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gameface_one
12-13-2007, 06:31 PM
I witnessed the time when I had to course thru the scalpers just to watch a Ginebra/Anejo game. Same experience with my Dad whenever he would tag me along to watch Toyota-Crispa games in the 70s and early 80s.

During those days, TV ratings for PBA games were skyrocketing - even out performing the telenovelas.

Now, the league's popularity has dwindled as indicated by a sharp decline in gate receipts and tv ratings.

By next week, the PBA will have a new Commissioner. I was informed that the candidates are down to 2: Lambert Ramos and Chito Salud.

What are the things that they should do to bring back the glory days of Asia's First Pro Basketball League?

Schortsanitis
12-14-2007, 08:46 AM
* Send a local player to the NBA (as if we have anybody right now good enough);

* Win at least the Silver Medal in the Asian Games.

aircanda
12-14-2007, 02:54 PM
Wild suggestion lang po..

pag-awayin ang mga players.. ;D tulad ng mga panahon nila jawo-fernandez.. inaabangan ng mga tao silang dalawa pag nasa court na sila.. narining ko nga sa aking mga kabarkada na sana ay hinde na pinagbati sila enrico-yeo para at least meron nang mainit na rivalry.. hehehe...

speaking of rivalry.. sana magpa-hype din ng rivalry ang PBA.. ipamukha nila sa mga tao na talagang nagkakainitan, lets say, Ginebra at Red Bull.. Tiyak na pagkakaabangan ng mga tao yan..

irateluvmachine
12-15-2007, 05:15 PM
maybe the question that needs to be asked is...

what was responsible for the PBA's glory days?

good rivalries? maybe so. wala na akong nakikitang classic rivalries sa PBA...last time i saw a rivalry so bitter in professional basketball was in the NBA...lakers versus kings. back in the "glory days", walang pakialamanan kung magka-sister teams yung magka-rivalry...anejo/ginebra versus san miguel, anejo/ginebra/gordon's versus purefoods (though nothing beats crispa vs toyota)...you had to be on one side or the other, di pwede balimbing. that's why i always considered myself an anomaly for being a die-hard purefoods fan...yet considering the vince hizon/early mark caguioa-era ginebra as my 2nd favorite team.

gameplay? depends on which school of thought you are from. some say, including many of my fellow gen-X'ers who grew up on pinball machine PBA scores, would consider the '80s as THE glory days. others believe it was the late '90s (immediate pre-MBA) when sportscasters (especially our favorite queenita) hyped up 60-58 snoozers as "classic games". either way, today's games, as i have observed, are neither as technical as the late '90s, nor as passionate as the pinball machine days of the '80s...

too much parity? as most of you may know, i'm doing lots of research on the pre-PBA era...and an extremely powerful team like caloy loyzaga's Yco teams of the '50s MICAA gave the rabid crowds a reason to boo, boo, boo the powerhouse and root, root, root for the underdog. yco had a virtual monopoly of the MICAA and National Open tournaments back in the day...

just my two cents...

tigerman
12-16-2007, 01:43 PM
Perhaps a highlight play like this will help the PBA...

enjoy! :)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=na3WP6rzP7E





USTE LO MEJOR!
VIVA SANTO TOMAS!

Schortsanitis
12-17-2007, 08:27 AM
Have the PBA adopt a community-based format.

oca
12-17-2007, 12:58 PM
The PBA of the 80s was a product of its own time, until the “corporate owners” purposely imposed a “corporate image” to everyone down the line.

The players then were very natural on court.

They speak as they would do so outside the court. Kung paano sila mag-mura sa labas, ganon din sa loob na court. Kung paano sila umasta sa labas ng court, ganon din sila sa labas. Yung nakikita natin oncourt, yun ang masasalubong natin sa labas in civilian clothes.

Until the “incorporation of the PBA”, players were players. Then, they were made* “salesmen”. They were players before, then ginawang corporate employee. That whatever they do is a reflection kuno of the corporation they play for!

Ngayon, ma-tabloid ka lang, tagilid na ang renewal ng contrata mo. Bakit, kryptonite ba ang tabloid sa paglalaro ng basketball?

The fans are not that stupid, that they will not know the player from the team. The team from the corporate owners. Vice versa.

Masyadong disente ang players ngayon. It goes against the very psyche of the Pinoy fans. Gusto nating yung “personal na labanan on court”. Aminin man yan ng fan o hindi, batid nya man o hindi, yan ang hanap niya.

Whereas, before the “incorporation” of the PBA, the league had a good number of rivalries and animosities among players and teams, mostly, maybe even all personal in nature.

The league then had not imposed stiff penalties/ sanction against “supposed unprofessional behavior”. The fines were minimal and does not serve as a deterrent for players to go at each other. There is a clear boundary to mayhem resulting to the end of one’s career and pure tough and rugged basketball. As long as a player is able to identify the demarcation, he shouldn’t fear losing his job.

Let’s not kid ourselves, the PBA* then “clicked” not simply because of the game per se, but more of the sub plots within the game.

Also contributing to the “seemingly lack of personal rivalries and animosities” was the PBAs offer to lend its players to the National Team beginning 1990.

From 1975 to 1990, PBA players hardly mingled with one another. That, imo, reinforced the rivalry and animosities.

Kung ano ang team mo, yun ang mundo mo.

But starting with the Asiad team of 1990, the top players from every team periodically intermingled with one another. They learned to live with one another. Makisama sa isa’t-isa. These top players became sort of ambassadors to other teams.

Nuon, walang umaawat na player pag may gulo. Pero ngayon, nanduon sa gitna yung mga “corporate good boys”. Umaawat at nagpa-pacify. Lintek! Wala namang mamatay dyan, ah!

The PBA lending its players to the NT broke the ice of that cold relationship that bred the rivalries and personal animosities.

Having said all of these, “How can the PBA bring back its old glory?”

I doubt the "glory". Pero ang popularity, pwede pa.

They just have to do away believing that a corporate image is what will benefit the individual corporate member and the league.

This is basketball. It is the "most intimate" among team sports. Just let the players be themselves on court.

Masyadong nang pa-disente ang PBA. It "kills" the players' personalities.

Schortsanitis
12-17-2007, 01:45 PM
One reason for the league's popularity back in the 80's, was the myth that somehow, the PBA players were just as good as the Chinese or the South Koreans, maybe even better.

Remember how it was always hyped that the country had the only other professional basketball league in world? A couple of exbihition matches w/ NBA teams also somewhat reinforced that myth. Another myth I also used to hear a lot before, was how PBA players were supposed to be, pound for pound the best players in the world.

It was under this expectation that was why guys like Alvin Patrimonio were able to secure P500k a month contracts. Aside from the glamour, there was also the expectation that Alvin & his like were, really, at least as good as the Chinese.

All of this came crashing down, though, when the pros finally got to play in the 1990 Asian Games, specifically when our all-star pros got bamboozled by China by 60 points. The public's expectation, as well as the league's popularity, started to tumble after that.

oca
12-17-2007, 02:39 PM
One reason for the league's popularity back in the 80's, was the myth that somehow, the PBA players were just as good as the Chinese or the South Koreans, maybe even better.

Remember how it was always hyped that the country had the only other professional basketball league in world?* A couple of exbihition matches w/ NBA teams also somewhat reinforced that myth.* Another myth I also used to hear a lot before, was how PBA players were supposed to be, pound for pound the best players in the world.*

It was under this expectation that was why guys like Alvin Patrimonio were able to secure P500k a month contracts.* Aside from the glamour, there was also the expectation that Alvin & his like were, really, at least as good as the Chinese.

All of this came crashing down, though, when the pros finally got to play in the 1990 Asian Games, specifically when our all-star pros got bamboozled by China by 60 points.* The public's expectation, as well as the league's popularity, started to tumble after that.


Does it follow that if we regain Asian supremacy with a team made up of PBA players, the PBA will regain its ol' glory?

Personally, I doubt it.

That the PBAs decline can be said to have started after the 1990 Asiad is, to me, circumstantial. The failure to win the gold could have happened in '94 or '98. It doesn't matter. The fact is, the "incorporation" of the PBA happened in the decade of the 90s.

If the PBA regains it's glory or at least the popularity it had when we regain Asian supremacy, then I may be wrong. I will be glad to be wrong. For then, I wala na akong off-season sa panonood ng basketball. As it is, I seldom watch the PBA now. Kaya matapos ang UAAP and NCAA, off season na rin ako. :(

I would be glad to be "active" year long.....

Schortsanitis
12-17-2007, 03:32 PM
Does it follow that if we regain Asian supremacy with a team made up of PBA players, the PBA will regain its ol' glory?

Personally, I doubt it.

That the PBAs decline can be said to have started after the 1990 Asiad is, to me, circumstantial. The failure to win the gold could have happened in '94 or '98. It doesn't matter. The fact is, the "incorporation" of the PBA happened in the decade of the 90s.

If the PBA regains it's glory or at least the popularity it had when we regain Asian supremacy, then I may be wrong. I will be glad to be wrong. For then, I wala na akong off-season sa panonood ng basketball. As it is, I seldom watch the PBA now. Kaya matapos ang UAAP and NCAA, off season na rin ako.* :(

I would be glad to be "active" year long.....


I can't speak for everybody else, of course, but I think it will. It is a turnoff to watch athletes earning so much, but not winning at a high level. I mean, we have athletes right now in other fields of sports who are excelling at a higher level internationally compared to our pros, but not being financially rewarded as much. So conversely, if an athlete is able to excel at the Asian Games level, then I think people will patronize & gravitate to it more.

mighty_lion
12-17-2007, 04:09 PM
Pasintabi ng konti. Medyo lihis ng konti but I think we have to start first on the problem sa marketing perspective.

Alam naman nating ang mga Pinoy eh die hard basketball fan. Hindi totoong Sepak Takraw ang national sport ng Pinoy. ;D Sa PBA as to what team to support that depends kung saan nila feel. Ika nga "where I belong". ;D Thats part of Filipino culture. Ganun lang talaga siguro tayong mga Pinoy, me pagkaloyal sa kung saan may cause. Sino ba ang pinakamaraming fans sa lahat ng teams? Barangay Ginebra. Bakit? Jawo may be instrumental to that but its the marketing perspective of we are part of "Baranggay."

UAAP and NCAA lang naman ang dahilan kung bakit medyo nasapawan ang PBA lately. Part of which dahil ang mga diehards has something to root for them which is the school pride. Only in the Philippines nga lang yata na mas kinababaliwan ang collegiate ball kesa professinal basketball.

Agree ako dun sa community-based teams na lang. One long-season per year. Then may off-season na hindi magcoconflict sa college ball.

oca
12-17-2007, 04:49 PM
Does it follow that if we regain Asian supremacy with a team made up of PBA players, the PBA will regain its ol' glory?

Personally, I doubt it.

That the PBAs decline can be said to have started after the 1990 Asiad is, to me, circumstantial. The failure to win the gold could have happened in '94 or '98. It doesn't matter. The fact is, the "incorporation" of the PBA happened in the decade of the 90s.

If the PBA regains it's glory or at least the popularity it had when we regain Asian supremacy, then I may be wrong. I will be glad to be wrong. For then, I wala na akong off-season sa panonood ng basketball. As it is, I seldom watch the PBA now. Kaya matapos ang UAAP and NCAA, off season na rin ako.* :(

I would be glad to be "active" year long.....


I can't speak for everybody else, of course, but I think it will.* It is a turnoff to watch athletes earning so much, but not winning at a high level.* I mean, we have athletes right now in other fields of sports who are excelling at a higher level internationally compared to our pros, but not being financially rewarded as much.* So conversely, if an athlete is able to excel at the Asian Games level, then I think people will patronize & gravitate to it more.*



When it does, I hope it is not just for a few conferences, but for a sustained period.

Just how it was for the entire 80s through the early 90s, except during the year '83 and '84 when Toyota disbanded at biglang nawalan ng rivalry ang liga, agrravated by the financial crisis that ensued in the same period when IMF and the int'l banking/ finance community imposed a moratorium on the Philippines.

Sana nga pag na-regain natin ang Asian supremacy, it would result to the resurgence of the PBA. Magkaroon uli ng character ang mga players at ang liga. Their brand of game has become boring to say the least. No creativity. Nothing surprises me anymore. It's basically basketball, Xs and Os. Period.

There's got to more in the game than just basketball.

Schortsanitis
12-17-2007, 05:12 PM
One thing I noticed about the PBA, though, is that they seem to have a DEEP resistance to switching to a community-based format.

I mean, look at the MBA: *An upstart league, w/c existed for only 5 years, compared to the PBA's 26 years (at the time the MBA folded up), & yet it managed to seriously challenge the PBA in terms of viewership & attendances. *Remember during one of the MBA's championship series, I think it was between the Cebu Gems & the Manila Metrostars, where the cities of both Mayors went out to bet 20 sacks of rice to the winner of the series? *The MBA then was THAT popular.

So the community-based format is a PROVEN format for success in terms of bringing in the crowds. *Despite such proof, though, the PBA still is not too keen on adopting it. *

I think its mostly because of the costs involved, but also I suspect there is also a little bit of pride in there. *If the PBA adopts the community-based format, then that would validate the MBA, a rival, perhaps the most serious threat in its entire existence of the PBA as a league. *Because of this, I get the impression that the league wants to do it "their way", meaning find a solution outside of what the MBA did. *

Outside of a community-based format, I really can't think of anything else that will bring back the glory days of the PBA, except possibly for them to win at least the Silver Medal in the Asian Games. *It is a much harder path to take, & one whose success is suspect, but I think the goal now for the PBA, is not just win the Asian Games Silver medal, but to exert as much effort in doing so. *If the people see the effort & desire, then they can sympathize w/ the league, & the players better.

This I feel is evident in the league's participation in the last Asian Games. *True, we fared miserably there, but the players played hard & gave it their best shot. *The people saw that, & were able to identify w/ the players better, resulting in what see now as an improvement in ratings & attendances, at least for the current conference.

pio_valenz
12-17-2007, 05:20 PM
Almost all of the reasons posted so far make sense. Another reason to consider is the fact that, unlike in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s, when there really wasn't much else to watch on TV, today the PBA has to compete with cable TV, the Internet, and other stuff that wasn't around 20 years ago. There's just so many other things for people to do nowadays.

bchoter
12-17-2007, 05:56 PM
Almost all of the reasons posted so far make sense. Another reason to consider is the fact that, unlike in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s, when there really wasn't much else to watch on TV, today the PBA has to compete with cable TV, the Internet, and other stuff that wasn't around 20 years ago. There's just so many other things for people to do nowadays.
Today it's not impossible for a kid to know Sakuragi but haven't heard of Kerby Raymundo.

oca
12-17-2007, 06:44 PM
Imo, the PBA will never go "community-based".

They have made themselves above politics. Not defined by political boundaries. They have made their players "salesmen" who must sell their products beyond the limits of their corporate addresses.

Do you believe those who control and run these corporations would willingly identify themselves with City Hall or the Provincial Capitol or a local community? Inevitably, that will be the consequence. But even now they would not allow themselves to be seen in public with these "public servants".

They are just tooooooooooooooooo corporate, so to speak.

They have decided to go "corporate" even before the MBA posed a threat to their existence.

If the PBA will undo its own act of making the league and all those involved in the league become "corporate", then they can become flexible in making the changes.

Just play basketball. Let the rules of the game define the competition and nothing else. Let the product name on the players uniform be just that-- a product-- and not an extension of the families or persons who control these PBA corporate members.

The public is intelligent enough to know what is basketball and what is the brand name on the uniforms and the company behind it and the families or persons controlling these companies.

Everyone in the PBA is sooooooooooooooo image conscious. Lintek. Just play basketball.

Yes, community based competition is prevalent and popular in North and South America and Europe. Basketball teams, baseball, football carry the names of cities. They were conceived as such to begin with. The MBA was conceived as such. Local businessmen financed the teams. Then,eventually, in Europe and the Americas, "non-resident" corporate entities were allowed participation. Now, many carry multi-national/ global brands. Either in their uniforms or playing venues.

But the PBA, from birth and even in the years when the members were still in the MICAA, they were not community based. Never was.

For the PBA to go community based, it will have to do the reverse!

Malaking paradigm shift yan. Ewan ko kung kakayanin yan ng PBA.

pio_valenz
12-17-2007, 06:55 PM
I happen to agree with the PBA's refusal to go community-based. The sad experience of the MBA showed that this format is simply not feasible. The MBA sold out most of its games in the provinces, but the bigtime advertisers, whose sponsorships are what keep ventures like this afloat, didn't care much about the provincial crowd. They didn't fit in the desired demographics.

And from a logistical standpoint, doing out-of-town coverage is very expensive, especially if you want to broacast two games in a row. That's because you will need twice as many cameramen, equipment, etc., plus travel expenses. Finally, provincial politicans will always want a hand in how things are run. That's also another reason the MBA died. Many of the provincial teams were used by governors or mayors as a vehicle to promote their popularity, so when they were no longer in office, they didn't give a damn anymore about their team.

oca
12-17-2007, 07:42 PM
Lessons from the MBA. A bit OT, pero gusto ko lang i-share.

This is not my observation or opinion, but that of a nephew who works for GMA7. This he said on the inaugural year of the MBA. Sabi niya sa akin, if this league intends to make money from TV ads then it will not live long.

I asked, "Why?"

Sagot niya, "Sino ba ang malalaking advertisers sa tv?

Tahimik lang ako....

Then dugtong niya...."...yung mga corporation na nasa PBA!"

Makes sense. Alangan naman mag place ng malalaking ads ang mga yun sa coverage ng MBA, eh miembro sila ng PBA!

I have read and heard a lot of opinions and observations on how and why the MBA failed. But what my nephew told me makes the most sense to me.

For anyone in advertising, you should know how much a San Miguel Corp account is worth to any TV / radio station or program, to broadsheets and other forms of mass media. During the time of the MBA, nandyan pa sa PBA yung RFM, Purefoods was still under the Ayala's.* Shell was still a PBA member yata. Of course GMC/ Alaska. Ang lalaking account yan, kung nakuha nila. But, that was just not possible.

Of course, it didn't help the MBA that they started offering outrageous salaries to "star players". It was intended to boost patronage and hopefully attract advertisers. But it didn't result to what was it was intended for. Kaya naging pabigat lang lalo yung mga players na kinuha nila from the PBA.

Hindsight daw is 20/20. But my pamangkin said what he said right off the MBAs inaugural year. He made sense and he was right.

Schortsanitis
12-17-2007, 10:30 PM
'Connection'

To me, the issue of new "distractions" like video games, cable TV, the internet taking away the attention of the fans from the PBA just highlights the fact that the connection between the PBA & the fans tend to be shallow.*

It's kinda hard to identify w/ a corporate entity, unless you work for that entity, or know somebody very close working for that company.* I mean, for example, I never drank any of Alaska's milk products.* My mom keeps telling me to cut down on my Coca-Cola.* It's just hard to go out & find something in common to cheer about w/ companies.

That shallow connection is the reason why people go out & end up looking for something more interesting.*

On the other hand, I was born in Davao, & despite the fact that I have spent more than 3/4 of my entire life outside of Davao, I still feel a tinge of pride whenever I think about that very promising Davao Eagles team w/ budding stars like Billy Mamaril, Donbel Belano & Peter June Simon.*

If you're a Cebuano, definitely you find it easier & more natural to identify w/ the Cebu Gems.* For Negrenses, they have the Negros Slashers.* In other words, fans tend to have a deeper, more intense identification w/ the community-based teams.*

This can also be seen in the NBA, wherein up to now, that league, since it is community based, is doing quite well despite competition from Cable TV, the Internet, etc.* The fans doesn't end up abandoning their teams even when something else comes along vying for their attention.*

'The National Team'

When the PBA allows its players to compete in international tournaments, they are in a way enhancing the connetion between the fans & the players (not necessarily the teams).* Against foreign teams, of course Filipinos will cheer & identify w/ their own, the ones representing the country.*

Who wouldn't be proud, when you hear news like that time when Asi Taulava went out to down 5 bottles of Red Bull just to be able to defend well all game long against the 7'3" Ha Seung Jin?

By enhancing the connection between the fans & the players, the PBA benefits from it indirectly as it will mean better patronage from the fans for the players & their teams.*

The problem w/ this is that it tends to be relatively short term, though.* After a while, past accomplishments tend to fade away, so the players will have to go out again to fight & possibly win more battles for the country.

oca
12-18-2007, 10:12 AM
Madaling sang-ayunan yung konseptong "community based teams". Madaling unawin yung "connection". Madaling maka-relate duon sa ideya na "we belong".

Pero, dahil ang usapan ay patungkol sa PBA, mahirap ito mangyari. Infact, tuwiran kong sasabihin, hindi yan mangyayari.

The PBA has even become elitist.

Come to think of it. In 32 years of existence, why haven't they expanded?

Most obvious is they have priced themselves too high. Napakahirap para sa isang nagnanais makapasok ang maging miembro.

Also, from time to time, someone from the PBA will say that increasing the number of teams will dilute competition, as you are spreading too few excellent players among so many teams.

Lintek!

Are they saying that in the same period of 32 years that they have been in existence, the level of play from high school to college to commercial leagues has not improved? Yung talent pool natin from 1975 to present has remained the same in numbers?

In 1975 and even up to mid-80's that may be true. But for the past 10 to 15 years, there are enough talents in the commercial leagues to allow the formation of 3 or even 4 teams. Expansion teams will lose a lot of games. Yes. But it doesn't mean they cannot compete.

Corporate na nga, elitista pa!

Liga daw ng bayan....sinong niloloko nila.

Maniwala kayo, kahit mag-champion tayo sa FIBA-Asia or Asiad, the resurgence that is expected to happen afterwards will not be sustained.

For people to gravitate to the league, there's got to be more than just basketball. Regaining supremacy in Asia is easily equated to being the best in basketball in the region. To validate your supremacy, even until the next event, does not mean people will gravitate to you.

We are a "personalistic" people. We love to emphatize. We love to symphatize. We are a very emotional people... fans. We want drama on court!

The PBA has become too businesslike. Lintek, may code of conduct pa nga ang mga players!

Just let the players be themselves on court. Let the rules of the game define the competition and not the image the corporate members would want to project.

To anyone who has work in a corporate setting in a multi-national or companies like those we see in the PBA, you should know the limitations and prohibitions in how you should conduct yourselves. Should the players be subjected to the same?

Let the players be themselves. Allow their personalities to come out.

During games, may mag-taas lang ng boses, technical na agad. May kasunod pang multa! Ano ngayon kung maya't-maya may reklamo ang player sa mga tawag? That's part of the game.

May maghamunan, technical na agad, may kasunod pang multa o suspension. Magpapatayan ba yan? Naghamaon lang naman, wala namang binitawang kamao.

Basketball wise, the PBA is the best we have in this basketball crazy nation. But, again, ther's got to be more than just basketball in the game.

dark_seid
12-18-2007, 03:27 PM
Almost all of the reasons posted so far make sense. Another reason to consider is the fact that, unlike in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s, when there really wasn't much else to watch on TV, today the PBA has to compete with cable TV, the Internet, and other stuff that wasn't around 20 years ago. There's just so many other things for people to do nowadays.



this was a discussion i had with a friend who loves to watch basketball. his observation was that cable tv (and subsequently it's access to nba) killed the pba. his premise was why should you want to watch fil-ams who while skilled and products of the u.s. ncaa couldn't make it to the majors. of course, the limited viewing time for us regular basketball watchers should be the pinnacle of the game as played in the nba. free time for only 2 hours per night, why watch the pba when the nba is also on the tube?

so maybe the glory days of the pba (where people from the streets, schools and up to the office towers) are talking about the upcoming games might not anymore be a possibility.

oca
12-18-2007, 07:23 PM
Sino ang nakakaalam ng statistics kung ilan sa Philippine households ang may TV?

Sino ang nakakaalam ng statistics kung ilan sa Phlippines households na may tv ang may cable subscription?

I am interested in knowing because, personally, I just don’t believe that Juan, Pedro and Maria have learned to love or like the NBA and other shows on cable because they have it on their tv.

If for every 100 households 90 has tv, and 30 of the 90 are subscribe to cable, then what happened to the 60? Of those 30 with cable, are all 30 not inclined to follow the PBA anymore?

There are a good number shows on ABS-CBN and GMA on the 5-10pm weekday timeslots that has high viewership. Why are they not affected by cable programming if the availability of cable is an issue?

At most, cable tv can be a “contributing factor”, but, imo, it is not the issue.

Maybe I am over simplifying or diminishng the cable tv factor.

Pero malamang, yung sagot sa tanong ko sa itaas, will dispel or reinforce arguments and/or opinon on the cable tv factor.

oca
12-18-2007, 07:34 PM
Almost all of the reasons posted so far make sense. Another reason to consider is the fact that, unlike in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s, when there really wasn't much else to watch on TV, today the PBA has to compete with cable TV, the Internet, and other stuff that wasn't around 20 years ago. There's just so many other things for people to do nowadays.



this was a discussion i had with a friend who loves to watch basketball. his observation was that cable tv (and subsequently it's access to nba) killed the pba. his premise was why should you want to watch fil-ams who while skilled and products of the u.s. ncaa couldn't make it to the majors. of course, the limited viewing time for us regular basketball watchers should be the pinnacle of the game as played in the nba. free time for only 2 hours per night, why watch the pba when the nba is also on the tube?

so maybe the glory days of the pba (where people from the streets, schools and up to the office towers) are talking about the upcoming games might not anymore be a possibility.




People talk about the games, but the very reason they patronize the league is because of the players. Not the teams because the brand sewn on that uniform has no relevance or significane to the man on the street.

Let's admit it, in the PBAs glory years, we were there because of the players.

But it would be wrong to say that current players have no charisma. Imo, league rules and policies has stifled the players from expressing themselves oncourt and even offcourt. Hindi nila maipahayag yung sarili nila oncourt, at dahil duon hindi natin sila makilala.

Naniniwala ba kayong walang malutong magmura ng p.i. sa mga iyan?

Gets niyo? ;)

Schortsanitis
12-18-2007, 08:57 PM
Personally, I find it difficult to watch foreign games long term, because:
- Its hard to identify w/ players who are as far from any Pinoy in appearance. In the US, the players are mostly tall, black super athletes, they don't look anything like most Pinoys out there.
- You only get to watch them on the boob tube, not in live play.

I think while most middle to upper class Pinoys are able to appreciate NBA games, the lower class Pinoys (which comprise the bulk of our population) aren't able to do so as well.

gameface_one
03-11-2008, 07:14 AM
Clean Living
PBA fans missing the good old days


By Manolo Ińigo
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 04:10:00 03/11/2008


Except for the recent Smart PBA Philippine Cup semifinals and the title series between eventual champion Sta. Lucia Realty and Purefoods, which attracted a lot of fans, one could see the alarming drop in attendance in the last few years. PBA chair Tony Chua of Red Bull and commissioner Sonny Barrios are aware of this.

The pro league cannot afford to lose the patronage of its fans. And I’m sure fans are looking forward to the good old days when they could watch quality imports and local heroes in action.

Gone are the days when Robert Jaworski, Ramon Fernandez and William “Bogs” Adornado reigned supreme. Or, for that matter, Allan Caidic, Fortunato “Atoy” Co, Philip Cezar, Abet Guidaben, Francis Arnaiz, Abe King, Samboy Lim, Benjie Paras, Alvin Patrimonio and Hector Calma, among others.

* * *

As far as I can recall, the PBA had its finest moments during its early years, when the fans and I enjoyed the presence of quality imports who amazed us with their cage savvy.

Among those imports worth mentioning were Cyrus Mann and Billy Ray Bates of Crispa, Byron “Snake” Jones and Andrew Fields of Toyota, Bobby Parks of Shell, Norman Black of San Miguel Beer and Pop Cola’s Tony Harris, who scored a single-game record of 105 points which has remained unmatched in the 33-year history of the PBA.

These imports dominated the PBA during the late 1980s and until the 1990s, drawing the basketball-batty crowds by the thousands.

But beginning in 2000, many imports became a pain in the neck due to their repugnant behavior.

* * *

I vividly recall an ugly incident which happened sometime in April 2002. In that incident, imports Lamont Strothers and Mario Bennett of San Miguel figured in an ugly display of basketball “hooliganism.”

In full view of the public, Strothers chased and cursed the Filipino referee and later threw the ball into the upper-box section of the Araneta Coliseum, taunting fans by taking off his jersey.

Bennett also showed his disrespect to the PBA and the public by likewise taking off his shirt.

As a result of their tantrums, the San Miguel management immediately sent the two home.

In another display of obnoxious conduct, import Robert Parker of Sta. Lucia openly argued and pointed his finger at coach Adonis Tierra during a game. Parker was likewise sent home by the Realtors for that misconduct.

In July 2002 at the Cuneta Astrodome, SMB import Art Long punched his Red Bull counterpart Tony Lang and threatened to throw a chair at the fans.

Long was sent home and replaced by Terquin Mott, who also became a problem for then coach Jong Uichico. The ill-tempered Mott slammed the ball on Lang’s head during a game and assaulted the Red Bull import on their way to the dugout of the Big Dome during a halftime break. San Miguel also sent home Mott after that.

* * *

In 2004, a returning Art Long, rehired by San Miguel for that season, misbehaved once more when he attacked Sta. Lucia’s Marlou Aquino.

Long was slapped a fine of only P20,000, a fine many felt was too light. They said the PBA should have banned Long for life because of his repeated misconduct.

Also in 2004, Talk ‘N Text import Jerald Honeycutt drew the public’s ire when he slammed the ball on the head of his opponent without provocation during the quarterfinals of the PBA Fiesta Conference.

Then, in full view of the coliseum crowd and those watching the game on TV, Honeycutt’s teammate, Asi Taulava, joined the fray when he was not supposed to do so.

Why am I writing about these incidents? It’s because I want the current crop of players to know that they need not resort to foul means to achieve their goals. As I have said before, hotheads have no place in sports.

Joescoundrel
03-11-2008, 10:22 AM
I'd have to agree with one of the above posts that it was the players - the true superstars - who made the PBA the rousing success it once was.

I further agree that people do not necessarily identify with the corporation so much as the players themselves. Even going back to the mid-1970's how many ordinary Pinoys could afford to buy a Toyota Corolla for instance? Perhaps they used Crispa t-shirts but then again how much of that had to do with the famed Redmanizers?

That is one angle I believe should be looked into: for the PBA fan is there any connection between the team/player they support and their opinions of/awareness about the mother corporation of said team/player. I'm sure a lot of fans know that Alvin Patrimonio won four MVP awards with Purefoods and he stayed loyal to the team from draft day to his retirement. But apart from selling traditional breakfast/snack meats, what else do PBA fans know about Purefoods anyway?

We know the corporation pours in millions for the operations of their PBA team. Looking at it from the other side, exactly how much does the team contribute to the corporation and its bottom line? Do corporations with a PBA team really and actually do better in terms of their bottom line and fulfilling their corporate mission statement? Or perhaps at an even more fundamental level: if we were to take a poll of the Starting 5 of each PBA team, would those players be able to answer basic questions about the corporation that pays them? A department manager, a sales guy, even perhaps a junior manager, would at least know the corporation's mission and vision, and how his department / position matters to the corporation's overall picture. Could the PBA players do the same?

Emon74
09-18-2008, 11:18 PM
Well, I have to modify my previous posts,

If the PBA is hell-bent to bring back its glory days, educate the players to gave extra effort to play for the fans, people pay to watch the games and players need not to act as masters and above themselves, how often do we see now players hurriedly going to the dugout after the game not even looking at fans around them.

PBA needs a PBL as a source for would be potential stars, the league is taking a step towards it with the plan D league, hopefully team owners can also give more priority to players from the south.