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chocoks77
10-26-2007, 08:29 PM
Guys, what can you say about the "new" PBA rules? Sarap panoorin parang basketball na may sabong na may sundot na mga suntok. Hehehhe. Just saw Roger Yap punch LA Tenorio sa sikmura. Balik sa panahon nila Big J wherein no blood no foul yata. Daming pushing and shoving. What are your thoughts?

kaybee07
10-26-2007, 09:12 PM
I just hope the players keep it "clean" even though they have the license to be more physical. I shudder to think that they are more likely to get seriously hurt because of the no harm, no foul policy being implemented by the PBA.

irateluvmachine
10-27-2007, 01:49 AM
haven't watched any game yet...but the scores are higher, many say it's become more exciting. if the game has become more physical, then well and good...pero sana wag maging parang WWE/UFC ang dating... :D

yokam
10-27-2007, 12:53 PM
I won't be surprised to see a lot of players and coaches with the tempers going way above boiling points.

sa_pula
10-28-2007, 08:57 PM
kahit nga si james yap na napakabait ay napuno kay Norman "cge babanatan kita"Gonzales ;D

AnthonyServinio
10-31-2007, 01:58 AM
* * *I like how the new rules have altered the PBA style of play.* For once, let the players work for their salary!* It's also high time that we weed out the sissies and 15/30 employees in the PBA and play it like it was during the PBA's first decade -- if a player jumps up in the air, he should not think as he is not even sure of where he's going to land!

dark_seid
10-31-2007, 01:14 PM
i finally saw a game on tv (magnolia vs coca-cola and some of the next game with sta. lucia vs talk n text). it's not as bad as i was imagining it. it's just a physical game.

maybe the players have been pampered with the no-touch type of officiating the pba has been using these past few years. i'm assuming that the league is trying to copy the nba by having more higher-scoring games.

Sam Miguel
10-31-2007, 04:35 PM
If anything it certainly returns the P back into the PBA. There was a time when Philippine basketball meant rough and tough basketball, giving new meaning to the term "cage wars". All of the great enforcers like Roel Nadurata, Tembong Melencio, Dave Regullano, Onchie Dela Cruz, Rudy Distrito, Ricky Relosa and of course Wang-Bu's idol the Big J, all helped many an RP Team strike fear into the hearts of even the biggest and strongest of opponents. It is high time this brand of MAN's basketball came back.

In an era of multi-million salaries and compensation packages the last thing any true blue hoops junkie wants to see are marshmallows like Jun Limpot and Marlou Aquino whining their way into bloated contract extensions on mere "reputation" and the negotiating skills of their agents.

Thank God for the likes of Homer Se, Ricky Calimag, Enrico Villanueva and Reynel Hugnatan, who remind all of us what it means to literally fight every day for your paycheck.

As the great Jose Lipa always says "EBREE WAN EES ENTITELD TO WAN HARD PAOL!" ;D

slugonice
11-01-2007, 07:41 PM
Let's scare the whole of Asia with the old-school type of Philippine basketball

irateluvmachine
11-05-2007, 12:17 PM
^actually, i think this will eventually return the PBA to its norm of the late '90s...the main reason why some of the early games were so high-scoring is because the refs were a bit whistle-happy and resulted in lots of free throws. but now that they've settled down, i think scoring is slowly beginning to trickle down...

i'll be able to judge for sure once i finally get a chance to watch again...probably later this week. but really...who cares about the scoring? IMHO, most fans preferred the low-scoring games of the mid-late '90s, but i'd rather see the philippines competitive again in the international circuit...and it doesn't matter if the pro games' scores are in the pinball machine ranges or closer to 50 or 60 in the defense-oriented "golden age" of the PBA...

gameface_one
11-06-2007, 08:56 AM
New PBA rules draw more fire



By Waylon Galvez
mb.com.ph


The PBA Commissioner’s Office believes that officiating has improved, but two veteran coaches disagree and are calling for a review of the new rule changes.


Yeng Guiao of Red Bull and Tim Cone of Alaska Milk are urging PBA officer-in-charge Renauld "Sonny" Barrios to take a closer look at how referees are calling the shots.

"I’m talking to (other PBA) coaches and they don’t know what a foul is and what a foul is not," said Guiao. "I’m still confused with the officiating."

Cone said the rule changes endanger the players’ career.

"I’m not saying the league is wrong or right in making these adjustments. It’s kind of a game of attrition. Normally, basketball is like a chess match. Now the game is like UFC," said Cone, referring to the contact sport Ultimate Fighting Championship.

"Whichever comes out bloodied at the end of the game might win it," added Cone.

Barrios had insisted that the referees are in control despite the rugged action on the court. But Cone and Guiao begged to disagree.

"It’s hard to run the offense. We can’t isolate at the post because there’s so much banging, pushing and shoving," said Cone. "People are driving to the basket getting bumped, getting hacked, and still not a foul. If we coaches cannot understand what a foul is, what more the public?

Guiao said the public has to understand the game in order to appreciate it.

Ryan Gregorio, who coaches the front-running Purefoods TJ Giants, said officiating remains inconsistent, but has learned to cope with it.

"We just have to roll with the punches and ride with the waves. Ang importante the referees are adjusting and my players are also adjusting. The most important thing is action and reaction. We are reacting positively sa officiating," said Gregorio.

Last week, Cone also criticized the way the referees handled the plays off the timeouts, saying: "There’s no sense of control out there on the floor, the way the refs took the ball on the floor coming out of timeout or break, nobody can organize anything."

Cone even likened the PBA games to high school basketball, which "makes (PBA) coaches look stupid."

In every timeout – 30 seconds or a full one-minute – the buzzer will sound with every 10 seconds left in the timeout and referees. As soon as the timeout ends, the referees will put the ball back in play.

The rule changes were adopted this season to expose PBA players to the international brand of play.

gameface_one
11-06-2007, 08:57 AM
Coaches push for review of PBA new rules

Tuesday, November 6, 2007
mb.com.ph

These coaches believe that changing the rules of the game is not the smartest thing to do in the PBA right now.

Red Bull’s Yeng Guiao and Alaska’s Tim Cone, two of the finest and most vocal coaches in the league, have raised serious concerns on the new rules being applied in the Smart Philippine Cup.

“We should revaluate our rules. It’s my opinion – to make an assessment. I’m talking to (other PBA) coaches and they don’t know what a foul is and what a foul is not,” said Guiao.

Guiao, the Pampanga vice governor shouldn’t be the one complaining as his team is up in solo second at 3-1. But he’s taking the cudgels for the others who have chosen to keep quiet.

“I’m still confused with the officiating. I’m not really sure what a foul is and what a foul is not. People are driving to the basket, getting bumped, getting hacked, and still not a foul.

“If we coaches cannot understand what a foul is, what more the public? The public has to understand the game in order to appreciate it,” said Guiao.

The PBA has adopted new rules that jive with the international brand of play, feeling and thinking that it would help the national team in its future campaigns overseas.

On top of the changes is the scrapping of the hand-check foul, giving players all the freedom to defend. But this has led to a lot of pushing and shoving, near-fights and technicals.

“I’m not saying the league is wrong or right in making these adjustments. It’s kind of a game of attrition. Normally, basketball is like a chess match. Now the game is like UFC (ultimate fighting),” said Cone.

“Whichever comes out bloodied at the end of the game might win it. It’s hard to run the offense. We can’t isolate at the post because there’s so much banging, pushing and shoving,” he said. – Abac Cordero

dark_seid
11-06-2007, 01:12 PM
Cone said the rule changes endanger the players’ career.


i am now going to wonder out loud.

how the hell does a more physical brand of basketball endanger a player? are submarining moves now legally allowed? are closed fist punches to the lower back being done in the paint? are moving screens/picks targeting the defender now being used out in the open?




"It’s hard to run the offense. We can’t isolate at the post because there’s so much banging, pushing and shoving," said Cone. "People are driving to the basket getting bumped, getting hacked, and still not a foul. If we coaches cannot understand what a foul is, what more the public?


isolation plays are not anymore effective in fiba games. so why go back and use them? weren't the movement and spacing of the triangle offense a big reason of the alaska success back then?




Cone even likened the PBA games to high school basketball, which "makes (PBA) coaches look stupid."

In every timeout – 30 seconds or a full one-minute – the buzzer will sound with every 10 seconds left in the timeout and referees. As soon as the timeout ends, the referees will put the ball back in play.


and finally, international play has less timeouts for coaches to utilize and affect the game's momentum. if the team on the court cannot learn how to dissect the defense or stop an offensive play, then they should be losing the game.


hmmm ... is this the same coach i admire so much? watching pba back then to see the chess matches between him and jacobs. working the refs, the rules and adjusting on the fly.

Semenelin
11-06-2007, 06:07 PM
“I’m still confused with the officiating. I’m not really sure what a foul is and what a foul is not. People are driving to the basket, getting bumped, getting hacked, and still not a foul.

“If we coaches cannot understand what a foul is, what more the public? The public has to understand the game in order to appreciate it,” said Guiao.


I actually like the physical play in the PBA but I agree with Coach Yeng. kahit magbanatan yun mga players ayus lng as clear kung ano ang foul at yun pwede. nanuod ako nun sunday ng alaska-welcoat and i saw a lot of shoving and even saw an elbow thrown. yun natechnical si coach tim kasi ang labo. medyo malakas na tulak yun nangyari pero walang foul. kung medyo naayus nila yun part do define what a foul is, ok na malamang yun mga tao.

Dark Knight
11-06-2007, 06:10 PM
Ang problema sa Pinoy players, kapag nalamang "no harm, no foul", tine take advantage na. Talagang nanadyang manakit para lang manalo.

Ang babaw ng pagkakaintindi sa bagong rule.

Pabor ako sa bagong rule na ito. It brings people to venue to watch. Naging interesado uli ang fans. Honestly, di na ko masyadong nanonood ng PBA dahil boring na. Pero ngayon, mas exciting na.

dark_seid
11-06-2007, 08:27 PM
^ hindi naman siguro taking advantage ... more like measuring the referees' interpretation of the rules. like how disadvantaged is player shooting with a hand on his back.

at kung ginawa mo pang DQ'ed on 5 fouls instead of 6 and a technical foul is equal to a personal foul (like in fiba) .. eh di kelangan na talagang pag-isipan kelan pwede gamitin ang hard foul at physical play. and kelan pwede uminit ang ulo.

gameface_one
11-07-2007, 02:43 PM
PBA to clarify disputed rules

League allays fears of restive coaches

By June Navarro
Inquirer
Last updated 10:54pm (Mla time) 11/06/2007


REACTING to brickbats thrown by the league's coaches, the Philippine Basketball Association has decided to clarify the controversial new set of rules that has transformed the action on the court into a highly physical contest.

PBA legal counsel Chito Salud said Tuesday the league's technical committee headed by Perry Martinez would try to explain the rules and their rigid implementation to the mentors.

Coach Tim Cone of Alaska has criticized officials for allowing flagrant contacts which he said disrupted the flow of the game while Red Bull's Yeng Guiao has expressed confusion over the league's definition of a foul.

"I think the sentiment all boiled down to one thing--these coaches are asking for a more constant implementation of the existing rules,' said Salud, son of former PBA commissioner Rudy Salud.

Salud stressed that a foul should be called when there is a clear and hard attack.

"The rules say that a foul takes place when a player holds, pushes or charges into an opponent--that is a foul,' he explained.

Salud added that the rules allow incidental contacts or the effort of a player to perform the normal movements in defense like hand-checks.

PBA chair Tony Chua earlier asked the Commissioner's Office to review the rules with the coaches.

Four games into the season, Guiao said his Bulls have yet to distinguish a foul from a clean contact. They will face the same dilemma when they tackle the Talk 'N Text Phone Pals Wednesday in the Smart-PBA Philippine Cup at the Cuneta Astrodome.

"I'm still confused with the officiating,' said Guiao.

In the first game at 4:35 p.m., the in-form Air21 Express take on the Sta. Lucia Realtors.

gameface_one
11-15-2007, 07:00 AM
Sports
Batting for consistency
SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson
Thursday, November 15, 2007
Philstar.com


PBA technical group manager Perry Martinez is aware that players are testing how far they can go with contact during the “adjustment” period. Referees, especially the holdovers used to being whistle-happy in the past, are also adjusting to the new orientation of tolerating incidental contact when there is no advantage gained by either the offensive or defensive player.

“I think we’re 70 to 80 percent consistent now with the calls,” says Martinez. “But realistically, even if we’re up to 100 percent, there will always be misses in a game. That’s how it is, too, in the NBA. Misses mean either wrong calls or non-calls. Right now, I estimate about six misses a game, including non-calls. It’s the inherent nature of the game that there are misses because referees are only human. Our job is to bring down the misses to zero or close to zero if possible.”

Martinez says one thing he can assure fans is the referees’ integrity.

“If a referee makes a mistake, it’s an honest mistake,” points out Martinez. “There is no issue of partiality, objectivity or fairness. All it boils down to is a consistent interpretation from all three referees in a game on what constitutes a foul.”

Martinez explains that under the current “raffle” system of assigning referees to a game, he cannot discount the incidence of poor chemistry. But during the playoffs when only the top referees are designated, Martinez guarantees more consistent Grade A quality performance.

* * *

This season, the PBA is employing 20 referees – five rookies, five veterans and 10 in the middle category, not too old, not too new.

In Martinez’ assessment, three of the five rookies are performing above par, three of the five veterans under par and the rest at par.

“The veterans admit they’re still adjusting and trying to break old habits,” says Martinez. “It’s good they know what they’re up against. That way, they’re aware of what they need to do to improve.”

PBA legal consultant Chito Salud notes that because of the new philosophy, games are now higher-scoring. “Before, we would get about three possessions a minute but now, we’re up to five,” he observes. “There are more scoring opportunities, less fouls and less free throws.”

Regarding the FIBA practice of referees handing the ball for an inbound without waiting for teams to set up, Martinez says it’s a matter of adjusting. “We’re not reinventing the wheel,” he continues. “We’re just implementing the rules. Coaches and players must be on their toes at all times to avoid getting victimized by ‘nakaw’ plays.”

Incidental contact is being tolerated under the new philosophy. No foul is called when a player makes an effort to reach the loose ball and incidental contact is created. A player performing offensive or defensive movement in the normal manner and makes incidental contact will not be whistled for a foul.

* * *

“All we want is to make the game more exciting,” says Salud. “A player fishing for a foul, like when he puts up a prayer with time running out and contact is made, won’t get the benefit of a call in all probability. We want to encourage players to play more passionately. We want the game, our product, to be more action-filled, more attractive to fans.”

At the same time, Salud says off-the-ball contact will be called if there is excessive holding, grappling or wrestling for position. On the perimeter, fouls will be whistled if an offensive player’s path is impeded by the defender and he is dislodged or displaced.

Unlike in the past when a referee’s discretion was limited and there was a presumption of doubt on his competence, the new philosophy allows a lot of latitude for judgment. It establishes not only a referee’s responsibility but also his accountability. The rule brings back respect for the referee who in turn, must earn it from the coaches, players and fans as he plies his trade on the floor, game after game.

muymuy
01-17-2008, 09:56 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4-EbC5faGQ

Woohoo Knockout!!! Si Sharma sinalo nang husto yung left hook ni Jondan. Calling Bob Arum are you there? this is a must see for you.