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danny
01-23-2008, 04:25 AM
http://www.canada.com/vancouvercourier/news/story.html?id=4707237d-1127-4ffb-8d93-0b2e0f1e155f

N-C double, eh?
Big leagues beckon UBC, SFU
Bob Mackin, Vancouver Courier

Was it any coincidence that Premier Gordon Campbell unveiled his $14 billion transit plan the same day that the National Collegiate Athletic Association voted at its Nashville convention to open the door to Canadian universities?

Campbell's riding includes Point Grey, home of University of B.C.'s main campus. But he's a Simon Fraser University grad (MBA 1978). If the NCAA admits both UBC and SFU and if the Broadway line gets built and connects with the Millennium line, then Metro Vancouver will have a "SkyTrain series."

UBC and SFU already meet, but football's Shrum Bowl and basketball's Buchanan Cup don't exactly bring city life to a halt. Both schools compete in Canadian Interuniversity Sport. It's such a poorly marketed entity that average Joes and Janes can't be faulted if they think CSI when they see CIS.

Joining the NCAA is akin to the Western Hockey League's Vancouver Canucks making the leap to the National Hockey League in 1970. It's even bigger, because the big league of college sports has 1,281 member institutions in three divisions. It would take until 3008 to play them all in every sport, so schools are placed in conferences.

Basketball is the most popular sport, with 1,026 men's teams and 1,052 on the women's side. UBC's new 7,000-seat Olympic arena would be perfect for division I hockey. Basketball, football and baseball? Division II; division I-A highly unlikely. Canada has suffered major foot drain in soccer. A successful division I-A program could be built quickly to keep Canadians playing and studying domestically. It would also be the best shot for either UBC or SFU to win national men's and women's championships within the first decade of entering the NCAA.

The NCAA was formed Dec. 28, 1905 by 62 football-playing schools in New York as the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States after President Theodore Roosevelt kicked off talks earlier in the fall. It became the NCAA in 1910 and held its first national championship in 1921 in track and field. NCAA adopted its 10-point code in 1922.

The Ten Commandments for universities and athletes included rules on conferences and amateurism, the freshman rule, a ban on playing pro football, three-year participation, no graduate students, faculty control, anti-betting, and a ban on playing for non-collegiate teams.

It's become a rather big business. NCAA's budget last year was $564 million, including $508.3 million in TV and marketing rights revenue. In 1999, it signed an 11-year, $6 billion deal with CBS for basketball's Final Four. Division I-A schools spent an average $27.2 million in 2003 on all sports.

danny
01-23-2008, 04:32 AM
NCAA to allow Canadian schools in D-IIThe Canadian Press

NCAA Division II delegates approved a pilot program Monday allowing Canadian schools to apply for membership as soon as June 1, which could lead to Canadians competing in some Division I sports.

The program was approved by a vote of 258-9 on the final day of the NCAA convention and takes effect immediately.
Details still must be worked out, but the concept is designed to allow Canadian schools to enter into the pilot program and explore membership. Schools that meet the June 1 application deadline could start the process of joining Division II as soon as the 2008-2009 academic year.

The program allows the NCAA to study any logistical challenges posed by teams competing outside the United States.

The University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University are among six Canadian schools that have discussed NCAA membership.

Simon Fraser belonged to the NAIA for more than 30 years before its American competitors moved to NCAA's Division II.

Some Canadian schools want to be able to award full athletic scholarships, which aren't allowed at Canadian universities.

http://www.cbc.ca/sports/amateur/story/2008/01/14/ncaa-canadian-schools.html

danny
01-23-2008, 04:41 AM
It seems that the most prestigous collegiate league in the world is opening up to Canadian Universities.

I did not know* that there are* actually 1,026 mens basketball teams in the three divisions of the US NCAA. Wow!*

Compare that to what we have back home. :D

danny
01-23-2008, 04:49 AM
To those who still remember , the Blue Eagles fought against the SFU Clansmen. Simon Fraser University ,located here in Vancouver, is expected to apply for the NCAA Division II.

danny
01-23-2008, 05:07 AM
Media clippings from Western Washington University:

Canadian schools may compete in DII
Pilot program allows schools to apply for membership Jan. 15, 2008

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - NCAA Division II delegates approved a pilot program Monday allowing Canadian schools to apply for membership as soon as June 1, which could lead to Canadians competing in some Division I sports.

The program was approved by a vote of 258-9 on the final day of the NCAA convention and takes effect immediately.

Details still must be worked out, but the concept is designed to allow Canadian schools to enter into the pilot program and explore membership. Schools that meet the June 1 application deadline could start the process of joining Division II as soon as the 2008-2009 academic year.

The program allows the NCAA to study any logistical challenges from competing outside the United States.

The University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University are among six Canadian schools that have discussed NCAA membership. Simon Fraser belonged to the NAIA for more than 30 years before its American competitors moved to NCAA's Division II.

Some Canadian schools want to be able to award full athletic scholarships, which aren't allowed at Canadian universities.



NCAA opens the door to teams from UBC, SFU -- but officials express caution
Dan Stinson, Vancouver Sun

Published: Tuesday, January 15, 2008

The door is now open to Canadian schools joining the NCAA, but both UBC and SFU aren't ready to step through it quite yet.

While delegates at the National Collegiate Athletic Association annual convention in Nashville approved possible Canadian schools membership on Monday, it will be some time before the University of B.C. and Simon Fraser University decide whether to seek membership in the U.S. college network.

Reacting to news that NCAA Division II delegates overwhelmingly approved a pilot program allowing Canadian schools to apply for membership as soon as June 1, UBC athletics director Bob Philip said: "This is just the start of a process that needs to be thoroughly discussed on our campus."

Philip's thoughts were echoed by Diane St-Denis, SFU's acting athletics director.

"This must involve discussions with many people on campus, not just those involved in athletics," said St-Denis.

The delegates' vote was 258-9 in favour of the pilot program on the final day of the convention. It takes effect immediately.

The pilot program could eventually lead to Canadian schools competing in some NCAA Division I sports. Several details still must be worked out, but the concept is designed to allow Canadian schools to explore membership.

The program allows the NCAA to study any logistical challenges from competing outside the U.S. Schools that meet the June 1 deadline could start the process of joining Division II as soon as the 2008-09 academic year.

"We were pretty excited by how it [the pilot program] was received," said Philip. "It was a good motion and it was well written. Now we begin a process of discussions on campus. There are a lot of things that have to be discussed, including finding a [NCAA Division II] conference to play in. Those discussions will be on a sport-by-sport basis. There are a whole bunch of different options."

Philip said those options include playing in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference and the Pacific West Conference of Division II. The closest school to UBC in the GNAC is Western Washington, which is located in Bellingham, and closest PWC school to UBC is Dixie College of St. George, Utah.

"It's great that the restrictions for NCAA membership have come off," said Philip. "But finding a conference to play in is another matter. We've got to discuss which conference best meets our needs for athletics. While most of our teams play in Canadian Interuniversity Sport, we have some teams, such as baseball, playing in the [U.S.-based] NAIA."

SFU is more evenly divided between CIS and NAIA membership. While its basketball, volleyball and football teams play in CIS, the soccer, cross-country and track and field teams compete in the NAIA.

"I'm pleased that the NCAA has seen the value of adding Canadian schools," said St-Denis. "But there's a gap between what we want to do and what we need to do. The questions include whether we're fit psychologically to move up to NCAA, whether we can compete at that level, and whether can we do it financially." St-Denis said SFU's academic faculty would have to be included in discussions about seeking NCAA membership.

"A move to the NCAA isn't just related to athletics," she said. "It also involves a change in how we approach academics for our students, and it plays a big part in the equation."

UBC and SFU are among four Canadian schools that have reportedly discussed NCAA membership. The others are the University of Alberta and St. Claire College of Windsor, Ont.

The University of Victoria has not expressed an interest in joining the NCAA, but athletics director Clint Hamilton said the university is keenly interested in the future of the Canada West conference.

"If UBC and SFU go to the NCAA, it would change the picture of the conference significantly," said Hamilton.

Any school looking to make the move to NCAA would have to deal with substantial changes in the recruiting of athletes. The major difference between membership in CIS and the NCAA is the way athletic scholarships are awarded.

In the NCAA, a Canadian university would be able to award a full-ride scholarship. In CIS, first-year students are able to receive a maximum of tuition, but only if they have a high enough academic average -- at least 80 per cent.

There would also be eligibility issues with hockey teams, as any player with past major junior experience would be ineligible to play in the NCAA. Many former Canadian Hockey League players play for their Canadian schools.

There is a provision in NCAA Division II that allows a school to have a maximum of one men's and one women's team participating in Division I athletics. That means if UBC is successful in getting Division II membership, its hockey team could play in Division I. There is no NCAA Division II hockey program.

If UBC and SFU are not accepted into a Division II conference, the only other option would be to play as an independent.


NCAA Division 2 welcomes interest
But CIS cool to the idea of dual membership Marc Weber, The Vancouver Province

Published: Tuesday, January 15, 2008

The door to the NCAA was flung wide open for Canadian institutions on Monday.

The door to the CIS might shut behind them if current members decide to go the southern route.

A landslide vote by NCAA Division 2 members at their convention in Nashville has brought the landmark moment of a Canadian school competing in the NCAA one step closer.

The vote was 97 per cent in favour of adopting the 10-year pilot program approved last year by the NCAA executive.

That means Canadian schools can now apply for Division 2 membership and could be playing in the NCAA as soon as 2009-10 (a provisional year), and be eligible to compete for national championships as soon as 2010-11.

The deadline for applications is June 1 of each year and both the University of B.C. and Simon Fraser University will be ramping up the pace of internal dialogue to determine their course of action before this year's deadline.

"It means we're going to get busier," said Diane St. Denis, SFU's pro-tem director of athletics.

Among the issues to weigh will be the question of leaving teams in CIS based on fit, or that sport not being offered in a particular Division 2 conference.

The NCAA told UBC athletic director Bob Philip that it would allow dual affiliation with CIS.

Don't hold your breath, was the message from CIS CEO Marg McGregor.

"Our membership will be the final determiner of this," said McGregor.

"But philosophically, the CIS wants to be made up of schools who want to be part of a Canadian organization.

"I don't expect that a number of concessions would be made in order to accommodate an organization that intends to leave and join the NCAA."

Currently, several CIS schools, including UBC and SFU, hold dual membership in the U.S.-based NAIA in sports such as baseball and track and field.

McGregor said those Canadian NAIA-affiliated schools are competing in sports not offered in CIS, or have historically competed there.

Both UBC and SFU's athletic departments have stated a philosophical alignment with the NCAA, largely based on their approach to athletic scholarships.

Should they go down this road, they would need to find a conference to play in.

Philip met with officials from the Great Northwest Athletic Conference and the Pacific West Conference in Nashville (see box).

"I thought they were really positive," he said of the talks.

"Many of their issues were addressed and the outstanding ones are centred more on the technical aspects of academics -- how we calculate grades, the SAT test -- just certain things we have to get decisions on.

"I think both conferences are looking to add members and there are a lot of positive things to look at there."

SFU has also pegged the GNAC as a strong option, given the fact that it's basically the same schools they used to compete against in the Pacific Northwest Athletic Conference of the NAIA.

"For us, it would be basically going back to our roots," said St. Denis.

Division 2 schools can have one men's and one women's team playing up in Division 1, with the exception of football and basketball.

However, with a moratorium on Division 1 membership until 2011, Philip said that was something on which they still needed clarification.

GNAC OR PACWEST

UBC has met with two Division 2 conferences -- the GNAC and PacWest -- while SFU has also named the GNAC as a desired destination should they apply for NCAA membership.
Here's a quick breakdown of the two:

Name: Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC)

Website: www.gnacsports.com

Established: 2001

Members: 10
States covered: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington

Sports: (Men) Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Golf, Soccer, Track & Field; (Women) Basketball, Cross Country, Soccer, Softball, Track & Field, Volleyball

Schools (location, enrolment): University of Alaska Anchorage (16,242), University of Alaska Fairbanks (9,380), Central Washington University (Ellensburg; 10,145), Montana State University (Billings.; 4,600), Northwest Nazarene University (Nampa, Idaho; 1,630), Saint Martin's University (Lacey, Wash.; 1,628), Seattle University (6,123), Seattle Pacific (3,773), Western Oregon University (Monmouth; 5,000), Western Washington (Bellingham; 13,069).

Name: Pacific West Conference (PacWest)

Website: www.pacificwestsports.org

Established: 1992

Members: 7
States covered: Hawaii, California, Arizona, Utah

Schools (location, enrolment): BYU-Hawaii (Laie; 2,400), Chamindale University (Honolulu; 2,132), Dixie State College (St. George, Utah; 7,000), Grand Canyon University (Phoenix, Ariz.; 13,000), University of Hawaii at Hilo (3,045), Hawaii Pacific University (Honolulu; 9,000), Notre Dame De Namur University (Belmont, Calif.; 1,600)

Sports: (Men) Basketball, Cross Country, Golf, Soccer; (Women) Basketball, Cross Country, Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Volleyball



http://wwuvikings.cstv.com/genrel/011508aab.html

danny
01-23-2008, 08:23 AM
The "opening" of the US NCAA is in stark contrast to the prevailing myopic sectarianism plaguing our puny pinoy collegiate sports.* * :(

Just a comment from a guy who just came back from a tropical vacation and now struggling in the midst of a* Canadian winter. Damn. ;D

Jeep
01-23-2008, 08:38 AM
^danny, call it inertia, lethargy, i.e., just the nice, comfy feeling of being in your own little world as opposed to the nervousness and fear that almost always accompanies something new (not to mention vested interests and the "old boys' club" mentality). there will always be resistance to opening up, to trying something new.

bigfreeze_bibby
01-23-2008, 08:56 AM
Since dikit dikit lang din naman ang U.S., Canada, and Mexico, will the U.S. NCAA also soon allow Mexican universities and schools to join the U.S. NCAA?

danny
01-24-2008, 01:44 AM
Since dikit dikit lang din naman ang U.S., Canada, and Mexico, will the U.S. NCAA also soon allow Mexican universities and schools to join the U.S. NCAA?


hahaha. Naunahan mo ako bigfreeze. ;D

danny
01-24-2008, 02:55 AM
Back at home, the tendency is to keep us all segregated. A lot of us enjoy watching the US NCAA but the powers that be, including the foot soldiers, would much rather preserve the status quo. March is coming. March Madness!*

When the* most prestigious collegiate league in the world adopted a cross border openness, our idea was to keep ourselves locked inside our own little fiefdoms and recite a litany of constraints rather than find*solutions.

Something is wrong.

The heck probably it's* the US NCAA that's crazy. What were they thinking?* 3 Divisions with hundreds of schools with thousands of different teams in different sports playing.* Now they are opening up to Canada?* They are nuts, eh?* :D

bigfreeze_bibby
01-24-2008, 08:48 AM
Teka maiba ko ng tanong, kahit ba division II (or III) university ka, you still have a chance of getting invited in March Madness?

danny
01-24-2008, 08:54 AM
Teka maiba ko ng tanong, kahit ba division II (or III) university ka, you still have a chance of getting invited in March Madness?


Hmmm. I don't think so. I thought March Madness is for Division I only. Hmmm.

BLUE HORSE
01-24-2008, 10:10 AM
You are correct Danny. The phrase "March Madness" is referred to the tournament sponsored by the NCAA for all division 1 schools in both men and womens basketball. The consolation price for those schools snubbed by the NCAA, they only pick 65 schools and the 2 lowest ranked schools play a do or die game as cannon fodder for the number 1 seeded team, is to play in the NIT which is also now ran by the NCAA. The selling point of the NIT is that the elimination games are actually played in school gyms but the semi and finals are held in Madison Square Garden. ESPN covers most of the NIT and all womens games while CBS holds the contract for March Madness.

Division II and III schools also have their own playoffs but they are not as well publicized as the NIT and NCAA Division I championship. Only the semi and finals are shown on ESPN.

It is my own opinion that the UAAP and the NCAA does not need to merge to have a successful national collegiate championship. They can co-exist and the same goes for the other leagues. What must first be agreed upon by all schools is to standardize and level the playing field like they did in the US NCAA. In football, who would have thought that mighty Michigan would be upset by a division II power in Michigans own field. They limit the number of scholarships offered, perks, who can play, academic requirements, etc. . The biggest stumbling block in the Philippines is the notion of having an independent professional body running the show with the necessary powers to sanction all teams.

The NCAA and UAAP can take baby steps that means something. Instead of imposing a unilateral merger of unequals, why doesn't the two league investigate immulating the Big 10/ACC basketball challlenge at the start of each season. Coaches can rank the schools depending on perceived strength and the top teams of each school face off, then the number 2 teams etc. . The ACC used to play the Big East but politics and geography was a big problem. The games must be played before the season starts because if the games are played after the championship has been won then there is no real incentive to play. Think of the games like the old LSGH/AHS dual meet with the league winning the most number of games having the bragging rights. Isama na rin ang HS games. This can all be done over a week by scheduling each team to play 1 game when all of the teams are still fresh. Just my opinion.

danny
01-25-2008, 01:51 AM
Blue Horse, I think that's exactly what the CCL is for. However, there is simply no incentive, especially for many UAAP and the NCAA schools, to really take this tournament seriously.

The constraints that were mentioned in different discussions were all trivial and secondary in my opinion. Jeep's comment is simple yet striking. It's the old boys club mentality. Yet, in principle, many of us would like to have a real national collegiate champion in the different sports.

The US NCAA's openness to Canadian Universities should give our local leaders something to ponder upon. After 2011, I believe these potential Division II Canadian Teams will be able to apply for Division I already. What about us? Will we still find ourselves segregated with Manila based leagues dominating the PR?

The move to have a true national competition is the vision of MVP. I believe our man would like to leave a legacy in collegiate sports.

danny
01-25-2008, 02:51 AM
Yet, I may be wrong about this whole oppening up by the Americans.

I heard some conspiracy theorists arguing that this is all part of the Establishment's design to create the AMERO. The currency that will replace the Canadian $ , American $ and the Mexican Peso. Baby steps towards a New World Order. :D

john_paul_manahan
01-25-2008, 03:37 AM
Teka maiba ko ng tanong, kahit ba division II (or III) university ka, you still have a chance of getting invited in March Madness?


each division has their own tourney.

that's the major diff in football. the division II and III have playoffs. division I is subdivided in the Bowl Subdivision and the CHampionship Subdivision.

BLUE HORSE
01-25-2008, 04:34 AM
Correct. The large schools involved in the BCS bowls may not want the extra playoff to determine the true champion in division 1 football when it means a dilution of the amount of money they receive from the bowl games. The bowl game committee will not want to pay extra money if the importance of their bowl is reduced. Millions of dollars are tied into these bowl games and in turn football and basketball revenue fund the financial needs of the other non-revenue sports.