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KobeWanKenobi
07-04-2008, 09:20 AM
If I could have the ear of Eala and the SBP, I would recommend the following:

1. Formation of Age Group National Teams. Basically, instead of forming a Youth and a Seniors team, the SBP will form a 16 and under, 18 and under, 21 and under, 23 and under, and Seniors Basketball team.

That means the best players per age group will be represented. That also means the Seniors Team and the Youth team have their respective pool of players to get from.

The age group teams is patterned after Yugoslavian/Serbia-Montenegro Pro teams. Each pro team (Partizan Belgrade, Red Star, etc) has an age group junior team which serve as sources of players for the seniors team.

That's the reason why there are 18 year old pros in Europe. They are discovered playing for age group teams.

2. Formation of Regional Age Group Teams. Same as above, these will form the basis of the best players who will be elevated to the NT. The players will be based in the following regional groups: Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, Metro Manila, US/Canada East Coast, and US/Canada West Coast.

For the US/Canada East and West Coasts, ex-players based abroad will be made responsible for the maintenance of the team.

3. A year round national team program. This means that players practice year round. During the season of their mother leagues, practices will be limited to once a week, with number of practices per week increasing during the offseason and/or elimination of teams.

This is a win win scenario because teams get to keep their players during the season while the players get to play for the NT during the offseason. No need to permanently pull out players from the PBA, UAAP, NCAA, PBL, etc.

A good example on how this works is when the Sydney Kings visited the Philippines, prior to the BAP being banned by FIBA, then NT coach Chot Reyes was able to produce two teams that competed against the Kings on short notice because a NT Pool was formed that practiced once a week.

4. Coordination with FIBA Calendar. That means the UAAP and NCAA should reschedule their calendar with FIBA from 1st sem to 2nd sem period since FIBA tournaments are held during 1st sem.

5. A single NT coaching program. What applies to the seniors applies to the age groups. That way, if a player is promoted (due to age or ability), he doesn't have to adjust to the team dynamics.

6. Adjustment on the age limits of players in the College and High School leagues. For High Schoolers, the maximum age should be moved to 17 from 18. For College players, the maximum age should be moved to 22.

This still gives Colleges five years service for their players but at the same time, it prevents colleges from hoarding players and only releasing them at a very old age. It also prevents schools from hoarding players in high schools.

7. Creation of regular invitational tournaments similar to the Jones Cup. But this time for each age groups including the seniors team.

D_I_A
07-05-2008, 09:00 PM
If I could have the ear of Eala and the SBP, I would recommend the following:

1. Formation of Age Group National Teams. Basically, instead of forming a Youth and a Seniors team, the SBP will form a 16 and under, 18 and under, 21 and under, 23 and under, and Seniors Basketball team.

That means the best players per age group will be represented. That also means the Seniors Team and the Youth team have their respective pool of players to get from.

The age group teams is patterned after Yugoslavian/Serbia-Montenegro Pro teams. Each pro team (Partizan Belgrade, Red Star, etc) has an age group junior team which serve as sources of players for the seniors team.

That's the reason why there are 18 year old pros in Europe. They are discovered playing for age group teams.

2. Formation of Regional Age Group Teams. Same as above, these will form the basis of the best players who will be elevated to the NT. The players will be based in the following regional groups: Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, Metro Manila, US/Canada East Coast, and US/Canada West Coast.

For the US/Canada East and West Coasts, ex-players based abroad will be made responsible for the maintenance of the team.

3. A year round national team program. This means that players practice year round. During the season of their mother leagues, practices will be limited to once a week, with number of practices per week increasing during the offseason and/or elimination of teams.

This is a win win scenario because teams get to keep their players during the season while the players get to play for the NT during the offseason. No need to permanently pull out players from the PBA, UAAP, NCAA, PBL, etc.

A good example on how this works is when the Sydney Kings visited the Philippines, prior to the BAP being banned by FIBA, then NT coach Chot Reyes was able to produce two teams that competed against the Kings on short notice because a NT Pool was formed that practiced once a week.

4. Coordination with FIBA Calendar. That means the UAAP and NCAA should reschedule their calendar with FIBA from 1st sem to 2nd sem period since FIBA tournaments are held during 1st sem.

5. A single NT coaching program. What applies to the seniors applies to the age groups. That way, if a player is promoted (due to age or ability), he doesn't have to adjust to the team dynamics.

6. Adjustment on the age limits of players in the College and High School leagues. For High Schoolers, the maximum age should be moved to 17 from 18. For College players, the maximum age should be moved to 22.

This still gives Colleges five years service for their players but at the same time, it prevents colleges from hoarding players and only releasing them at a very old age. It also prevents schools from hoarding players in high schools.

7. Creation of regular invitational tournaments similar to the Jones Cup. But this time for each age groups including the seniors team.


don't forget that there might be prospects in Australia and Europe that we could also tap, i suggest that the SBP should also appoint scouts to go to Europe and Australia to scour these places if there might be Fil-Foreigners just waiting to be tapped.

thadzonline
07-12-2008, 11:41 PM
nice suggestions, I hope it happens, parang yung 1st is the cadet club concept of Euro teams

john_paul_manahan
07-13-2008, 07:17 PM
If I could have the ear of Eala and the SBP, I would recommend the following:

1. Formation of Age Group National Teams. Basically, instead of forming a Youth and a Seniors team, the SBP will form a 16 and under, 18 and under, 21 and under, 23 and under, and Seniors Basketball team.

That means the best players per age group will be represented. That also means the Seniors Team and the Youth team have their respective pool of players to get from.

The age group teams is patterned after Yugoslavian/Serbia-Montenegro Pro teams. Each pro team (Partizan Belgrade, Red Star, etc) has an age group junior team which serve as sources of players for the seniors team.

That's the reason why there are 18 year old pros in Europe. They are discovered playing for age group teams.

2. Formation of Regional Age Group Teams. Same as above, these will form the basis of the best players who will be elevated to the NT. The players will be based in the following regional groups: Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, Metro Manila, US/Canada East Coast, and US/Canada West Coast.

For the US/Canada East and West Coasts, ex-players based abroad will be made responsible for the maintenance of the team.

3. A year round national team program. This means that players practice year round. During the season of their mother leagues, practices will be limited to once a week, with number of practices per week increasing during the offseason and/or elimination of teams.

This is a win win scenario because teams get to keep their players during the season while the players get to play for the NT during the offseason. No need to permanently pull out players from the PBA, UAAP, NCAA, PBL, etc.

A good example on how this works is when the Sydney Kings visited the Philippines, prior to the BAP being banned by FIBA, then NT coach Chot Reyes was able to produce two teams that competed against the Kings on short notice because a NT Pool was formed that practiced once a week.

4. Coordination with FIBA Calendar. That means the UAAP and NCAA should reschedule their calendar with FIBA from 1st sem to 2nd sem period since FIBA tournaments are held during 1st sem.

5. A single NT coaching program. What applies to the seniors applies to the age groups. That way, if a player is promoted (due to age or ability), he doesn't have to adjust to the team dynamics.

6. Adjustment on the age limits of players in the College and High School leagues. For High Schoolers, the maximum age should be moved to 17 from 18. For College players, the maximum age should be moved to 22.

This still gives Colleges five years service for their players but at the same time, it prevents colleges from hoarding players and only releasing them at a very old age. It also prevents schools from hoarding players in high schools.

7. Creation of regular invitational tournaments similar to the Jones Cup. But this time for each age groups including the seniors team.


welcome to gameface, kobewankenobi.

clutchjedi
07-14-2008, 11:00 AM
3. A year round national team program. This means that players practice year round. During the season of their mother leagues, practices will be limited to once a week, with number of practices per week increasing during the offseason and/or elimination of teams.


Oo nga..I seem to recall nung bago yung program ni coach Chot Reyes, they said Monday was "national team day", which would be reserved for the pool's training and practice. If PBA teams could agree to something like this, that would be great.

pio_valenz
07-14-2008, 09:20 PM
Hire a foreign coach.

time1513
07-14-2008, 09:57 PM
Hire a foreign coach.


i think the philippines has a lot of good solid coaches... maybe a consultant would be better... pero i think ok na yun pinoy na coach..

Joescoundrel
08-27-2008, 12:57 PM
Something from, of all people, Dr Michael Tan of UP, courtesy of PDI...

Pinoy Kasi

Culture and Sports

By Michael Tan
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 00:32:00 08/27/2008

There was a time our education department was called the Department of Education, Culture and Sports, or DECS, which I thought captured more fully the idea of what education should be.

I’m taking off from that earlier name of the education department for another reason: This is to look at how culture and sports are related. With the 2008 Olympics over, and our athletes coming home without any medals, we’re going to hear the usual lamentations about our neglect of sports.

I suggest we deemphasize winning for now, and get on working out realistic goals that fit us—as a people and as a nation. We can start by looking at the countries that did well, and how their victories reflect differences in culture.

Basketball

We start with the most obvious link, a “sports culture,” i.e., what a particular society considers to be sports. Many of the athletic events we see today have specific origins: e.g., judo (said to be from Japan, although the game belongs to a wider tradition of martial arts that come from Chinese Buddhist meditative traditions).

If it’s the Olympics we’re aiming for, we need to excel in one of the internationally recognized sports, and we have some choices here. I sometimes think if the Spaniards had stayed on into the 20th century as our colonizer, we might have developed soccer as a national sport, as many Latin American countries have.

Instead, we became addicted to basketball, a legacy from the Americans, who brought in another sport, baseball, which didn’t quite prosper because we did not create the public space needed for the game, or for that matter, for most sports, soccer included. Note how even the poorest towns have a cockfighting arena, but no public facilities for sports.

Basketball took off partly because it required less public space. In fact, Filipino-style basketball is often played on hijacked space, like the tiniest streets and alleys, or the barangay hall’s yard.

Alas, while we are fanatically in love with basketball, it just doesn’t like us. The reason I hear most often for this non-compatibility is that we don’t have the height for it. But height is a matter of both nature and nurture and even as we see a younger generation of Filipinos (and Filipino-Americans) reaching new heights, excellence in basketball isn’t going to follow that easily.

I suspect partly it’s because basketball has to be played with elaborate rules, and by a team. For all the talk about the community-oriented Filipino, he doesn’t always work that way when it comes to sports (or for that matter, business and politics). We make rules to break them, and I don’t say this in a negative way. To survive, we’ve learned to be ad-hoc, to modify rules along the way, and if we lose out in the process, we cry “foul!” and “unfair!” You just can’t play basketball that way.

There are other reasons, of course, for our problems with basketball. One of these is the massive investments that need to be poured in for a team to be internationally competitive. One Chinese blog writer, Xue Qong, notes how the Chinese team didn’t fare too well in what he calls “professional sports” like basketball, soccer and tennis, saying this was because these are sports that have high “spectator value” and, therefore, attract commercial sponsors.

That’s why basketball survived in the Philippines in a large way, with large private corporations and schools, investing heavily in the spectator event and particular athletes who, in effect, became professionals. But the investments in Philippine basketball do not come anywhere close to those in American basketball or European soccer, where athletes themselves become commodities for swapping, and where they are heavily used to push not just sports goods but all kinds of other consumer products. (Remember Yao Ming for Apple computers?).

Xue Qong cites a second category of sports where individual performance is important, like track and field and swimming. These events do not carry as much spectator value as basketball and soccer do, but they do draw some following, so the private sector invest in individual athletes, mainly with the hope that champions will endorse their products (e.g., shoes, swimwear).

Xue Qong notes how China chose to concentrate on a third category of sports: gymnastics, weight-lifting, ping-pong. These are events which draw even fewer crowds than swimming, but because they can be sources of Olympic gold, they were seen as worthwhile investments. Not only that; these sports have a better fit with Chinese history and culture. I’ve already mentioned the interface of gymnastics and acrobatics.

What’s interesting too about this third category of sports is the way individual champions can be shaped. It is not accidental that China and the former socialist states of Russia and Eastern Europe harvested gold medals in this area. These states pick out potential athletes at a very early age, separating them from their families and subjecting them to intensive (some say cruel) routines that shape the bodies and minds of the athletes.

Speaking of bodies and minds, Chinese athletes were certainly spurred by a strong sense of nationhood, of performing for China on a world stage. Patriotism does blend well with individual achievement in sports.

Geeks, jocks

A last point about the link between culture and sports: It’s time we moved away from the stereotyped distinction between “geeks” and “jocks.” We tend to think of athletes as all brawn, no brains; and geeks as scrawny, bespectacled bookworms.

Is a geek jock possible? The Chinese believe so. They boast of athletes like table tennis champion Deng Yaping, who has a Ph.D. in land economics from Cambridge, and Chen Yanqing, a weightlifting champion who has a master’s in applied psychology from Suzhou University.

Athletes are encouraged to go on to a university, particularly Renmin in Beijing, where they are given extra support to pursue academics. Not only that, there is a separate Beijing Sports University where athletes can enroll and get degrees that are related to sports and athletics.

It is also through Beijing Sports University, and other centers, where China is pursuing a strong program in sports sciences. As the country becomes richer, both the State and the private sector will have even more resources to put into sports, including integrating science into sports. They know western countries invest in sports sciences, marshalling physics, medicine and other sciences to monitor their best athletes to figure out the right formulas for training.

Our resources are much more scarce, but we might want to think of taking the first steps toward bringing back sports, culture and education—starting out with local sports, no matter how lowly they seem—and with a local ethos that emphasizes competition but not in an obsessive must-win way. That’s why I say we should deemphasize the medals for now. Athletics is both about becoming a better sport and developing sports.

pachador
08-28-2008, 05:57 AM
regarding the hiring of a foreign coach for the RP national team:
The SBP should refer to the job position as "consultant" even though they are hiring a coach because it will be good 'PR' or public relations, secondly, the 'consultant' will not only coach but conduct seminars for local coaches in-between tournaments. If the the local coach group of Narvasa is worried about job loss then the SBP can hire two or three of the local coaches as the 'symbolic' or figurehead coach of the national team while the 'consultant' will be the real coach. These 2 or 3 'symbolic' local coaches should ideally be someone who would be the replacement later on of the foreign consultant as they will be learning coaching from this foreign consultant 'on the job' while assisting the foreign consultant so basically these 2 or 3 'symbolic' coaches real job will be assistant coaches to the foreign consultant at the same time they are learning coaching from the foreign guru.

D_I_A
08-28-2008, 07:56 PM
regarding the hiring of a foreign coach for the RP national team:
The SBP should refer to the job position as "consultant" even though they are hiring a coach because it will be good 'PR' or public relations, secondly, the 'consultant' will not only coach but conduct seminars for local coaches in-between tournaments. If the the local coach group of Narvasa is worried about job loss then the SBP can hire two or three of the local coaches as the 'symbolic' or figurehead coach of the national team while the 'consultant' will be the real coach. These 2 or 3 'symbolic' local coaches should ideally be someone who would be the replacement later on of the foreign consultant as they will be learning coaching from this foreign consultant 'on the job' while assisting the foreign consultant so basically these 2 or 3 'symbolic' coaches real job will be assistant coaches to the foreign consultant at the same time they are learning coaching from the foreign guru.




kaso talagang kulang sa pansin si Narvasa at ang kanyang BCAP

Howard the Duck
08-30-2008, 01:21 AM
more independence among regional groups

like they can organize meets amongst themselves. the only time SBP will intervene is when they invite foreign teams.

thadzonline
08-30-2008, 10:26 PM
more independence among regional groups

like they can organize meets amongst themselves. the only time SBP will intervene is when they invite foreign teams.


amen, pero kahit sa pag invite ng foreign teams, dapat din maging liberal

Howard the Duck
09-01-2008, 05:08 PM
more independence among regional groups

like they can organize meets amongst themselves. the only time SBP will intervene is when they invite foreign teams.


amen, pero kahit sa pag invite ng foreign teams, dapat din maging liberal

IMHO, inviting foreign teams should one thing the national federation should do exclusively. unless of course kung one on one meet lang OK lang. pero kung full-fledged tourney dapat may auspices ng SBP.


parang gobyerno lang yan, kung mga kapwa pinoy kahit larong kanto pwede na. pero kung may mga foreigners na dapat gaimitin ang proper channels.

pachador
09-02-2008, 05:16 AM
One group to blame for our loss are the greedy school leagues . Booo !!! . No question about that. The philippine newspapers should write news articles and editorials castigating the school leagues for not doing their share in helping the national team. At least the PBA already moved their schedule. The loss of the U18 national team should be a learning lesson to the UAAP, CESAFI , NCAA and other greedy school leagues to move the start of school basketball games to october or november or even better to the second semester after christmas. This way, the best of the high school and university players are free to be released to the National team.

thadzonline
09-02-2008, 01:26 PM
One group to blame for our loss are the greedy school leagues . Booo !!! . No question about that. The philippine newspapers should write news articles and editorials castigating the school leagues for not doing their share in helping the national team. At least the PBA already moved their schedule. The loss of the U18 national team should be a learning lesson to the UAAP, CESAFI , NCAA and other greedy school leagues to move the start of school basketball games to october or november or even better to the second semester after christmas. This way, the best of the high school and university players are free to be released to the National team.



ang problema kasi minsan, school leagues rely so much on the gate receipts from basketball to finance the other sports who have less spectators. Probably also the reason why these sports also start after the basketball competitions are over

easter
09-10-2008, 07:58 PM
a. Hire a permanent full-time coaching staff.

b. Compete with schools in the recruitment of players. These will eb the core of the senior and juniors team. Players should be given incentives:
i. Allowance for their families
ii. Free school from DECS. Also tutors.

c. Form Team A's and B's for both divisions.

c. Have an agreement with the PBA that members of the RP team will not be recruited until they reach a certain age or service to the country. If a player is not a national team member then PBA can recruit them.

Make being a part of the RP team as an opportunity and not only as a sacrifice!

glock23
09-10-2008, 09:20 PM
a. Hire a permanent full-time coaching staff.

b. Compete with schools in the recruitment of players. These will eb the core of the senior and juniors team. Players should be given incentives:
* * * *i. Allowance for their families
* * * ii. Free school from DECS. Also tutors.

c. Form Team A's and B's for both divisions.

c. Have an agreement with the PBA that members of the RP team will not be recruited until they reach a certain age or service to the country. If a player is not a national team member then PBA can recruit them.

Make being a part of the RP team as an opportunity and not only as a sacrifice!




I agree with you on this one easter. I just hope that if ever Franz is taken out as head coach of the youth team the one replacing him wont have an affiliation with any school. In fact your suggestion is perfect in an idealistic sense. But grapevine talks point to a Reyes if ever franz is replaced. Does that sound right?