchristian and xenophobic attitude !



if i were SBP..stay the course don't get distracted with BCAP!

BCAP's a CRAP!!! >:(

mangtsito
09-11-2008, 02:18 AM
Here comes the tidal wave of "nationalistic" opposition...

No to Serbian coach, says Guiao

by Rey Joble

...

But Pumaren, Guiao and Austria unanimously agreed that the Philippine team that will compete in major Asian basketball tournaments and possibly in the Olympics should be handled by no less than our very own.

“There are many competent coaches here and I believe success comes within the program,” said Pumaren, also the head of the Philippine Basketball Association’s Players Union.

...

“Why hire a foreign coach? Will he cry alongside the players everytime we suffer a setback? Or how compassionate he is compared to a Filipino coach while handling the Philippine team? I mean, there are a lot of talented coaches here who will stick to the team win or lose. ’Yang foreign coach na ’yan, uwi na agad yan pagkatapos ng contract niya,” said Guiao.

http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/?page=sports1_sept10_2008



Eh kung yung local coach nga umuwi na nung hindi pa tapos yung trabaho sa Iran, wala naman siyang reklamo doon.

danny
09-11-2008, 02:23 AM
Even if you put an alien to coach our national team, it will still be worthless. What we need is discipline, put aside politics and more money for training.

Only Ron Jacobs stirred the aour national team to championship in the Jones Cup but we have two imports to reinforce our team.

Filipinos will never learn.


You nailed it. Those were momentous events for us Filipinos.

Ok. I am going to ask the immigration offices of Canada, US, New Zealand and Australia to stop the processing of Pinoy applicants.

They are taking away jobs from bona fide citizens. Stop the business process outsourcing. Why give jobs to pinoys when we citizens can do it better. To hell with cheap labor. *;D

^^^

The last statement? Typical pinoy mentality after acquiring citizenship from the host country. *Basta sarili ang iniisip, there is always the "nationalist card". ;)

Have we not learned anything from the history of the world?

Vulgar nationalism has always been the last refuge of *scoundrels.

D_I_A
09-11-2008, 02:39 PM
Even if you put an alien to coach our national team, it will still be worthless. What we need is discipline, put aside politics and more money for training.

Only Ron Jacobs stirred the aour national team to championship in the Jones Cup but we have two imports to reinforce our team.

Filipinos will never learn.


You nailed it. Those were momentous events for us Filipinos.

Ok. I am going to ask the immigration offices of Canada, US, New Zealand and Australia to stop the processing of Pinoy applicants.

They are taking away jobs from bona fide citizens. Stop the business process outsourcing. Why give jobs to pinoys when we citizens can do it better. To hell with cheap labor. *;D

^^^

The last statement? Typical pinoy mentality after acquiring citizenship from the host country. *Basta sarili ang iniisip, there is always the "nationalist card". ;)

Have we not learned anything from the history of the world?

Vulgar nationalism has always been the last refuge of *scoundrels.







there's nothing wrong with nationalism, only those who place primacy of self-interests ruins it

pachador
09-13-2008, 02:59 AM
we might just be a little confused including me. I'm sure the SBP knows that PBA will select the coach of the PBA NT . Now, since the SBP will select a foreign coach, then this can only mean one thing: the foreign coach will coach the non-PBA NT teams, e.g. U19 and the training pool of players while Guiao will coach the PBA national team. toroman's other responsibility is as a skills coach since toroman is supposed to be very good as a skills coach, as well as give seminars to local coaches and lastly, if Guiao is open-minded enough , toroman is available if Guaio has questions.
what do you guys think?

D_I_A
09-13-2008, 02:17 PM
we might just be a little confused including me. I'm sure the SBP knows that PBA will select the coach of the PBA NT . Now, since the SBP will select a foreign coach, then this can only mean one thing: the foreign coach will coach the non-PBA NT teams, e.g. U19 and the training pool of players while Guiao will coach the PBA national team. toroman's other responsibility is as a skills coach since toroman is supposed to be very good as a skills coach, as well as give seminars to local coaches and lastly, if Guiao is open-minded enough , toroman is available if Guaio has questions.
what do you guys think?


kaso ang pinaiiral eh pagiging makabayan na nakatagong makasariling interes../

BCAP is the mouthpiece of false nationalism!!! >:(
magsama kayo ng BAP!!!

Down with the BAP!!!

CrossOver
09-14-2008, 06:01 AM
SBP to help Laos host SEAG
By Nelson Beltran

The Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas is extending the necessary assistance to Laos so it could include basketball in its hosting of the Southeast Asian Games in Vientiane next year.

SBP executive director Noli Eala said they’re willing to donate a wooden floor to Laos or host the event right here in Manila with the local federation to take care of the FIBA-Asia officials and the competing teams.

“Of course, we’re for the inclusion of basketball. It’s a sure gold medal for us and it’s an opportunity for us to help the RP delegation,” said Eala.

Eala has a chance to lead the petition or the lobbying as he’s been invited by Philippine Olympic Committee official Go Teng Kok to join the RP group in the SEA Games Federation meeting on Nov. 8.

Basketball is among sports not included in the initial list of events to be played in Vientiane. So far, only 22 sports have been calendared.

“Mr. Go Teng Kok informed us there are two proposals for basketball to be included in the Games. One is a donation of a wooden floor to Laos. Second, for basketball to be played in Thailand near the Laos border. We’ll make our own proposal, through the POC, for us to host the event in the Philippines,” said Eala.

Eala is open to suggestion of donating a wooden floor to Laos.

“My idea, however, is for the Philippine Sports Commission to donate its (Philsports Arena) court then we’ll replace it. With that, tayo ang magkakaroon ng mas bagong court,” Eala said. “It can be done. We’ll just look for friends to ship the floor.”

SBP is currently in search of a foreign coach who’ll handle a long-term national team program patterned after the NCC concept in the 80s. The initial tourneys for this team include the SEABA and the Southeast Asian Games next year.

The PBA is to form a separate national team tasked to represent the country in the FIBA-Asia men championship also next year. PBA commissioner Sonny Barrios is to name the coach of the pro selection upon his return from vacation in the US late this month.

The two teams will run parallel with each other, with the PBA selection looking to qualify for the World Championship in Turkey 2010 and the other team aiming to make the Olympics in 2012 in London.

“The SEABA and the SEA Games are part of our long-term program,” said Eala.

The Philippines is the reigning champion in both tourneys. The SMC-RP team of coach Chot Reyes reigned supreme in Ratchaburi, Thailand. The Harbour Centre-RP squad of coach Junel Baculi topped the SEA Games competition in Nakhon Ratchasima also in Thailand in 2006.

PhilStar (http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Sports&p=49&type=2&sec=30&aid=20080913157)

amdgc82
09-15-2008, 12:47 PM
Monday, September 15, 2008
Tanquingcen welcomes Serbian coach
www.manilastandardtoday.com

SIOT Tanquingcen, the soft-spoken San Miguel Beer mentor, holds his fellow coaches in the Philippine Basketball Association in high regard. He believes anyone of them can handle the Philippine men’s basketball team that will see action in the 2009 FIBA Asia Men’s Basketball Championship.

While most of his peers are opposing the hiring of Serbian coach Rajko Toroman, who led Iran to the FIBA Asia Men’s Basketball Championship last year, Tanquingcen thinks it’s high time to try and give a foreign coach a shot of leading the national squad to an Asian title—and possibly see another coaching great in the mold of American mentor Ron Jacobs.

“I think there’s nothing wrong with that,” Tanquingcen told Standard Today. “We can always look back at the accomplishments of coach Ron [Jacobs] and his contributions to Philippine Basketball.”

Tanquingcen was an understudy of coach Ron Jacobs along with Jong Uichico. As a player and as a student of Jacobs, Tanquingcen has learned valuable things he had never seen in many years of playing the game.

“My coaching influence came mostly from coach Ron,” said Tanquingcen, who won two titles handling Ginebra before he transferred to San Miguel Beer. “From the basics up to the detailed context in the play book, I got it from coach Ron. But there are many things I’ve learned from coach Ron when valuing the team.” Rey Joble

danny
09-16-2008, 07:45 AM
there's nothing wrong with nationalism, only those who place primacy of self-interests ruins it


Dude, that is what vulgar nationalism is all about. Using "nationalism" for your own self-interest.

clutchjedi
09-16-2008, 09:57 AM
Dude, that is what vulgar nationalism is all about.* Using "nationalism" for your own self-interest.


Or (as Ateneo history prof Glenn Garfield Ang would put it) that's what I would call "nationism", not nationalism. :D

D_I_A
09-18-2008, 01:58 AM
Dude, that is what vulgar nationalism is all about.* Using "nationalism" for your own self-interest.


Or (as Ateneo history prof Glenn Garfield Ang would put it) that's what I would call "nationism", not nationalism. :D


Bayan muna isabay ang sarili!!! ;D

The_Big_Cat
09-18-2008, 10:09 AM
Mas maganda pa nga mag hire ng foreign coach kasi mas mabibigyan ng pansin niya ang national team.

Unlike if you hire from one of the PBA coaches, the coach is "torn between two lovers". Ang National team and his mother team. This is the trend right now worldwide. The inability of the pro-league coach to focus and give total committment to his National team.

Pero bago tayo pumunta dyan bigyan muna natin ng isa pang pagkakataon ang homegrown coach that will be appointed to the 2009 FIBA Asia Championships.

korn666333
09-18-2008, 05:04 PM
tama...focus on coaching the national team...

pachador
09-24-2008, 01:00 AM
lumaki siguro mata ng serbian coach nung nakita niya ang dambuhalang crowd ;D

Serbian mentor soaking up UAAP, NCAA action

By Nelson Beltran Philstar
Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Serbian coach Rajko Toroman, being considered by the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas to run its long-term program for the men’s national team, is in town for four days now, hosted as a special guest by the national cage body.

Toroman watched Game One of the UAAP finals between Ateneo and La Salle last Sunday and the San Beda-Mapua knockout match for the second finals berth in the NCAA last Monday.

Yesterday, he made a round of the practices of the Barangay Ginebra Kings, the San Miguel Beermen and the Alaska Milk Aces.

The architect of the Iran conquest of the FIBA-Asia men’s championship in Tokushima last year, Toroman, 53, is set to formally meet SBP president Manny V. Pangilinan today.

“There’s no formal contract yet but the reaction of the SBP leadership in hiring Toroman as coach is good,” said SBP executive director Noli Eala. “He’s interested to coach the Philippines but at the end of the day it would still depend on the contract he’ll be offered.”

Toroman, assistant coach of the Yugoslavian national team from 1991-96 and head coach of the Yugoslavian youth team in 1996, is now unattached following the expiration of his contract with Iran.

Toroman has other offers but appears inclined to accept coaching job here.

He has a son, Denis, who’s currently playing in the Premier A Slovenian Basketball League.

pachador
09-24-2008, 02:29 AM
Serbian coach in RP to talk about improving local basketball

09/23/2008 GMA news

MANILA, Philippines – Rajko Toroman, the Serbian coach credited for turning Iran into an emerging power in Asian basketball, was part of the 22,900 spectators who watched the Ateneo Blue Eagles beat the La Salle Green Archers at the Araneta Coliseum last Sunday.

"He’s amazed at the way the game of basketball is played here – the passion, the enthusiasm," according to Noli Eala, executive director of the Basketball Association of the Philippines-Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (BAP-SBP).

Toroman, he added, enjoyed the emotional game.

"He’s been watching many games and practices so far during his stay," Eala said. "He’s really impressed with the talent of Filipino players."

And what did Toroman think of the record crowd?

"Oh, he said he has never seen a crowd as large as the one that watched last Sunday," a smiling Eala added.

The 53-year-old Toroman is a guest invited by the BAP-SBP to discuss with local caging officials ways to further improve the country's basketball program.

He was once an assistant coach with the Yugoslavian national team and mentor of the Yugoslavian under-23 national squad.

Toroman took over the coaching reign of Iran just last year and immediately produced results by leading the team to the championship of the FIBA-Asia Men’s Basketball Championship in Tokushima, Japan.

It was at that tournament that the Iranians beat the Philippine Basketball Association-backed national five of coach Chot Reyes, 75-69, in a hotly-contested game in Group A.

The meet served as a qualifier for the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Iran failed to win in all of its five assignments at the Olympiad, but from its ranks emerged the meet’s top rebounder and block shot artist in Hamed Haddadi.

The 7-foot-2 center averaged an Olympic best 11.2 rebounds and 2.6 block shots, numbers that dwarfed even the ones pulled off by Yao Ming, Pau Gasol, Dirk Nowitzki, and Dwight Howard.

Haddadi has since been signed by the Memphis Grizzlies in the NBA.

Toroman will leave for Iran over the weekend.

Toroman has a son, Denis, who currently plays for Luka Koper in the Premier A Slovenian Basketball League. - GMANews.TV

pachador
09-25-2008, 12:59 AM
Toroman tells us what is wrong with Philippine basketball :

Toroman cites RP upside in hoops

By Joaquin Henson
Thursday, September 25, 2008
Serbian coach Rajko Toroman said yesterday the Philippines could be a serious contender for the Asian championship in two or three years but a reorientation of the training program for the national team must begin now if the objective is to qualify for the London Olympics in 2012.

Toroman, 53, is fresh from piloting Iran at the Beijing Olympics. He was the coach when Iran beat the Philippines, 75-69, at the FIBA-Asia Championships in Tokushima last year. Iran won the FIBA-Asia title while the Philippines settled for ninth place.

Toroman arrived here last Saturday on the SBP’s invitation to watch the UAAP and NCAA finals and observe practice games of PBA teams preparing for the season opening on Oct. 4.

SBP executive director Noli Eala said Toroman is a leading candidate to coach the Philippine team at the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships for a slot in the London Olympics the next year. Before 2011, the PBA will take charge of the national squad with its own coach for the 2009 FIBA-Asia Championships to qualify the top three finishers for the 2010 World Championships in Turkey.

If the SBP and Toroman come to terms, his first major assignment will likely be in the 2010 Asian Games.

Toroman said to prepare for the future, a pool of 15 top collegiate players must be formed now to practice regularly and eventually compete in the PBA as a team.

“There is tremendous potential in Philippine basketball, maybe two or three times more than in Iran which has no high school and college program,” he said. “Iran has a weak professional league while the Philippines has a very successful professional league with many talented players. We can start with 15 collegiate players and when there are invitations to play overseas, we could reinforce the team with some professionals depending on the necessity.”

Toroman said it would benefit the national team to be introduced to the European style of play.

“I think the Filipino players are more suited for the European style which puts an emphasis on tactics,” he continued. “Right now, I see Filipinos playing more like Americans with very little system, a lot of one-on-one and dependent on the athleticism and skills of individuals. In Beijing, the US was the worst tactical team but they won because of their superior individual talent.”

Toroman said when he coaches a team, his emphasis is fundamentals. “I usually call for practice twice a day,” he went on. “I don’t get the players up too early. I want the timing of the practices to be natural. In the morning, we start with weights then drills. In the afternoon, we continue the practice. I like to do different things at practice so nobody gets bored. I like to build discipline and character with my players.”

Toroman said he will recommend recruiting a naturalized player, like Japan, Jordan and South Korea, to beef up the national team.

“Iran won the FIBA-Asia title because of Hamed Hadadi who is 7-2,” said Toroman. “He was the only player to average a double double in Beijing and that’s why he just signed a three-year contract with Memphis in the NBA. I think the Philippines could use a big man in the middle like Hadadi. The Philippines has excellent outside players but it needs a post presence to open up more options on offense. FIBA allows a country to recruit one naturalized player and many countries do it.”

Toroman admitted the Philippines was his biggest nightmare in Tokushima and singled out Jimmy Alapag, Dondon Hontiveros, Asi Taulava, Mick Pennisi and Mark Caguioa as the players who gave him a scare.

In Tokushima, Iran held a slim one-point lead with 57 seconds to go when Greek referee Nikolaos Zavlanos slapped a technical foul on the Philippines bench to ice the contest. The technical foul meant two free throws and possession.

“It’s not true that Zavlanos and I are best friends but I don’t deny I know him because I coached in Greece where he works,” said Toroman. “From what I know, someone on the Philippine bench complained there was no travelling call on Iran and he was right behind Zavlanos. In FIBA, that’s an automatic technical foul. I don’t think Zavlanos was conscious of the game situation. Anyway, we deserved to win because we led most of the way even if we missed 24 free throws and Hadadi played poorly.”
Under Toroman’s watch, Iran improved dramatically in basketball, jumping from No. 51 to No. 37 to No. 29 in the FIBA rankings. The Philippines is No. 65.

Toroman said a problem in the Philippine situation is the calendar.

“In Iran, there is no local competition from March to August which frees players to practice for the national team,” he said. “I started with 29 players in the pool last year. In the Philippines, the pro league ends in July and the collegiate leagues in September, which gives very little time for the national team to jell. As you know, chemistry is very important for a team to be competitive.”

Toroman said in choosing players for the national team, he puts a premium on mental attitude.

“In the Philippines, I notice players are very popular like they’re celebrities so I think it’s possible many of them believe they’re great players,” said Toroman. “That could be a problem because they may not be receptive to lessons on how to improve on the international level. It’s not like in Iran where basketball isn’t popular and only 300 people watch the games. The players always have to prove themselves on the court.”
Toroman said he recently took a break from his basketball chores to visit his 14-month old grandson.

“I have only one child, a daughter who is married to Mladen Sekularac, a 6-8 player who was drafted by Dallas in 2002 and played two summer leagues with the Mavericks,” he said. “For a while, Mladen was considered to be the next Dejan Bodiroga. For 4 1/2 months, I travelled the world with the Iranian team and coached 32 games. After the Olympics, I just had to go home and visit my grandson whom I miss so much.”

Toroman said a nephew, Denis Toroman plays pro ball in Slovenia.

The other day, Toroman was introduced by Eala to SBP officers Nic Jorge, Bernie Atienza, Perry Martinez and Fritz Gaston. It is expected that a formal offer will be made soon for Toroman to coach the national team.

ayoboi
09-25-2008, 09:50 AM
Good day, hiring a foreign coach will be the answer in bringing back the Filipinos in the world of basketball, we need an experience coach who has several achievements and sucess in the world of basketball!

D_I_A
09-25-2008, 12:59 PM
Don't let this guy pass! Give him an offer he can't refuse.

Support the SBP!!!

Down with the BAP!!!

>:( >:( >:(

D_I_A
09-26-2008, 01:29 AM
Philippine Journal
9/26/2008
Why a foreign coach? Listen to Noli
By: Gerry Ramos

THE BAP-Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (BAP-SBP) is keeping its fingers crossed that the Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BSCP) will see some wisdom in its plan to tap the services of Serbian mentor Rajko Toroman as coach of the RP men’s basketball team in future international tournaments.
* *
BAP-SBP Executive Director Noli Eala clarified that the possible entry of the 53-year-old Toroman, architect of the Iran basketball team’s success in last year’s FIBA-Asian Men’s Basketball Championship, is in a way, not a hindrance to the state of coaching in the Philippines.
* *
Eala said the move can even led to its upliftment and development, Filipino mentors not having tried before working with a European coach.
* *
‘There’s a rationale behind it. In addition to that, it has to be made very clear that coach Toroman is not there to take away any opportunities for Filipino coaches,” said Eala to members of media over dinner Wednesday. “Instead, it is really upgrading the technology for our Filipino coaches.”
* * *
Through the years since it was first established in the 80s, the BCAP has been at the forefront of opposing the appointment of foreign coaches here, a battle that saw the group contesting the coaching jobs of Norman Black, Tim Cone, Ron Jacobs, the late John Moran, Bill Bayno and Paul Woolpert.
* *
Right now, Eala said he’s in constant communication with BCAP president Chito Narvasa regarding the BAP-SBP stand on Toroman, adding, “we‘re continuing with our discussion and hopefully, we can provide him with the rationale and reasons for seeking the assistance of a foreign coach.”
* *
Narvasa confirmed that he already talked with the BAP-SBP about the matter, but wants to get more proofs for the association to be convinced of the need to* * *Besides, he said there are already existing guidelines on the hiring of foreign coaches as exemplified in the court ruling that decided in favor of BCAP in the case it field against Moran in 2004.
* *
“There are guidelines that should be followed in hiring a foreign coach. But we’re still discussing with the BAP-SBP,” said Narvasa.
* *
Eala said there is no definite agreement yet between the BAP-SBP and Toroman as discussions are still on-going on his possible appointment. Both sides met again for the second straight day Wednesday.
* *
A decision is expected to be reached once the Serbian mentor leaves the country next week.
* *
But as Toroman himself told to BAP-SBP president Manny V. Pangilinan, at least five of the top six teams in Asia right now has foreign for coaches.
* *
“The only one that probably doesn’t have a foreign coach is Korea,” Eala said, mentioning Asian power China, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar and Chinese-Taipei as among the countries that have foreign coaches.




Malaya
9/26/2008

BCAP unlikely to oppose
hiring of Serbian coach

BY NOLI CORTEZ

THE Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines is not expected to raise objections to the plans of the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas to tap Serbian coach Rajko Toroman to call the shots for the national team in future international tournaments.


"I’ve already talked to (BCAP president) coach Chito (Narvasa) and he said there will be no problem with coach Toroman as long as we follow the guidelines set forth in the John Moran case," SBP Executive Director Noli Eala said yesterday.

"It has to be very clear that coach Rajko will not take away any opportunity from our Filipino coaches, and that he’s here to also improve our technology in terms of basketball coaching," Eala added.

Moran was the American coach hired by Shell in the 2004 Fiesta Cup who was eventually fired after the Turbo Chargers lost five of their first six games.

Narvasa said the BCAP is not exactly against Toroman, but reiterated the latter should present his credentials and basketball program.

"We’re still discussing with the SBP," Narvasa said. "There are guidelines that should be followed in hiring a foreign coach."

Toroman and the SBP should ink a three-year deal today.

Eala said Toroman’s long list of credentials should be enough to convince any local coach the former Iranian national mentor is very capable of putting up a three-year program and a team that will represent the country in the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou, China.

"What he did in Iran is truly remarkable. He helped that nation vault from 51st to 23rd in the international basketball rankings, the biggest such jump in history," said Eala.

Toroman, 52, had an 18-month stint with the Iranians, steering the team to victory in the FIBA Asia men’s tournament in Tokushima, Japan, a first-ever Olympic stint and an 11th place finish in Beijing. He also oversaw the preparations of the Iranian juniors team that also won the Asian crown recently.

If the SBP and Toroman reach an agreement, the formation of the national team, composed of played aged from 19 to 22, will start before the year ends.

"Our agreement with the PBA ends in 2009, so coach Toroman’s team will take over representing the country starting in such tournaments as the SEA Games, SEABA and the 2010 Asian Games," explained Eala.

Toroman said he plans to tap the top 15 players from the NCAA, UAAP and provinces, as well as from abroad.

"That’s our strategy, if we make an agreement," Toroman said, adding the basketball atmosphere in the country is more conducive for development than in Iran.

"The situation here is 10 times better than Iran. You have better leagues, you have better high school and college competitions, and the players are growing up. Iran doesn’t have that. They have some talented players, but they’re not playing enough games. They don’t have a coaching plan.

"I’m sure the difference between Iran and Philippines is not so big. The Philippines have good players. Good for future World Championship," he added.

An economics major, Toroman worked as manager of an export/import company before starting coaching in the early 80s. In 1988, he started coaching professional basketball teams in Europe.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

i wonder how would BCAP explain or claim that a foreign coach is already depriving a local coach of a coaching job?
pag may umangal na coach ibig bang sabihin na deprived na agad sya kahit walang technical expertise and experience in foreign basketball competitions?

di kaya may compromise dito regarding sa pagpili ng RP Men's Team Coach Yeng Guiao and the latest stand of BCAP regarding Toroman's upcoming appointment?

i hope Toroman gets the job and start improving our basketball program down to the grassroots level

Jomar09
09-26-2008, 01:55 AM
ndi kya mgtampo si djurovic sa atin??? db sya dti ang gs2 nting kunin, ngun dumating lng si toroman nklmutan na sya.. ???

D_I_A
09-26-2008, 02:09 AM
ndi kya mgtampo si djurovic sa atin??? db sya dti ang gs2 nting kunin, ngun dumating lng si toroman nklmutan na sya.. ???


ano ba credentials ni djurovic?

PilipinasFan
10-01-2008, 08:58 PM
Is hiring a foreign coach to handle the national team’s long-term program a smart move?

Two pro coaches with a combined 10 championships in the Philippine Basketball Association have no problem with the idea.

Jong Uichico of Ginebra and Ryan Gregorio of Purefoods said over the weekend that they are open to the possibility of the national team working with a non-Filipino.

“We might learn new things from him," said Uichico, the RP coach during the 2002 Asian Games and an assistant in the 2007 Fiba-Asia Olympic qualifiers.

“The transfer of new basketball technology will benefit the RP team in the long run," Gregorio added.
“Secondly, his understanding of amateur rules will be a big help."

Sta. Lucia’s Boyet Fernandez said that he would welcome foreign aid but Filipino coaches must be allowed to work closely with him.

“If the [Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas] thinks that a foreign coach is better than a local coach, it is their prerogative," Fernandez said.

“But if they hire one, they should put local coaches as assistants so that we can learn the system."

The SBP signed recently Serbian coach Rajko Toroman to be the federation’s project director with the formation of a competitive RP 5 to the 2010 Asian Games and 2012 London Olympics as the primary goal.

The team will be different from the one coach Yeng Guiao will form for the 2009 FIBA-Asia World Championship qualifiers for the 2010 World Championships.

Toroman’s squad will be made up mostly of college players who will be requested to remain in the amateur ranks.

PilipinasFan
10-01-2008, 09:03 PM
this topic is from GMAnews.tv

cameronCrazy
10-02-2008, 05:02 PM
I think that is a smart idea of SBP to hire a foreign coach. And yes, the Filipino coaches should serve as assistants so they can learn and enhance their skills.

The tough area is for the amateur players to stay as amateurs..many of them would go definitely to the PBA and earn big bucks! The challenge is to match the salaries of PBA teams to keep them as amateurs.

The UAAP and NCAA teams would also have problems with that since the priority of the schools is their collegiate campaigns and not the Philippine team.

It will be a great challenge but it is a good sign that SBP is making some positive strides.

glock23
10-04-2008, 02:18 PM
Here comes the tidal wave of "nationalistic" opposition...

No to Serbian coach, says Guiao

by Rey Joble

...

But Pumaren, Guiao and Austria unanimously agreed that the Philippine team that will compete in major Asian basketball tournaments and possibly in the Olympics should be handled by no less than our very own.

“There are many competent coaches here and I believe success comes within the program,” said Pumaren, also the head of the Philippine Basketball Association’s Players Union.

...

“Why hire a foreign coach? Will he cry alongside the players everytime we suffer a setback? Or how compassionate he is compared to a Filipino coach while handling the Philippine team? I mean, there are a lot of talented coaches here who will stick to the team win or lose. ’Yang foreign coach na ’yan, uwi na agad yan pagkatapos ng contract niya,” said Guiao.

http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/?page=sports1_sept10_2008



Eh kung yung local coach nga umuwi na nung hindi pa tapos yung trabaho sa Iran, wala naman siyang reklamo doon.


eh hindi sya ikaw eh! :D

sajubeads
10-05-2008, 06:26 AM
WTF is this stupid , highly politicized - Coach doing. He is more talk than Chot Reyes. The reason why Philippines is still at the doldrums in international basketball is because we dont know how to play the international type of game. Yeng's assertion that the main problem is height is not entirely true. Look at the African team in the latest Olympic games, their tallest pl,ayer is just 6-7 -6-8 but still the team can still play competitive basketball. Two days ago, narvasa mentioned in a National televised interview that even countries with foreign coaches did not fair well in the Olympics. He mentioned Iran , coached by Toroman and China by Kauskaukas. But at least Iran made it to Olympics in just 18 months under Toroman. If China's 6th place in Olympics is not good enough for Narvasa then probably Chot's 9th place is better or the Cebuana National team of Zamar( lossing to Paranaque Jets ) is the best.

The reason why SBP has to resort to hiring of a foreign coach is because of the fact that " NO FILIPINO " has the expertise and the "technology " to coached the international game. Sure there are lts of good Filipino coach but they are good only for Filipino type, dribble-dribble type one on one play. Who among the Coaches were able to land a medal in the Asian tournaments the last 20 years .... All foreigners right..... championship by Jacobs, 3rd place by Cone and Black, 4th by Uichico and 9th by Reyes. The 2nd place of Jaworski is the best by a Pinoy caoch but remneber that the core of the team is made up of NCC/ Jacobs trained players. The contention of BCAP is that by hiring a foreign coach , it will deprive Filipino coaches. But the main question here is competence, ijust like in a merchandise, if you are going to buy a product, you look for a product where your money is worth. Just because Johnny tam has no job, you have to choose him over Toroman...


Yeng Guiao, just do your job or should i say your jobs... Imagine Yeng Guiao, a Vice - governor of Pampanga, professional coach, national team coach ... I am from Pampanga and what has he done... to divide the local politicians here in Pampanga and creating chaos here in the province

sajubeads
10-05-2008, 07:55 AM
Bill Bayno: “A Success Story”


By Mike Barrett

It’s early August, three months from the start of the NBA season, but Zach Randolph is on a court in Atlanta, on the campus of Georgia Tech University. He’s pounding away at the hoop, literally destroying a much smaller man, who is wearing khaki shorts and a plain white t-shirt. All the while, this man is talking, challenging Randolph to go harder and longer. “Come at me Zach,” he says. “Bring it right into me. You’re not going to hurt me. Attack the basket. Again.” Moments later the words “water break” are heard, and Zach heads for the bench to grab some Gatorade. The man in the white shirt stays on the floor, never stopping his dribble, antsy for the player to return so they can resume the workout.

Ah, the life of an NBA player development coach. For the Portland Trail Blazers, this position now belongs to Bill Bayno, the man in the t-shirt. He’s sweating as much as Randolph, but looks like he can’t get enough. That’s love, and that’s passion, and that’s just part of what it takes to succeed at the NBA level- for players and coaches.

Bayno is new to the position, but isn’t new to traveling around the world working with players. Teaching the game, helping players with their skills, and helping them handle life in the big time, isn’t new either. That’s why he’s here.

It takes a unique individual to be a player development coach. The term “gym rat” is used a lot to describe players who are tireless workers. It should also be applied to coaches, like Bayno. They don’t want attention, shy away from the spotlight and TV cameras, and have an incredibly selfless attitude.

“I want to be way in the background,” says Bayno. “My job is just to make sure our guys are absolutely ready- ready to play, and ready to buy in. Anything I can do to help Nate McMillan and our assistant coaches, that’s what I’m going to do.”

The Blazers are fortunate in that Bayno not only has experience at teaching the game, and working with players, but has also been a head coach at several different levels. He knows what’s expected of him, and what’s expected of his players.

“I have to be around a gym, and have to be around basketball,” says Bayno. “That’s just the way it is.”

A Lasting Relationship is Born

Bayno was born and raised in Newberg, New York, about 30 minutes north of New York City. Like many coaches, his love for the game started as a player. Bayno excelled in high school, and enrolled at the University of Massacusetts, where he played for two seasons. It was then on to Sacred Heart in Connecticut, where he became a Division II All-American. Following a short tryout with the New York Knicks, Bayno immediately went into coaching.

Bayno’s first coaching job came as a graduate assistant for P.J. Carlisimo at Seton Hall. After that, it was on to Kansas, where he accepted a similar position under Larry Brown. It was there he met a young freshman point guard, and took the player under his wing. The player was Kevin Pritchard, the current director of player personnel for the Trail Blazers. Pritchard ended up leading the Jayhawks to the 1987 NCAA National Championship.

“I was 23, and Kevin was 19,” remembers Bayno. “We had a unique relationship. KP and I spent hours playing together. We developed a bond that has stayed through to this day. Kevin is like a brother to me.”

Pritchard, who played on that title team at Kansas with Danny Manning, gives Bayno a lot of credit for his success as a player.

“Right away I felt Billy had a special quality, in that you trust him,” says Pritchard. “He has a great way of building players’ trust, not only on but off the court. I’ve known him now for over 20 years, and I would say he’s a big reason why I was able to make it to the NBA. He was always pushing me to be better.”

Two years ago, with that feeling still fresh in his mind, Pritchard set out to team up with Bayno once again, this time with the Trail Blazers. After Pritchard served as the Blazers interim head coach late in the 2004-05 season, following the dismissal of Maurice Cheeks, he needed someone to coach the Blazers’ youngsters at the Las Vegas Summer League. He called his old friend, who accepted the short assignment.

Perhaps the most important thing to come out of the summer league experience, was the fact that Bayno was able to develop a relationship with new-Blazers coach Nate McMillan, who was hired after the summer league was already underway. This summer, McMillan was happy enough with what he saw of Bayno the previous summer in Las Vegas, that the offered him the position of player development coach. “I’ll be eternally grateful to Nate for believing in me, and for giving me this chance, says Bayno.”

Not everyone watching the Trail Blazers at that 2005 summer league in Vegas recognized the irony of that situation, or even realize it now.

The UNLV Experience

Following his stint as a graduate assistant coach at Seton Hall and Kansas, Bayno’s first full-time job came at Charleston Southern University, where he was in charge or recruiting. It didn’t take him long to be chased down by a major program, and shortly after he was off to the school where his basketball career, as a player, started- The University of Massachusetts.

Bayno accepted the job at UMass and spent seven seasons as an assistant coach. He learned under John Calapari as that program rose to the top, and competed in a Final Four. Bayno recruited and helped develop players like Marcus Camby and Lou Roe.

In 1995, at just 32 years of age, the time had come for Bayno to take over his own program, and there was no wading into the shallow end, as it was former powerhouse UNLV that named him its head coach on April 1st, 1995. It’s the same UNLV that rose to college basketball’s elite in the early 90s, under legend Jerry Tarkanian. The team won the NCAA title in 1990, drilling Duke 103-73, and then put together a 45-game winning streak that lasted until March of 2001. To put it mildly, expectations were off the charts. The school tried Rollie Massimino, and then Tim Grgurich as head coaches, and then turned to a very young Bayno.

“A lot of coaches turned that job down before I got it,” says Bayno. “It was a job that probably wasn’t as good as it looked. Tark had built up an amazing program, but when he left support dwindled. I knew how to get kids to play hard, and I could recruit. I was just a young coach figuring things out as I went.”

The success was steady under Bayno, as UNLV won four conference titles, and returned to the NCAA Tournament. In fact, Bayno is still the only coach since Tarkanian to take UNLV to the big dance.

However, it was after that trip to the NCAA tourney in 1999, that things took a downhill turn, at least off the court. Anyone familiar with big-time college hoops knows one of the biggest challenges coaches face is keeping boosters away from players and recruits. A Las Vegas-area dentist had been accused of giving financial aid to current L.A. Laker Lamar Odom, who, as it turns out, never played a minute at UNLV.

“Lamar had been taking money from a booster to survive,” says Bayno. “We had already kicked him out of school and he never played for us. The NCAA report put all the blame on the administration. But, before the report came out, they fired me. I accept it, and take full responsibility for it. I was the coach. But, I do take pride in the fact that I don’t have one violation against me. I’m not ashamed. We had a lot of success at UNLV.”

As expected, Bayno’s public image took the hardest hits, and he decided to try coaching in the ABA. He coached the Phoenix Eclipse, and went up against Kevin Pritchard’s Kansas City Knights. Pritchard’s team went on to win the ABA title that year.

After that, Bayno was off to the Philippines, where he coached the Talk n’ Text Phone Pals. Right after that season ended he took the head-coaching job with the CBA’s Yakima Sun Kings, and won the CBA title in 2003. Obviously, it was hardly a straight line to the NBA.

Conquering Other Demons

The life of a coach is tough, especially at the highest levels, and Bayno’s story isn’t that unique in this business. Dealing with expectations, the pressure of keeping a job, the constant traveling, the late nights, and the long off seasons. Coaches deal with these things in different ways- sometimes in destructive ways. For Bayno, the battle was with alcohol.

“If you’re an alcoholic, you know it. That’s the simplest way I can put it,” says Bayno. “My parents were alcoholics and I knew I was going to have it face it at some point in my life.” That point came when he was fighting the wars of big-time college basketball, at UNLV. Although Bayno says he never drank during the season, it was a constant temptation in the off-season.

“I was a young coach at Vegas, at just 32. I was under extreme pressure, I was making a lot of money, and my alcoholism got the best of me. It was just the combination of Vegas, money, and stress.” Like most people battling this disease, Bayno doesn’t hesitate when he’s asked when he had his last drink. “December 23rd, 1999,” he proudly says.

The most painful part of being a public figure can be when one does succumb to the trials of everyday life. The battle is fought on a very big stage, in front of lot judging eyes.

“That was the most painful part of all of that,” says Bayno. “I put myself in a position for people who don’t know me, to take shots at me and make unfair assumptions. The only person I hurt was myself. I take such pride in being a good person. I’ve just tried to use my experience to help others, and I think I’ve done that. I’m proud of that. There are a lot of people in this business, including players, who struggle with this. I’m happy that I’ve been able to help a lot of them, and I’ll continue to try and do that.”

The NBA Opportunity

For Bayno, this is the opportunity he’s been wanting. He turned down an offer from the L.A. Clippers to work with the young Trail Blazers. One only has to watch him workout with a player to realize what this chance means to him. The 2005 summer league experience was like a brief tease. Now, he’s got the real thing.

“I don’t think there’s anything more rewarding than having the opportunity to make someone better,” says Bayno. “I love making them better players and better people. I’m very open with my life experiences, and I think that’s as important as my work with the players on the court. I’m teaching these guys how to maximize their lives, how to handle adversity, and how to be professionals.”

He didn’t have to sell that aspiration to Pritchard or McMillan when the opportunity presented itself in Portland.

“We’re so lucky to have him,” says Pritchard. “He has developed so many players in this league. He was a great scout for his last season, but I felt like the better role for him was as a player development coach. Where we’re at as a team, we needed the best one we could find. All he wants to do is get on the floor and help guys get better. He’s a success story, and we’re better because of him.”

And, where some assistants aspire to gain their own spots in the head coaching community, Bayno has been there. He’s thrilled to be in Portland, in this position, and wants nothing more.

“I don’t like the pressure of being a head coach,” says Bayno. “ “If I’m never a head coach again I’ll be happy. This job, doing what I’m doing now, it’s the most fun I could ever have in basketball.”


Bayno used to coach TNT but was released due to strong opposition of BCAP. In fact he is one of the Coach mentioned by Narvasa as "nothing special type of Coach"/ Filipinos can do a better job ". Look where he is now.

PilipinasFan
10-05-2008, 09:31 AM
Eala: Give change a chance



Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:16:00 10/05/2008


MANILA, Philippines—Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas executive director Noli Eala appealed Saturday to critics protesting Rajko Toroman’s appointment as the national basketball’s program project director for a little calm, saying the Serbian is “capable and willing to help.”

“It is best for everyone to just calm down,” Eala said in a text message to the Philippine Daily Inquirer. “We all belong to the same team so let’s not pull each other down.”

“Why don’t we give change a chance?” he added. “We have a person who is clearly capable and is willing to help. Maraming dala sa mesa si Toroman (Toroman brings a lot to the table), including something we badly need—instant global credibility to our program.”

Eala was reacting to reports quoting national coach Yeng Guiao as saying that money was misspent on Toroman. Newspaper reports quoted Guiao as saying that the SBP should have spent its money on naturalizing a foreign 7-footer for the national team instead.

“I’m sure he (Guiao) will have enough funds at his disposal to get his 7-footer,” said Eala.

Toroman’s hiring has been the subject of intense scrutiny by the Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP), which sees his appointment as a stepping stone toward a head coaching job with the national team.

The BCAP frowns on foreigners holding local coaching positions as part of its mandate to protect the welfare of Filipino coaches.

Eala said Toroman, indeed, may end up coaching the national team, but only if the program of the former Iran national mentor passes SBP scrutiny. When that happens, Toroman’s appointment will be made in the proper manner.

“There will be nothing illegal or unlawful about it,” Eala explained.

The former PBA commissioner has also been in contact with BCAP chief Chito Narvasa, although Narvasa said Tuesday night that he is still awaiting one more document—Toroman’s intended program—before holding more talks with the SBP.

“We asked for his [curriculum vitae] and his program because we wanted to come up with a win-win situation,” Narvasa told the Inquirer Tuesday night. “But we were not furnished a copy of his program tapos nagkapirmahan nalang (and all of a sudden, there was already a contract-signing).”

Eala, who has already submitted the Serbian’s CV, assured the BCAP that Toroman is still working on the program after familiarizing himself with the Philippine setting.

“Like Toroman said, every program is unique,” Eala said. “What worked in Iran is not necessarily the program that will be used in the Philippines. It needs to be adjusted according to our culture, player makeup and environment. As soon as it will be finished, it will be discussed with the appropriate and necessary groups.”

pachador
10-05-2008, 11:43 AM
what the local coaches as leaders of their local teams want is similar in some respects to what president Quezon said back in the 1930s. "better a philippines run like hell by filipinos than a philippines run like heaven by americans" . What is implicit or implied is the resistance to change. When you resist change even though it is inevitable and necessary, then you become static and never improve, a prescription for basketball hell* *;D

D_I_A
10-05-2008, 12:42 PM
what the local coaches as leaders of their local teams want is similar in some respects to what president Quezon said back in the 1930s. "better a philippines run like hell by filipinos than a philippines run like heaven by americans" . What is implicit or implied is the resistance to change. When you resist change even though it is inevitable and necessary, then you become static and never improve, a prescription for basketball hell* *;D



BCAP is a stumbling block to Philippine Basketball Progress!!! >:( >:( >:(

D_I_A
10-05-2008, 12:50 PM
Eala: Give change a chance



Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:16:00 10/05/2008


MANILA, Philippines—Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas executive director Noli Eala appealed Saturday to critics protesting Rajko Toroman’s appointment as the national basketball’s program project director for a little calm, saying the Serbian is “capable and willing to help.”

“It is best for everyone to just calm down,” Eala said in a text message to the Philippine Daily Inquirer. “We all belong to the same team so let’s not pull each other down.”

“Why don’t we give change a chance?” he added. “We have a person who is clearly capable and is willing to help. Maraming dala sa mesa si Toroman (Toroman brings a lot to the table), including something we badly need—instant global credibility to our program.”

Eala was reacting to reports quoting national coach Yeng Guiao as saying that money was misspent on Toroman. Newspaper reports quoted Guiao as saying that the SBP should have spent its money on naturalizing a foreign 7-footer for the national team instead.

“I’m sure he (Guiao) will have enough funds at his disposal to get his 7-footer,” said Eala.

Toroman’s hiring has been the subject of intense scrutiny by the Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP), which sees his appointment as a stepping stone toward a head coaching job with the national team.

The BCAP frowns on foreigners holding local coaching positions as part of its mandate to protect the welfare of Filipino coaches.

Eala said Toroman, indeed, may end up coaching the national team, but only if the program of the former Iran national mentor passes SBP scrutiny. When that happens, Toroman’s appointment will be made in the proper manner.

“There will be nothing illegal or unlawful about it,” Eala explained.

The former PBA commissioner has also been in contact with BCAP chief Chito Narvasa, although Narvasa said Tuesday night that he is still awaiting one more document—Toroman’s intended program—before holding more talks with the SBP.

“We asked for his [curriculum vitae] and his program because we wanted to come up with a win-win situation,” Narvasa told the Inquirer Tuesday night. “But we were not furnished a copy of his program tapos nagkapirmahan nalang (and all of a sudden, there was already a contract-signing).”

Eala, who has already submitted the Serbian’s CV, assured the BCAP that Toroman is still working on the program after familiarizing himself with the Philippine setting.

“Like Toroman said, every program is unique,” Eala said. “What worked in Iran is not necessarily the program that will be used in the Philippines. It needs to be adjusted according to our culture, player makeup and environment. As soon as it will be finished, it will be discussed with the appropriate and necessary groups.”



dapat naman talaga manahimik muna ang BCAP at si Yeng, tama na ang grandstanding, sa Senado at Kongreso lang yun, di dapat ipauso sa basketball..napaghahalataan tuloy ang BCAP na utak BAP..utak pulbura..

BCAP instead of truly promoting Philippine basketball interests is only promoting divisiveness, chaos, stagnancy and their own vested interests in basketball.

Bayan daw muna tapos isabay ang kanilang sariling interes kasi mawawalan daw sila ng trabaho kahit na di naman talaga sila ganun kagagaling at nakakaintindi ng international competitions.

Coach Yeng and BCAP Shut Up for Philippine Basketball sake!!!

Instead of mudslinging Coach Yeng, fine tune the RP-PBA National Team, sayang ang pondo ng PBA para sa National Team sa kakatira mo sa SBP programs!!!


Down with the BAP!!!

Deport Graham Lim Now!!!

SUPPORT THE SBP!!!

SHUT UP BCAP!!!


OT: maybe this topic can be merge with the thread "Regarding Hiring a Foreign Coach"

D_I_A
10-05-2008, 01:14 PM
Give Serb a chance – Moying Martelino


By WAYLON GALVEZ

Former FIBA-Asia Secretary-General Moying Martelino yesterday defended the decision of Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) in hiring Serbian coach Rajko Toroman as Project Director of the country’s basketball body.

Toroman just inked a lucrative three-year deal with SBP, an agreement which drew flak from RP team and Red Bull coach Yeng Guiao.

Toroman’s main job is to prepare a program aimed at giving the country a berth in the 2012 London Olympics.

Martelino, who once served as secretary-general of the Asian Basketball Confederation – now FIBA-Asia – sees nothing wrong in hiring the 53-year-old Toroman.

"They (local coaches) should give the Serbian coach a chance," Martelino said. "Besides, it’s the call of the association (SBP). If nothing happens by hiring a foreign coach for whatever capacity, then blame the association. But not now, not now when the SBP is trying to put things in place."

Guiao, who will call the shots for the RP team that will see action in the qualifying tournament for the 2010 World Championship in Turkey, was the most vocal in the appointment of Toroman.

Guiao suggested that the money intended for Toroman should instead go to the naturalization of a 7-footer whom he said could play a vital role in the country’s bid to return to the Olympic scene.

The last time the country played in the Olympics was in 1972 in Munich.

Lined up for Toroman are various competitions including the Southeast Asian Games in Laos next year, the 2010 Asian Games in China and the Olympic qualifier 2011 FIBA-Asia Championship.

Martelino said hiring of foreign coaches is now a trend in Asia. He said China was handled by Lithuanian Jonas Kazlauskaz in the recent Beijing Olympics.

Prior to signing with the SBP, Toroman steered the Iran national team to the FIBA-Asia Championship last year to earn a seat in the Beijing Games.

"We really don’t know if the Serbian coach has something to offer, hindi pa naman kasi siya nag-uumpisa eh. What if maging successful? What if mag-work for the national team?" Martelino stated.

"At kung pumalpak naman, SBP ang may sagot n’yan because it was the one which hired the foreign coach," Martelino added.


BCAP Shut Up!!!

CrossOver
10-05-2008, 03:05 PM
Kadiri talaga politics sa atin. Mahalin niyo naman po bayan natin MAGING OPEN MINDED NAMAN PO KAYO!

m_14
10-05-2008, 05:46 PM
kung may bida (noli eala), meron din syempre kontrabida (BCAP).

The_Big_Cat
10-07-2008, 07:58 PM
Explain presence of Serb cage coach, RP coaches group tells nat’l federation
10/07/2008 | 06:05 PM

MANILA, Philippines – The Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines will give national federation Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas a chance to air its side on the SBP’s hiring of Serbian coach Rajko Toroman.

The coaches’ group, led by Chito Narvasa, reached the consensus Monday because it wasn’t known yet in what capacity Toroman will be working for the SBP.

"Right now, it's a wait-and-see attitude for us because we have yet to know his exact role," Narvasa said.
"We're still keeping the doors open for the BAP-SBP to explain to us what its program is."

Narvasa added that the BCAP is not totally against the hiring of foreign coaches who can lend their expertise to improve the craft of the Filipino coaches.

He cited the key role the BCAP played when foreign coaches Shin Dong Pa of Korea and former NBA player Detlef Schrempf visited the country to conduct clinics.

But the BCAP said it would draw the line when the hiring of a foreign coach will result to a Filipino being bumped off in his place.

"We're saddened by this move because the message we're getting is that there are no capable Filipino coaches to handle the national team," Narvasa, a former professional coach said.

"They seemed to give up on hiring a Filipino and instead [they] want to hire foreigners and let the Filipinos watch and learn."

If Toroman does assume a coach’s role, Narvasa believes the BCAP can win should the case reach the courts, recalling his group’s victories against three foreign coaches tapped by teams in the PBA.

"We are standing on firm legal grounds. We did that to [Bill] Bayno, [Paul] Walphert and [John] Moran and our batting average is 100 percent," beamed Narvasa.

Toroman is being credited as the man behind the meteoric rise of the Iranian basketball team which played in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

He was tapped by BAP-SBP executive director Noli Eala to craft a program for the country that will be good for three years with the option to extend for another year if Philippines make it to the 2012 London Olympics.

Besides the selection process, the BCAP would also like Eala to explain if the move was approved by the BAP-SBP board or only by a few individuals.

According to Narvasa, if the decision to hire Toroman was made by just a few people, it would not speak well for BAP-SBP since the new basketball body was formed after leaders accused officials of the BAP of not involving other basketball stakesholders during their term.

"Wala rin tayong ikinaiba sa old federation for basketball kung isang tao lamang ang nagdedesisyon para sa basketball," said Narvasa. – [b]GMANews.TV

a_ron
10-07-2008, 10:57 PM
kung may bida (noli eala), meron din syempre kontrabida (BCAP).



how come Noli Eala seems to be a hero to many?

CrossOver
10-08-2008, 12:33 AM
BCAP may contest Toroman appoinment
By Joey Villar

The Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines yesterday warned the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas on its decision to tap Serbian coach Rajko Toroman as the man in charge of the RP cage program.

BCAP president Chito Narvasa said they might bring the case to court the way the BCAP did in opposing and stopping the appointment of Americans John Moran, Bill Bayno and Paul Woolpert as coaches in the PBA.

“You know we did that against Bayno, we did that against Woolpert and we did that against Moran. In all cases, eventually you know we all won so BCAP’s batting average is 100 percent,” Narvasa.

“If we’re going to talk about legality, I think we’re standing on solid ground. We are disappointed because the coaches feel like we’ve been let down,” he said.

Narvasa cited a 2004 court decision implemented by the Department of Labor and Employment barring foreigners from coaching in the country unless the local coaches can no longer perform as well as them.

Narvasa warned the SBP on its appointment of Toroman, who is currently out of the country, as project director tasked to oversee the program designed for the country’s bid to qualify in the 2012 London Olympics.

“We’re taking a wait and see attitude until we’ve been clarified where all this is going through,” said Narvasa.

The BCAP wants the program scrutinized, which unfortunately, the BAP-SBP has not made available upon signing the 53-year-old Toroman.

“We’re asking them to show us his program first since this is a Philippine endeavor. But we’re very disappointed because what happened was they signed the deal first before consulting with us,” said Narvasa.

He, however, admitted the BCAP isn’t taking any action at the moment since Toroman has yet to be named national coach.

PhilStar (http://www.philstar.com/index.php?Sports&p=49&type=2&sec=30&aid=20081007172)

D_I_A
10-08-2008, 02:11 AM
Shame on BCAP!!!

Akala nyo naman kung sino kayong mahuhusay na coach.

Puro kayo porma at posisyon..

Is BCAP the Trojan Horse of BAP to bring down SBP?

Napaghahalataan ka Mr. Narvasa..

You're the new saboteur in Philippine Basketball.

Down with BAP!!!

Shut Up BCAP!!!

insulares
10-08-2008, 08:39 AM
Chot Reyes backs Serb’s stint as project director


By Rey BANCOD

Former national coach Chot Reyes believes Serbian coach Rajko Toroman will be a big help to Philippine basketball, citing his credentials and track record.

"I’m in a unique position because I can see two sides. I believe that Toroman will bring something on the table," said Reyes who twice met Toroman during the Serbian’s five-day visit recently.

Toroman’s appointment as head of the basketball development program of the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) has come under fire from newly-appointed RP coach Yeng Guiao and officials of the Basketball Coaches of the Philippines (BCAP).

"I understand the BCAP position, but I believe that Toroman will bring the kind of program that we don’t have here. I would like to see it when he returns," Reyes said.

Toroman is set to return on Oct. 20 and is expected to form the 15-man national young men’s team that will be trained for various international competitions.

Guiao, tasked with forming and training an all-PBA national team for the FIBA-Asia event next year, has been vocal against Toroman’s appointment, saying it deprives local coaches job opportunities.

Reyes, however, believes Toroman will not displace local coaches.

"In the first place, no one among us can do the job because it’s full-time. How can anyone of us serve the program for three straight years. Secondly, Toroman has something that we don’t have, Olympic experience," Reyes said.

Reyes’ stand is understandable.

The national team that he handled went to Serbia last year as part of its training for the FIBA-Asia championship.

There, Reyes saw the kind of program that Serbia has in basketball.

"What the kids are doing in the city is also being done in rural areas which tell us something about the kind of coaches that they have. The kids are being taught the same kind of drills," he noted.

Reyes disclosed that Serbia has a school for basketball coaches.

"It’s a two-year course, but unfortunately, only Serbians can take it because of the language barrier," he said. "If you get a license there, you can coach any team in Europe."

Reyes added that some 200 Serbian coaches are handling teams in Europe and even in the United States.

"I would like to see Toroman bring their curriculum here so that coaches here can benefit from it," he said.

The SBP has shown interest in Toroman after he steered Iran to the FIBA-Asia title last year despite only 18 months of preparation.

Reyes, however, supported Guiao’s view that naturalizing a seven-foot player would enhance the country’s chances in Asian competition.

"On one hand, if we have a seven-footer in the team, I think we can win. I didn’t have that luxury before," he said.

On that score, Reyes said Toroman can be of big help.

"Toroman can find a talented seven-foot player in Serbia for us," he said.

While playing an active role in the formation of the national team, Reyes said he has reservations about its rationale.

"Nowhere in the world can you find a nation that wins without its best players. Yes, Iran may have been represented by its former national junior team, but they are currently the best players in their country," he said.

http://www.mb.com.ph/SPRT20081008137402.html

insulares
10-08-2008, 08:44 AM
how come Noli Eala seems to be a hero to many?


Because he doesn't think like a dinosaur unlike certain PBA officials and BCAP coaches.

The_Big_Cat
10-08-2008, 09:44 AM
Chot Reyes backs Serb’s stint as project director


By Rey BANCOD

Former national coach Chot Reyes believes Serbian coach Rajko Toroman will be a big help to Philippine basketball, citing his credentials and track record.

"I’m in a unique position because I can see two sides. I believe that Toroman will bring something on the table," said Reyes who twice met Toroman during the Serbian’s five-day visit recently.

Toroman’s appointment as head of the basketball development program of the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) has come under fire from newly-appointed RP coach Yeng Guiao and officials of the Basketball Coaches of the Philippines (BCAP).

"I understand the BCAP position, but I believe that Toroman will bring the kind of program that we don’t have here. I would like to see it when he returns," Reyes said.

Toroman is set to return on Oct. 20 and is expected to form the 15-man national young men’s team that will be trained for various international competitions.

Guiao, tasked with forming and training an all-PBA national team for the FIBA-Asia event next year, has been vocal against Toroman’s appointment, saying it deprives local coaches job opportunities.

Reyes, however, believes Toroman will not displace local coaches.

"In the first place, no one among us can do the job because it’s full-time. How can anyone of us serve the program for three straight years. Secondly, Toroman has something that we don’t have, Olympic experience," Reyes said.

Reyes’ stand is understandable.

The national team that he handled went to Serbia last year as part of its training for the FIBA-Asia championship.

There, Reyes saw the kind of program that Serbia has in basketball.

"What the kids are doing in the city is also being done in rural areas which tell us something about the kind of coaches that they have. The kids are being taught the same kind of drills," he noted.

Reyes disclosed that Serbia has a school for basketball coaches.

"It’s a two-year course, but unfortunately, only Serbians can take it because of the language barrier," he said. "If you get a license there, you can coach any team in Europe."

Reyes added that some 200 Serbian coaches are handling teams in Europe and even in the United States.

"I would like to see Toroman bring their curriculum here so that coaches here can benefit from it," he said.

The SBP has shown interest in Toroman after he steered Iran to the FIBA-Asia title last year despite only 18 months of preparation.

Reyes, however, supported Guiao’s view that naturalizing a seven-foot player would enhance the country’s chances in Asian competition.

"On one hand, if we have a seven-footer in the team, I think we can win. I didn’t have that luxury before," he said.

On that score, Reyes said Toroman can be of big help.

"Toroman can find a talented seven-foot player in Serbia for us," he said.

While playing an active role in the formation of the national team, Reyes said he has reservations about its rationale.

"Nowhere in the world can you find a nation that wins without its best players. Yes, Iran may have been represented by its former national junior team, but they are currently the best players in their country," he said.

http://www.mb.com.ph/SPRT20081008137402.html

Matagal na gusto ni Chot Reyes na magkaroon tayo ng "foreign consultant". Kaya its no surprise he backs Toroman.
Let us give Toroman the opportunity. It's a 3-year program. If it doesn't work we could always go back to our homegrown coaches.

CrossOver
10-08-2008, 01:14 PM
"In the first place, no one among us can do the job because it’s full-time. How can anyone of us serve the program for three straight years. Secondly, Toroman has something that we don’t have, Olympic experience"

Ito mga positive feedback ng most na mga nag-iisip na fans ke former national coach Chot Reyes nag mula "Full Time" ang kelangan na coach ng RP National Team. Hindi magiging bias or mag corrupt sa utak ng player para makasali sa mother team ng coach, kahit saan pa nating anggulo titingnan me "K" si Toroman makikita naman natin sa resume nya.


"Nowhere in the world can you find a nation that wins without its best players"

Ito ang style ng dating BAP magpadala ng National Team na napulot lang ang mga player sa "Kangkungan"

pachador
10-08-2008, 01:30 PM
I recall several years ago some posters said that Guiao is 'magulo' daw kaya hinid puede mag-coach sa national team. looks like totoo nga. it looks like Guiao is good as a coach but 'politically' speaking or 'PR' speaking, he is a disaster. oh well. the world is not perfect.

Even though Chot was the one "directly" affected because he was not chosen anymore in favor of Guiao, he choose not to be bitter and still backed Toroman and cited several good reasons.

myktristan
10-08-2008, 04:13 PM
NO FOREIGNER TO COACH RP FIVE

BCAP ready to take Toroman to court
By Julius Manicad
http://www.tribune.net.ph/sports/20081008spo1.html


The Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP) will play tough against Serbian coach Rajko Toroman.

And the group would not back down against his possible appointment as national team coach, if ever the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) decides to make him full-time mentor of the RP five rather than keep him as project director, which is his official designation, for now.

Chito Narvasa, BCAP president, issued the warning, saying his group is ready to file a civil case in the event the 53-year-old Serbian mentor is elevated to a coaching position.

Narvasa claimed he is standing on a solid legal ground after winning a legal battle over American coach John Moran, who was hired by the Shell Turbochargers in the 2004 PBA Fiesta Cup but got fired early on after an awful 1-5 start.

“It could be an option, and we’ve done it before (in Moran’s case). If we decide to take on a legal turn, we know we’re standing on a solid legal ground,” Narvasa said during the weekly PSA forum at Shakey’s UN Avenue branch in Manila.

“When he’s already appointed as head coach, that’s the time we’ll make a legal move. Right now, his designation is not yet clear. We even do not know his role to the national team because (SBP executive director) Noli (Eala) did not consult us before they signed Toroman.”

The issue is another blot in the country’s basketball affairs as the SBP has yet to solve its problems with the Basketball Association of the Philippines (BAP), its predecessor which has yet to give up its claim as the legitimate association for the sport although it was kicked out of the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) family a long time ago.

In 2005, the country was given a two-year suspension after the legitimacy tussle between the BAP and the POC-supported Pilipinas Basketball, which later changed its name to SBP.

Although a brand-new basketball body was formed, leading to the extinction of the old BAP, the country still paid a hefty price as its suspension barred Team Philippines from seeing action in the cage competition of the 2005 Manila Southeast Asian Games.

“They are saying that it’s a new NSA (national sports association) but what they are doing is just like what the old NSA did before,” Narvasa said, questioning whether the hiring of Toroman received the full support of the SBP board of trustees.

After inking Toroman to a three-year pact, Eala said his primary responsibility is to chart a long-term basketball program aimed at qualifying in the 2012 London Olympics. He is also expected to improve the basketball technology among Filipino coaches.

But SBP insiders claimed that Toroman’s designation as project director is a baby step towards his formal appointment as national team head coach, a post which was earlier given by the PBA to Yeng Guiao by virtue of its Memorandum of Agreement with the SBP.

“But what if Yeng turned out to be a tremendous national coach, will he be fired just because they have already signed a Serbian coach?” Narvasa said. “We don’t want to be treated like a second-class citizen in our own country.”

“We’re taking a wait and see attitude until we’ve been clarified where all this is going through,” Chito Narvasa said.

His declaration came a week after the SBP formally signed Toroman, the soft-spoken mentor who steered the Iran men’s basketball team to the championship of the FIBA-Asia Olympic qualifying meet last year, as project director tasked to oversee the program meant for the country’s bid to qualify in the Olympics.

m_14
10-08-2008, 05:23 PM
kung may bida (noli eala), meron din syempre kontrabida (BCAP).



how come Noli Eala seems to be a hero to many?




maganda ang plano nya for the country, masyado lang kasi nagmamarunong mga taga BCAP..even china who is already a world class nation kumuha pa ng foreign coach e, tayo pa na sobrang tagal na nasa kangkungan...

sano99
10-08-2008, 08:07 PM
NO FOREIGNER TO COACH RP FIVE

BCAP ready to take Toroman to court
By Julius Manicad
http://www.tribune.net.ph/sports/20081008spo1.html


The Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP) will play tough against Serbian coach Rajko Toroman.

And the group would not back down against his possible appointment as national team coach, if ever the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) decides to make him full-time mentor of the RP five rather than keep him as project director, which is his official designation, for now.

Chito Narvasa, BCAP president, issued the warning, saying his group is ready to file a civil case in the event the 53-year-old Serbian mentor is elevated to a coaching position.

Narvasa claimed he is standing on a solid legal ground after winning a legal battle over American coach John Moran, who was hired by the Shell Turbochargers in the 2004 PBA Fiesta Cup but got fired early on after an awful 1-5 start.

“It could be an option, and we’ve done it before (in Moran’s case). If we decide to take on a legal turn, we know we’re standing on a solid legal ground,” Narvasa said during the weekly PSA forum at Shakey’s UN Avenue branch in Manila.

“When he’s already appointed as head coach, that’s the time we’ll make a legal move. Right now, his designation is not yet clear. We even do not know his role to the national team because (SBP executive director) Noli (Eala) did not consult us before they signed Toroman.”

The issue is another blot in the country’s basketball affairs as the SBP has yet to solve its problems with the Basketball Association of the Philippines (BAP), its predecessor which has yet to give up its claim as the legitimate association for the sport although it was kicked out of the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) family a long time ago.

In 2005, the country was given a two-year suspension after the legitimacy tussle between the BAP and the POC-supported Pilipinas Basketball, which later changed its name to SBP.

Although a brand-new basketball body was formed, leading to the extinction of the old BAP, the country still paid a hefty price as its suspension barred Team Philippines from seeing action in the cage competition of the 2005 Manila Southeast Asian Games.

“They are saying that it’s a new NSA (national sports association) but what they are doing is just like what the old NSA did before,” Narvasa said, questioning whether the hiring of Toroman received the full support of the SBP board of trustees.

After inking Toroman to a three-year pact, Eala said his primary responsibility is to chart a long-term basketball program aimed at qualifying in the 2012 London Olympics. He is also expected to improve the basketball technology among Filipino coaches.

But SBP insiders claimed that Toroman’s designation as project director is a baby step towards his formal appointment as national team head coach, a post which was earlier given by the PBA to Yeng Guiao by virtue of its Memorandum of Agreement with the SBP.

“But what if Yeng turned out to be a tremendous national coach, will he be fired just because they have already signed a Serbian coach?” Narvasa said. “We don’t want to be treated like a second-class citizen in our own country.”

“We’re taking a wait and see attitude until we’ve been clarified where all this is going through,” Chito Narvasa said.

His declaration came a week after the SBP formally signed Toroman, the soft-spoken mentor who steered the Iran men’s basketball team to the championship of the FIBA-Asia Olympic qualifying meet last year, as project director tasked to oversee the program meant for the country’s bid to qualify in the Olympics.


Guaio is a tremendous coach in the PBA because he knows how to plays the team there even with the line-up that he has. He had'nt done this overnight. What can he do if he don't know how to play in the intenational scene. the aspect most filipino coaches don't have. If Narvasa want's BCAP coaches to do the job, recommend a coach that has the resume Toroman has. even eric spolstera(SP) don't have his credentials.

bluefelix90
10-08-2008, 11:31 PM
SHUT UP BCAP!
whats the real intention here??? BCAP will try to sabotage the program of SBP>........ or again will try to milk money from MVP... remember when they filed a case against the coaches of talk and text.... they got money out of it...
they got recognition that they can stop any teams in hiring americans...

so MAY i ask if the bcap sabotage group (narvaza, chua, guiao, gonzalez) have contribute to upgrade the coaching level of filipino coaches....??? except for a once in 5 years or something clinics that they come up when they are not so busy.....

what they want is to get recognition, money and put their favored coaches to handle the national team??

toroman annexing the fiba asia for iran..... can any filipino coach come close to what he has done with iran???

lets give him the chance to revolutionized philippine basketball!

enough of politics mr. narvaza and BCAP (bully coaches association and politician)

D_I_A
10-09-2008, 02:00 AM
Why don't we start a petition against BCAP!!!


Shut Up BCAP!!!

STOP BCAP!!!

sajubeads
10-09-2008, 06:03 AM
NO FOREIGNER TO COACH RP FIVE

BCAP ready to take Toroman to court
By Julius Manicad
http://www.tribune.net.ph/sports/20081008spo1.html


The Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP) will play tough against Serbian coach Rajko Toroman.

And the group would not back down against his possible appointment as national team coach, if ever the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) decides to make him full-time mentor of the RP five rather than keep him as project director, which is his official designation, for now.

Chito Narvasa, BCAP president, issued the warning, saying his group is ready to file a civil case in the event the 53-year-old Serbian mentor is elevated to a coaching position.

Narvasa claimed he is standing on a solid legal ground after winning a legal battle over American coach John Moran, who was hired by the Shell Turbochargers in the 2004 PBA Fiesta Cup but got fired early on after an awful 1-5 start.

“It could be an option, and we’ve done it before (in Moran’s case). If we decide to take on a legal turn, we know we’re standing on a solid legal ground,” Narvasa said during the weekly PSA forum at Shakey’s UN Avenue branch in Manila.

“When he’s already appointed as head coach, that’s the time we’ll make a legal move. Right now, his designation is not yet clear. We even do not know his role to the national team because (SBP executive director) Noli (Eala) did not consult us before they signed Toroman.”

The issue is another blot in the country’s basketball affairs as the SBP has yet to solve its problems with the Basketball Association of the Philippines (BAP), its predecessor which has yet to give up its claim as the legitimate association for the sport although it was kicked out of the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) family a long time ago.

In 2005, the country was given a two-year suspension after the legitimacy tussle between the BAP and the POC-supported Pilipinas Basketball, which later changed its name to SBP.

Although a brand-new basketball body was formed, leading to the extinction of the old BAP, the country still paid a hefty price as its suspension barred Team Philippines from seeing action in the cage competition of the 2005 Manila Southeast Asian Games.

“They are saying that it’s a new NSA (national sports association) but what they are doing is just like what the old NSA did before,” Narvasa said, questioning whether the hiring of Toroman received the full support of the SBP board of trustees.

After inking Toroman to a three-year pact, Eala said his primary responsibility is to chart a long-term basketball program aimed at qualifying in the 2012 London Olympics. He is also expected to improve the basketball technology among Filipino coaches.

But SBP insiders claimed that Toroman’s designation as project director is a baby step towards his formal appointment as national team head coach, a post which was earlier given by the PBA to Yeng Guiao by virtue of its Memorandum of Agreement with the SBP.

“But what if Yeng turned out to be a tremendous national coach, will he be fired just because they have already signed a Serbian coach?” Narvasa said. “We don’t want to be treated like a second-class citizen in our own country.”
“We’re taking a wait and see attitude until we’ve been clarified where all this is going through,” Chito Narvasa said.

His declaration came a week after the SBP formally signed Toroman, the soft-spoken mentor who steered the Iran men’s basketball team to the championship of the FIBA-Asia Olympic qualifying meet last year, as project director tasked to oversee the program meant for the country’s bid to qualify in the Olympics.



Stupid son of a gone.....Narvasa is having interviews left and right but dont read the papers. For your info Mr. President, Yeng Guiao will coach only until 2010 coz he is mandated to Coach the PBA-backed team, after 2010, PBA will not lend its players anymore thus SBP is now forming a team oncePBA is not there anymore. Another thing, Chot said it succinctly, the position of basketball devt director / national coach is a full-ime job, do you think yopu can tie down Yeng Guiao to that position for more than 3 years, how about his gobenatorial plans in Pampanga, how about his Pba coaching career. All top notch Pinoy Coach are already in the PBA or coaching in UAAP and NCAA and i think no one among them will resign from thier present post just to Coach solely for the RP team

iF ever Yeng Guioa will become successful in 2009 and gets to play in WBC, then let him Coach the national team but atleast we have already secured the future of our young players by having Toroman teaching them the basics and the international brand of play. Besides the court decsion of BCAP regarding foreign coach only applies here in the Phil, meaning he cant Coach here in thre PHil but i guess it wont cover once he Coach the national team in international play. Gulangan na lang ng SBP>

CrossOver
10-09-2008, 07:06 AM
Sa tingin ko wala namang karapatan sa paningin ko tong BCAP para mag assign ng Nat'l coach ng bansa natin bakit meron ba silang ginagawa para mas lalong umunlad ang kalidad ng mga coaches sa atin? Like for example meron ba silang program or skul for basketball coach? Susme wala akong nababalitaang ganyan sa nakikita ko puro kayabangan lang sila at nagbubulagbulagan etong si Toroman ang ganda ng ginawa niya, nagawa niyang ipakilala sa ang Iran sa mundo ng basketball na noon ay nilalampaso lang natin. Tumahimik na kayo BCAP itong ginagawa ng SBP ay sagot lamang sa mga kakulangan niyo.

insulares
10-09-2008, 08:56 AM
Why don't we start a petition against BCAP!!!


Shut Up BCAP!!!

STOP BCAP!!!



For BCAP fans everywhere:

Narvasa may be contacted at tel. Nos. 6872156 to 58 or 6871048 (fax) or via e-mail at info@aynresource.com.ph.

http://www.surfshop.net.ph/pba2/alaska/archives.asp?dt=2%2F3%2F2008&ar=2

korn666333
10-10-2008, 11:36 AM
hayz yan nanaman ang mga tao jan. taas talaga ng mga pride.buti naman if coach si toroman baka kung pinoy coach baka iiwanan na naman yung team at babalik sa mother team yong coach ng national team. mas mabuti naman pag kuha ng coach na coach lang talaga sa national team hindi yong dadalawang team ang hahawakan. luma na mga sistema!

insulares
10-11-2008, 11:35 PM
PHI – Toroman leaves Iran on good terms, pens Philippines deal


MANILA (Olympics/FIBA Championship) – Rajko Toroman guided Iran to their first berth at the Olympics.

Now the Serbian will attempt to do the same with the Philippines after being handed a three-year deal to serve as their national team project director.

The coach leaves former side Iran with the blessings of the country’s basketball federation.

“He is a good friend, good colleague and a good coach and he did a great job in our country,” said Mr. Mahmoud Mashhoun, the president of Iran’s federation, to FIBA.com.

“As his contract expired after the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, it was his right to sign a contract with others and I wish him all the best on his new assignment.”

Toroman’s tenure with Iran had a lot of highs and lows both on and off the court.

He coached Iran to a surprise gold medal at the 2007 FIBA Asia Championship to earn a spot at the Beijing Games but not long after, Aidin Bahrami, one of the team’s best players and the brother of captain Samad, died in a car crash.

Toroman and Iran spoke of their determination to honor Aidin’s memory by showing hard work and determination on the court and they met that aim.

A busy summer saw them compete in warm-up tournaments in Italy and Slovenia, and also with the help of FIBA take an historic trip to the United States to practice and take part in the Rocky Mountain Review, a summer league for NBA teams.

In Nanjing, they took part in the FIBA Diamond Ball and upset Serbia before travelling to Beijing for the Olympics.

The executive director of the governing body for basketball in the Philippines (Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas) Noli Eala said to the country’s newspaper website the Inquirer.net that Toroman’s job will be to put together a program.

"We will study his program and decide what to do after that," Eala said.

Concerns have been expressed in the country’s media over the concern that Toroman, a foreigner, might coach the Philippines.

Eala said: "We are not discounting the possibility of Toroman coaching but all that will come after we see his program. Why don't we give change a chance?”

FIBA

http://www.fiba.com/pages/eng/fc/news/lateNews/arti.asp?newsid=28635

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Toroman not only has the credentials, but his former employer also gave him a great job reference. The guy conducts himself professionally on and off the court and can definitely contribute to the long-term advancement of Philippine basketball if we let him.