PDA

View Full Version : Fil-Am Erik Spoelstra new Miami head coach



amdgc82
04-29-2008, 06:34 AM
Riley Steps Down, Spoelstra Named Head Coach
http://www.nba.com/heat/news/riley_spoelstra_080428.html

MIAMI, April 28 – Miami HEAT President and Head Coach Pat Riley announced this afternoon that he has decided to step down as Head Coach of the Miami HEAT, but will continue to serve as team President. HEAT Managing General Partner Micky Arison and Riley jointly announced that former Assistant Coach/Director of Scouting Erik Spoelstra has been elevated to head coach. Spoelstra becomes the sixth head coach in franchise history.

“The game of basketball is a game about talent,” said Riley. “While we are always looking for NBA talent to perform on the court, the most important talent that you may find has to perform on the bench, in the locker room, on the practice court, late at night, watching film, motivating and executing all the responsibilities of a head coach. I believe Erik Spoelstra is one of the most talented young coaches to come around in a long time. This game is now about younger coaches who are technologically skilled, innovative and bring fresh new ideas. That’s what we feel we are getting with Erik Spoelstra. He’s a man that was born to coach.”

Spoelstra just completed his 13th season as a member of the HEAT staff and his seventh in the role of Assistant Coach/Director of Scouting where he had the primary role of developing game plans for upcoming opponents. Spoelstra was responsible for coordinating the video staff and advance scouts while also overseeing the development of scouting reports and videos. He has been in charge of the HEAT’s Individual Player Development Program and has served as the head coach of the HEAT’s summer league squad each of the past three summers.

The 37-year old Portland native originally joined the HEAT as the team’s video coordinator in 1995. He spent two years in that role where he was responsible for preparing scouting tapes and heading up the team’s information technology for the coaching staff. He served as Assistant Coach/Video Coordinator the following two seasons (1997-99). He was then promoted to Assistant Coach/Advance Scout and served in that role for two seasons (1999-01) before being elevated to Assistant Coach/Director of Scouting the role he has served in the past seven years. Spoelstra has become the NBA’s youngest current head coach, born on Nov. 1, 1970 in Evanston, IL. He is 69 days younger than the second youngest head coach, Lawrence Frank of the New Jersey Nets.

A 1992 graduate from the University of Portland, Spoelstra was the starting point guard for four years for the Pilots and was named the West Coast Conference Freshman of the Year. After college he spent two years as a player/coach for Tus Herten, a team in the professional sports league of Germany.

Spoesltra is the son of Jon Spoelstra, a long-time NBA executive who has guided the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets. Riley joined the HEAT as President and Head Coach on Sept. 2, 1995. In his two stints as head coach (1995-2003 and 2005-08) he guided the HEAT to a 454-395 (.535) record with one NBA title, one conference championship, six division championships and eight playoff berths in his 11 seasons on the bench. In addition to ranking as Miami’s all-time victory leader, Riley ranks third on the NBA’s all-time regular season list, compiling a 1,210-694 (.636) career mark in 24 seasons as an NBA head coach with the Los Angeles Lakers, New York Knicks and Miami HEAT. He also ranks second on the all-time postseason victory list amassing a 171-111 (.606) mark. Riley, who was elected into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame earlier this month, has led his teams to five NBA championships as a head coach, nine conference championships and a league-record 18 division championships. He is the only coach in league history to capture the NBA Coach of the Year Award with three different teams and his string of 19 consecutive playoff appearances as a head coach from 1982-2001 is a league record for consecutive postseason appearances. His 21 total postseason appearances are also the most by a head coach in NBA history. He has been named NBA Coach of the Month an NBA-record 11 times and has more 50-win (17) and 60-win (7) seasons than any coach in NBA history. Additionally, when he registered his 1,000th regular season victory on Nov. 1, 2000, he became the fastest coach or manager to reach 1,000 wins in the history of the four professional sports in North America, bettering the previous mark held by Fred Clarke of the Pittsburgh Pirates by 144 games. Riley recorded his 1,000th win in just his 1,434th game. On Feb. 29, 2008 he became the only coach in NBA history to record at least 450 wins with two franchises as he guided the HEAT to a 103-93 win in Seattle. Riley currently stands as the all-time leader in both regular season and postseason victories for both the Lakers and the HEAT and owns the highest winning percentage in Knicks history.

amdgc82
04-29-2008, 06:42 AM
Riley resigns as Heat coach, names Spoelstra his replacement
By TIM REYNOLDS, AP Sports Writer

MIAMI - Pat Riley's worst season as coach of the Miami Heat will be his last. The Hall of Famer resigned as coach Monday but remains team president. Erik Spoelstra, a 37-year-old assistant, will succeed Riley and become the NBA's youngest current coach. Spoelstra has never been a head coach at any level outside the NBA's summer league.

Miami finished the season with the NBA's poorest record (15-67) and, by far, the worst of Riley's 25-year career.

"I look forward to the challenge," said Spoelstra, who received word of the decision over the weekend.

As president, Riley will continue overseeing the plan to rebuild a franchise that's just two years removed from a championship, after deciding that he'd best benefit the franchise by working exclusively from the front office.

The on-court duties now belong to Spoelstra, who started in the Heat video room in 1995.

"While we are always looking for NBA talent to perform on the court, the most important talent that you may find has to perform on the bench, in the locker room, late at night, watching film, motivating and executing all the responsibilities of a head coach," Riley said. "I believe Erik Spoelstra is one of the most talented young coaches to come around in a long time."

Riley's future was among many major issues awaiting Miami this offseason. The Heat could have the No. 1 pick in the draft, are assured a top-four pick and are certain to make moves in an effort to revamp a roster plagued by injuries.

"Pat Riley has instilled in me values that enabled me to win a championship in just three seasons," Heat guard Dwyane Wade said Monday. "I've seen him do the necessary things to make us winners and I believe that with his focus on being president and his commitment to the team, we will once again become a contender."

Wade has worked extensively with Spoelstra in practices and 1-on-1 sessions.

"I believe in Coach Spo and have complete confidence that our team will succeed with him at the helm," Wade said.

Spoelstra indicated he would like to keep assistants Ron Rothstein, Bob McAdoo and Keith Askins.

Unless he comes back — he has once before — Riley finishes his career with 1,210 victories, third most in NBA history behind Lenny Wilkens and Don Nelson. He won seven championships in all, five as a head coach, one as an assistant and one as a player, and was voted into the 2008 Hall of Fame class this month. His induction is Sept. 5.

"Today, I am definitely sure that I don't want to do this anymore," Riley said.

The rebuilding process will still be his primary focus.

Riley essentially began that job in February when he traded disgruntled center Shaquille O'Neal to the Phoenix Suns. The move not only rid the team of a player who didn't want to remain in Miami, but gave the Heat some salary-cap room that wouldn't otherwise have been available until O'Neal's contract expired in 2010.

"Regardless if Pat is coaching or not, I think he'll still have a lot of say-so in what goes on around here," Heat forward Shawn Marion, who was acquired in that trade for O'Neal, said this month.

Spoelstra came to the Heat in 1995 as video coordinator and was promoted to assistant coach/video coordinator two years later. In recent years, many team insiders considered Spoelstra as the person Riley would promote when he deemed the time was right.

That time was Monday.

"This game is now about younger coaches who are technologically skilled, innovative and bring fresh new ideas," Riley said. "That's what we feel we are getting with Erik Spoelstra. He's a man that was born to coach."

It's a tactic Riley used before. He stepped down days before the 2003-04 season began, walking into then-assistant coach Stan Van Gundy's office one morning and asking him, "You ready?"

Van Gundy remained coach for two-plus seasons, resigning 21 games into the 2005-06 campaign. Riley replaced his former protege on the bench and engineered Miami's march to the 2006 championship.

But the Heat have gone 59-105 in regular-season games since, the second-biggest two-year fall by a championship team in NBA history.

"I've worked for a great leader, a Hall of Fame coach and someone who's been a great mentor to me for 13 years," Spoelstra said. "It's been a great relationship."

Riley started his head coaching career with the Los Angeles Lakers, winning a championship in his first season with a team led by Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. He also took the New York Knicks to the NBA finals before coming to Miami in 1995, where on the day he was introduced he famously talked about envisioning a championship parade down Biscayne Boulevard.

Eleven years later, that vision became reality. And if it happens again, it'll come with Riley watching from off the court.

Riley's last game was the Heat finale on April 16, a win over the Atlanta Hawks. If he knew that would be his last time on an NBA sideline, he didn't tip his hand that night.

The final buzzer sounded, Riley waved to the Hawks' bench and walked briskly through the tunnel leading to the locker room.

No last look around, no grand gesture, just a nondescript exit to one of the NBA's most glamorous coaching careers.

"I made a point 25 years ago when I started coaching, made a point to myself and a promise to myself and more than anything else to the game that if I could never give everything I have to the game that I need to give, then I know it's time for me to step aside," Riley said.

erichubert
04-29-2008, 09:30 AM
Congratulations to him, at least we beat China and Japan in having a coach in the NBA. He should be careful though, knowing Pat Riley he can't stand someone overshadowing him, if Erik becomes too successful, Riley might just cut him off and take over again.

The_Big_Cat
04-29-2008, 10:14 AM
Maybe, in the future we can tap Erik Spoelstra as the future coach of our Team Pilipinas.

Gil_Andrews
04-29-2008, 02:29 PM
^^^^ There could be a chance:

Fil-Am takes coaching reins of Miami Heat



By ROY MEDINA
abs-cbnNEWS.com

Another Filipino has again made it to the A-list.

Eric Spoelstra, however, will not be belting out tunes in the "American Idol" or "Britain's Got Talent."

Instead, Spoelstra, 37, will take head the Miami Heat club in the National Basketball Association.

Spoestra, an assistant coach of the Heat, was appointed chief following the resignation of Pat Riley on Tuesday.


"I believe Erik Spoelstra is one of the most talented young coaches in a long time," Riley told a news conference.

"The last five years I've been a little bit in conflict with whether or not I wanted to (coach)," said the 63-year-old who had also coached the Los Angeles Lakers to four NBA titles, led the New York Knicks to the NBA Finals and steered the Heat to the championship in 2006.

Despite his resignation, Riley said he will continue his duties as Heat president. "I am very excited about moving forward in building this franchise back to where we can all be proud of it."

Reuters reported that Spoelstra spent two years as a player-coach for Tus Herten in the German professional league following his spell at the University of Portland.

He is the son of Jon Spoelstra, a long-time NBA executive who helped run the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets.

"I'm fortunate I've had the opportunity to work for a great leader, a Hall of Fame coach and someone who has been an incredible mentor," said Spoelstra, who joined the Heat as the team's video coordinator 13 years ago.

Nearly played in the PBA

Spoelstra is proud of his Filipino roots.

He said he still has relatives in the Philippines and family in the US.

However, the new Heat coach said he has yet to return to his mother's homeland since he was three.

Spoelstra also admitted he nearly came home to the Philippines after finishing with a degree from the Unviersity of Portland.

"Looking back I wish I had the opportunity to play in the PBA," he told ABS-CBN's "Balitang America" during a previous interview.

Asked if there are immediate plans of visiting the Philippines, Spoelstra said he wants to bring NBA-style coaching to develop Philippine basketball. With Reuters

The_Big_Cat
04-29-2008, 02:31 PM
He is the Migz Noble look-alike. ;D

Kid Cubao
04-29-2008, 02:36 PM
^^ indeed, he is a deadringer for migs noble. congrats to coach spoelstra.

The_Big_Cat
04-29-2008, 02:39 PM
I would like to see Bill Velasco interview this guy before somebody else does it.

tigerman
04-29-2008, 03:15 PM
^ Di magpapahuli si Quinito Henson diyan. ;D

Anyway, congrats Erik Spoelstra. Hope to see our country benefit from this as well...


USTE LO MEJOR!
VIVA SANTO TOMAS!

AnthonyServinio
04-30-2008, 12:29 AM
PRIOR to the rise of Coach Erik Spoelstra, the closest that a "Filipino" came to coaching in the NBA was through Arthur "Chip" Engelland, who served as an assistant coach with the Denver Nuggets. Coach Engelland is a naturalized Filipino citizen which he earned via a decree issued by President Ferdinand E. Marcos in the early 1980's.

amdgc82
04-30-2008, 05:20 AM
New Heat coach has Pinoy blood* (http://www.journal.com.ph/index.php?issue=2008-04-30&sec=7&aid=57942)
By: Gerry Ramos*
April 30, 2008 07:17 PM Wednesday
www.journal.com.ph

HALL of Famer Pat Riley has anointed an unknown for his successor as coach of the Miami Heat.
* *
Unknown to many too, Riley’s heir has Filipino blood.
* *
On Monday, young Erik Spoelstra became the new Heat coach after Riley stepped down from his post following one of the worst seasons in NBA franchise history.
* *
Once the Heat’s video coordinator and advance scout who rose from the ranks and became an assistant in Riley’s coaching staff, Spoelstra, 37, has a Filipina for a mother, Fe Celino, who hails from San Pablo, Laguna.
* *
Although born in Portland, Spoelstra traveled to the Philippines once when he was three years old.
* *
A product of University of Portland, Spoelstra has been with the Heat for 13 years now, a stint that saw him win an NBA championship in 2006 when Miami rallied back from 0-2 down to beat the Dallas Mavericks.
* *
“He’s a man that was born to coach,” said Riley when he presented the first ever NBA coach with Filipino blood to the media in Miami yesterday.
* *
Red Bull mentor Yeng Guiao, former president of the Basketball Coaches Association of the Philippines (BCAP), sees the appointment of Spoelstra not only good for local coaches but to Filipino basketball fans in general.
* *
“Of course, that’s good news. Di ko yun kilala, pero if he’s Filipino, that’s good for all Filipino basketball fans, not just coaches,” he said.
* *
His father, Jon Spoelstra, is an Irish-Dutch who was an NBA executive for the Portland Trailblazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets. His grandfather, Wilson Spoelstra, was a long-time Detroit Tigers beat writer.
* *
As the youngest NBA coach today, Spoelstra has his work cut out for him as he tries to turn around a franchise that finished with the worst record (15-67) in the 2007-08 season, two years removed from its championship stint.
* *
Riley, the Armani-wearing coach inducted into the basketball Hall of Fame recently as the brains behind the exciting and victorious ‘Showtime Lakers’ of the 80s, came aboard Miami in 1995 at a time when Spoelstra was still confined in the Heat video room.
* *
“I’ve worked for a great leader, a Hall of Fame coach and someone who’s been a great mentor to me for 13 years,” Spoelstra said. “It’s been a great relationship.”
* *
Spoelstra was the starting point guard at University of Portland for four years and was named West Coach Conference Freshman of the Year. After college, he spent two years as a player/coach for Tus Herten, a team in the professional sports league of Germany.
* *
Miami superstar Dwayne Wade welcomed his new coach with open arms.
* *
“I believe in Coach Spo and have complete confidence that our team will succeed with him at the helm,” Wade said.
* *
Spoelstra indicated he would like to keep assistants Ron Rothstein, Bob McAdoo and Keith Askins, a one-time PBA import.

amdgc82
04-30-2008, 06:19 AM
Fil-Am calls the shots for Miami Heat (http://philstar.com/index.php?Sports&p=49&type=2&sec=30&aid=20080429170)
By Dante Navarro
Wednesday, April 30, 2008
http://philstar.com

Eric Celino Spoelstra, a Fil-Am who once missed a crack at the PBA, will now call the shots for one of the teams in the NBA.

The 37-year-old Spoelstra, who traces his roots to San Pablo, Laguna, was named head coach of the Heat following the resignation of Pat Riley Tuesday, making him the first mentor with Filipino roots and youngest to ever coach in the league.

“I believe Erik Spoelstra is one of the most talented young coaches in a long time,” Riley, who steered the Heat to the NBA crown in 2006, told a news conference.

Spoelstra, son of Irish-Dutch Jon Spoelstra, a long-time NBA executive involved with the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets, said he’s proud of his Filipino roots even as he previously said he regretted declining an offer to play in the PBA.

Born in Portland, Spoelstra, whose mother Fe Celino is from San Pablo, Laguna, has been to the Philippines only once.

“I’m embarrassed to admit I’ve visited the Philippines only when I was three years old,” said Spoelstra in a previous interview with The STAR. “I’m definitely planning to go again. I have lots of relatives who live just outside Manila. I’m hoping that someday soon, I’ll be able to visit and maybe, do some coaching clinics so I can share whatever I know about basketball.”

At the time of his appointment as head coach, Spoelstra just completed his 13th season as a member of the Heat staff and his seventh in the role of assistant coach/director of scouting where he had the primary role of developing game plans for upcoming opponents.

Spoelstra was responsible for coordinating the video staff and advance scouts while also overseeing the development of scouting reports and videos. He has been in charge of the Heat’s Individual Player Development Program and has served as the head coach of the Heat’s summer league squad each of the past three summers.

Spoelstra originally joined the Heat as the team’s video coordinator in 1995. He spent two years in that role where he was responsible for preparing scouting tapes and heading up the team’s information technology for the coaching staff.

Born on Nov. 1, 1970, Spoelstra has become the NBA’s youngest current head coach, 69 days younger than the second youngest head coach, Lawrence Frank of the New Jersey Nets.

A 1992 graduate from the University of Portland, Spoelstra was the starting point guard for four years for the Pilots and was named the West Coast Conference Freshman of the Year. After college he spent two years as a player/coach for Tus Herten, a team in the professional sports league of Germany.

In a previous interview, Spoelstra said he’s aware of how basketball is loved by Filipinos.

“I know about the PBA,” said Spoelstra. “I know Billy Ray Bates played there. Jim Kelly invited me to play in the PBA some years ago and I think it was for the Coca-Cola team. I would’ve been eligible to play as a local.”

Cited by Sports Illustrated (May 30, 2005) for his work in honing star guard Dwyane Wade’s shooting balance and smoothing out his release after the Flash’s return from the Athens Olympics, Spoelstra said working with Riley and predecessor Stan Van Gundy has been an awesome learning experience.

However, Spoelstra will have a lot of rebuilding to do as the Heat, hobbled by injuries to key players, including Wade, and hampered by the loss of Shaquille O’Neal in a trade with Shawn Marion and Marcus Banks, finished with the worst record this season with a woeful 15-67 (win-loss) mark.

shyboy
04-30-2008, 07:30 AM
^ Di magpapahuli si Quinito Henson diyan.* ;D


If I remember it right, Quinito already interviewed Spoelstra several years ago. I think it was during the time the Heat won the NBA championship.

easter
04-30-2008, 07:34 AM
More Filipinos will now monitor the progress of the Heat. I will be one of them. ;)

amdgc82
04-30-2008, 07:37 AM
Spoelstra was Heat's first choice (http://www.miamiherald.com/594/story/513139.html)
Posted on Mon, Apr. 28, 2008
BY SARAH ROTHSCHILD
srothschild@MiamiHerald.com
www.miamiherald.com

Pat Riley could have conducted a wide-ranging search for his successor when he announced Monday that he was resigning as coach of the Miami Heat.

Several big name coaches are available this offseason, and the list likely will grow as teams bow out of the NBA playoffs.

But Riley knew the guy he wanted. He saw no reason to waver - or wait. The soon-to-be Hall of Fame coach had been grooming prodigy Erik Spoelstra - the guy who started with the Heat as a video coordinator 13 years ago.

"They're all competent, they have their own story," Riley said of outside coaching options. "I don't know what their story is. I know (Erik's) story."

Spoelstra is of Dutch, Irish and Filipino descent. He played four years as a guard for the University of Portland before spending two years as a player coach for a professional team in Germany. But coaching - not playing - was Spoelstra's passion.

He joined the Heat in 1995, working his way from the film room to the sidelines. He has played a big role in the development of players from superstar Dwyane Wade to undrafted rookies. Spoelstra, 37, is the youngest head coach in the NBA, 69 days younger than New Jersey Nets coach Lawrence Frank.

"I think I knew pretty early on, probably after high school, that I wanted to get into coaching," Spoelstra said. "I was obsessed with the game. So coaching was the avenue." For the past seven seasons, Spoelstra served as an assistant coach and director of scouting, and the last couple years coached the Heat's summer-league team. Spoelstra's duties have ranged from scouting to player development and delivering pre-game speeches and preparing game plans.

Spoelstra said Monday he has been involved in personnel decision the last two or three years. Riley would allude to Spoelstra's coaching future by saying, "You better get ready" to become a head coach.

Spoelstra insists he's ready. He said he intends to retain the coaching staff of Ron Rothstein, Keith Askins and Bob McAdoo.

"Change is about change, but it's also about continuity," Spoelstra said. "My skill set fits here."

Several Heat players embraced Spoelstra's new role, with Wade making a congratulatory phone call Sunday night.

"I believe in Coach Spo, and have complete confidence that our team will succeed with him at the helm," Wade said.

Heat veteran Alonzo Mourning, 38, the lone player on the roster older than his head coach, said he is "proud" of Spoelstra and believes the rookie coach can "take the organization back to our winning ways."

Riley was effusive in praising Spoelstra and believes he has the perfect makeup to relate to the players and thrive in his elevated role, saying Spoelstra is "one of the most talented young coaches to come around in a long time."

Riley is not alone in holding Spoelstra in high esteem. Within NBA circles, Spoelstra had been a hot commodity in recent offseasons, according to Riley.

"There have been a lot of teams that have called me about our coaches - and he's one of the most (sought after)," Riley said. "He would always say no. He had some great opportunities to go places where he could have been the assistant head coach and I was even negotiating salaries for him but he never went. He's a loyalist. He wanted to be here."

Spoelstra said he spurned other offers, hoping to later become Heat coach.

"As a young coach it's a tremendous opportunity to work for a first-class organization, under a Hall of Famer," Spoelstra said. "When you're weighing that against other offers it's tough to beat, even if you're getting a better salary or title. It boiled down to the family atmosphere and the way things are run at the Miami Heat."

The_Big_Cat
04-30-2008, 11:04 AM
^ Di magpapahuli si Quinito Henson diyan. ;D


If I remember it right, Quinito already interviewed Spoelstra several years ago. I think it was during the time the Heat won the NBA championship.

Yes the 2006 NBA Finals.
But It was different then, maybe we could get Erik's new perspective now that he is a head coach of an NBA franchise.

amdgc82
04-30-2008, 12:52 PM
Spoelstra rises up every rung of Heat ladder to take over
By TIM REYNOLDS, AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP)—Erik Spoelstra’s tenure with the Miami Heat nearly ended after just a few months when Pat Riley arrived in 1995.

Spoelstra was settling in as Miami’s new video coordinator in 1995 when the Heat hired Riley as coach and president. Riley had final say over everything, including staff, and wanted someone he already knew to manage that part of the team’s operation. But those plans ultimately fell apart, keeping Spoelstra’s job safe.

“I didn’t know his name for about three years,” Riley said.

Now, Spoelstra’s name follows Riley in the Heat history books.

After 13 years, Spoelstra—“Spo,” as many in the organization call him— finally has the best seat in the Heat’s house. Tabbed Monday as Riley’s replacement, the 37-year-old Spoelstra becomes the sixth coach in team history and replaces the Nets’ Lawrence Frank as the youngest sideline boss in the NBA.

The guy who traveled to see 120 games a year as a scout, who would stay for hours after practices to help All-Star guard Dwyane Wade hone his jumper and who turned down higher-paying opportunities elsewhere in deference to the Heat notion of loyalty has become, in Riley’s eyes, the right guy for any job.

“A lot of people bring a lot of what he has to the table,” Heat assistant coach Keith Askins said. “But what you don’t understand about Spo is that he’s a basketball junkie. He really studies the game, he wants to get better and he wants to win. I don’t think there’s a better X’s and O’s guy out there. He’s been under coach’s wing for some time now and it’s time to see how he can fly.”

Other than stints as coach of the Heat summer league team, Spoelstra will be a rookie, in terms of head coach experience.

But really, he’s a basketball lifer.

“I wasn’t totally blind to what head-coaching responsibilities are. I’ve seen this, closely, now for 13 years,” Spoelstra said. “I’ve watched it pretty intently the last couple of years. That’s just part of it. It’s going to be a big challenge. It’s going to be a big change. But I’m ready to take that step right now.”

Spoelstra’s father is Jon Spoelstra, who was an executive with the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets, and is probably best remembered in some circles for getting traded—he was shipped from the Blazers to the Indiana Pacers front office for one week of consulting in exchange for point guard Don Buse.

Erik Spoelstra was a standout high school guard in Oregon, then played at the University of Portland, where he was the West Coast Conference’s freshman of the year. After college, he spent two years playing professionally in Germany, before the Heat called with their offer to work at the lowest rung of the organization.

He jumped at the chance, worked his way up and has a championship ring—not to mention the respect of just about everyone in the organization, including Wade, who was among the three players Riley consulted about promoting Spoelstra before the deal was finished.

But even after 13 years, Spoelstra still doesn’t exactly look like a grizzled NBA veteran.

“Give me a few months on the job: I’m sure I’ll look quite older than I do right now,” Spoelstra said. “That’s just the nature of the game. I’m looking forward to that.”

He interviewed with Heat owner Micky Arison last week, a lengthy conversation to talk about the team’s past and its future. Arison and Spoelstra didn’t know each other well before that chat, but the owner came away convinced that Riley was making the right decision.

With that, the deal was done, and the Riley coaching era ended.

“Erik’s a guy who’s worked hard for the organization and has deserved the right to get this opportunity,” Arison said.

Stan Van Gundy, one of Spoelstra’s closest friends, knows what it’s like to replace Riley.

He did it in 2003, when Riley told him eight days before the season-opener that he was stepping aside and clearing the way for his top lieutenant. Van Gundy stayed in the job for a little over two seasons before stepping down for family reasons.

“I look forward to picking his brain as much as I can,” Spoelstra said.

Van Gundy now coaches the Orlando Magic—the team that replaced Miami as Southeast Division champions this season.

“From my selfish perspective here, I wish they would have hired somebody not so good,” Van Gundy said. “But from a personal perspective, I like Erik very much as a person; he’s one of my best friends. I have as much respect for him as I have for anyone in the business. I think he’s unbelievable, and I am really, really happy that all his hard work got rewarded.”

Five years ago, Riley thought the time was right to step aside.

Now, he says he is absolutely certain that’s the case.

“You get to the point, as a man, where you just don’t want to do something anymore,” Riley said. “It doesn’t mean that I don’t want to be part of basketball or part of a competitive situation or build a team. But in the best interest of the team, I don’t believe that I could give them my very best.”

He believes Spoelstra not only can, but will.

“He understands what the nature of this thing is,” Riley said. “It’s really about winning.”

Associated Press Writer Travis Reed in Orlando, Fla. contributed to this report.

stonecold316
04-30-2008, 02:10 PM
Lalo dapat tayo maging proud at kababayan rin natin ang taong ito.
:D :D :D

stonecold316

Dark Knight
04-30-2008, 03:20 PM
Lalo dapat tayo maging proud at kababayan rin natin ang taong ito.
:D :D :D

stonecold316


Obviously................... :P

batangueńo
05-04-2008, 02:36 AM
Papayag ba kayo na maging coach ng Philippine National Team si Spoelstra? ;D

tawkytawny
05-04-2008, 03:33 AM
Papayag ba kayo na maging coach ng Philippine National Team si Spoelstra? ;D


Well, it's too early to tell. Let us see first if he can reverse the misfortunes of the Heat before entertaining the thought of letting him coach our National Team. He hasn't proven anything yet as a coach.

sa_pula
05-04-2008, 10:33 PM
^yung maging coach ng isang NBA team malaking achievement na yon as a coach..

amdgc82
05-05-2008, 06:38 AM
NBA's Fil-Am Spice Boy Spoelstra heats up Miami (http://sports.inquirer.net/inquirersports/inquirersports/view/20080505-134567/NBAs-Fil-Am-Spice-Boy-Spoelstra-heats-up-Miami)
By Percy D. Della
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 01:51:00 05/05/2008

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA – "Where Amazing Happens" is the theme of the National Basketball Association's advertising campaign this season.

The Miami Heat's hiring of Erik Spoelstra indeed lends credence to the league's current branding effort. A promotional spin-off should be tag lined "Where the First Asian Head Coach Happens."

Spoelstra, the 37-year old wunderkind from Portland, Oregon refers to himself as a "Dutch-Irish-Filipino." His dad, Jon is a retired executive of the NBA's Portland Trailblazers. His mom, Elisa Celino, hails from San Pablo City, Laguna.

Spoelstra is now the NBA's youngest head coach. With his boyish looks, he appears even younger than his actual age.

There is no mistaking the guy's Filipino lineage, with his black hair, brown complexion and smiling, bright eyes.

You'd easily mistake this bachelor for one of the Spice boys of the Philippine Congress – those erstwhile 30-somethings critical of the Joseph Estrada administration in the late '90s and who played a key role in his removal from office.

Erik isn't just the youngest of NBA head coaches right now (he's 69 days younger than the New Jersey Nets coach Lawrence Frank). He is apparently the first Asian American to crack the head-coaching ranks in any of the three major sports leagues – the NBA, National Football League and Major League Baseball.

By naming the first Asian American head coach, the NBA has wittingly or unwittingly scored a marketing coup. It has amplified the league's popularity in the Asian continent, including the Philippines, a rabid basketball country.

And, all of a sudden, the NBA has just become more compelling to watch for the basketball fans among 11 million or so Asian Americans. Eric will be in their radar screen as he helps rebuild the 2006 NBA champion Heat, owners of the worst record in the league this season (15 wins and 67 losses).

Previously, Asian Americans felt a small sense of pride in Chinese imports like Yao Ming and Yi Jianlian who are making good in the NBA. They were walking on air when Erik was named to fill the shoes of Hall of Fame coach Pat Riley in Miami.

amdgc82
05-10-2008, 07:49 AM
Fil-Am coach proud of Filipino heritage (http://philstar.com/index.php?Sports&p=49&type=2&sec=30&aid=20080509103)
By Joaquin Henson
Saturday, May 10, 2008
http://philstar.com

Newly appointed Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra said yesterday he is thrilled to become the first Fil-Am named to the high-level position in the NBA and being “very proud of my heritage, this is a great honor.”

Spoelstra’s mother Elisa Caridad Celino is from San Pablo, Laguna. She is a UP Diliman journalism graduate and taught at the Mindanao State University in Marawi City before leaving for the US in 1966. Spoelstra’s father Jon is of Dutch-Irish descent and used to work in the front office of the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets.

A bachelor, Spoelstra has an older sister Monica who is involved in advertising and graphic design.

“I am currently the NBA’s youngest coach but not the youngest ever as Lawrence Frank was 33 when he was named head coach for New Jersey,” said the 37-year-old Spoelstra in an e-mail to The STAR. “As the league’s youngest coach now, though, I am extremely honored to have been promoted to this level with the Heat.”

Spoelstra said he was told of his appointment after several meetings with predecessor Pat Riley and team managing general partner Micky Arison.

“Over my 13 years with Miami, Pat has been an incredible mentor and has given me so much valuable advice,” said Spoelstra who was a playing coach for two years with Tus Herten in the German league before joining the Heat as a video coordinator. “I was both surprised and excited when he told me I would be elevated to head coach.”

Spoelstra said Riley is his biggest influence and mentor.

“Additionally, Stan Van Gundy is a close friend and someone who really made an impression on me with his passion for coaching and teaching,” he went on. “Other influences with the Heat are Ron Rothstein, Bob McAdoo who’s a Hall of Famer, Jeff Bzdelik and Marc Iavaroni – all of them showed such great enthusiasm for their jobs that it became contagious.”

In a previous STAR interview, Spoelstra said he was invited by Jim Kelly to play in the PBA but the opportunity to work for Miami came up.

Kelly, who is married to a Filipina, coached in Germany where Spoelstra played and was a PBA coaching consultant before joining the Toronto Raptors where he is now the director of player personnel.

“I really would have cherished the opportunity to play in the Philippines out of college but I also had some wonderful experiences in Germany and when I started my career with the Heat,” said Spoelstra. “I don’t have any immediate plans to visit the Philippines yet but only because I will be so busy planning for this first year. Obviously, this first year is extremely important and I have a lot of preparation to do. I’d love to spend time in the Philippines sometime in the future.”

Since the STAR broke the story about Spoelstra’s Filipino heritage during the NBA Finals in 2006, he has been deluged by requests for interviews and appearances by Fil-Am groups. That year, he was featured in a cover story as Miami’s “secret weapon” in Filipinas Magazine, a monthly publication for Filipinos in the US.

“Yes, I have been receiving more media requests from Filipino media over the years, especially since last week’s announcement,” said Spoelstra. “It’s a tremendous honor for me to receive the promotion from the Heat and to receive the media recognition that I have, including the cover story in Filipinas. I’m very proud of my heritage so all of the Filipino media coverage has been exciting for me to receive.”

Spoelstra, however, has been to the Philippines only once – when he was three years old.

Spoelstra said despite Miami finishing last in the NBA with a lowly 15-67 record this past regular season, he is positive about the future.

“Our first immediate objective this summer is to get our current guys, who are under contract, healthy, in shape, focused and ready to go when training camp starts in October,” he continued. “We feel very positive about our young, athletic core. We have the draft lottery on May 20 and the NBA draft on June 26. We hope to get an impact player in the draft then make a few key free agent signings to complement our team.”

When informed that San Antonio Spurs assistant coach Chip Engelland, Golden State assistant coach Keith Smart and Miami cager Earl Barron had played in the PBA, Spoelstra said he’ll talk to them about their impressions on the Philippines.

“Unfortunately, I haven’t had the opportunity to discuss the experiences of playing basketball in the Philippines with Keith or the others,” he said. “I’d love to hear about their experiences if the opportunity comes up.”

Spoelstra’s 67-year-old mother, fondly called “Baling” by relatives, has a sister and two brothers living in the Philippines. Her oldest sister Fe has passed away. A sister Esperanza resides in Naga. Brother Tony lived over 10 years in the US and is now based in Los Bańos. Another brother Cecilio is a surgeon at the Philippine Heart Center.

Spoelstra’s first cousin Dr. Andy Dimayuga of San Pablo said the family is proud that a Fil-Am has finally broken the coaching barrier in the NBA.

amdgc82
05-21-2008, 06:32 AM
Tracing Spoelstra’s roots
SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson
Wednesday, May 21, 2008
http://philstar.com

A phonecall from Liga Pilipinas president Noli Eala’s brother Dr. Juvy triggered a tracking process that led to unraveling the Filipino roots of newly appointed Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra.

Dr. Juvy said his San Pablo City colleague Dr. Andy Dimayuga is Spoelstra’s first cousin and could reveal details of the NBA’s first Fil-Am coach’s Filipino heritage.

Before long, Dr. Andy was on the line. His late mother Fe’s younger sister Elisa Caridad or Baling is Spoelstra’s mother.

“I’ve only met Erik once – when he was three years old,” recalled Dr. Andy. “That was during Erik’s only trip to the Philippines. I was in elementary school and looked after him. Five years ago, when I was on a fellowship in New York, I e-mailed Erik. He replied but because of work, we couldn’t get together.”

In all, Spoelstra has 13 Filipino first cousins on his mother’s side.

“Of course, we’re all very excited that someone in our family is now an NBA head coach,” said Dr. Andy. “That makes Miami our favorite NBA team from now on.”

Dr. Andy’s mother Fe passed away in 1989 and his father Leandro Sr. two years later. Spoelstra’s mother Baling, 67, graduated from the University of the Philippines with a journalism degree in 1964 and taught at Mindanao State University in Marawi City before leaving for the US to marry Jon Spoelstra, an American of Irish-Dutch descent.

Baling has one other sister Esperanza who lives in Naga and two brothers Tony and Cecilio, a surgeon at the Philippine Heart Center.

Dr. Andy referred me to his uncle Tony whom he said would be able to give more details about Spoelstra’s life.

A call to Tony proved productive. Tony lived in the US from 1990 to 2001 with his wife and four children and was often in touch with Spoelstra.

“I remember when Erik played for the University of Portland, he came to Madison, where we lived, to play the University of Wisconsin whose star player was Mike Finley,” said Tony. ”After the game, Erik was over at our house.”

* * *

Tony, 65, said he knows Erik to be hard-working.

“After graduation, he worked as a stockman at Nike in Beaverton which is close to where they lived in Portland,” said Tony. “His work ethic is exemplary. In every thing he does, he goes the extra mile. He won’t hesitate to sacrifice to do a good job. When he was a video coordinator for the Heat, he often spent nights in the office and slept in a couch. When he was a kid, he used to cut grass around the neighborhood and did odd jobs. To be hard-working is a family trait.”

Tony said Spoelstra’s parents met in Manila.

“Erik’s mother stayed in a dorm while she was a student at UP and one of her dormmates was an American,” related Tony. “One day, her American friend introduced her to an American tourist who was in town on vacation. That tourist was Jon. When Jon went back to the US, they continued to correspond. After a few years, Jon invited Baling to the US and sent a round-trip ticket. At first, my father wouldn’t agree to let Baling go. But in the end, Baling got his blessings. Anyway, it was a round-trip ticket so if the relationship didn’t work out, she could always come home.”

As it turned out, they got married. Their children are Erik and Monica who’s involved in advertising and graphic design. Tony said Monica was involved in creating the logo for the European basketball league.

“Erik loves Filipino food like pansit and adobo,” said Tony. “When I would visit Baling in Portland, I cooked for Erik. My children still live in the US and Erik is very close to them. One of my children is with the US military in Iraq.”

Tony said Erik’s father was a big influence in his passion for sports. He was a long-time executive with NBA teams in Portland, Denver and New Jersey and is a sports broadcaster. His grandfather Watson was a Detroit Tigers beat writer.

* * *

“I think coach (Pat) Riley noticed how hard Erik works and how well he relates with the players,” said Tony.“From what I know, he was being groomed to be head coach since two or three years ago. It’s a pressure-laden job. I’m confident Erik will do well as head coach.”

Tony said Spoelstra is a bachelor. “I don’t know if he has plans to get married soon,” he went on. “But he’s always so busy. He wants to visit the Philippines again and see his relatives. The problem is he only has two to three weeks of vacation a year and that’s not too much. Now that he’s the head coach, he’s working double time during the offseason to rebuild the team.”

Tony now lives in Los Bańos where his wife does research work for UP. His late father Martin was a UP Los Bańos professor who specialized in microbiology.

In an e-mail to The STAR, Spoelstra said:“I am thrilled to become the league’s first Filipino-American head coach. I am very proud of my heritage so this is a great honor. I don’t have any immediate plans to visit the Philippines yet but only because I will be so busy planning for this first year. Obviously, this first year is extremely important and I have a lot of preparation to do. I’d love to spend more time in the Philippines sometime* in* the* future.”

cobaltinee
10-04-2009, 05:20 PM
Yeah. i like Erik Spoelstra. He is a natural Filipino-American. He loves to visit in the Philippines. He is proud being work ethics. Proud to be pinoy. :)

________________
web hosting (http://www.webmasterztoolbox.com)