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5FootCarrot
04-04-2006, 11:12 AM
Someone (I forget who and Google wasn't helpful) once observed that there was an inverse relationship between the size of the ball used in a sport and the number of good books written about said sport. Hence, there are many good books about golf, quite a few about baseball, a few about basketball and none about beach balls.* ;D

EDITED TO ADD: Here's the quote from writer George Plimpton: "There are superb books about golf, very good books anout baseball, not many good books about football and very few good books about basketball. There are no books about beach balls."

This thread is for discussing the few good books about basketball. If you have any favorites, whether fiction or non-fiction, or want to recommend a good training manuals or something, please share about them here. :)

MonL
04-04-2006, 11:47 AM
Someone (I forget who and Google wasn't helpful) once observed that there was an inverse relationship between the size of the ball used in a sport and the number of good books written about said sport. Hence, there are many good books about golf, quite a few about baseball, a few about basketball and none about beach balls.* ;D

This thread is for discussing the few good books about basketball. If you have any favorites, whether fiction or non-fiction, or want to recommend a good training manuals or something, please share about them here. :)


For several years, "The Complete Handbook Of Pro Basketball" by Zander Hollander was sold at major bookstores. They stopped seling it after 1998. What sets it apart from other NBA books which contained tons of team and individual player statistics, was the subjective and sometimes witty comments on individual player profiles.... take a look at some:

Sam Pellom (Atlanta Hawks)- works as a cameraman in the offseason and may be a full time employee any moment now...
John Stockton - a vapor trail...
Mel Turpin - (Player who ate himself out of the league) - "Dinner-bell Mel"
Larry Bird-(1990 edition) earned 1.8 million and is underpaid.
Bill Laimbeer- Born in Boston, where shrine of him will never be built....
Rick Mahorn- No more calls. we have a winner. Probably the most hated player in the NBA... elbows flying like windmills...
Players with poor shooting percentages:* still can't throw it in the ocean from the edge of the pier........

bchoter
04-04-2006, 11:49 AM
Someone (I forget who and Google wasn't helpful) once observed that there was an inverse relationship between the size of the ball used in a sport and the number of good books written about said sport. Hence, there are many good books about golf, quite a few about baseball, a few about basketball and none about beach balls.* ;D

This thread is for discussing the few good books about basketball. If you have any favorites, whether fiction or non-fiction, or want to recommend a good training manuals or something, please share about them here. :)


For several years, "The Complete Handbook Of Pro Basketball" by Zander Hollander was sold at major bookstores. They stopped seling it after 1998. What sets it apart from other NBA books which contained tons of team and individual player statistics, was the subjective and sometimes witty comments on individual player profiles.... take a look at some:

Sam Pellom (Atlanta Hawks)- works as a cameraman in the offseason and may be a full time employee any moment now...
John Stockton - a vapor trail...
Mel Turpin - (Player who ate himself out of the league) - "Dinner-bell Mel"
Larry Bird-(1990 edition) earned 1.8 million and is underpaid.
Players with poor shooting percentages:* still can't throw it in the ocean from the edge of the pier........


A friend got a copy from a shop that sells second hand bookstore about 2-3 years ago.

MonL
04-04-2006, 11:56 AM
A friend got a copy from a shop that sells second hand bookstore about 2-3 years ago.


My brother and I have been buying this book since 1982. Minsan lang kami sumablay, and we bought Street and Smith's. Full of stats ito pero ang tabang compared to "Complete Handbook..."

Lucas Palaka
04-04-2006, 12:46 PM
there's always the books written by zen master phil jackson. he's written at least four already, and the only one i've read so far is sacred hoops, which is more in the vein of sophie's world in the sense that it's a philosophy book passing off as a basketball tome. headtrip pare, iikot ulo mo :p

phil jackson also wrote a wonderful article for men's journal chronicling his year away from basketball, which he spent criss-crossing australia, new zealand, and tahiti on motorbike alone and with his brothers, one of which was mortally ill. he also identified and explained the factors that brought him back to the lakers despite shaq leaving and kobe staying. in the article, you'd be surprised who convinced him to return to coaching.

Mateen Cleaves
04-04-2006, 02:26 PM
For me, Values of the Game by former Knick and US Senator, Bill Bradley, captures what makes basketball THE game -- for those who've played it. But the beauty of it is that it rings true for anybody who has experienced being part of a team.

I once lent my copy to a volleyball player who had just played her last UAAP game. She wasn't a bookworm but she gladly took it home, and kept it for a week. She returned it with a lot of thanks, and said that she had purchased a copy for herself... and her father. Turns out her father was a former Toyota Comet. He saw what she was reading, took his own turn at it, then tearfully pointed out which anecdotes he had experienced himself. ;D

yungha
04-04-2006, 05:04 PM
i think it was about adam keefe, formerly of the utah jazz, that zander hollander wrote - can't shoot. can't pass. can't dribble. can't rebound. good personal hygiene habits though.

AnthonyServinio
04-04-2006, 11:45 PM
TOTAL BASKETBALL (2003)

. . . over 1,500 pages of complete information on the NBA and other minor and defunct pro leagues leagues plus a ton of feature articles on a wide array of topics ranging from superstar player profiles to free agency to women's basketball.* Special sections on the Olympics, FIBA Worlds and NCAA Division I, II and III.* Half of the book is a very comprehensive registry of one-time and current NBA, ABA, NBL and BAA players from A to Z.

. . . the cool thing is I found this book lying at the Book Sale in Robinson's-Cagayan de Oro a week ago for only PHP510.00 as compared to the cover price of US$49.95.

. . . I don't think I will buy another basketball-related book to add to my bookshelf very soon.

. . . ok now I hope the airline is lenient and won't charge me for excess baggage!

freak
04-05-2006, 01:44 AM
there's always the books written by zen master phil jackson. he's written at least four already, and the only one i've read so far is sacred hoops, which is more in the vein of sophie's world in the sense that it's a philosophy book passing off as a basketball tome. headtrip pare, iikot ulo mo :p

phil jackson also wrote a wonderful article for men's journal chronicling his year away from basketball, which he spent criss-crossing australia, new zealand, and tahiti on motorbike alone and with his brothers, one of which was mortally ill. he also identified and explained the factors that brought him back to the lakers despite shaq leaving and kobe staying. in the article, you'd be surprised who convinced him to return to coaching.


read his book The Last Season.. it chronicles the Lakers last season with Shaq and the team's journey through the season.. maybe the article you're referring to was lifted from the book.. ;)

try reading the book man, it's always very interesting to know what really happens off the court.. and how influential Kobe is in the Lakers organization. ;)

also, I also own Dennis Rodman's Bad as I Wanna Be, telling the story behind the Worm's journey from the champion Pistons team, the tumultous seasons with the Spurs and his entry to the Bulls team.

I also read other carreer-based books by other players everytime my sched and Powerbooks/National or other bookstores permits. ;D ;D ;D

easter
04-05-2006, 09:17 AM
So far, I was only able to read one basketball book and what a read it was, the book "Breaks of the Game" by David Halberstam.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0394513096/102-8821251-0096904?v=glance&n=283155

This book follows the exploits of the 1979 Portland Trailblazers, about two years removed from the championship season. With Bill Walton gone, this team has become a lottery squad. A man very familiar to Filipinos almost saved the season for the Blazers...Billy Ray Bates!

This book is interesting since it gives us glimpses on the inital impression on Bird and Magic and how Isaiah Thomas was recruited by Bobby Knight.

If you can still find it here at National Bookstore, buy it. Halberstam is a great writer! 8)

paralusi
04-05-2006, 11:18 AM
fab five: basketball, trash talk and the american dream, by mitch albom.

still, the best recruiting class in the history of ncaa ball. and they made it fun.

5FootCarrot
04-07-2006, 08:14 AM
easter, I've read David Halberstam's Summer of '49, about the 1949 pennant race between the Yankees and Red Sox. You're right, Halberstam is a good writer! :)

I've also read only one basketball book in my life, a loaner from salsa caballero. In his book The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball, John Feinstein follows one season in the Patriot League (http://patriotleague.cstv.com/), a league that emphasizes academic excellence alongside athletic achievement.

I don't follow NCAA hoops, so I'm not certain how the PL compares to other schools or NCAA leagues, but the impression that I got was that the PL was of a lower-profile and, because of its emphasis on academics, probably at a disadvantage, recruiting-wise. Nevertheless, the PL member-schools take pride in their athletes, who are shown in the book to be hard workers both on the court and in the classroom. You can't help but admire them for being intelligent, well-rounded young men who give it their all not really because they want a shot at the NBA (at the end of the book, one of the senior players was preparing for a career in business), but because they love the game.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316278424/104-8893161-7363933?v=glance&n=283155

MonL
04-07-2006, 08:22 AM
easter, I've read David Halberstam's Summer of '49, about the 1949 pennant race between the Yankees and Red Sox. You're right, Halberstam is a good writer! :)

I've also read only one basketball book in my life, a loaner from salsa caballero. In his book The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball, John Feinstein follows one season in the Patriot League (http://patriotleague.cstv.com/), a league that emphasizes academic excellence alongside athletic achievement.

I don't follow NCAA hoops, so I'm not certain how the PL compares to other schools or NCAA leagues, but the impression that I got was that the PL was of a lower-profile and, because of its emphasis on academics, probably at a disadvantage, recruiting-wise. Nevertheless, the PL member-schools take pride in their athletes, who are shown in the book to be hard workers both on the court and in the classroom. You can't help but admire them for being intelligent, well-rounded young men who give it their all not really because they want a shot at the NBA (at the end of the book, one of the senior players was preparing for a career in business), but because they love the game.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316278424/104-8893161-7363933?v=glance&n=283155


One product of the Patriot League playing in the NBA is Golden State's Adonal Foyle. Coming out of College, he had numbers similar to Tim Duncan's: double digit points and rebound numbers, about 20 and 10, and six to seven blocks per game... However, the disparity in quality of players produced by their leagues became apparent when both came out to the pros...

AnthonyServinio
04-07-2006, 11:04 AM
Watch out for the book I have wanted to start writing for the longest time . . . "Blitz: Five Seasons of the MBA"

razor
04-07-2006, 12:25 PM
For Laker Fans, Ron Lazenby's books on the team and on Kobe Bryant (NBA Education of KB) are very insightfull. Available at Power Books from time to time (if not, you can place an order). He alo wrote "Mind Games" regarding Phil Jax

One book I'm itching to buy details the NCAA rivalry of Duke and NC - its also available at PB last time I was there.

5FootCarrot
04-07-2006, 01:07 PM
MonL, that's right, Adonal Foyle is a proud graduate of Colgate University. He left college early to play in the NBA, but continued working on his degree even as a pro athlete. He graduated magna cum laude in 1999 with a BA degree in History.

http://www.adonalfoyle.com/BIO_college.shtml

MonL
04-07-2006, 01:23 PM
MonL, that's right, Adonal Foyle is a proud graduate of Colgate University. He left college early to play in the NBA, but continued working on his degree even as a pro athlete. He graduated magna cum laude in 1999 with a BA degree in History.

http://www.adonalfoyle.com/BIO_college.shtml


Carrot, that's pushing it to another level..a Scholar-athlete.....

bigfreeze_bibby
04-07-2006, 02:25 PM
One book I'm itching to buy details the NCAA rivalry of Duke and NC - its also available at PB last time I was there.


Eto din ang gusto kong bilhin. The title of this is blue blood ata if I'm not mistaken. Nag sale dati powerbooks and I wanted to buy it pero nagdalawang isip pa ko. Ayan, nawala na tuloy at naubos siya pagbalik ko sa powerbooks.

LION
04-07-2006, 02:38 PM
^ Try Fully Booked at Rockwell. They have a very good list but so far I have not seen any with a "Blue Blood" title. I go there Monday - Friday. If I see that book I will post it here.

MonL
04-07-2006, 03:54 PM
MonL, that's right, Adonal Foyle is a proud graduate of Colgate University. He left college early to play in the NBA, but continued working on his degree even as a pro athlete. He graduated magna cum laude in 1999 with a BA degree in History.

http://www.adonalfoyle.com/BIO_college.shtml


If my memory serves me right, he's not even born in the continental United States, but originated from the Grenadines, an Island territory like Duncan's Virgin Islands.... He was listed in college as 6-10, 260 or so pounds, but he was more closer to 6-8 when remeasured, and that probably took a toll on his pro game.... he's got bigger and more talented guys to block and battle now. But he has parlayed his skills to a multiyear contract with the Warriors, and he's set up for life.....

Mateen Cleaves
04-07-2006, 04:23 PM
One product of the Patriot League playing in the NBA is Golden State's Adonal Foyle. Coming out of College, he had numbers similar to Tim Duncan's: double digit points and rebound numbers, about 20 and 10, and six to seven blocks per game... However, the disparity in quality of players produced by their leagues became apparent when both came out to the pros...


Speaking of Patriot League alums, David Robinson of the US Naval Academy wasn't too bad himself. ;)

paralusi
04-07-2006, 04:56 PM
Eto din ang gusto kong bilhin. The title of this is blue blood ata if I'm not mistaken. Nag sale dati powerbooks and I wanted to buy it pero nagdalawang isip pa ko. Ayan, nawala na tuloy at naubos siya pagbalik ko sa powerbooks.


there's another book which deals with the rivalry, only with a much longer - but better - title.

To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever : A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry

MonL
04-07-2006, 06:07 PM
One product of the Patriot League playing in the NBA is Golden State's Adonal Foyle. Coming out of College, he had numbers similar to Tim Duncan's: double digit points and rebound numbers, about 20 and 10, and six to seven blocks per game... However, the disparity in quality of players produced by their leagues became apparent when both came out to the pros...


Speaking of Patriot League alums, David Robinson of the US Naval Academy wasn't too bad himself.* ;)


What an oversight. THAT I didn't know. :o Thanks, Mateen. ;D Yes, I know he was from Canoe U, but not that they played in the Patriot League. Didnt Navy play in postseason National tournaments? All that I know that after graduating as Midshipman he spent two years in the service before turning pro, preceding Shawn Bradley's and his missionary stint. But unlike him, Shawn's hiatus probably stunted his development as a pro...

pio_valenz
04-07-2006, 09:57 PM
My favorite basketball books:

Playing for Keeps - by David Halberstam. Biography of Michael Jordan. Halberstam is sometimes too generous in his praise for Jordan, but the writing is excellent. Then again, Halberstam is a Pulitzer winner, so the writing should be good.

The Jordan Rules - by Sam Smith. First negative book written about Jordan. Caused a stir in NBA circles which forced Smith to stay away from several Bulls games.

Drive - by Larry Bird. Although this book covers only up to the end of the 1987-88 season, Larry Legend displays a wry sense of humor.

My favorite non-basketball (but still sports) books:

The Life of Reilly - A compilation of the best columns written by SI's Rick Reilly, voted the best American sports columnist for six straight years. I practically idolize this guy.

Sports Illustrated: 50 years of Great Writing - various authors. A celebration of SI's best articles from 1954-2004. Now, this is what I call really great writing. There are articles by SI legends Frank DeFord, Alexander Wolff, Rick Reilly, and many others. Plus some articles by contributors including the great John Steinbeck. A great, great read.

MonL
04-10-2006, 12:51 PM
In a related topic, sometimes amusing material comes from unusual or irregular places. GQ Magazine, in one instance, published in the late 90s a feature article made by then New Jersey Nets power forward Jason Williams, entitled "The Basketball Diaries" which was his account of one season in the NBA where he led the league in rebounding. About a quarter of the article was laced with the usual F-word and other profane remarks, and the article delved on his one big season when he blossomed as a player, his relationship with his coach, the Nets organization, and his fellow players. He was not particularly fond of John Calipari, then Nets coach, and a lot of the article delved on his wanting to kick Calipari's @ss or put a foot in his mouth;* and he has some stories/remarks on some players, for instance:

Chris Morris: Saw teammate Rick Carlisle playing a piano in a hotel lobby, and asked him to "Play some Picasso."

Dominique Wilkins: Saw himself playing in a Hawks game on TV and said, seriously: "Hey, is this game live?!?"

Marques Johnson(?) He was filling out an application form and left out the year on "birth date."* When asked what year, he said "every year."

Shawn Bradley* Now Shawn was from Brigham Young U, and a devout Mormon. When he found out to his dismay that he was traded, he became a regular guy, mouthing off profanities and uttering the Lord's name in vain, and shocking even the vulgar Williams....

Michael Jordan and Vernon Maxwell The two toughest players Williams would want "on the trenches" with him in battle because they give their all, as Jordan is a man of the world and knows how the game is played, and Vernon simply doesn't give a damn....

Charles BarkleyCharles used to be a notorious night lifer. When Williams asked him if he ever slept, Barkley said "I'll sleep when I'm dead, Jay."

Yinka Dare: Saw Christian Laettner's jersey having a "C" written on it and asked if that meant "Caucasian?" instead of "Captain"...* Because they were losing, Williams said he could not afford to be seen laughing, and just covered his head with a towel....

Benoit Benjamin: Butting in on the conversation with Yinka(see above), this guy Wiliams said was another "rocket scientist" said "Woo-hoo, that Yinka can be so silly. Everyone knows that 'caucasian' begins with a "K."

Paul of Bataan
04-10-2006, 01:25 PM
hahahahaha, play some picasso :D

LION
04-10-2006, 02:34 PM
One book I'm itching to buy details the NCAA rivalry of Duke and NC - its also available at PB last time I was there.


Eto din ang gusto kong bilhin. The title of this is blue blood ata if I'm not mistaken. Nag sale dati powerbooks and I wanted to buy it pero nagdalawang isip pa ko. Ayan, nawala na tuloy at naubos siya pagbalik ko sa powerbooks.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

^ As promised, the title of the book is not "blue blood". It is "True Blue", a tribute to Mike Krzyzewski's career at Duke. It sells for P1,248.00 hard bound. One copy left at Fully Booked - Rockwell.

Because of the book's title, I am not sure if you are still interested to buy this book.

salsa caballero
04-11-2006, 05:45 PM
easter, I've read David Halberstam's Summer of '49, about the 1949 pennant race between the Yankees and Red Sox. You're right, Halberstam is a good writer! :)

I've also read only one basketball book in my life, a loaner from salsa caballero. In his book The Last Amateurs: Playing for Glory and Honor in Division I College Basketball, John Feinstein follows one season in the Patriot League (http://patriotleague.cstv.com/), a league that emphasizes academic excellence alongside athletic achievement.

I don't follow NCAA hoops, so I'm not certain how the PL compares to other schools or NCAA leagues, but the impression that I got was that the PL was of a lower-profile and, because of its emphasis on academics, probably at a disadvantage, recruiting-wise. Nevertheless, the PL member-schools take pride in their athletes, who are shown in the book to be hard workers both on the court and in the classroom. You can't help but admire them for being intelligent, well-rounded young men who give it their all not really because they want a shot at the NBA (at the end of the book, one of the senior players was preparing for a career in business), but because they love the game.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316278424/104-8893161-7363933?v=glance&n=283155


Hi Carrot,

My favorite player from that book was Spitler from Holy Cross. That kid was a fighter, wasn't he? Reminded me a lot of our own Eman Nazareno, actually.

pio_valenz
04-11-2006, 08:20 PM
^I saw a copy of this book in Fully Booked several months ago. I borwsed through it a bit and it did look like a good read. John Feinstein is a pretty good writer and a well-respected authority on NCAA hoops. I read one of his otehr books, A March To Madness, which chronicled the goings-on in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) during the 1996-97 NCAA season - the last season of Dean Smith as head coach of North Carolina, and the last collegiate season of Tim Duncan at Wake Forest.

5FootCarrot
04-12-2006, 07:50 AM
Hi Carrot,

My favorite player from that book was Spitler from Holy Cross. That kid was a fighter, wasn't he? Reminded me a lot of our own Eman Nazareno, actually.
Hey, Salsa :) Thanks for reminding me of Spitler. I had forgotten his name, but remember much about his heart. You're right; he and Emman certainly have a lot in common in that department!

EDITED TO ADD: Correction, I've read more than one basketball book in my life - I also own a copy of Ruey de Vera's It's Our Time, the book about the Ateneo 2002 championship ;D I can't believe that slipped my mind.

salsa caballero
04-12-2006, 10:25 AM
By the way, would you know who has my book? Do you remember who got it from you? Thanks!

5FootCarrot
04-12-2006, 10:47 AM
:o You still don't have it?

Well, I know that after I read it, Mother Goose borrowed it, and while she had it, JC and Macky wanted to have a look, too. I lost track of things after that. You might want to check with MG :)

freak
04-14-2006, 04:02 AM
EDITED TO ADD: Correction, I've read more than one basketball book in my life - I also own a copy of Ruey de Vera's It's Our Time, the book about the Ateneo 2002 championship ;D I can't believe that slipped my mind.


Didn't know there was a book about the '02 championship.. where was this book sold? or is it still being sold? ???
I reckon meron pa sa A-shop?

5FootCarrot
04-14-2006, 07:39 AM
freak, I think I got my copy thru the A-Shop (I only asked someone to buy it for me and then paid her back), and if I'm not mistaken I might have seen the book also in PowerBooks. However, this was way back in early 2003 so I don't know if It's Our Time is still available. :-\

salsa caballero
04-14-2006, 05:44 PM
Copy that, thanks a lot! :)

MonL
04-17-2006, 07:35 AM
I bought me a bargain for historical junkies like me several years back, and it served me well this Holy Week in the province, where there was nothing to do since Thursday . It’s a 590-page book entitled “The Biographical History of Basketball” by Peter C. Bjarkman. I got the book for P500 at a Powerbooks sale, and the cover price of this book was US$25. It has more than 500 narrative portraits of the game’s past and present on-and off-court personalities. Its timeline covered the game’s first half century, significant events in college and pro ball, the modern game, as well the men and women who made an impact on the game, be it statistical achievements and introduction of innovative styles that forever changed the game. I am fascinated by stories about the likes of Joe Fulks’ introduction of the jump shot, the first dominant big men such as George Mikan and Bob Kurland, Bill Russell’s dominance by means of defense, prodigious scorers like Chamberlain, Jabbar, Maravich, West, and The Big O, the introduction of hang time by Baylor, Erving and Jordan, even Manute Bol’s contribution to the sport, and, delving into the dark side, the Connie Hawkins case, and the Kentucky Wildcats’ game fixing scandals in 1949-51, which caused the banning for life of several players who already strutted their wares in the fledgling NBA. Of course, it touched upon the 50 greatest players and a case for debate on who is THE greatest ever, using statistics and "style points," some of the basis for which the vote edge goes to Jordan for now.

freak
05-16-2006, 10:03 PM
freak, I think I got my copy thru the A-Shop (I only asked someone to buy it for me and then paid her back), and if I'm not mistaken I might have seen the book also in PowerBooks. However, this was way back in early 2003 so I don't know if It's Our Time is still available. :-\


Hello folks!

I've been searching for this book since Carrot mentioned it in the forums but still have not gotten any luck. Anybody who has info on how to get a copy? I already tried looking at most books stores, but it seems they don't have any copies left or they didn't even had a copy ???.. any info will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

kryptonite
05-16-2006, 11:36 PM
freak, I think I got my copy thru the A-Shop (I only asked someone to buy it for me and then paid her back), and if I'm not mistaken I might have seen the book also in PowerBooks. However, this was way back in early 2003 so I don't know if It's Our Time is still available. :-\


I think I saw a copy of that book at National Bookstore superbranch in Cubao. I don't know if its still there.

freak
05-17-2006, 10:03 PM
freak, I think I got my copy thru the A-Shop (I only asked someone to buy it for me and then paid her back), and if I'm not mistaken I might have seen the book also in PowerBooks. However, this was way back in early 2003 so I don't know if It's Our Time is still available. :-\


I think I saw a copy of that book at National Bookstore superbranch in Cubao. I don't know if its still there.


Talaga? I'll just check it with them again.. btw, in what specific section did you see it? thanks for the info dude! ;)

kryptonite
05-17-2006, 10:33 PM
freak, I think I got my copy thru the A-Shop (I only asked someone to buy it for me and then paid her back), and if I'm not mistaken I might have seen the book also in PowerBooks. However, this was way back in early 2003 so I don't know if It's Our Time is still available. :-\


I think I saw a copy of that book at National Bookstore superbranch in Cubao. I don't know if its still there.


Talaga? I'll just check it with them again.. btw, in what specific section did you see it? thanks for the info dude! ;)


Nasa 2nd floor dati, sa magazine section. Kaso ni-renovate yung building kaya di ko na alam san nakalagay. Kung gusto mo, tawagan mo muna sa phone. Para di ka na rin mapagod.

freak
05-18-2006, 10:11 PM
Maraming salamat dude.. I'll try to contact NationalBookstore Cubao. Thanks ulit! ;)

Ghostrider
05-19-2006, 10:36 AM
Salsa,

I commiserate with you.* I'm very particular when it comes with my books (that's why I don't usually lend them).

Regarding the Zander Hollander books, I used to collect them too but they sort of disappeared in 1997 leading me to buy the Sporting News and Street & Smith's versions.

My favorite description:* Benoit Benjamin - "Can't walk and chew bubble gum at the same time".* Funny anecdotes on unknowns like Stuart Gray, Greg Dreiling, Greg Kite.* I found out that Wayman Tisdale was a great jazz musician through Zander's books.

Haven't collected any basketball books lately so I only have "Larry Legend" and Drive", "Management by Auerbach", "Bad as I want to Be" "The Jordan Rules" and various NBA registers.* I recently bought "Il Basketball D'Italia" and its an interesting read on the Italian League (during the time of Toni Kukoc, Dino Meneghin, Daryl Dawkins and Michael Ray Richardson).

I'm planning on buying Barkley's book - "Who's afraid of a large Black Man".* I like his no-holds barred style and his humourous manner of delivering all sorts of commentaries, be it social or political.* Its a little bit pricey but I believe ultimately worth the price.

On another topic, recently watched "Hoop Dreams" that's really a documentary where they followed William Gates and Arthur Agee from age 14 until they reached college.* This is were one sees the underbelly of high school recruiting, warts and all.* A must see for all hoops junkies.

Links to the books:

Drive: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553287583/sr=1-3/qid=1152777708/ref=pd_bbs_3/104-0092788-9503141?ie=UTF8&s=books

Jordan Rules: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671796666/ref=pd_sim_b_5/104-0092788-9503141?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155

canmaker
05-19-2006, 05:57 PM
Ghost,

Tisdale in fact has a jazz album. I think he plays bass guitar ...


---------



Salsa,

I commiserate with you.* I'm very particular when it comes with my books (that's why I don't usually lend them).

Regarding the Zander Hollander books, I used to collect them too but they sort of disappeared in 1997 leading me to buy the Sporting News and Street & Smith's versions.

My favorite description:* Benoit Benjamin - "Can't walk and chew bubble gum at the same time".* Funny anecdotes on unknowns like Stuart Gray, Greg Dreiling, Greg Kite.* I found out that Wayman Tisdale was a great jazz musician through Zander's books.

Haven't collected any basketball books lately so I only have "Larry Legend" and "Drive", "Management by Auerbach", "Bad as I want to Be" "The Jordan Rules" and various NBA registers.* I recently bought "Il Basketball D'Italia" and its an interesting read on the Italian League (during the time of Toni Kukoc, Dino Meneghin, Daryl Dawkins and Michael Ray Richardson).

I'm planning on buying Barkley's book - "Who's afraid of a large Black Man".* I like his no-holds barred style and his humourous manner of delivering all sorts of commentaries, be it social or political.* Its a little bit pricey but I believe ultimately worth the price.

On another topic, recently watched "Hoop Dreams" that's really a documentary where they followed William Gates and Arthur Agee from age 14 until they reached college.* This is were one sees the underbelly of high school recruiting, warts and all.* A must see for all hoops junkies.

Jaco D
05-20-2006, 04:50 AM
Delata-man,

Tisdale has done seven or eight albums since he hung-up his sneakers in 97/98.* Saw him live once.* Very entertaining guy, in more ways than one.* Ang laking kumag, and his five-string bass looks like a ukelele in his hands!* Seems like his 12 or so years as a (basketball) player have served him well since he moves a lot on stage and can play long sets and solos without huffing and puffing.* The nice thing is the big fella is a respected name in contemporary jazz circles.

Not bad for a number two draft pick and former olympian (tama ba?).

I have Barkley's "I May Be Wrong But I Doubt It" and have only read a few random sections (oras lang talaga).* The guy is smart.* If you think Sir Charles is opinionated regarding sports, you should read his ideas on politics, racial equality and the like.* His thoughts are as radical as his golf swing.

kryptonite
05-20-2006, 06:30 AM
D

Not bad for a number two draft pick and former olympian (tama ba?).




Wayman Tisdale was the 2nd overall pick in 1985 behind Patrick Ewing. He won the gold medal during the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics together with Michael Jordan, Chris Mullin, Patrick Ewing, Alvin Robertson and Sam Perkins among others.

Another nice book is Runnin' Rebel: Shark Tales of "Extra Benefits", Frank Sinatra and Winning It All. It focuses on the time of Jerry Tarkanian of the UNLV Runnin' Rebels, how the NCAA targeted him on NCAA violations. Great reading!

kryptonite
05-20-2006, 06:36 AM
Haven't collected any basketball books lately so I only have "Larry Legend" and "Drive", "Management by Auerbach", "Bad as I want to Be" "The Jordan Rules" and various NBA registers. I recently bought "Il Basketball D'Italia" and its an interesting read on the Italian League (during the time of Toni Kukoc, Dino Meneghin, Daryl Dawkins and Michael Ray Richardson).




Where did you buy "Il Basketball D'Italia" ? There are a few books focusing on European basketball, especially the EUROLEAGUE.

AnthonyServinio
05-21-2006, 11:25 AM
Haven't collected any basketball books lately so I only have "Larry Legend" and "Drive", "Management by Auerbach", "Bad as I want to Be" "The Jordan Rules" and various NBA registers.* I recently bought "Il Basketball D'Italia" and its an interesting read on the Italian League (during the time of Toni Kukoc, Dino Meneghin, Daryl Dawkins and Michael Ray Richardson).




Where did you buy "Il Basketball D'Italia" ?* There are a few books focusing on European basketball, especially the EUROLEAGUE.
I once contributed to the "Jump and Julius Basketball Register". It's a series of books published in Italy with profiles on top local players and imports in Europe and all over the world (including the Philippines).

Ghostrider
05-22-2006, 10:38 AM
I picked up "Il Basketball Italia" in a rummage sale.* Interesting read.* The author packed up his bags and spent an entire season in Italy to do a feature on the Italian League following such teams as Knorr Bologna, Il Massegero, Virtus.

He spent alot of time with Coach Mike D'Antoni (now of the Phoenix Suns) and chronicled the life of imports in Italy.

My favorite part was an interview done with Oscar Schmidt.* When asked politely about his tendency to hog the ball, Oscar non-chalantly answered, "Some people are born to play the piano, others are born to move the paino."* :P



Editorial Reviews:

From Publishers Weekly
Ostensibly about basketball in Italy, this book is really about Patton, a sportswriter for Willamette Week in Oregon. He spent the 1992-1993 Fall season in Italy, where a number of American basketball players have put in one or more years with the Italian League-and where the sport takes a distant second to soccer in the hearts of fans. He found the Americans settled there not quite good enough to play consistently in the NBA, too old for the pace of the game here or ousted from home courts for their drug habits. But, though he realized the level of play was not up to that in the States, Patton learned to love Italy, the Italians and even their attitude to the game-namely that basketball need not be a religion, or even a profession, but merely a good way to while away a couple of hours. As a sports book, this is inconsequential; but as a valentine to Italy, it's winning. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Patton, a former newspaper sports columnist and basketball enthusiast, wanted to enhance his life. He did so by getting sponsorship to journey to Italy to cover basketball with a particular emphasis on Americans who have joined Italian teams. This entertaining book combines extensive interviews, sports trivia, player profiles, and game commentaries with autobiographical travel coverage. Residing outside the popular resort of Rimini, Patton also traveled to many cities following various teams. He presents material from the perspective of a casual fan and that of a player confidante. Through his contacts, Patton offers readers a candid, behind-the-scenes glimpse of the people, finances, and workings of Italy's basketball teams and American involvement. In addition to covering the sports, Patton captures the overall spirit of the country and its people. For general collections.

5FootCarrot
05-22-2006, 10:46 AM
My favorite part was an interview done with Oscar Schmidt.* When asked politely about his tendency to hog the ball, Oscar non-chalantly answered, "Some people are born to play the piano, other are born to move the paino."* :P
Hahaha! I've heard this one! :D

And "Knorr Bologna" sounds like a delicious name for a basketball team.

AnthonyServinio
05-22-2006, 04:36 PM
My favorite part was an interview done with Oscar Schmidt.* When asked politely about his tendency to hog the ball, Oscar non-chalantly answered, "Some people are born to play the piano, other are born to move the paino."* :P
Hahaha! I've heard this one! :D

And "Knorr Bologna" sounds like a delicious name for a basketball team.
The naming system of teams in the Italian League follows the format of SPONSOR + CITY

Hence we have teams like . . .

Knorr Bologna (later changed their sponsor to Buckler, a beer hence Buckler Bologna)
Benneton Treviso
Philips Milan

and many others

5FootCarrot
05-22-2006, 04:57 PM
Masarap din ang combo ng beer at bologna... ;D

gameface_one
06-23-2006, 07:44 AM
IN HUDDLE :
Caidic launches ‘The Triggerman’


By Beth Celis
Last updated 03:43am (Mla time) 06/17/2006

Published on page A22 of the June 17, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

FOR the first time in his 43 years, Ginebra team manager Allan Caidic celebrated his birthday in a unique way, and in a most unlikely place—a bookstore!

Simultaneous with his birthday bash, Allan launched his autobiographical book, “Allan Caidic, The Triggerman,” at the National Bookstore at the Shangri-La Mall. The invitation was for 6 p.m. of June 15.

Allan said he expected friends and associates—people who had touched his life in a significant way—to be at the launch.

* * *

People were starting to mill outside the bookstore when I arrived just before 6 last Thursday.

I read in a spirits’ book years ago that on a person’s birthday, he is given a fresh ration of energy or life force that would last him the entire year until his next birthday.

A person must use this energy wisely and even try to generate more through various means, otherwise, he is likely to go “low batt” way before his next ration.

The book said the reason why a person is usually susceptible to accidents, illnesses and other negative occurrences just before his birthday is because he has used up his life force for the year.

* * *

In Allan’s case, he looked like he just got his fresh ration last Thursday night. He was in such high spirits you could practically feel the electricity oozing from him. Allan shook every well-wisher’s hand with vigor and “beso-besoed” the lady-guests with glee.

Allan’s guests represented different generations in Philippine basketball. The “blast from the past” cast included his University of the East mentor Virgilio “Baby” Dalupan, who was reunited with him in the PBA’s defunct Presto team, and his Warrior teammates Jerry Codiñera and George Ella.

Red Bull assistant coach Roehl Nadurata, another former coach, was there to join the festivities. From afar, I thought that the silver-haired gentleman chatting with Roehl and Baby D was newly appointed UAAP commissioner Elmer Yanga. On closer scrutiny, I was surprised to see that it was former Presto team manager Ignacio Gotao, who was also the team’s representative to the PBA board.

The real Elmer Yanga walked in much later.

I didn’t make a head count, but I believe the Ginebra Kings, led by coach Siot Tanquingcen who was accompanied by his wife, came in full force. Also gracing the affair were San Miguel Corp.’s Henry Cojuangco, Robert Non and Jun Cabalan, Allan’s fellow team managers, old chums Samboy Lim and Hector Calma, and PBA coaches Jong Uichico and Binky Favis.

The affair was truly star-studded, the small venue filled.

The party was still in full swing when my pal Rhea Navarro and I decided to take a French leave, with the intention of returning.

* * *

Bumping into Siot and his wife on their way to one of the pizza restaurants, I couldn’t help but inquire about his heavily bandaged arm, which I didn’t notice in the past, probably because it was flesh-colored.

“What happened?” I asked.

“Katangahan (stupidity),” was Siot’s short explanation.

I told him he was lucky his bones didn’t get crushed.

“But they did,” he said, making me more curious as to the cause of the injury.

“I’ll bet you smashed the brick wall with your bare hands after the Kings lost,” I joked.

Siot just laughed. I guessed right.

* * *

The morning after, I texted Allan for some post-celebration notes.

He said it was his happiest and most memorable birthday ever and he had a long list of people and entities to thank for this. He mentioned San Miguel Corp., Ginebra, Accel, Tamayo’s Catering, Kolins TV, Atlas Publication and National Bookstore. He also thanked kumpare Reli de Leon, and writers Tito Talao, Dulce de la Cruz, and last but not least, yours truly.

bigfreeze_bibby
06-29-2006, 07:46 AM
One book I'm itching to buy details the NCAA rivalry of Duke and NC - its also available at PB last time I was there.


Eto din ang gusto kong bilhin. The title of this is blue blood ata if I'm not mistaken. Nag sale dati powerbooks and I wanted to buy it pero nagdalawang isip pa ko. Ayan, nawala na tuloy at naubos siya pagbalik ko sa powerbooks.

------------------------------------------------------------------------*

^ As promised, the title of the book is not "blue blood".* It is "True Blue",* a tribute to Mike Krzyzewski's career at Duke. It sells for P1,248.00 hard bound. One copy left at Fully Booked - Rockwell.

Because of the book's title, I am not sure if you are still interested to buy this book.


Okay lang yan kahit true red, true yellow, or whatever the color is in the title hehe. Iba naman ang usapan pagdating sa US NCAA basketball eh. I've been following both basketball teams as well.

Ghostrider
07-11-2006, 10:06 AM
Just finished reading "Loose Balls" a book by former New Jersey Nets PF Jayson Williams (the one who shot the limo driver).

It was a very interesting book.* A must read for serious basketfall junkies like myself.* He chronicles the life of a NBA player, how they party, pick up women during the games, college life and gives a no holds barred insights on fellow players and coaches.

He recounts how Charles Shackleford once went after Armen (the "Hammer") Gilliam with a machete, his views on John Calipari and Phil Jackson as coaches, how Hakeem Olajuwon is a nasty person and why Larry Bird is alot better than people think and how Michael Jordan is one mean SOB.

He also gives insights on racism in the NBA and as a child of a multi-racial marriage, he had a unique perspective on things.*

Ominously, he also tells of his childhood pals (mafiosi), how they got someone else to take his SATs, how they picked up his sister's killer after he got out of jail and almost executed him in the nieghborhood park and how he almost killed NY Jets star Wayne Chrebet while in his shooting range.

Happy reading!

pio_valenz
07-11-2006, 03:28 PM
^Ghostrider, where is this book available?

Ghostrider
07-11-2006, 04:18 PM
Pio,

Got the hardbound copy at national bookstore cubao for Php 350.00.* All in all, it was quite a steal!

Here are the reviews:



Here's what you probably know about Jayson Williams: as of 2000, he has been in the NBA for 10 years, played in one all-star game, is one of the league's best rebounders, and has a seven-year, $100 million contract. He also has a reputation as a loudmouth with an attitude problem.
Here's what you probably don't know: he comes from a mixed-race family, lost two of his sisters to AIDS, adopted their children, and became a grandfather at 28, plus he calls his mom and dad a few times every day. Here's another thing you might not know about him: he's funny.

Williams shows off his sense of humor in Loose Balls, an irreverent look at life in the NBA. His style is conversational and snappy, with short vignettes strung together into brief, loosely themed chapters. One chapter, "What's Young & Skinny & Can Do a 580-Degree-Double-Pump-Backward Jam but Doesn't Know How to Shoot a Jump Shot or Set a Back-Side Pick? Meet the Future of the NBA" is all of eight pages long. However, by the end of the book Williams has dished the dirt on dozens of his colleagues--who is the biggest flopper (Rodman, of course), who is the worst trash talker (Gary Payton), and who is the dirtiest player (not John Stockton, but his tight shorts are a problem: "Someone should tell the man the ABA days are over.").

Williams also offers observations on coaches, refs, cheerleaders, and fans across the NBA--as well as events from his childhood, early career, and well-publicized days as a wild man. Williams's candor and charm are apparent throughout the book, as is his love of basketball. Hoops fans will love this book. --M. Stein --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
The $100-million star of the hapless New Jersey Nets, Williams may want to be remembered as "a good man," but this brash collection of anecdotes and rants shows that he can be as cruel as he is kind. For one, Williams is willing to speak his mind so shamelessly he makes Keyshawn Johnson look shy--yet that brazenness may be the book's greatest strength. His insights into talking trash and team dynamics, his often scathing portraits of coaches and players, his look at front-office machinations--all make for scandalous reading. (Of course, Williams may have to wear a throat guard and flak jacket on the court once other players read this book.) The book's thematic structure, showing that Williams has reformed himself from his wild early days, mixes up old, sometimes violent, escapades with recent good works, such as visiting sick children in hospitals.His accounts of the brutal prejudice he and his family encountered in South Carolina will shock many of his fans, while his descriptions of the intensive loyalty he feels toward his college buddies reveal a more appealing side of his character. In the end, readers may not like Williams, but they'll have had fun hearing him run at the mouth. (Mar.)

You can read excerpts from the book here:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0767905695/qid=1152606019/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/104-6863892-1322333?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

Just go to the search inside the book portion ;D

pio_valenz
07-11-2006, 08:01 PM
P350 for a hardbound copy??? Are you serious?? Sana Biyernes na, para pagkakuha ng sweldo, diretso na akong National!

Ghostrider
07-18-2006, 09:53 AM
Just ordered (from Barnes & Noble) and finished reading "The Jump: Sebastian Telfair and the High-Stakes Business of High School Ball" by Ian O'Connor and it is such a sordid tale.

It's quite an eye opener because, to a lesser extent, this is probabaly the state of our own HS hoops right now.* This is the reason why kids as young as 2nd year HS have "managers" and how these managers influence (based on the size of the payout), the kid's choice of school.

I believe that there should either be a higher standard of regulation, but knowing the state of sports politics and some of the school's overzealous boosters, maybe the better role to emulate would be the European formula where kids join club farm teams and are developed by professionals.

Hopefully we find a better way soon, because the current system isn't going to last much longer.

Next book . . . hopefully "Values of the Game" by Senator Bill Bradley.



Editorial Reviews

From Booklist
Anyone who pays attention to pro basketball knows that many of the NBA's best players skipped college and entered the professional ranks directly from high school. Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, and LeBron James, all six feet six inches tall or taller, are the best of the high-school phenoms. As a high-school senior, Sebastian Telfair considered himself that group's equal on the court. At an even six feet, though, he was not their equal in size, and if he were to make the jump directly to the professional ranks, he would become the smallest player to have done so. O'Connor, a columnist for USA Today, meticulously chronicles Telfair's senior year at Brooklyn's Lincoln High. It's not pretty. All variety of people wanted to hitch a ride on Telfair's star, including college coaches, shoe companies, agents, neighbors, and NBA executives. Telfair's Brooklyn neighborhood is riddled with gang shootings and drugs. On one side of his street lurks a life with virtually no hope; on the other, riches and fame beckon. Telfair made the jump. He was picked in the NBA draft by the Portland Trailblazers, with whom he signed a multimillion-dollar contract. This is a story of a harrowing journey without an ending. Telfair emerges as a likable young man whose millions, at this point, guarantee him only that others will continue to take advantage of him. This will be the most discussed book of the NBA season. Wes Lukowsky
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"No journalist in America gets to the heart and soul of sports culture stories like Ian O'Connor." -- Bill Plaschke, Los Angeles Times

“One phenom (Ian O'Connor) writing about another (Sebastian Telfair). You want to know why hoops is no longer about the hoop? Read this book. You want to know how America lost the patent on the very game Americans invented? Read this book. You want to accompany one of America's premier sports columnists on a journey into the dark belly of one of its premier games, as seen through the jaded eyes of one of its premier players? Take this trip.” -Bill Plaschke, Los Angeles Times, ESPN's “Around the Horn”

“Hoop Dreams takes a wild ride on the Coney Island Cyclone as Ian O'Connor dives headfirst into the world of big-time high school basketball and emerges with a searing and beautifully written tale. No sports book digs deeper into its subject. THE JUMP stands tall as the definitive work on the preps-to-pros phenomenon that has dramatically altered the culture of the sport.” -Harvey Araton, The New York Times, coauthor of Money Players: Days and Nights Inside the New NBA

"A must-read for anyone who cares about basketball, about sports, or about young athletes trying to come of age." -- John Feinstein, The Washington Post, author of A Season on the Brink and Let Me Tell You a Story: A Lifetime in the Game

"Anyone looking for evidence of how the culture of sports has changed (for better and for worse) will find it in Ian O'Connor's engrossing account of Sebastian Telfair's young life." -- Bob Costas, NBC Sports, HBO

Sebastian Telfair was a secondary-school basketball phenom whom experts rightly predicted would be the next student to jump from public school to the National Basketball Association, following in the footsteps of NBA superstars such as Kobe Bryant and Le Bron James. Here, USA Today columnist O'Connor chronicles Telfair's senior year at New York City's Lincoln High in 2003–04. O'Connor utilizes a variety of voices to compile this book, having interviewed family members, friends, coaches, agents, and recruiters. Considering that Telfair hails from the Brooklyn projects, an area notorious for drugs and violence, his accomplishments are remarkable. His abilities secured him a $20 million endorsement deal with Adidas; in fact, he was a millionaire before graduating from Lincoln High. A good read that basketball enthusiasts will enjoy.—Larry R. Little, Penticton P.L., B.C.

To read excerpts from the book, click here:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/1594861072/ref=sib_dp_pt/104-0092788-9503141#reader-link

Edited to add: Just visited Fully Booked Promenade. The softbound copy of this book is available for PHP 672.00.

5FootCarrot
08-09-2006, 07:57 AM
Interesting.

I was browsing through PowerBooks last night and found that John Feinstein (author of The Last Amateurs (http://www.gameface.ph/forums/index.php?topic=189.msg3797#msg3797)) has written a basketball mystery book for young adults, called Last Shot. I wasn't able to buy it, though; at any rate, I'm just letting y'all know that it's there 8) I think PB is having a sale, so you might be able to get a good deal off the tag price.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0375831681/104-2722469-9855116?v=glance&n=283155

Mel
08-11-2006, 09:21 AM
Basketball Books na meron ako:

Drive by Larry Bird
The Last Banner (about the 86 Celtics)
On playing and coaching the Game I love (also by Bird)

LION
08-11-2006, 11:21 AM
Now I know. You are a Larry Bird fanatic. Just like me. :)

pio_valenz
08-11-2006, 05:48 PM
Basketball Books na meron ako:

Drive by Larry Bird
The Last Banner (about the 86 Celtics)
On playing and coaching the Game I love (also by Bird)


Did someone say Larry Bird fan? Present! Tatlo na tayo. Mel, where did you purchase The Last Banner and On Playing and Coaching? I already have Drive, but I've been looking for a copy of The Last Banner for several years now. That was the one by Bob Ryan, right?

LION
08-11-2006, 05:52 PM
Buking ang mga edad natin hehehe.

pio_valenz
08-11-2006, 06:10 PM
My older cousins were the ones who told me of Bird's exploits. I never saw him play. :P

jembengzon
08-11-2006, 06:19 PM
My older cousins were the ones who told me of Bird's exploits. I never saw him play.* :P


you missed a lot if you've never seen him play. truly one fo the greats, and played and lived the game the way it should be played and lived.

make that four bird fans :)

pio_valenz
08-11-2006, 06:42 PM
Hehe, joke lang yun, jem. I did see Bird play.

jembengzon
08-11-2006, 07:24 PM
Hehe, joke lang yun, jem. I did see Bird play.


hahaha 1 my bad, pio. you never know how it is with cyber people, diba ? ;) ;D ;D ;D

back to the topic :D

kryptonite
08-12-2006, 01:47 AM
A book on the Biography of Allan Caidic is also a good read. If you're interested about UAAP in the 80s then this is a good source of info. Soft-bound copy only published by Atlas Publishing, the same one which used to publish the Sports Weekly Magazine. I hope they can re-release a better copy.

Ghostrider
08-12-2006, 11:29 AM
Lima na tayong Larry Bird fans, kaya ng unang titles ko ay: "Larry Legend", "Drive", "Bird Watching" plus I had "Bird on Basketball" instructional book.* Marami akong tips nakuha sa libro na yun when I was still playing competitively.

Here's the link to "Bird on Basketball":
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0201142090/ref=sib_dp_pt/104-6426175-5524759#reader-link

Other Celtics books ko naman are : "MBA - Management by Auerbach", "Cousy" and "The Jump - Sebastian Telfair".

Celtics dvds ko are: 5 dvd set: History of the Boston Celtics, Larry Bird special and "Through the Fire - Sebastian Telfair".

"Bird Watching" : http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0446608882/ref=sib_dp_pt/104-6426175-5524759#reader-link


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com
The first sentence of Larry Bird's candid post-player memoir begins blandly enough: "On August 18, 1992, I announced my retirement from the Boston Celtics." It's the one that follows--"It was one of the happiest days of my life"--that sets the tone for the book. Most stars have to be pulled off center stage, but as Bird Watching makes clear, the former Celtic legend who returned home to eventually coach the Indiana Pacers is certainly a rare bird. He's not afraid to ruffle feathers. And he's not afraid to tell his truth.

Perhaps the most striking revelations concern his heart. On top of the back pain that plagued him through much of his career, from time to time Bird experienced the feeling--and disorienting flush--of an irregular heartbeat, which he kept hidden from the Celtics. Even now, in the stress-filled world of coaching, Bird has almost passed out on the bench a couple of times--but he remains a fierce competitor. "I'm not going to be stupid about this heart condition, but I'm not going to live my whole life in fear of this thing either. If it goes, it goes."

Bird Watching spends virtually no time with Bird the player; he's not one for looking back. He's more interested in explaining his evolution and thinking as a coach, examining the current state of the NBA, and picking apart the Pacer's disastrous 1999 playoff loss to the Knicks. He does, however, reminisce about his amazing connection to Magic Johnson, comparing it to the bond between Ali and Frazier. "I knew it was going to be like that forever after I played him in college for the national championship," Bird writes. "I never came up against anyone, other than Magic, who could challenge me mentally. Magic always took me to the limit." From Bird, it's hard to imagine a more heartfelt compliment. --Jeff Silverman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
Fans expecting the literary highlight reel of the NBA legend's championship years with the Boston Celtics may be initially put off by this loosely organized collection of opinions and reminiscences. They should stick with it, however, because ultimately the book is an endearingly honest self-portrait of a humble man who has made the most of his opportunities. Celtic fans will be titillated by the frank reports of just how Larry Legend wound up leaving Boston. Being a give-it-to-me-straight kind of guy, he was disgusted with the disingenuous ways of the Celtic front office, where he briefly worked after his playing days. Bird, now the head coach of the Indiana Pacers, also explains, quite briskly, how his relationship with fellow Celtic Kevin McHale went sour: as their careers wound down, McHale and another teammate went behind Bird's back to reporters with complaints that his play had become selfish. But Bird's refusal to pull punches doesn't hit only his adversaries: he admits that he was lucky that his good friend Rick Robey was traded away from the Celtics, because the good times they had together got in the way of Bird's career. He also writes that not he, but Jerry Sloan of the Utah Jazz should have been named Coach of the Year in 1998. The Hick from French Lick solidifies his reputation as a straight-talker unimpressed with his own legend. (Sept.)


Larry Legend:

:FROM THE PUBLISHER
After conquering the NBA, Larry Bird returned home in 1997 to be the head coach of the Indiana Pacers. Skeptics wondered if he could coach. He could—the Pacers had one of their best seasons ever. Larry Legend examines the life and times of the basketball legend and '97 - '98 rookie coach. It features extensive biographical material and explores the personal and professional lives of a paradoxical man who is one of the great sports heroes of the 20th century. This updated edition includes new information on the 1999 season.

SYNOPSIS
Larry Legend features the fascinating Horatio Alger-like story of Larry Bird—Hall of Fame basketball superstar and NBA Coach of the Year—a man whom Magic Johnson called "the only player I feared and the smartest player I ever played against." Among the topics covered, author Mark Shaw chronicles:

Bird's early childhood and adolescent years in Springs Valley, Indiana
Why he left Indiana University and Coach Bob Knight
Bird's never-to-be-forgotten collegiate days at Indiana State, where he first became a "coach"
How he led the Boston Celtics to three world championships by being what teammates called a "coach on the floor"
Bird's sabbatical from basketball and why he decided to coach the Indiana Pacers
The inside story of how he molded the Pacers into championship contenders using the same work ethic that made him one of the five greatest players in basketball history
Fascinating insights into the "Bird method"
Bird's thoughts about over-coaching in the NBA, pace of play, defensive pressure, leadership, motivation, Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, and many other players

Cousy: http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0743254767/ref=sib_dp_pt/104-6426175-5524759#reader-link

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly
Nicknamed the "Houdini of the Hardwood" by sportswriters during the 1950s, Bob Cousy was basketball's "first genuine superstar," as Providence Journal columnist Reynolds shows in this insightful, well-written biography. Cousy became a Hall of Fame member for originating such NBA staples as the behind-the-back dribble and the no-look pass, but most importantly because his enormous talent made the Boston Celtics the dominant team of the 1960s. Excellent chapters on Cousy's pro career explore his interactions with basketball legends like the gruff Celtics coach Red Auerbach and Bill Russell, the brilliant and enigmatic Celtics center who endured years of racism from many of the same Boston fans who cheered Cousy. Reynolds does a remarkable job illuminating the sport's early days in the 1940s, when three-time All-American Cousy became one of the biggest names in college hoops, and the NBA's first gritty years. But the book's best parts are those in which Reynolds illuminates how Cousy's impoverished 1930s youth in a Manhattan tenement and the constant tension between his parents created in him a drive to succeed that resulted in anxiety attacks, sleepwalking and a "raw, unadulterated, fear" of failure—all of which he hid from the public yet used to motivate himself and to maintain a social consciousness about racism that was unfortunately uncommon for his era.

From Booklist
Bob Cousy was the NBA's first fan-friendly star. George Mikan was leading the Minneapolis Lakers to championships, but he was a bespectacled behemoth with whom few fans could identify. Cousy, on the other hand, was only six feet tall, and he dazzled fans with his ball handling. Reynolds, a columnist for the Providence Journal, gives the NBA's first marketable star the full-dress biography he deserves. Working from material collected in a series of interviews with Cousy, Reynolds traces the star's early life and shows how he became, first, the Celtics' team leader and, later, how he merged his talents with those of Bill Russell to forge a dynasty. Reynolds also explores Cousy's close but not too close relationship with the baseline Celtic coach and general manager Red Auerbach. Cousy collaborated on a couple of earlier biographies, but this is clearly the definitive one. Reynolds brings a serious biographer's sense of balance to the task, as contrasted with a typical sports biographer's sense of hype. This is wonderful reading, both for old-time fans and new ones who wonder if superstars were always like Shaq and Kobe.

Mel
08-14-2006, 10:26 AM
I got the "Last Banner" as a gift...bought from the States..yup Bob Ryan..
very interesting discussion there on why the 86 celtics is the greatest team of all time.

Kareem/Magic fan ako when I was young but as I my understanding of the game broadened,
I became a Larry Bird convert.

He brought wonder back into the game.

Mel
08-14-2006, 10:32 AM
@pio_valenz

On playing and coaching the game I love (Bird Watching) ..nabili ko sa airport sa HK.

mvfciii
08-23-2006, 06:24 AM
switching topic , for those of you historians of the game i highly recommend th e following:

Playing For Keeps (Micheal Jordan and the world he made) - by david halberstam

: this book not only chronicles the development of jordan (most notably the 98 season) but also the development of modern NBA media coverage being the birth of ESPN, the image of the NBA in the US and around the world.

Who's Better, Who's Best In Basketball - by Elliott Kalb

: this book is set right before the 2003-2004 season. elliot kalb who has worked in the NBC boradcast booth for some 20+ years with commentators bob costas and marv albert. what he does here is conjure up his own 50 greatest players but he does so by ranking them. this is highly entertaining in that his argument based on statistics and comparative (hypothetical or otherwise) performance of players.

pio_valenz
04-24-2007, 02:58 PM
One of the best sports authors of all time has passed away.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/more/04/23/halberstam.obit.ap/index.html

I loved reading his Michael Jordan biography, Playing for Keeps. He also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Vietnam.

MargaretThrasher
04-24-2007, 03:08 PM
I was sorry to read that David Halberstam had died, too, although I knew him more for his book on baseball. :'(

flsfnoeraekadad
04-24-2007, 04:09 PM
Phil Jackson's books.

irateluvmachine
08-17-2007, 04:44 PM
TOTAL BASKETBALL (2003)

. . . over 1,500 pages of complete information on the NBA and other minor and defunct pro leagues leagues plus a ton of feature articles on a wide array of topics ranging from superstar player profiles to free agency to women's basketball.* Special sections on the Olympics, FIBA Worlds and NCAA Division I, II and III.* Half of the book is a very comprehensive registry of one-time and current NBA, ABA, NBL and BAA players from A to Z.

. . . the cool thing is I found this book lying at the Book Sale in Robinson's-Cagayan de Oro a week ago for only PHP510.00 as compared to the cover price of US$49.95.

. . . I don't think I will buy another basketball-related book to add to my bookshelf very soon.

. . . ok now I hope the airline is lenient and won't charge me for excess baggage!


sa booksale ko din binili yun...christmas '04, for P1800. damn, if only i had waited a couple more months...

the book is as comprehensive as it gets, much more than the NBA-approved pro basketball encyclopedias, but at times the writers' spelling and dates isn't such a pleasing sight...saka kulang-kulang yung info sa NBA draft. otherwise, it was a very good buy and still a very good read...

irateluvmachine
08-17-2007, 04:51 PM
Salsa,

I commiserate with you.* I'm very particular when it comes with my books (that's why I don't usually lend them).

Regarding the Zander Hollander books, I used to collect them too but they sort of disappeared in 1997 leading me to buy the Sporting News and Street & Smith's versions.

My favorite description:* Benoit Benjamin - "Can't walk and chew bubble gum at the same time".* Funny anecdotes on unknowns like Stuart Gray, Greg Dreiling, Greg Kite.* I found out that Wayman Tisdale was a great jazz musician through Zander's books.

Haven't collected any basketball books lately so I only have "Larry Legend" and Drive", "Management by Auerbach", "Bad as I want to Be" "The Jordan Rules" and various NBA registers.* I recently bought "Il Basketball D'Italia" and its an interesting read on the Italian League (during the time of Toni Kukoc, Dino Meneghin, Daryl Dawkins and Michael Ray Richardson).

I'm planning on buying Barkley's book - "Who's afraid of a large Black Man".* I like his no-holds barred style and his humourous manner of delivering all sorts of commentaries, be it social or political.* Its a little bit pricey but I believe ultimately worth the price.

On another topic, recently watched "Hoop Dreams" that's really a documentary where they followed William Gates and Arthur Agee from age 14 until they reached college.* This is were one sees the underbelly of high school recruiting, warts and all.* A must see for all hoops junkies.

Links to the books:

Drive:* http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553287583/sr=1-3/qid=1152777708/ref=pd_bbs_3/104-0092788-9503141?ie=UTF8&s=books

Jordan Rules: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671796666/ref=pd_sim_b_5/104-0092788-9503141?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155


the complete handbook of pro basketball...panalo yun dati! ;D anyone know where i can find copies of this? malamang sa mga booksale, but the last time i saw one of hollander's "complete handbooks" it was for pro football...bought it anyways cuz the player write-ups can indeed be hilarious...while still being on-the-dot...

i used to borrow the 1987 edition about every other week back when i was in high school...too bad i never got around buying an actual copy when it was still being printed.

Ghostrider
08-17-2007, 08:59 PM
^^

Wala na atang Basketball Handbook. I think good old Zander has retired permanently :-\

MonL
02-05-2008, 10:06 AM
Saw this write up on Kevin Garnett in the book "The Biographical History of Basketball" by Peter Bjarkman, published in the year 2000:

Chapter 7: Biggest Show in Town (1981-1998) (Highlights of the people who made such an impact in that period.)

"If there is a single player who seems to symbolize everything that is potentially wrong with today's NBA, it would have to be Minnesota Timberwolves prize project Kevin Garnett. Garnett held the Minnesota franchise hostage for a mind-boggling contract even though his value lies entirely in future promise* and his three-season league performance has displayed little that has been so far earth-shattereing. While Garnett made a considerable splash in 1995 as the first player in more than 20 years drafted directly out of high school, he grabbed even bolder headlines in 1997 when he surpassed Shaquille O'Neal as owner of the richest contract in professional sports history. The $125 million multiyear deal was shattering, not only because it was paid to a novice player, who in two NBA seasons has not yet averaged 20 points per game and has led his also-ran team only in blocked shots, but even more because it outstripped the more than $37 million that owner Glen Taylor had paid for the entire franchise three years ealier. It also left Garnett in the same league with Michael Jordan, whose reported $36 million was still the top annula salary.* Garnett himself didn't do much to help fans swallow such an extraordinary deal when he first rejected a $105 million package and testily commented to the press "it's not about the loot....I want the sky, and I'm not going to stop until I reach the top." (translation: this is not about money or playing talent, it is only about ego.) An intriguing question for NBA watchers over the next half-dozen seasons will be whether 6'11" Kevin Garnett will be best remembered by future generations for his championship rings (like Russell and Magic), his awesome statistics (like Jordan and Chamberlain) his unrivaled court artistry (like Oscar Robertson or Dr. J) or merely for the fatness of his bank accounts, the chutzpah of his contract demands, and the size of his unchecked ego."



Fast forward to the present:
Looks like Kevin only needs a championship ring to legitimize his greatness. Salaries? Bank accounts? Top baseball players make twice as much. Artistry? He's one of the quickest big men of this generation.* Unchecked Ego? He partially submerged his game to co-exist with Ray Allen and Paul Pierce. He took Glenn "Ticket Stub" Davis under his wing and mentored him. The man wants to win so much, and is probably the most intense player in the NBA, and is loved by the Celtic Nation.*

And Minnesota, with all the players they got in exchange for him remains at the bottom of the pile.* Holding a franchise hostage? He was the franchise.

And the writer of that piece greatly misread him.

LION
02-05-2008, 06:17 PM
Saw this write up on Kevin Garnett in the book "The Biographical History of Basketball" by Peter Bjarkman, published in the year 2000:



Fast forward to the present:
Looks like Kevin only needs a championship ring to legitimize his greatness. Salaries? Bank accounts? Top baseball players make twice as much. Artistry? He's one of the quickest big men of this generation.* Unchecked Ego? He partially submerged his game to co-exist with Ray Allen and Paul Pierce. He took Glenn "Ticket Stub" Davis under his wing and mentored him. The man wants to win so much, and is probably the most intense player in the NBA, and is loved by the Celtic Nation.
And Minnesota, with all the players they got in exchange for him remains at the bottom of the pile.* Holding a franchise hostage? He was the franchise.

And the writer of that piece greatly misread him.





Garnett also works hard during practice (naks, parang andun talaga ako ah!) and sets a good example to the young players. He did not only mentor "Big Baby". He even bought nice Italian suits for Davis and the other young Celtics in Italy during the NBA Euro tour last summer. His willingness to "submerge" his game in order to make his teammates look good speaks highly of the man. This did not go unnoticed and the fans rewarded him with the most number of votes in the all-star balloting.

Even Paul Pierce, the acknowledged leader of the Celtics team, defers to Kevin Garnett and has for all intents and purposes relinquished his throne and handed it over to Kevin.

Teka, saan ba makakabili ng Kevin Garnett jersey No. 5? :)

mighty_lion
02-05-2008, 06:54 PM
^ OT: Sa Adidas outlets meron pero hindi ganun kaganda ang pagkakagawa.

Dapat i-update yong libro para isama si Rashard Lewis. Biggest smile after contract signing in the history of the NBA. ;D ;D ;D

MonL
02-05-2008, 11:16 PM
^ OT: Sa Adidas outlets meron pero hindi ganun kaganda ang pagkakagawa.

Dapat i-update yong libro para isama si Rashard Lewis. Biggest smile after contract signing in the history of the NBA.* ;D ;D ;D


But then he was better known as the saddest player ever to attend an NBA draft as he was the only one among the players present who were invited that was left in the sitting room for draft candidates :P, and he cried a river afterwards. But that gave him the incentive to prove wrong the teams that bypassed him in the first round, particularly Houston which drafted three in the first round who are already out of the league.

john_paul_manahan
02-06-2008, 06:28 AM
well said.

bchoter
02-09-2008, 12:45 PM
^^^ You can easily buy a Pierce or Allen jersey in Boston but KG's 5s are almost always sold out and are cost twice as much

PilipinasFan
10-04-2008, 08:31 AM
Pacific rims
THE GAME OF MY LIFE By Bill Velasco
Saturday, October 4, 2008
Three years after first landing in the Philippines, author Rafe Bartholomew flew back to New York City, overwhelmed and reluctant to leave after imbibing the Philippine basketball scene. He can finally sit down and finish the book, which kept on growing the longer he stayed.

“The more I learned, the harder it got to finish the book. At one point, I thought it would reach a thousand pages,” Bartholomew jokingly told The STAR. “There was a time I was sure I was almost finished, then somebody told me, “What, you haven’t written about Crispa-Toyota?” That added another 20 to 30 pages right there.”

Bartholomew, who gained attention when he wrote about the Ateneo-La Salle rivalry for The New York Times, recalls the aftermath of that article. Not only did it make him recognizable here, but also generated a wave of popularity for him and his family, particularly his father, who runs the oldest bar in New York City.

“At first, the editors weren’t too keen on it,” the Northwestern graduate admitted. “But when it came out, it became the second-most e-mailed story for the paper for that week. People were coming up to my dad at the bar and asking if he had copies of it.”

Bartholomew spent a season following the Alaska Aces, and scrimmaging with many younger players from every league, including most of the Fil-Ams in the PBA. The Alaska experience will be one of the main threads of the book, tentatively titled “Pacific Rims”.

I asked Bartholomew what set Philippine hoops apart. He had two answers.

“Well, what really got my attention was La Salle-Ateneo,” he revealed. “And I had to wait a year to actually experience it because of the DLSU suspension. The sheer passion the people have for the games is unreal. And the level of power in the building. I’ve never seen politicians, big businessmen, even the US Ambassador, watch games and become ordinary rabid fans. The crowd is practically evenly split down the middle. You just don’t get that anywhere in the world.”

The second peculiarity is a little more mundane.
“Probably I’d say the signature move in Philippine basketball is the sidestep,” he laughs, shaking his head. “I’ve just never seen that move done anywhere else. Of course, along with the concept of diskarte, as well. The acrobatic, yoyo lay-up, too. That’s probably the Pinoy version of the dunk, I guess.”

Bartholomew also wrote about past and present PBA imports for US publications, and even reported on the tremendous reception that Washington Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas received here. All the input made it all the more difficult for him to prune the book down.

“The idea is for me and my agent to get some sample chapters out to the publisher as soon as possible,” Bartholomew explained. “Then, once we have a contract, I can get the book out in six months or less. The goal is to have it out before 2010 at the latest.”

But Bartholomew promised he would find “any excuse” to come back out here, and is looking at the possibility of doing a book on basketball personalities in the Philippines, or some similar research. He promised to bring his writing, and his game back to the country that has shown him an unmatched fanaticism for the sport he loves dearly, too.

irishwhip
10-13-2008, 12:21 PM
Best books I think I've read were:

1. Leading by the heart - Coach k
2. Beyond Basketball - Coach k
3. The Carolina Way - Dean Smith

any opinions of any good basketball or coaching basketball books?

Coolmanny
10-28-2008, 04:42 PM
we want to give a UAAP basketball coach a book on coaching, any suggestions?

i don't want to limit it to basketball coaching

this will be our christmas gift to that coach

cameronCrazy
11-17-2008, 12:58 PM
coolmanny, I suggest:

1. Leading with the heart - Coach K....basketball, leadership and life
2. Basketball and Beyond - Coach K.... leadership skills that can be used in basketball and life

pio_valenz
11-19-2008, 02:35 PM
we want to give a UAAP basketball coach a book on coaching, any suggestions?

i don't want to limit it to basketball coaching

this will be our christmas gift to that coach


The Carolina Way by Dean Smith.

Coolmanny
11-23-2008, 05:12 AM
cameron/pio,

thank you very much

manong - hanap na tayo

john_paul_manahan
11-23-2008, 10:22 PM
fully booked has a lot stocked.... :)

amdgc82
10-31-2009, 05:33 PM
James Naismith: The Man Who Invented Basketball
by Rob Rains with Hellen Carpenter
Foreword by Roy Williams
216 pp. Illustrated
$27.50, Oct 2009
978-1-43990-133-5

http://www.hoophall.com/storage/post-images/naismith_book_cover.JPG?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION =1254428667282

The first definitive biography of basketball's inventor.

It seems unlikely that James Naismith, who grew up playing "Duck on the Rock" in the rural community of Almonte, Canada, would invent one of America’s most popular sports. But Rob Rains and Hellen Carpenter’s fascinating, in-depth biography James Naismith: The Man Who Invented Basketball (October publication/Temple University Press) shows how this young man—who wanted to be a medical doctor, or if not that, a minister (in fact, he was both)—came to create a game that has endured for over a century.

Rob Rains reveals how Naismith invented basketball in part to find an indoor activity to occupy students in the winter months. When he realized that the key to his game was that men could not run with the ball, and that throwing and jumping would eliminate the roughness of force, he was on to something. And while Naismith thought that other sports provided better exercise, he was pleased to create a game that "anyone could play."

With unprecedented access to the Naismith archives and documents, Rains and Carpenter chronicle how Naismith developed the original rules of basketball, coached the game at the University of Kansas—establishing college basketball in the process—and was honored for his work at the 1936 Olympic games in Berlin.

Reviews

"All of us who played, coached or enjoyed watching the game of basketball owe a great debt of thanks to James Naismith for devising a game that gave people the opportunity to play inside during the winter."
—Bob Knight

"Dr. Naismith was so much more than the inventor of the sport and James Naismith: The Man Who Invented Basketball is a well written documentation of his outstanding attributes as an educator, religious scholar and leader of young people. Naismith lived his entire life without regard for personal glory or financial rewards, but rather for setting examples of integrity and perseverance for all to follow. Everyone who reads this book will have a better understanding of the evolution of the game, but more importantly, they will realize that when we follow Dr. Naismith’s general life principles, we and the game become the real winners."
—Billy Packer

Rob Rains is a former National League beat writer for USA Today's Baseball Weekly and for three years covered the St. Louis Cardinals for the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. He is the author or co-author of autobiographies or biographies of Tony La Russa, Ozzie Smith, Mark McGwire, Jack Buck, Red Schoendienst and many other sports celebrities.

Hellen Carpenter is the granddaughter of James Naismith. For more than forty years she had in her possession more than 300 documents from Naismith’s files which were instrumental in crafting this biography.

The publication will also be available in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame’s Museum Store.

amdgc82
10-31-2009, 05:37 PM
HOOPS HEAVEN: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Author: Jack McCallum, Mel Greenberg, Blair Kerkhoff, and Notable Basketball Writers and Gowdy Award Winners
Publisher: Ascend Books LLC
Binding (Trim size) 9” x 11”, hardcover, color dust jacket
ISBN 13: 978-0-9817166-8-8
ISBN 10: 0-9817166-8-7

http://www.hoophall.com/storage/post-images/Hoops%20Cover.bmp?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=12569 17680522

(OVERLAND PARK, KS) – The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, which recently inducted its most celebrated class in history, teamed up with Ascend Books of Overland Park, Kansas, to celebrate the occasion with an official 50th anniversary commemorative book.

The 50th anniversary book, titled Hoops Heaven: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, offers a compilation of the game’s greatest players, coaches, contributors, referees, and teams, and their representation in the 80,000-square foot Hall located in Springfield, Massachusetts. The Hall traces the game’s roots from its invention by Dr. James Naismith in 1891 through the present-day popularity of college basketball and the NBA.

“It’s a natural fit for Ascend to publish this anniversary book,” Ascend CEO and Publisher Bob Snodgrass said. “We have specialized in helping organizations commemorate important milestone events for many years. We know how important it is for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame to publish its history during this pivotal year in the Hall’s existence.”

Ascend recently has published books by 2008 Naismith Hall of Fame inductee Dick Vitale and by Bill Self, head coach of the University of Kansas and 2009 Associated Press Coach of the Year. Ascend will also release the official 75th anniversary commemorative book of the Orange Bowl in December 2009.

The Hall of Fame inducted its most celebrated class ever during ceremonies September 10-11, 2009, in Springfield, Massachusetts. Michael Jordan, David Robinson, Jerry Sloan, John Stockton, and C. Vivian Stringer comprised the Class of 2009.

For more information about the book, please contact Kerry Comiskey at kcomiskey@ascendbooks.com or (913) 948-5500.

About Ascend Books
Ascend Books specializes in turning media-related ideas into custom books for events or organizations across the country. Each year organizations, associations, celebrities, charities, and teams celebrate significant anniversaries, events or accomplishments worthy of a custom book project. With these milestones comes the opportunity to broaden the collective mind share of the customers, fans or membership close to that organization, personality or milestone. Ascend Books publishes books with high-profile individuals and groups in areas of business, sports, and entertainment. We are interested in books worthy of regional or national trade distribution, as well as opportunities requiring an industry-specific emphasis to a targeted and specific readership. For more information, visit www.ascendbooks.com.

amdgc82
10-31-2009, 06:46 PM
When the Game Was Ours
by: Larry Bird; Earvin Johnson; Jackie MacMullan
ISBN-13/EAN: 9780547225470; $26.00
ISBN-10: 0547225474
Hardcover; 352 pages
Publication Date: 11/04/2009
Trim Size: 6.00 x 9.00
Carton Quantity: 12

http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/assets/product/9780547225470.gif

Description:
From the moment these two players took the court on opposing sides, they engaged in a fierce physical and psychological battle. Their uncommonly competitive relationship came to symbolize the most compelling rivalry in the NBA. These were the basketball epics of the 1980s -- Celtics vs Lakers, East vs West, physical vs finesse, Old School vs Showtime, even white vs black. Each pushed the other to greatness -- together Bird and Johnson collected 8 NBA Championships, and 6 MVP awards and helped save the floundering NBA at its most critical time. When it started they were bitter rivals, but along the way they became lifelong friends.

With intimate, fly-on- the- wall detail, WHEN THE GAME WAS OURS transports readers to this electric era of basketball and reveals for the first time the inner workings of two players dead set on besting one another. From the heady days of trading championships to the darker days of injury and illness, we come to understand Larry’s obsessive devotion to winning and how his demons drove him on the court. We hear him talk with candor about playing through chronic pain and its truly exacting toll. In Magic we see a young, invincible star struggle with the sting of defeat, not just as a player but as a team leader. We are there the moment he learns he’s contracted HIV and hear in his own words how that devastating news impacted his relationships in basketball and beyond. But always, in both cases, we see them prevail.

A compelling, up-close-and-personal portrait of basketball’s most inimitable duo, WHEN THE GAME WAS OURS is a reevaluation of three decades in counterpoint. It is also a rollicking ride through professional basketball’s best times.

Reviews:
“MAGICBIRD, BIRDMAGIC really should be the titled “When the Game was Mine” because that is how they went after each other on the court. In When the Game Was Ours you will enjoy an exhilarating ride down one of the most competitive rivalries ever.”
—Pat Riley

"Finally—a book that tells the story of Magic and Larry from their vantage point. When the Game Was Ours took me inside their fascinating rivalry with new insights and revealing details about two men who evolved from bitter competitors into lifelong friends."
—Denzel Washington

"At long last the great book on Bird and Magic—their own account, told from behind the scenes, inside huddles, confidential phone conversations, backseats of cars, and most importantly, from their inner hearts. Their book is alive with truth—it's a story of brilliance, brilliantly told with the help of prize-winning writer Jackie MacMullan."
—Sally Jenkins, author of The Real All Americans, Funny Cide, and It’s Not About the Bike with Lance Armstrong

"When The Game Was Ours is the ultimate insiders' account of the rivalry, the friendship, the tension and the bond between Bird and Magic that launched the modern NBA. A real treat for all hoops fans."
—Tom Verducci, author with Joe Torre of the #1 New York Times bestseller, The Yankee Years

"You know that game where you pick a certain number of characters for your favorite dinner party of all time? (The one where you picked Gandhi, Babe Ruth, Li'l Wayne and, who was it, Jenna Jameson?) I just spent a couple of nights with Larry Bird and Magic Johnson in the lyrical When The Game Was Ours and they should be in the mix. They're funny, frank, anecdotal and just plain interesting. This book is terrific."
—Leigh Montville, bestselling author of Ted Williams and The Big Bam

maroonmartian
05-16-2010, 07:56 AM
To the Ateneans, could I promote a new book on our favorite sport: Basketball ;D

Its about the Politics of Basketball in the Philippines.

It is written by Rafe Bartholomew and is titled "Pacific Rims". Here is the youtube link of the promo ad:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5TDI1AZmw4

Any criticisms, reactions etc.

On-topic:

So the Eagles is on top of their group with 6-1 and is assured of the 1 or 2 spot. Hope you enjoy your US trip. Yung iba na wala sa kondisyon, magpakondisyon na. ;D See you on June 9.

augustine
05-16-2010, 08:17 AM
To the Ateneans, could I promote a new book on our favorite sport: Basketball ;D



When and where available?

maroonmartian
05-16-2010, 08:22 AM
^ Sorry Mods for being OT

May reviews pa so kung gusto ninyo na maisama eh contact this guy. ;D I suggest si Ricky Olivarez para meron point of view ng Atenista. As for La Salle, si Tony Atayde or Christian Soller :o Anybody to help this guy? I am not an authority.

BLUE HORSE
05-16-2010, 08:55 AM
I believe Chris Soler is an Atenean and was part of the faculty.

kulaspiro
05-16-2010, 10:21 AM
I believe Chris Soler is an Atenean and was part of the faculty.


Chris is an Ateneo EuroStudies summa cum laude grad and Theo lecturer. And I believe doing grad studies in Urban Planning at UP Diliman. So he has a bit of maroon too. But he seems to follow the NCAA in his inboundpass column.

danny
05-30-2010, 06:45 AM
A book about Pinoy basketball from a foreigner with little intimate knowledge of Pinoy baketball history and politics? :D

If this guy never visited gameface and listened to the likes of oca, that alien point of view is useless in my opinion. ;)

maroonmartian
05-30-2010, 03:47 PM
Mga sir actually he lives in the Philippines for quite some time. He has a blogspot.

http://katipunani.blogspot.com/

And well I heard about his plans from a former PolSci studying abroad. The problem I think is he doesn't make a distinction about college and professional ball (he concentrated more on the pro because I think it is more accessible to the mass). Will ask my prof about the development of the book.

gameface_one
06-01-2010, 10:59 AM
Fyi, Rafe Barthlomew is actually a Gameface member.

Schortsanitis
06-01-2010, 12:55 PM
I hope you publish your book on electronic format (preferably Kindle), Mr. Barthlomew, 'cause the last time I looked a couple of weeks ago, it still wasn't available there. I hate lugging stacks of heavy books around.

john_paul_manahan
06-03-2010, 04:13 AM
Said book now is available in your fave outlet. (although as per @firequinito, he bought the last copy at the place where he bought it)

maroonmartian
06-12-2010, 12:49 PM
^ Where could we get this book by Rafe Bartholew?How are the reviews. Meron na sa Philippine Daily Inquirer ngayong araw na ito sa Lifestyle section. Ok naman reviews. Hope Rafe's book will do well. Any info on the book?

Jaco D
06-22-2010, 01:18 AM
I got my copy two weeks ago but have only been able to cover half of the book dahil sa letcheng trabaho.

But based on what I've read so far:

This guy can write! I think the book is more than just a book on basketball. It's an objective, third party view of Philippine culture and society, written in the context of The Game. Given the state of archivial resources back home, I think the book was well researched, with a lot of primary sources (inteviews, etc.). Even the writing style is in the mold of the great sports journalists that we've come to know like Riley and his ilk. If you can get a copy of the book, spend an evening or two reading it from cover to cover. You're gonna split your sides laughing yet mapapa "oo nga no" ka reading passages that look at Philippine culture and society - things we take for granted.

I think the Fulbright Foundation met its objective in sending the author over. If there's something I got from the book it was the fresh insight into things tangent to basketball. Basahin nyo na lang and you'll get what I mean. The author is definitely a one-man US Peace Corps organization. Jack Kennedy would have been proud.

maroonmartian
07-03-2010, 10:21 AM
One of those listed on the dedication page was a former professor in UP. Rafe Bartholew's book however limited on my perspective (sorry Rafe it is limited and selective) gave us the impression of an American on our addiction to basketball. Still as some members said here, a foreign scholar's take on our basketball. Nice try actually BUT I think:

1) You forgot COLLEGE BASKETBALL. But I think this is the fact that FEW FILIPINOS WENT TO COLLEGE. Sa PBA na lang sila nanonood at nakikisuporta. National kasi ang Scope.

2) And even if he focused more on the pro-level, I think he focused more on Alaska and Ginebra. Pero kasi sila favorite e.


Disclaimer: I just leafed the pages of the book. Its price tag of P995 made me think to spend it to other things like a Law book/readings. IMO, it is A BLOG-type of book.

thechosenone23
12-26-2010, 01:40 AM
Nice topic! Here are the basketball books that I have:
1. 1988 to 1991 Complete Handbook of Pro Basketball - My favorite quote from these books. I forgot the name of the player: "He looks like Superman but plays like Clark Kent." hehe!
2. When the Game Was Ours by Larry Bird and Magic Johnson
3. Magic Johnson: My Life by Magic Johnson
4. 32 Ways to Be a Champion in Business by Magic Johnson (signed by the author)
5. Drive: The Story of My Life by Larry Bird
6. Bird Watching: On Playing and Coaching the Game I Love by Larry Bird
7. NBA at 50 by Mark Vancil (signed by the author)
8. Rare Air by Michael Jordan
9. I Can't Accept Not Trying by Michael Jordan
10. For the Love of the Game: My Story by Michael Jordan
11. Michael Jordan's 50 Greatest Games: From His Ncaa Championship to Six Nba Titles by Bob Condor
12. Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson
13. Living the Dream My Life and Basketball by Hakeem Olajuwon
14. At the Buzzer! Havlicek Steals, Erving Soars, Magic Deals, Michael Scores by Bryan Burwell
15. Sports Illustrated: The Basketball Book by Editors of Sports Illustrated
16. NCAA March Madness: Cinderellas, Superstars, and Champions from the NCAA Men's Final Four by Ncaa
17. The Book of Basketball: The NBA According to The Sports Guy by Bill Simmons
18. Hoops: Four Decades of the Pro Game by Walter Iooss Jr.
19. Giants: The 25 Greatest Centers of All Time by Mark Heisler
20. Allan Caidic autobiography
21. Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball by Beth Celis
22. Pacific Rims

Magazines:
1. Complete Slam Magazines from 1994 to present
2. Sports Illustrated NBA Previews Magazines
3. Sports Illustrated NBA Champions Tribute Magazines
4. Lebron, Kobe, Jordan, Bird, Magic, Greatest Players Tribute Magazines