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pachador
04-07-2007, 02:58 AM
Heres the complete article from Asia-basket on China's plans for the Asian championship in Japan, but I would not trust it 100%. If I was Chot Reyes , I would still assume a worst case scenario wherein China sends it Team 'A'.

What is more interesting in the article below is the practice schedule of China's team 'A' :

China lists A and B National Teams and Plans Exhibition Schedule

by Arthur Volbert - Apr 5, 2007
China has named both its national team A team and its national team B team. The A team will play in various exhibition games this summer while the B team will play in the Asian Championships in Japan from July 28 through August 5.
China has named both its national team A team and its national team B team. The A team will play in various exhibition games this summer while the B team will play in the Asian Championships in Japan from July 28 through August 5.

Since China is automatically entered in the 2008 Olympics as the host nation, it has no need to win the Asian championship and can use that tournament as a tryout for younger players. Because the games for the A team are for practice rather than for national prestige, it can afford to use Ming Yao (226-C-80) and Yi Jianlian sparingly, and give all its top players opportunities to gain experience. It is especially important to give Yao sufficient rest this summer as he has suffered major injuries both last season and this season and China cannot risk that Yao will break down again in 2008.

The A team has scheduled games against NCAA competition. It will be interesting to see how the team fares against top US college teams.

There are 22 players on the A team and 16 players on the B team. It is possible that players will shift back and forth between the two teams based on performance. The A team has seven players who can play point guard while the B team has only two, Liu Xiaoyu and Luo Zhi. It is quite likely that one more point guard, and perhaps two, will be added from the A team for the Asian championship. There is also the World U19 Championship in Serbia from July 12 through July 22. Ding Jinghui, Li Xiaoxu, Zhou Peng, Liu Xiaoyu and Chen Jianghua will likely participate in that tournament.

Jiao Jian and Xie Libin did not make either team. Jiao is simply a tweener in international competition while Xie had a bad season this year after excelling the year before. Bateer has been left off either team and likely is now too slow to make the Olympic team. Ming Yao, Wang Zhizhi and Yi Jianlian are clearly superior to him at center and t*&^ Zhengdong, Zhang Songtao and even Mo Ke will be more effective at center in international competition.

Li Wei from Beijing Aoshen made the B team. He started ahead of A team selection Zhang Songtao for Aoshen's ABA team. He was better than Zhang in fast-paced ABA competition but Zhang may be a better fit for the national team. But Li does have an outside chance to make the Olympic team as a combo center-power forward. Zhang Jinsong, who played for the National Team in the Asian games, did not make either team but while he is listed as being born in September 1973, he is probably 35 years old or even older.



A team schedule:

May 17-21== Some games in China
Jun 14-26== Four Nation Tournament in China (Croatia, Italy, Australia)
Jul 6-15== NBA Summer League in Las Vegas
Jul 28-Aug 6== 3rd Stankovic Cup in China (Venezuela, Slovenia, New Zealand, Angola, USA-NBDL All-Stars)
Aug 15== Games in Germany
Aug 15-31== Efes World Cup in Turkey (Croatia, Latvia, Poland, Serbia)
Sep 10-22== NCAA teams in USA
Oct 1-7== CBA-NBL-Euroleague Challenge in China (Bennetton Treviso, CSKA Moscow, Sydney Kings)
Oct 17== NBA Preseason in China (Orlando Magic, possibly Cleveland Cavaliers)

A team:

Liu Wei 27 190 cm PG
Sun Yue 21 205 cm PG/SG
Wang Zhongguang 20 193 cm PG
Chen Jianghua 18 188 cm PG
Yang Ming 19 193 cm PG/SG
Li Nan 32 198 cm SG/SF
Zhang Qingpeng 22 188 cm PG
Han Shuo 18 196 cm PG
Wang Shipeng 24 198 cm SG
Huo Nan 26 198 cm SG
Du Feng 25 207 cm PF/SF
Zhu Fangyu 24 201 cm SF
Mo Ke 24 210 cm PF
Zhou Peng 17 206 cm SF
Wang Yong 21 202 cm SF
Gong Songlin 25 197 cm SF/SG
Li Xiaoxu 16 204 cm PF
Yi Jianlian 19 212 cm PF/C
Ming Yao 27 226 cm C
Wang Zhizhi 29 214 cm PF/C
t*&^ Zhengdong 23 213 cm C
Zhang Songtao 22 215 cm C

B team:

Zhang Kai 24 6'11+(211 cm) C
Li Wei 21 6'10(208 cm) PF/C
Gu Liye 20 6'10(208 cm) PF/C
Hu Ke 20 6'10(208 cm) C
Li Ke 25 6'9+(207 cm) PF
Yi Li 19 6'8+(204 cm) PF
Ding Jinghui 16 6'8+(204 cm) PF
Liu Xiangtao 27 6'8-(202 cm) PF
Wang Bo 25 6'8-(202 cm) SF
Wang Lei 20 6'7+(200 cm) SF
Chen Chen 20 6'5+(196 cm) SF/SG
Chen Lei 24 6'5-(195 cm) SF/SG
Yang Chao 21 6'5-(195 cm) PG/SG
Bian Qiang 28 6'4-(192 cm) SF/SG
Liu Xiaoyu 18 6'3-(190 cm) PG
Luo Zhi 20 6'3-(190 cm) PG

darkwing
04-09-2007, 01:58 PM
I've read the same article on Asia-basket.com. It's interesting to note that the China NT team B's head coach is A Di Jiang which probably is Adiljian, China's Mongolian and bald point guard during the 90's. If indeed China will be sending it's team B to the Asian Championships then our chances of making it to the olympics has greatly improved. I just hope that coah Chot wont just concentrate on beating the chinese,Tim Cone did the same mistake and they got blown off the court by the Koreans during the 1998 Asian Games. There are a lot of up and coming teams from Middle East particularly Lebanon, who beat the French NT during last years' World Championships. Qatar has a strong team backed by imports (posing as locals).

pachador
04-09-2007, 02:25 PM
yep yep.

1.) one team at a time focus. dont just focus on china. all opponents can be dangerous.
2.) different strategy for each opponent (if necessary)
3.) in-depth Scouting of the opposing teams
4.) better to cook own food. host country might serve spoiled or bad food
5.) get your own transport. dont depend on host country's transport
6.) mental conditioning against hostile crowds or hostile referees and developing a killer instinct

darkwing
04-09-2007, 03:53 PM
another factor to consider is bracketing, bear in mind that the Philippines has not participated in the last Asian Championships, and before that the country was sending amateur players resulting in poor showing. These are the factors used by FIBA in bracketing countries into groups wherein top ranked teams are divided into groups together with the lower ranked teams.The Philippines being bracketted in the same group with China is not a remote possibiity.

pachador
05-22-2007, 11:35 AM
Malaysia win over Philippines university Champion

by Chong Jzen - May 16, 2007
(Kuala Lumpur, May 13) Malaysia NT was win twice over Philippines university ST Thomas in a series of Friendly match. ST Thomas is the champion of the Philippines university basketball league.However, NT coach Sim Sin Heng is not satisfied with the players FT field percentage. Beside that, Sin Heng remind his players should control their temper when the opponent is playing rudely.
(Kuala Lumpur, May 13) Malaysia NT was win twice over Philippines university ST Thomas in a series of Friendly match. ST Thomas is the champion of the Philippines university basketball league.However, NT coach Sim Sin Heng is not satisfied with the players FT field percentage. Beside that, Sin Heng remind his players should control their temper when the opponent is playing rudely. In the second friendly against ST Thomas, the opponent are 8 players foul out due to rudely behaviour because they are not happy with the losing result since half time. "This is a good tutorial for every NT players to know what is the filipino styles of basketball, the playes should control their temper to continue to play well in the game while the opponent playing rudely" Sin Heng said.

The friendly match is arranged by Penang basketball association in order to give malaysia NT to preparing for the coming 7th SEABA host by Thailand. Sin Heng also said "Penang basketball association is do a very good job in arrange the friendly match, there are good enough in help me to test my player before SEABA".

The Roster for the Malaysia NT in against ST Thomas university is Tan Kien Hoong(6-3 G/F), Chai Chze Hian(6-0 G), Koh Way Tek(6-4 C), Francis Loh Hoo woon(6-3 C), Satyaseelan(6-1 F), Chow Kim Hoong(6-2 F), Chan Kek Tai(6-6 C/F), Tung Wen Yong(5-10 G), Helmi Rashid (5-11 G), Soo Eng Heng(6-0 G)


asia-basket.com

pachador
05-22-2007, 11:39 AM
Malaysia is ready for SEABA - news and NT Rosters

by Chong Jzen - May 21, 2007 Asia-basket.com

(May 21, 2007) Although without Ooi Ban Sin in the Battle for 7th SEABA, but surprisingly the two overseas player Chee Li Wei and Guganeswaran( both played for China, Fujian quanzhou HuaQiao university) are joined the NT to enlarge the ability to get better result in the coming game.

The Champion and the runner-up for this competition will be invited to play in the Asia Championship game host by Japan from July 28 to August 5. However Chee Li Wei and Guga is recently join the NT without any training with the team, but NT coach Sim Sin Heng is believe that they are not a problem for them. "Li Wei and Guga is always come back to play in AGONG CUP and NBL, and both of them is not first time to represent NT, the players is know each other, then we just need to train several times to recover their teamwork" Sin Heng Said. Sin Heng also hope that Malaysia NT can playing well in SEABA to win back the reputation.

Malaysia is the champion for 6th SEABA which host in KL 2 years ago.However with the champion title, but the glory is without participation of the South-east strongest, Philippines. So, President of MABA Dato Loke Yuan Yew is order Sim Sin Heng at least able to get silver for this competiton. He said"if you(Sin Heng) can bring Malaysia win over Philippines, then you will be the miracle person". Beside that, if Malaysia is unable to achieve what Data Loke Yuan Yew said, Malaysia NT will unable to get allowances for the SEA game at the end of the year. Therefore, the Journey to Thailand is actually stressful for the NT players.

Malaysia NT Rosters for SEABA
Name Height Club Position
Soo Eng Heng 182cm Segamat Rimba Timor G
Guganeswaran 180cm Melaka Chinwoo G
Tong Wen Yong 178cm Segamat Rimba Timor G
Chai Chze Hian 180cm Melaka Chinwoo G
Tan Kian Hoong 192cm Segamat Rimba Timor G/F
Chow Kim Hoong 188cm Segamat Rimba Timor F
Satyaseelan 185cm Segamat Rimba Timor F
Francis Loh Hoo Won 190cm Melaka Chinwoo C/F
Chan Kek Tai 196cm YSL C/F
Koh Way Tek 193cm Segamat Rimba Timor C/F
Ng Thiam Hong 194cm Segamat Rimba Timor C
Chee Li Wei 196cm Melaka Chinwoo C

Average Height:187.83cm

Head Coach:Sim Sin Heng

pachador
05-22-2007, 11:41 AM
how good is the current varsity team of Univ of Sto Tomas ???

christian
05-22-2007, 12:45 PM
Nakakainis basahin...

JonarSabilano
05-22-2007, 12:55 PM
Nakakainis basahin...


Oo nga. Wala pang scores...

Sam Miguel
05-22-2007, 01:00 PM
Nakakainis basahin...


Oo nga. Wala pang scores...


Jonar, I believe the uhh... quality of writing of asia-basket speaks for itself... ;D

JonarSabilano
05-22-2007, 01:02 PM
Malaysia is ready for SEABA - news and NT Rosters*
*
by Chong Jzen - May 21, 2007 Asia-basket.com

(May 21, 2007) Although without Ooi Ban Sin in the Battle for 7th SEABA, but surprisingly the two overseas player Chee Li Wei and Guganeswaran( both played for China, Fujian quanzhou HuaQiao university) are joined the NT to enlarge the ability to get better result in the coming game.*

The Champion and the runner-up for this competition will be invited to play in the Asia Championship game host by Japan from July 28 to August 5. However Chee Li Wei and Guga is recently join the NT without any training with the team, but NT coach Sim Sin Heng is believe that they are not a problem for them. "Li Wei and Guga is always come back to play in AGONG CUP and NBL, and both of them is not first time to represent NT, the players is know each other, then we just need to train several times to recover their teamwork" Sin Heng Said. Sin Heng also hope that Malaysia NT can playing well in SEABA to win back the reputation.

Malaysia is the champion for 6th SEABA which host in KL 2 years ago.However with the champion title, but the glory is without participation of the South-east strongest, Philippines. So, President of MABA Dato Loke Yuan Yew is order Sim Sin Heng at least able to get silver for this competiton. He said"if you(Sin Heng) can bring Malaysia win over Philippines, then you will be the miracle person". Beside that, if Malaysia is unable to achieve what Data Loke Yuan Yew said, Malaysia NT will unable to get allowances for the SEA game at the end of the year. Therefore, the Journey to Thailand is actually stressful for the NT players.

Malaysia NT Rosters for SEABA
Name* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *Height* * * * * * * * *Club* * * * * * * * * Position
Soo Eng Heng* * * * * * * * 182cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * *G
Guganeswaran* * * * * * * 180cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *G
Tong Wen Yong* * * * * * *178cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * *G
Chai Chze Hian* * * * * * * *180cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *G
Tan Kian Hoong* * * * * * *192cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * G/F
Chow Kim Hoong* * * * * *188cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * F
Satyaseelan* * * * * * * * * *185cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * F
Francis Loh Hoo Won* * 190cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *C/F
Chan Kek Tai* * * * * * * * * 196cm* * * *YSL* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *C/F
Koh Way Tek* * * * * * * * *193cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * C/F
Ng Thiam Hong* * * * * * * *194cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * C
Chee Li Wei* * * * * * * * * * 196cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * * C

Average Height:187.83cm

Head Coach:Sim Sin Heng







I've heard in other forums that Perpetual Help-Dalta has a couple of foreign recruits who stand 6'6" and 6'8". They are reportedly Indonesian and Malaysian (although I don't know which is which). It's quite a wonder they're not suiting up for their respective NTs.

JonarSabilano
05-22-2007, 01:04 PM
Nakakainis basahin...


Oo nga. Wala pang scores...


Jonar, I believe the uhh... quality of writing of asia-basket speaks for itself... ;D


Well, expected na 'yun. "ST Thomas University" raw, o... ;D

pachador
05-22-2007, 01:09 PM
merong 6'8" na 17 or 18 years old sa malaysia. his name is harvinder singh. bale bombay-malaysian ito siya.* basta singh ang last name ibig sabihin Sikh ang religion niya. ito ba kaya ang tinutukoy mo?
ito pic ng 6'8" na malaysian:
http://www.eurobasket.com/images/mas/harvinder%20singh.jpg

pachador
05-22-2007, 01:14 PM
these southeast asian players get experience sa UAAP or other Philippine school leagues then when they graduate, they will play for their country's national team and use the experiences they gained in the Philippines against us .

pachador
05-22-2007, 01:37 PM
malaysian National team loses to Taiwan's top pro club Yulong by only 3 points

Our cagers beaten by Taiwanese side , asia-basket.com

by Eurobasket News - Aug 14, 2006
Malaysia put up a spirited challenge but it was not enough to see them through against Taipei’s Yulong Club in their final match of the Philips Singapore Cup 2006 basketball tournament here yesterday. Malaysians were beaten 90-93 by the champion club from Taiwan to finish fourth in the four-team competition, which also featured the Melbourne Tigers and the Singapore All-Stars.
Malaysia put up a spirited challenge but it was not enough to see them through against Taipei’s Yulong Club in their final match of the Philips Singapore Cup 2006 basketball tournament here yesterday.
Malaysians were beaten 90-93 by the champion club from Taiwan to finish fourth in the four-team competition, which also featured the Melbourne Tigers and the Singapore All-Stars.
On Saturday, Malaysia were trounced 50-111 by the professional club from Australia in their opening match but it was the size and the height advantage of the Australians that did all the damage.
Against the Taiwanese, it was a different ball game.
At least Malaysia did not give too much away physically. From the start, the Malaysians, led by skipper Ooi Ban Sin, threw in everything they had and by the end of the first quarter, the score was 24-18 in Malaysia’s favour.
Ban Sin and centre Koh Way Teck were giving the Taiwanese plenty to worry about as they kept driving at the opponents, forcing them on the back foot for long periods.
But in the third quarter, the Taiwanese, with their experience and their overall height advantage, capitalised on the tiredness that crept into the Malaysian players to score a 26-14 run, which was to prove decisive.
Malaysia never recovered and a late fightback, which saw Way Teck top scoring with 24 points and Tan Kian Hoong with 15, was still not enough.
"We lost out in experience and the little height advantage the Taiwanese had over us proved very decisive. But we played well, especially in offence, and we passed the ball better too," said Malaysia’s coach Brian Lester.
(Courtesy of thestar)

AnthonyServinio
05-22-2007, 02:24 PM
how good is the current varsity team of Univ of Sto Tomas ???


* * *They are just the defending champions of this year's UAAP, ready to go for a back-to-back with an almost intact returning roster.* *::)

AnthonyServinio
05-22-2007, 02:33 PM
merong 6'8" na 17 or 18 years old sa malaysia. his name is harvinder singh. bale bombay-malaysian ito siya.* basta singh ang last name ibig sabihin Sikh ang religion niya. ito ba kaya ang tinutukoy mo?
ito pic ng 6'8" na malaysian:
http://www.eurobasket.com/images/mas/harvinder%20singh.jpg


SOMETIME AROUND 2000, the Malaysia Amateur Basketball Association (MABA) embarked on a program to discover tall youths for its basketball program. They would scour the country and offer their finds scholarships and a lot of other benefits.

I believe that it about the right time that Malaysia will be reaping the benefits of this program.

This same program was copied by the discredited Chinese-controlled BAP under the name of "Burlington Socks Tuklas Taas". Like most BAP programs, I don't now if they discovered any talent they could really call their true discoveries.

GHRanger
05-22-2007, 03:37 PM
Nakakainis basahin...

Oo nga. Wala pang scores...

Jonar, I believe the uhh... quality of writing of asia-basket speaks for itself... ;D
/quote]
Well, expected na 'yun. "ST Thomas University" raw, o...* ;D



OT: Masanay na kayo kung magbabasa kayo ng english na galing dito sa indo-china peninsula. It's a mix of brit english, mixed up subject verb agreements, and their local accents... first time i heard Ma-nglish and Sing-lish, medyo sumakit tenga ko... reading it is like a perpetual puzzle. :) Kung ganyan ang basa mo dahil kasi ganyan sila magsalita. :D

AnthonyServinio
05-23-2007, 12:52 AM
Malaysia NT Rosters for SEABA
Name* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *Height* * * * * * * * *Club* * * * * * * * * Position
Soo Eng Heng* * * * * * * * 182cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * *G
Guganeswaran* * * * * * * 180cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *G
Tong Wen Yong* * * * * * *178cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * *G
Chai Chze Hian* * * * * * * *180cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *G
Tan Kian Hoong* * * * * * *192cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * G/F
Chow Kim Hoong* * * * * *188cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * F
Satyaseelan* * * * * * * * * *185cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * F
Francis Loh Hoo Won* * 190cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * *C/F
Chan Kek Tai* * * * * * * * * 196cm* * * *YSL* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *C/F
Koh Way Tek* * * * * * * * *193cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * C/F
Ng Thiam Hong* * * * * * * *194cm* * * *Segamat Rimba Timor* * * * * C
Chee Li Wei* * * * * * * * * * 196cm* * * *Melaka Chinwoo* * * * * * * * * C

Average Height:187.83cm

Head Coach:Sim Sin Heng






* * *FROM WHAT I understand, the Petronas Team in the last SEABA Champions Cup is essentially the Malaysian NT.* So if the posting above is accurate, it means that seven of the 12 Petronas players will be going to Thailand:

CHAI Cze Hian
CHOW Kim Hoong
KOH Way Tek
LOH Hoo Won Francis
SATYASEELAN Kuppusamy
SOO Eng Heng
TAN Kian Hoong

* * *Therefore, the new faces on the team are:

CHAN Kek Tai
CHEE Li Wei
GUGANESWARAN
NG Thiam Hong
TONG Wen Yong

Of all the Southeast Asian teams, it is Malaysia that has had a long history of being the Philippines biggest headache!

gameface_one
05-26-2007, 04:56 PM
Baculi, Alas scouting SEAG rivals



By WAYLON GALVEZ
mb.com.ph



RATCHABURI, Thailand — With the strong possibility of facing the same teams in the 24th Thailand Southeast Asian Games, coaches Junel Baculi and Louie Alas arrived here the other day to scout the opposition.


The trip of Baculi, Alas and Albert Tirono was made possible through the efforts of PBL Commissioner Chino Trinidad and Harbour Centre owner Mikee Romero.

"This is a good opportunity for us to see the other countries which will be our opponent in the SEA Games," said Baculi.

The Philippines, which fielded in an all-pro team in this event, will be up against Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.

Alas said both Indonesia and Malaysia have improved tremendously as shown with their performance in the SEABA Club Championship held last month in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Alas and Baculi, however, are both wary about Singapore which is reportedly tapping some players from China.

But their main concern is Thailand which will be fielding – according to reports – some US-based players who saw action in the US NCAA Division I schools.

After the PBL Unity Cup, Baculi, who is likely to be named head coach with Alas as assistant, is likely to hold a tryout for the national team since most of the top amateur players, including JC Intal, Jason Castro and Marvin Cruz are turning pro this year.

"Most of them like Marvin Cruz, JC Intal and Jason Castro might not be there," said Baculi.

If Fil-Am Ryan Reyes is still available for the SEA Games, he’s likely to be included in the national team.

gameface_one
05-26-2007, 05:02 PM
Other RP team‚ here to scout opposition
By Nelson Beltran
Saturday, May 26, 2007
Philippine Star




RATCHABURI – The Philippines’ quest for glory in two different international tourneys started in earnest here yesterday with the SMC-RP team hitting the road in its Olympic bid and the Harbour Centre-Team Philippines, in the sidelines, scouting the opposition in its SEA Games campaign.

Harbour Centre sent here head coach Junel Baculi and deputies Louie Alas and Albert Tirona to scout the field in its preparations for the SEA Games in December.

To be composed of top amateur players, the Harbour Centre-RP team is looking to conquer host Thailand in the SEAG.

“We’ll scout the opposition,” said Baculi, tasked to win the tourney dominated by the Philippines since the country regained the crown from Malaysia in 1991.

Baculi’s main concern is how to form the team early, but he’s in the dark as to who among the PBL players will join the PBA draft in August.

Ken Bono, JR Quinahan, JC Intal, Marvin Cruz and Emman Samigue are among players reportedly turning pro. Players likely to be left and eligible for the team are Fil-Ams Joe DeVance, Nick Stephens and Ryan Reyes.

Baculio also considers collegiate talents but he doubts whether they would be allowed to join his program. He mentioned Jervy Cruz of UST, Mark Borboran and Marcy Arellano of UE and Rico Maierhoffer of La Salle.

“I’m looking to form the team before August then start training. The problem is that the PBA Draft isn’t yet held and the collegiate leagues still ongoing then,” said Baculi.

“Arrangements have to be done. We have to talk to many people and many organizations, and we need cooperation. Habang wala pa, what I’m doing is talking to the players personally. Tinatanong ko na kung mag-pro-pro na ba sila,” Baculi said.

pachador
05-29-2007, 12:10 PM
Expansion Ryukyu Golden Kings name Planells head coach*

by Kenny - May 18, 2007
According to The Japan Times, the bj-league's newest expansion team, the Okinawa-based Ryukyu Golden Kings, have named Hernando Planells Jr. as their head coach for the upcoming 2007-08 season. Planells has coached in the ABA as well as at high schools in California and Arizona. The 30-year old LA native has also worked for NBA director of scouting Marty Blake during his career in the U.S.* *
According to The Japan Times, the bj-league's newest expansion team, the Okinawa-based Ryukyu Golden Kings, have named Hernando Planells Jr. as their head coach for the upcoming 2007-08 season. Planells has coached in the ABA as well as at high schools in California and Arizona. The 30-year old LA native has also worked for NBA director of scouting Marty Blake during his career in the U.S.*

asia-basket.com

gameface_one
07-03-2007, 07:55 AM
Yi scores 20 in losing cause as US teens down China
abs-cbnnews.com

DALLAS, Texas (AFP) - Tajuan Porter scored 20 points and Stephen Curry added 16 to lead the US under-19 team over China 91-75 in an exhibition here Sunday that featured China's newest NBA player, Yi Jianlian.

Yi scored 15 points, 14 of them in the fourth quarter. He sank 3-of-8 shots from the field and 8-of-12 free throws, and grabbed eight rebounds for the Chinese squad, which was without Houston Rockets superstar center Yao Ming.

Yi was selected sixth overall last Thursday by the Milwaukee Bucks in the National Basketball Association Draft.

Zhu Fangyu led China with 20 points and Liu wei added 12 with Wang Zhizhi, China's first NBA player, had eight points and five rebounds for a Chinese unit that will spend July facing NBA talent in practice games at Las Vegas.

The US teens, who will compete in the world championships July 12-22 in Serbia, played their first game just a day after the final roster was selected.

"They respected China but the certainly didn't fear them because they all have played against good teams," US coach Jerry Wainwright said.

"For never going against a zone I thought we did a pretty good job. We got in gaps and our guards are so quick we could penetrate. Tajuan and Stephen played really well."

gameface_one
07-09-2007, 08:16 AM
Chot says RP can survive elims in Japan


By NELSON BELTRAN
The Philippine Star


TAIPEI – Having seen the caliber of Iran and Jordan in the Jones Cup here, RP team coach Chot Reyes is now more than convinced the Nationals can survive the Group of Death games in the FIBA-Asia championship in Japan later this month.

"Nabawasan ang apprehension. Now we know we can beat these two teams," said Reyes, having sized up the Iranians and the Jordanians whom the Nationals will have to hurdle to make the quarterfinal round of the Tokushima Olympic qualifier.

The Nationals dropped a close 70-74 defeat to the Jordanians Friday then whipped the Iranians, 89-79, Saturday.

Reyes believes Iran is a better team than Jordan.

"Iran beat Jordan for third place in the Doha Asian Games last year. Iran is taller. Our problem with Jordan is that their big players can shoot from the outside," said Reyes.

Incidentally, the Philippines is bracketed with Doha Asiad champion China, third placer Iran and fourth placer Jordan in the FIBA-Asia championship.

"It’s really a tough bracket. At least, we have seen Iran and Jordan. Our performance against them here is a confidence-builder," said Reyes.

Supposing the Chinese top the group in Tokushima, the Nationals should finish second to make the next round.

Man for man, the Iranians and the Jordanians are taller than the Filipinos. But the RP team has proved here that it can match up using quickness, physical game and good outside shooting.

The RP team did well against Iran and Jordan even with Danny Seigle and Renren Ritualo in the sidelines.

"May tinatago pa tayo, sila naglabas na ng baraha," said Reyes, noting that the Iranians unveiled here brothers Aidin and Nikkha Bahrami and the Jordanians their naturalized player Rashiem Wright.

"During a break in the Champions Cup, we played the Iran national team in a three-quarter tune-up game. Wala yung magkapatid pero tinambakan kami. That time, parang walang pag-asang talunin natin ang Iran," said Reyes, suggesting that his team has vastly improved.

On Wright, Reyes said the naturalized player is one individual who has made Jordan a tremendous force.

"Without him, Jordan is just an ordinary team. The good thing for us is that we have players who have shown that they can neutralize him," said Reyes.

pachador
07-15-2007, 12:22 PM
J.R. obtains citizenship, to play for national team

Asia-basket

by Kenny - Jul 14, 2007

In a shocking development, 6-year JBL veteran center J.R. Henderson (206-F-76, agency: Paris Global Sports, college: UCLA) of the Aisin Sea Horses obtained Japanese citizenship last week and will suit up for the Japanese national team when they play in the upcoming FIBA Asia Championship from 7/28-8/5 in Tokushima prefecture.
In a shocking development, 6-year JBL veteran center J.R. Henderson (206-F-76, agency: Paris Global Sports, college: UCLA) of the Aisin Sea Horses obtained Japanese citizenship last week and will suit up for the Japanese national team when they play in the upcoming FIBA Asia Championship from 7/28-8/5 in Tokushima prefecture. This tournament is the 2008 Beijing Olympic qualifier which means that the winner of the tournament will earn the right to represent Asia in the 2008 Summer Olympics along with the host country China.

Henderson, the former UCLA standout who was a member of the 1995 NCAA Championship team and played for the Vancouver Grizzlies of the NBA in the 1998-99 season, will be known as "Sakuragi J.R." from now on. His addition to the national team will no doubt boost Japan's chances of winning the tournament. Henderson had been working on obtaining Japanese citizenship for quite some time and it finally came to fruition last week. It'll be interesting to see how far Henderson/Sakuragi can take the Japanese national team.

pachador
07-15-2007, 12:35 PM
what i saw from his record is that he played in the PBA:
2000: in Aug.'00 signed by Mobiline (PHI-PBA) to replace Carlos Strong: 2 games: 13.0ppg, 7rpg




J.R. obtains citizenship, to play for national team*

Asia-basket

by Kenny - Jul 14, 2007

In a shocking development, 6-year JBL veteran center J.R. Henderson (206-F-76, agency: Paris Global Sports, college: UCLA) of the Aisin Sea Horses obtained Japanese citizenship last week and will suit up for the Japanese national team when they play in the upcoming FIBA Asia Championship from 7/28-8/5 in Tokushima prefecture.*
In a shocking development, 6-year JBL veteran center J.R. Henderson (206-F-76, agency: Paris Global Sports, college: UCLA) of the Aisin Sea Horses obtained Japanese citizenship last week and will suit up for the Japanese national team when they play in the upcoming FIBA Asia Championship from 7/28-8/5 in Tokushima prefecture. This tournament is the 2008 Beijing Olympic qualifier which means that the winner of the tournament will earn the right to represent Asia in the 2008 Summer Olympics along with the host country China.

Henderson, the former UCLA standout who was a member of the 1995 NCAA Championship team and played for the Vancouver Grizzlies of the NBA in the 1998-99 season, will be known as "Sakuragi J.R." from now on. His addition to the national team will no doubt boost Japan's chances of winning the tournament. Henderson had been working on obtaining Japanese citizenship for quite some time and it finally came to fruition last week. It'll be interesting to see how far Henderson/Sakuragi can take the Japanese national team.*

gameface_one
07-15-2007, 11:22 PM
Vogel drafted by SuperSonics
By Joaquin Henson
Sunday, July 15, 2007
Philstar.com



It’s a little known fact that Lebanese starting center Joe Vogel was picked on the second round by the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1996 NBA draft. The 6-11 beanpole, who hit 25 points – including six treys – in Lebanon’s 88-83 loss to the Philippines in the Manila Invitationals last Thursday, was born in North Platte, Nebraska, and played at Colorado State before swearing in as a Lebanese naturalized citizen.

Vogel, 33, played for Lebanon at the 2002 and 2006 World Championships.

Another US-born Lebanese cager is 6-9 Brian Beshara, now using the surname Feghali. His parents Tony and Chris are from Dallas. Beshara, 29, claims Lebanese lineage and is considered a “local” in the national squad.

Under FIBA rules, a national team may recruit only one naturalized player. If Vogel is Lebanon’s naturalized player, Beshara must be a local otherwise he wouldn’t be eligible. He joined the national team in 2004 and averaged 9.8 points at the World Championships where Lebanon posted a 2-3 record, beating Venezuela, 82-72, and France, 74-73, last year.

Lebanon coach Dragan Raca, 46, is from Serbia and has lived in Cyprus since 1990. He coaches the APOEL club in Cyprus where he played for 12 years and finished as the league’s all-time leading scorer. Raca used to coach the Lebanese team Sagesse.

Raca was hired to coach Lebanon exclusively for the FIBA-Asia Olympic qualifiers in Tokushima on July 28-Aug. 5. He took over the Lebanese team last June 1 and his contract expires on the last day of the Japan tournament.

* * *

Syria’s lineup is reinforced by two “BraSyrians” Eduardo Caviglia, now known as Farhat, and Marcelo Correa. They’re not naturalized citizens but locals because of supposed Syrian descent. A third “BraSyrian” Andre (Dede) Barbosa would’ve made the squad much tougher but the 6-5 Magic Johnson play-alike was disqualified from playing for Syria after it was discovered he suited up for Brazil at the Americas Cup in Venezuela three years ago.

Correa’s father Roberto is a former Brazilian national cager. Caviglia’s father allegedly left Syria to migrate to Brazil over 30 years ago. It is uncanny that three Brazilian professional cagers, not related to each other, claim Syrian heritage.

Former California State at Fullerton coach John Sneed was initially tipped to call the shots for Syria in Tokushima but in the end, the job went to Ulsame Samer Kayali and assistant Moustafa Mohammad Abo Sada.

Syria’s top gun 6-3 Michel Maadanli was the leading scorer in the recent FIBA-Asia Champions Cup in Tehran. The other Syrian weapon is 7-foot center Wissam Yakoub.

* * *

Only four players from China’s 22-man national pool are seeing action in the Manila Invitationals. They are 6-2 Zhang Qingpeng, 6-4 Yang Ming, 6-7 Wang Yong and 6-6 Han Shuo. Curiously, the four are considered “juniors” in the senior squad with Zhang the oldest at 21 and Han the youngest at 18.

Chinese head coach Jonas Kaulauskas, a Lithuaninan, sent his top assistant Adijian Chang Bin to sit on the bench for the four-team pocket tournament. Kaulauskas is busy with China’s A team training in the US.

The others in China’s lineup are standouts from the 20-under selection, in particular Yi Li, Zhang Kai and Gu Liye. Yi tallied 30 points to power China to a 98-94 win over Syria in the opening game of the Manila Invitationals last Thursday. The four recruits from the national pool combined for 23 points.

China’s B team will represent the Mainland in Tokushima because the A squad is playing in the Stankovic Cup to be held at the same time. China is seeded in the Beijing Olympics as the host nation so playing in the Tokushima qualifiers is inconsequential.

The Philippines is bracketed in Group A with China, Jordan and Iran in the qualifiers. The top two teams in the group will advance to the knockout quarterfinals while the last two will be relegated to the consolation pool for ranking purposes.

WampumTribe
07-16-2007, 12:24 AM
Qatar may soon be a regional sports power.

Not through gifted Qatari athletes but through the strategic solution they usually come up with: OIL MONEY.

Instead na homegrown, "home shopping network" ang ginagawa nila. They're buying foreign athletes left and right; offering them citizenships (and tons of money) to play for the Qatar flag.

They've got Kenyans in their track and field team, they once naturalized virtually an entire Bulgarian weightlifting team (who all tested positive for performance enhancers), i believe they've got non-Qatari Arabs in their basketball squad, and they were once about to "Qataricize" a third- or fourth-rate Brazilian for their national football team.

Hindi lang labour force ang imported sa Qatar (and other rich Gulf states). Pati national team players imported. At least yung mga Fil-Ams may dugong Pinoy maskipaps.* *

Howard the Duck
07-16-2007, 12:25 AM
is this the reason why qataris doesn't look like arabs?

WampumTribe
07-16-2007, 03:06 AM
is this the reason why qataris doesn't look like arabs?


Kung tall, dark and mahilig sa tisoy, ito yung mga "original" Qataris descended from Bedouins. Pag medyo fair-complexioned, nalahian na ng ibang Arabo. Jordanians, Lebanese and Syrians are generally light skinned, and their womenfolk (specially Jordanians) can be mistaken for Europeans. Tanggalin mo lang ang belo, puti (Caucasian) na. But the men will invariably sport distinctly Arab features (matangos ang ilong, hairy, and mahilig pa rin sa tisoy.) Kung malihis man ang itsura sa dalawang physical templates na nabanggit ko, chances are hugot na 'yun. Lalo na kung mukhang African.

Howard the Duck
07-16-2007, 06:25 PM
is this the reason why qataris doesn't look like arabs?


Kung tall, dark and mahilig sa tisoy, ito yung mga "original" Qataris descended from Bedouins. Pag medyo fair-complexioned, nalahian na ng ibang Arabo. Jordanians, Lebanese and Syrians are generally light skinned, and their womenfolk (specially Jordanians) can be mistaken for Europeans. Tanggalin mo lang ang belo, puti (Caucasian) na. But the men will invariably sport distinctly Arab features (matangos ang ilong, hairy, and mahilig pa rin sa tisoy.) Kung malihis man ang itsura sa dalawang physical templates na nabanggit ko, chances are hugot na 'yun. Lalo na kung mukhang African.


kahit kasi sa AFC Asian Cup, yung qataris mga maiitim. kaya pala. :D

gameface_one
07-17-2007, 09:28 AM
China to reinforce FIBA-Asia squad


By JOAQUIN HENSON

The Philippine Star

Because of China’s poor showing in the just-concluded Manila Invitationals, the team will likely be reinforced by at least three more recruits from the 22-man national pool for the FIBA-Asia Championships in Tokushima on July 28-Aug. 5.

PBA commissioner Noli Eala said Monday a ranking official of the Chinese delegation intimated there will be changes in the lineup for the Olympic qualifiers.

China enlisted four players from its national pool to combine with veterans from the Chinese league and standouts from the under-20 selection for the Manila Invitationals. Coach Adijian Chang Bin was visibly upset by the "B" team’s last place finish.

It was the "B" team’s first overseas appearance and exposed China as beatable in Tokushima. China posted a 2-2 record and lost a 90-85 decision to Syria in the battle for third place at the Big Dome last Sunday. The consolation was China won two of three elimination round games, beating Syria, 98-94, and host Philippines, 77-74.

China is bracketed with Jordan, Iran and the Philippines in Group A in the first round of eliminations in Tokushima. Philippine coach Chot Reyes called it "the group of death" because every team has a chance to advance to the quarterfinals.

In the Manila Invitationals, China showed its vulnerability by ranking last in field goal percentage (.412), rebounding (36.7), field goal percentage allowed (.525) and fastbreak points allowed (16.8). The stats pointed to deficiencies on both ends of the floor.

"It wasn’t mentioned who exactly will be the replacements but definitely, not their NBA guys," said Eala, referring to Yao Ming, Wang Zhizhi, Sun Yue and Yi Jianlian. "I think the Chinese team will get a center, a power forward and a guard. But even then, they’re still vulnerable."

Eala said he was told the "B" team had hardly played together before flying to Manila. The consensus was the team appeared to be badly coached. Adijian, an assistant in Chinese national team coach Jonas Kaulauskas‚ staff, was assigned to call the shots for the "B" squad in Tokushima.

China is sending its "B" team to Tokushima because Kaulauskas is fielding the top squad in the Stankovic Cup on July 28-Aug. 2 in Guangzhou and Macau. Besides, there is no incentive for China to win in Tokushima because it is automatically seeded into the 12-team basketball tournament in Beijing next year as the host country.

But Eala said China will play for pride in the Olympic qualifiers. "With the lineup they played in the Invitationals, maybe even Jordan has a chance to beat China," continued Eala. "I’m sure China will find it unacceptable to be eliminated in the first round."

Among the national pool players who may be tapped to reinforce China in Tokushima are 7-foot center Tang Zhengdong, 6-5 guard Gong Songlin, 6-6 forward Zhu Fangyu and 7-1 center Zhang Song Tao. The four players are not in the "A" roster.

The "B" team that played in the Invitationals featured four national pool players – 6-2 Zhang Qingpeng, 6-4 Yang Ming, 6-7 Wang Yong and 6-6 Han Shuo but none averaged in double digits. The leading scorers were 6-11 Yi Li (15.3), 6-11 Zhang Kai (12.0) and 6-10 Li Ke (10.5). Li, 27, played on the Chinese squad that took the gold medal at the Asian Games last year.

Eala said since the Jones Cup, the Philippine team has made clear headway.

"Chot has started using a more defined rotation of players," he added. "All credit goes to the coaching staff and the team. They’re playing with lots of pride, a sense of urgency, a clear purpose and tons of energy. Chot is at his coaching best – looking for mismatches, maximizing strengths of the team and defining roles for everyone. The assistant coaches are working hard, scouting, studying opponents and preparing the gameplan. The players are driven and focused. (Team manager) Robert (Non) is giving San Miguel’s all-out support. It’s been an entire team effort.

"As for me, I just explained to the team what their laptops and modern devices do not show. The eagerness of all the fans to see some respect for the Philippines, the pride of the Filipino in our game and how grateful the nation is for what they’re doing. More than victory, it’s respect that we’re gaining."

WampumTribe
07-17-2007, 10:36 PM
is this the reason why qataris doesn't look like arabs?


Kung tall, dark and mahilig sa tisoy, ito yung mga "original" Qataris descended from Bedouins. Pag medyo fair-complexioned, nalahian na ng ibang Arabo.* Jordanians, Lebanese and Syrians are generally light skinned, and their womenfolk (specially Jordanians) can be mistaken for Europeans. Tanggalin mo lang ang belo, puti (Caucasian) na. But the men will invariably sport distinctly Arab features (matangos ang ilong, hairy, and mahilig pa rin sa tisoy.) Kung malihis man ang itsura sa dalawang physical templates na nabanggit ko, chances are hugot na 'yun. Lalo na kung mukhang African.*


kahit kasi sa AFC Asian Cup, yung qataris mga maiitim. kaya pala. :D


And their star striker – Sebastian Soria – is an "ex-Uruguayan."

pachador
07-20-2007, 01:08 PM
looks like our rivals are making some last minute preparations:

3 Nations Tournament [Jul 21-23 China]

July 21, Qatar vs. Jordan
July 22, China "B" vs. Jordan
July 23, China "B" vs. Qatar

from: interbasket

pachador
09-21-2007, 03:41 AM
Our neigboring countries are not getting left behind, They are taking steps to improve the competition level in their league. The following are some of the import players playing in the Malaysian National league:

Lau Bik Ing - 5'11" Australian-Malaysian - played in the Australia semi-pro league ABA,representing Hill Hornets.

Chris Kuete - 6'5"- Cameroon

Emany Meka Samuel 6'3" -Nigeria(?)

Malaysian national league website:

http://nbl.com.my/news.php

pachador
10-10-2007, 07:29 AM
It looks like our neighboring ASEAN countries are on the same level as NBC which is lower(?) than PBL. I am not sure if NBC is lower than MVBA or about the same. I hope tuloy na yung planned regional SBP championships para we have an idea of the skill level ng NBC versus PBL versus MVBA and so forth:

NBC Spring Cooking Oil lost to Malaysia NT; finished deadlast in Taiwan tournament

by Hector Santos - Oct 7, 2007
NBC Spring Cooking Oil suffered what seems to be a nightmare after losing this time against the Malaysian National Team in the end of the 2007 Guanhu Cup Invitational Tournament in Taiwan. The Malaysian National Team, which used this tournament as preparation for the coming SEA Games in Thailand, proved their supremacy against the import led-Filipino squad via a 82-77 win.
NBC Spring Cooking Oil suffered what seems to be a nightmare after losing this time against the Malaysian National Team in the end of the 2007 Guanhu Cup Invitational Tournament in Taiwan.

The Malaysian National Team, which used this tournament as preparation for the coming SEA Games in Thailand, proved their supremacy against the import led-Filipino squad via a 82-77 win.

The team which consists of NBC selection along with two imports finished a very disappointing dead last among ten teams that participated.

Dacin Tigers of Taiwan's SBL won the tournament after beating S. Korea's Kyung Hee University, 76-71.

Guanhu Cup placing:
1. Dacin Tigers
2. Kyung Hee University
3. Yulon Dinos
4. dmedia
5. Ryukyu Golden King
6. Taiwan Beer
7. Afghanistan NT
8. Pure Youth
9. Malaysia NT
10. NBC-Spring Cooking Oil


NBC-Spring Cooking Oil lost anew, will next face SBL's Dacin


by Hector Santos - Oct 4, 2007
HUA Lien, Taiwan - The NBC-Spring Cooking Oil lost anew to drop out of the title race in the Annual Kwan Hu Probation Basketball tournament here. The team of NBC President Nathaniel “Tac” Padilla and EVP Mayor Bambol Tolentino fell to their second straight loss against USA Velocity Athletics.
HUA Lien, Taiwan - The NBC-Spring Cooking Oil lost anew to drop out of the title race in the Annual Kwan Hu Probation Basketball tournament here.

The team of NBC President Nathaniel “Tac” Padilla and EVP Mayor Bambol Tolentino fell to their second straight loss against USA Velocity Athletics.

USA Velocity Athletics, which was composed of American and Middle Eastern players, were led by Afganistan national team standouts Bilal Azizi (187-F-85) and Nari Mashriqi.

Ex-pros Niño Marquez and EJ Feihl finished with 25 and 12 points, respectively, for the Filipino quintet.

The Cooking Oil Masters will next face Taiwan SBL's Dacin.

A win will move them to the battle for the third place.

The NBC-backed squad outfitted by Champion Sportswear lost to Japan's Ryukyu Golden Kings, 96-81, in the opening day.

Ghostrider
10-10-2007, 11:08 AM
^^

We'll have to check the team composition and who were the "imports" for Spring Cooking Oil?

To put it this way, the Ateneo men's basketball team beat Spring Cooking Oil twice during the preseason. Ken Barracoso, Eman Monfort and Nonoy Baclao led the Ateneo charge during both games.

Baka pang collegiate level lang ang ating neighboring ASEAN countries.

gameface_one
01-12-2008, 11:01 AM
Chinese team out of basketball league playoffs

Agence France-Presse

BEIJING - Title contenders Xinjiang Guanghui have been kicked out of the Chinese Basketball Association playoffs for fielding an ineligible player, state media reported Friday.

The team, which finished second in the league during the regular season, broke a rule that says clubs can field no more than two foreign players, the China Daily said.

Xinjiang were stripped of all points from 18 games in which the third foreign player, Vietnamese-American Sou Song Cun, played, the newspaper said.

The player, who held US travel documents, was registered by the club using fake Chinese documents and played under the Chinese name Guan Xiuchang.

He had previously played under a false identity for another league club, Yunnan Hongghe, during the 2004 season.

As a result of the sanction, the team's ranking dropped from second in the league to 11th, falling outside the top eight who qualify for the playoffs that begin Wednesday.

The regular season standings were topped by the Guangdong Tigers, who survived the loss of Yi Jianlian to the NBA to finish with a 26-4 record.

Xinjiang Guanghui, based in China's westernmost Xinjiang region, also had a 26-4 record, but finished second due to two regular season losses to Guangdong.

A former bottom-ranked club, Xinjiang were enjoying the best season in club history after signing former San Antonio Spurs center Menk Bateer with a contract worth four million yuan (550,000 dollars).

They also fielded US import David Jackson, named by Titan Sports weekly as the league's most valuable foreign player this season.

Xinjiang admitted no wrongdoing but owner Hou Wei apologised.

"I am sorry for letting our fans down," he told the newspaper. "I hope fans can understand us and support us in the future."

League officials had supplied details of the case to police for possible criminal investigation.

The east coast team of Zhejiang Guangsha, who finished ninth in the regular season, will take Xinjiang's place in the playoffs.

insulares
03-16-2009, 11:18 AM
The Philippines and Japan are both former basketball powers in the Asian circuit.* Today, both countries face developmental challenges for their respective NT's.* Both countries are missing some of their best players in the long-term national pool, for different reasons.* For the Philippines, the problem is the unwillingness (read: selfishness) of their pro league to lend players beyond 2010.* Even with a new, more forward-thinking federation (SBP), the Philippine long-term program suffers from the myopic, unimaginative thinking of dinosaurs in the current PBA leadership.* The PBA is the major member in the SBP, but currently has zero player contribution to the long-term NT program.

In the case of Japan, dinosaurs in their national federation (JBA) aren't utilizing any of the available talent from its second premier league (the BJ-league) that, unlike the PBA in the Philippines, is actually willing to help.* Only players in the JBL are in the NT pool.

************************************************** *************************************

JBA's archaic ways suffocating basketball's development in Japan

By ED ODEVEN

The status quo's got to go.

This may sound like the opening remarks in a political speech, but it isn't. This is a basketball tale, and this much is certain: If the topic of discussion is the sorry state of affairs involving men's basketball in Japan, then this can be the only possible conclusion.

It's time for a Plan B to emerge — quickly and sensibly. To do that, however, there needs to be recognition that the old way of doing things won't work in the future.

Unfortunately, the Japan Basketball Association refuses to adapt with the changing times.

On Tuesday, a JBA spokesperson confirmed that no upcoming tryouts are planned for the national team. Intense, full-blown tryouts should be the first official duty of new national team coach David Hobbs.

Instead, it's more of the same.

The JBA-sanctioned Japan Basketball League (JBL) provides all of the players for the national team. The JBL, an eight-team circuit, features a 35-game regular season.

The non-sanctioned (read: conveniently ignored) bj-league, currently in its fourth season, now plays a 52-game schedule. There are 12 teams in the bj-league, and a 13th squad will join the fold next season.

Let's do the math, folks. In the bj-league, there are about 100 Japanese players, athletes who are playing as many as 17 more regular-season games than their JBL counterparts. That's more than half of the games being played in the established, old-school JBL.

And of those 100 players, the JBA's brain trust refuses to understand the value of inviting a few of them to participate in national team workouts, scrimmages, or, heck, even a chance to earn a spot on the national team.

Think of the goodwill that this simple gesture would have for the feuding leagues. Think of the motivation it would have for players in the bj-league to have a chance to earn a spot on the national team. And think of the value that competition would have for players from both leagues.

Since the bj-league began play in the fall of 2005, Osaka Evessa head coach Kensaku Tennichi has been the most successful basketball coach in the country. Tennichi has guided his team to three titles, and his team has a chance to earn a fourth straight title this season. And that's why his opinion ought to matter, even if it doesn't follow the old, tired way of thinking.

Listen to Tennichi's words following a recent Evessa practice:

"If our Japanese guys could go to a tryout and become national team players, that is good for any player, their value as a player should be going up and get a better salary or a better opportunity as a player. That is good for the player and good for the league.

"If you want to create a national team, why do you have limitations to choose players? It should just be open to (all) players. It doesn't matter (if the player) is from the JBL or the bj-league."

FIBA, basketball's world governing body, understands this simple concept. The JBA's stubborn, arrogant (translation: foolish) leaders don't.

In fact, if the JBA's leaders had anything resembling a true plan, they would've used the recent visit of FIBA's top two leaders, president Bob Elphinston and Patrick Baumann, who took separate airplane trips from Australia and Switzerland, respectively, for a Feb. 26 meeting and that day's news conference to present a new, bold plan to the assembled group of reporters.

The plan should've included simple, clear steps to effectively solve the bj-league/JBL impasse. Instead, the JBA leaders provided more of the same, tired message: We are involved in talks, but no deadlines have been set for agreements between the two leagues, JBA leaders stated.

This plan should've stated that both the bj-league and JBL can compete in JBA-sanctioned tournaments (exhibitions, 3-on-3 games, postseason championship tournaments) beginning this spring. It would've been a big step forward, a much-needed sign of progress, even if the bj-league isn't yet a JBA-recognized circuit. After all, every journey requires a first step. And this should be the first step, a necessary first step.

Tokyo Apache point guard Darin Satoshi Maki, who has played for the club since 2005, also realizes that bj-league players should get a chance to prove themselves against their JBL counterparts.

"I don't believe that bj-league players suck," Maki said after Tokyo's March 5 game against the Shiga Lakestars at Komazawa Gymnasium. "I think we have some good players that can make a difference at the tryouts."

Maki, a California native, is one of the top defensive guards in Japan, as evidenced by his inclusion on Asia-basket.com's 2007-08 Ultimate All-Defensive First Team, which included players from both Japanese leagues.

After the aforementioned game against the Lakestars, Tokyo Apache coach Joe Bryant, who has coached here since 2005, was asked about his thoughts on what Hobbs, who was invited to the game but reportedly didn't attend it, would've seen.

"If he was here," Bryant said, "I know he was impressed with Darin's defense and Cohey (Aoki's) fantasy for the game. Cohey made a couple of passes — left hand off the dribble — (and) you can't teach that. That's just something special that Cohey has. So I know that if he was here, he could give Darin Maki and Cohey and (Masashi) Joho a call."

* * * * *


Hobbs is in charge of rebuilding the national team in the foreseeable future. It remains to be seen if he'll actually be allowed to field a truly representative national team, or if JBA officials will only give him permission to conduct workouts, training camps and games with JBL players.

On a related note, it's obvious that Hobbs should go out of his way to convince Link Tochigi Brex point guard Yuta Tabuse, the first Japanese to play in the NBA, to commit to playing for the national team.

Tabuse commands respect from his peers and his involvement on the national team would send the proper message to the other players: We must make the national team better, starting right now.

Hobbs, who has mentored numerous future NBA players during the course of his lengthy career as a college coach in the United States, should also take another bold step and reach out to Columbia University senior sharpshooter K.J. Matsui, who wrapped up his collegiate career on March 7.

It's the notion here that there's not a logical reason for the Tokyo native to be denied the opportunity to compete for a spot on the national team.

Matsui, a 188-cm and 82-kg performer, has the physical skills and experience of playing against numerous top-flight NCAA clubs (105 total games) to give the national team a boost of fresh energy, solid outside shooting, and a much-needed different perspective that comes from playing ball overseas.

Again: If something isn't broken, you don't need to fix it. But, on the other hand . . .

Let's review the facts: The last time Japan's men's basketball team competed in the Olympics was in the 1976 Montreal Games. Unless a miracle is in the works, Japan will fail to earn a spot to the 2012 London Games.

Long-term failure requires a new system to be implemented, new ways of thinking, and leadership that is willing to grasp this basic concept.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/sp20090315eo.html

insulares
03-16-2009, 11:41 AM
Veselin Matic was former coach of the Polish NT, and also coached in the Baltic Basketball League (BBL).* His Estonian club team fired him last summer and replaced him with another Serbian, Nenad Vucinic (New Zealand NT head coach).

Many Serbian coaches rule the FIBA Asia/Oceania zones.

************************************************** *****************

Serbia’s Matic named as Iran’s basketball coach

Tehran Times Sports Desk


TEHRAN -- Veselin Matic was appointed as Iran’s basketball coach on Saturday.

The 49-year-old Serbian coach has penned a one-year contract with Iran’s basketball federation.

Matic has replaced his compatriot Rajko Toroman who is currently working as coach in the Philippines.

Matic said, “I have respected Iran’s national basketball team since I saw them in the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. I will call Toroman in the following days to get more information about Iran’s basketball.”

He will head the Iranian team in the Asia Basketball Championship (Tehran, Iran, July 1 to 6) and the 2009 FIBA Asia Championship (Tianjin, China, August 6 to 16).

http://www.tehrantimes.com/index_View.asp?code=191144

amdgc82
04-23-2009, 05:22 AM
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/sports/article/17421.html

April 22, 2009
Wimbo Satwiko
Satria Muda Faces a Packed Schedule

May is a busy month for Satria Muda Jakarta.

The reigning Indonesian Basketball League champion continues its bid for a fifth successive title when the league restarts on May 6. It also has to contend with the FIBA Asia Champions Cup, which takes place May 12-20 at Britama Arena in Jakarta.

Satria Muda’s 13-man rotation helps it maintain its dominance in Indonesia, but that alone is not enough to compete with the best.

Head coach Fictor Roring said the club was looking for two foreign players — a forward and a guard — to help it when it moves to a higher level of competition.

“We're looking for much better players as we'll compete at the Asian level,” Fictor said on Wednesday. “After talking to our agent, he recommended Brandon Cole and Rashad Paul.”

Cole arrived in Jakarta on Monday and joined the team in training on Wednesday. Paul is scheduled to arrive on May 1.

“I really like the team. There are many good players and they have talent and a lot of heart,” Cole said. “I can't compare Satria Muda with my previous clubs, as all teams are different. But I like what I see so far.”

Cole, 25, played four years of NCAA Division I college basketball at Xavier University. He was part of the Musketeers’ run to the Elite Eight in 2003 and had his best season in 2006-07, recording career highs in points, rebounds and games started.

In the Champions Cup, Satria Muda was drawn in Group B with Qatar’s Al-Arabi, Al Wasi of the United Arab Emirates, Jordan’s Zain and Young Cager of India. West Asia champion Mahram of Iran, Al Riyadi of Lebanon, Sangmoo Army Club of Korea, Smart Gilas of the Phillipines and Al Qadsia of Kuwait are in Group A.

During Wednesday’s press conference, Satria Muda owner Erick Thohir announced the club would also take part in the Asean Basketball League.

“Currently, the league is assessing four to five clubs’ applications, and last night I received a message from the league that Satria Muda has been approved to be one of ABL clubs, along with Singapore Slingers,” he said.

The Asean league is scheduled to begin in September.

PilipinasFan
05-01-2009, 12:45 PM
no one cares about the malaysian team., even with thorough preparations, they will never be able to beat the philippines.,

jesronne
05-02-2009, 12:17 AM
Satria Muda is an indonesian team

amdgc82
05-06-2009, 08:47 PM
http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,8659,25438085-23769,00.html
Former Boomers coach Brian Goorjian signs on to assist China's men's team
May 06, 2009

Former Australian men's basketball coach Brian Goorjian has emphatically declared ``I'm an Aussie'' despite agreeing to resurrect his international career in China.

Goorjian has signed on as an assistant coach for the Chinese men's national team ahead of next year's world championships and the 2012 Olympic Games.

He will help 33-year-old rookie head coach Guo Shiqiang after the duo were appointed on Wednesday.

Goorjian's appointment to the Chinese program comes less than two months after Basketball Australia replaced him as Boomers coach with San Antonio Spurs assistant coach Brett Brown.

Goorjian, who coached the Australian men at the past two Olympics, will remain head coach of the South Dragons in the elite Australian basketball league planned to replace the NBL - confident he can combine both jobs successfully.

He said the opportunity to return to the international stage with China was too good to pass up.

And he shrugged off any suggestion of disloyalty, saying he remained a proud Australian but wanted to stay involved in international basketball.

"I'm an Aussie, but I'm in a profession where my job is played around the world. I put my hand up, I didn't get the position and I think I handled that with class," Goorjian said.

"Somebody's offered me a position and I've taken it. If somebody had offered me 10 times the money and I had the Boomers job, I'd have taken the Boomers.

"But when that's taken away from you and something comes your way, you've got to take it.

"If we play a game, I'm going to do everything I can for China, I'll shake hands afterwards.

"But I live in Australia, my family's in Australia and when it comes down to it, I'm an Aussie."

China finished eighth at the past two Olympics and have a roster featuring NBA superstar Yao Ming of the Houston Rockets.

Goorjian said he was thankful to both Australian basketball and the players he worked with, saying they and their Olympic performances were the key to him getting the Chinese job.

"The Andrew Boguts and Patrick Mills' put me in a position to do this. I'm proud of the team, the performance and the improvement we had at the Boomers," Goorjian said.

"Being an international coach, the most exciting thing about it is working with the level of players.

"To work with Yao Ming, the excitement of basketball in this country where it's like Australian rules football, the experience for me and the chance to do something special, it'll be huge in this country - and this country's pretty big."

amdgc82
05-06-2009, 09:00 PM
http://www.china.org.cn/sports/2009-05/06/content_17731263.htm

Youngster named national hoops coach

http://images.china.cn/attachement/jpg/site1007/20090506/000802aa2f490b6b660a31.jpg

Guo Shiqiang, a teammate of NBA all-star center Yao Ming just four years ago during the Athens Olympics, was appointed head coach of the national team by the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA) yesterday, making him the youngest national hoops coach in the nation's history.

The former 1.92m guard beat a number of much more experienced candidates to take over the post vacated by Lithuania's Jonas Kazlauskas after the Beijing Games, where the team finished eighth and Guo was an assistant.

After playing for the national team for just six years between 1999 and 2005, he shrugged off concerns over his entitlement to the post when other players boast more national team experience.

"I will not think of it too much," said the 34-year-old. "The most important thing is you do the best as a coach and inspire your players.

"Every time I ask them to do something, I will first do it myself."

It took less than a year after retirement for Guo to showcase his coaching ability by spearheading the Liaoning women's team to win the WCBA (China women's top flight league) title.

He took another step forward a year later when he led the Liaoning men's team to fourth in the 2006-07 CBA season.

But his coaching highlight came last year when named CBA's Coach of the Year after Liaoning qualified for the 2007-08 CBA playoff finals, only to lose to Guangdong.

Unfortunately though Guo failed to deliver this season and even suffered the humiliation of calls for his sacking by fans after Liaoning finished a disappointing 12th in the regular season.

According to an internet poll on Sina.com yesterday, 54 percent of people are opposed to the CBA's decision while only 33 supported his appointment.

Guo will debut as coach during the Asian Championships on home soil in Tianjin in September.

He will immediately face pressure to win the title despite the likely absence of Yao and Yi Jianlian, of New Jersey Nets.

But star center Yao speaks highly of his former teammate.

"I know there are some people criticizing him or even attacking him," said Yao. "To me, he is a man of honesty. As a player, he was hard working. As an assistant coach for the Beijing Games, he was eager to learn new things. He's aggressive and I believe he will prove himself in the new post."

In order to release some pressure on the young coach, as well as further hone players' skills, Brian Goorjian, one of the most successful coaches in Australia's basketball history, has been invited to act as technical advisor for China.

(China Daily May 6, 2009)

amdgc82
05-06-2009, 09:06 PM
http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v5/newssport.php?id=409237

May 06, 2009 19:32 PM
Maba To Use National U-16 Championship To Spot Talent

KUALA LUMPUR, May 6 (Bernama) -- The Malaysian Amateur Basketball Association (MABA) will use the National Under-16 Basketball Championships in Raub, Pahang from June 3-11, to select players for the Asian Under-16 Championships in November.

MABA assistant secretary-general Sim Sin Heng said during the championships, 30 players would be identified to undergo a first phase of training.

"The number would be reduced from 30 to about 15 or 18 during the second phase, to make up the team for the Asian Under-16 Championships from Nov 19-29 in Johor Baharu.

"Their selection will be strictly based on merit," he told reporters after the draw for the championships held at the MABA House here Wednesday.

The draw for the boys saw defending champion Johor, Pahang, Penang and Melaka in Group A, Selangor, Perak, Sabah, Kelantan make up Group B while Sarawak, Kuala Lumpur, Kedah and Negeri Sembilan fill up Group C.

In the draw for the girls category, defending champion Selangor head Group A together with Melaka and Pahang, neighbour Kuala Lumpur head Group B with Sarawak, Kedah and Kelantan while Perak, Johor, Penang and Negeri Sembilan make up Group C.

amdgc82
05-15-2009, 06:26 PM
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-05/15/content_11380235.htm

China announces national basketball squad, without Yao
www.chinaview.cn 2009-05-15 16:56:42

BEIJING, May 15 (Xinhua) -- The Chinese Basketball Association (CBA) announced the men's national squad early on Friday morning when Yao Ming was excluded due to a season-ending foot injury.

Yao sustained an injury in his left foot in Houston Rockets' 108-94 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers on May 8. Team doctors said he had to rest for 8-12 weeks.

The newly Chinese team was formed for the 2009 Asian Men's Basketball Championships slated for August 6-16 in Tianjin, China.

"We don't expect Yao Ming to be ready in August. He needs at least two months to nurse the injury and another month for a full recovery. I don't think he can make it (for the championships)," said Hu Jiashi, vice president of the Chinese Basketball Management Center, on Friday.

Most of the members of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games were registered in the new national team. The 34-year-old Guo Shiqiang was named the head coach of the team last week.

The CBA announced a backup national team on Wednesday, which Hu said, concluded most of the young stars of the domestic league.

"Players of the second national team have chances to make into the first team, if they work hard enough," Hu said. "We set up a backup national team in 2007 when three of the team made into the first team eventually. It's a good way to help the young players being mature and being ready for bigger assignments."

"Both teams are the preparation for the 2012 London Olympics. The final squad for the Olympics will be selected from members of the two teams," Hu added.

The squad:

Yi Jianlian (New Jersey Nets), Zhu Fangyu, Wang Shipeng, Du Feng, Chen Jianghua (Guangdong), Yi Li, Hu Xuefeng (Jiangsu), Wang Zhizhi, Wang Lei (Bayi), Zhang Qingpeng, Li Xiaoxu (Liaoning), Liu Wei (Shanghai), Ding Jinhui (Zhejiang), Zhang Songtao, Sun Yue (Beijing Aoshen).

jesronne
05-19-2009, 08:43 PM
lebanon will have a NATURALIZED GUARD... may Daniel Faris na sila kaya di na nila need another bigman... tsaka mukhang nag titipid sila kasi mahal ang hinihingi ni khatib at daniel faris....

digitalsuperman
05-19-2009, 09:10 PM
hmmm..diba may isa na silang naturalized? si vogle? tama bah?

amdgc82
05-26-2009, 04:44 AM
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/home/garuda-pulls-double-duty-in-league-regional-event/277185

May 25, 2009
Wimbo Satwiko

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/media/images/large/20090525212439126.jpg
XL Aspac's Fandi Andika Ramadhani puts the pressure on Garuda Flexi point guard Teddy Febiyanto in an IBL game. (Photo: Rizky Aulia, Antara)

Garuda Pulls Double Duty In League, Regional Event

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/media/images/medium/20090525212537103.jpg
XL Aspac center M. Isman Thoyib going for the block on Garuda Flexi point guard Teddy Febiyanto in an IBL game. The two will play on the same side at the Seaba Championship in Medan. (Photo: Rizky Aulia, Antara)

In addition to fighting for its first Indonesian Basketball League title, Garuda Flexi Bandung will represent Indonesia at the Southeast Asian Basketball Association (Seaba) Championship in Medan, North Sumatra, from June 6-10.

Indonesian Basketball Association (Perbasi) official Azwar Zulkarnaen said Garuda was chosen because of its 2008 IBL Tournament championship.

“This should be a national team event, but we only have a very short time to prepare the team,” Azwar said on Monday. “We have to select the team which is ready to play in the event. Satria Muda just played in the FIBA Asia Champions Cup, so after a meeting, we picked Garuda.”

He said Perbasi had asked Seaba to postpone the event because the association was not ready to organize the championship, but Seaba instead spoke directly to Perbasi North Sumatra, which said it could organize the tournament on its own.

Garuda is slated to play as Indonesia in the championship and will face three Southeast Asian teams — Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines.

While Garuda has a number of national players on its roster, including Denny Sumargo, Mario Wuysang and Kelly Purwanto, the club will bolster its chances with players from fellow IBL teams.

Garuda manager Simon Pasaribu said his team would borrow players from XL Aspac Jakarta and Pelita Jaya Esia for the Seaba tournament.

“M. Isman Thoyib of Aspac and Andi Poedjakesuma will join us for the event, and their clubs have given permission,” Simon said. “We dropped our plan to borrow two Satria Muda Britama players.”

Garuda initially asked archrival Satria Muda to loan out Ronny Gunawan and Christian Ronaldo Sitepu. Ronny was too exhausted after playing for his club in the FIBA Asia Champions Cup, Simon said, and Christian had to focus on his college studies.

The Seaba Championship will take place between the IBL’s fifth series, May 28-June 2 in Surabaya, and the sixth series, June 12-16 in Bandung.

pachador
06-05-2009, 07:14 AM
Jackson Vroman (208-F/C-81) will be the new naturalized and replacement for his compatriot Joe Vogel in the Lebanese NT for the upcoming Asian Championship which will be held in China this summer!

from interbasket , jahrakal.

nardy
06-05-2009, 01:30 PM
hmmm..diba may isa na silang naturalized? si vogle? tama bah?


he is retiringb

Grr_tiger
06-05-2009, 02:54 PM
It is reported that JACKSON VROMAN will be naturalized by Lebanon and will be playing in the FIBA Asia Championships.


http://www.asia-basket.com/Lebanon/basketball.asp?NewsID=161308

amdgc82
06-12-2009, 09:56 AM
http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2906031
National basketball team cruises past China
June 12, 2009

Hur Jae won his first international match as head coach of the national basketball team yesterday behind the leadership of veteran point guard Joo Hee-jung and clutch shooting from forward Kim Min-soo.

Korea shoved aside injuries to down China 70-62 in the first Group A match of the 2009 FIBA East Asian Tournament. The game was held at the Park Arena Komaki in Nagoya, Japan.

It marked the first time Korea has defeated China in basketball since the 2002 Asian Games finals in Busan.

The Chinese squad yesterday was without its star big men Yao Ming and Wang Zhizhi, while the Korean team was without its starting center and his backup due to injuries.

But veteran point guard Joo came through for Korea with 13 points, seven rebounds, four assists and three steals. Argentinian-born Kim contributed baskets when the team needed them the most, ending the game with a team-high 17 points on the day.

Korea got off to a quick start with Joo in control of the team’s attack in the first quarter. Center Oh Sae-geun did a formidable job defending China’s young but talented big man Su Wei, a former national youth team member tabbed by some as the country’s next big star. Su ended the day with 15 points.

The Korean squad had a sluggish second period, committing four traveling violations and managing a mere five points. Plagued by missed shots and sloppy play, Korea ended the half down 28-26.

The team’s woes continued in the second half as the Chinese guards took advantage of the Korean defense, which focused heavily on defending the paint. That freed up China’s outside shooters. But Korea managed to turn the tide, and a Kim 3-pointer with two seconds left in the third quarter put the team up 52-51.

Korea continued to feed the hot hand, as Kim nailed another shot from beyond the arc early in the fourth quarter. The team was able to cruise through the rest of the quarter to earn the win.

Korea plays Hong Kong today at 3:30 p.m.

By Jason Kim [jason@joongang.co.kr]

amdgc82
06-12-2009, 09:59 AM
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2009/06/136_46701.html
Korean Hoops Team Beats China 70-62
By Yoon Chul
Staff Reporter

The South Korean basketball team beat China 70-62 Thursday in its opening game of Group A at the East Asia Basketball Association Championship in Nagoya, Japan.

SK Knights forward Kim Min-soo scored a team-high 17 points and points guard Joo Hee-jung added 13 points to lift head coach Huh Jae's side past the Asian basketball powerhouse.

Joo, the league's Most Valuable Player (MVP), also registered seven rebounds, four assists and three turnovers.

This is the first time Korea has claimed a win over China since the Busan Asian Games in 2002, when the home side rallied to win a gold medal in the final game.

China, which finished eighth at the Beijing Olympics in 2008, did not include Houston Rockets center Yao Ming and other NBA players, such as Yi Jianlian of the Milwaukee Bucks and Sun Yue of the Los Angeles Lakers.

In the six-team tournament, the top two team will be promoted to the FIBA Asia Championship in Tanjin, China in August.

Korea will play Hong Kong in another qualifier Friday.

yc@koreatimes.co.kr

chinito_guy
06-17-2009, 09:33 PM
is this SOKOR team and CHINA team the same teams in Group A and Group C respectively in the recent FIBA World Cup Qualifier draw lots?

chinito_guy
06-17-2009, 09:34 PM
parang nakakatakot ang SOKOR kung ito rin ang team na kaBracket natin sa Group A sa August tournament... ???

tamarawz_14
06-17-2009, 10:05 PM
FIBA GROUPINGS..


Group A:

Korea
Japan
Philippines
Sri Lanka

Group B:

Iran
Chinese-Taipei
Kuwait
Uzbekistan

Group C:

Kazakhstan
Bahrain
India
China

Group D:

Lebanon
Jordan
Indonesia
United Arab Emirates


good luck to our national team...akala ko group of death na naman...

amdgc82
06-19-2009, 06:34 AM
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2009/06/136_47075.html
06-18-2009 17:44
Korea Has Lucky Draw ar Asian Championship
By Yoon Chul
Staff Reporter

Korea will join Japan, the Philippines and Sri Lanka in Group A in the preliminary round of the FIBA Asia Championship, to be held from August 6-16 in Tianjin, China.

The Korean national basketball team, managed by Hur Jae, qualified for the continental tournament by winning the East Asia Championship.

Defending champion Iran will be joined in Group B by Taiwan, Kuwait and Uzbekistan, while Kazakhstan, Qatar and India will challenge powerhouse China in Group C.

Lebanon, Indonesia, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates comprise Group D.

The top two teams in each of the four groups will advance to the quarterfinals. Those eight teams will be divided into two groups, and the top two squads in each will move on to the semifinals after a round robin.

The top three teams at the Asia Championship will move on to the FIBA World Championship next year in Turkey.

The Asia Championship began in 1960 and is held every two years. Iran secured the trophy at the last competition in 2007 in Japan. Korea beat Kazakhstan 80-76 in the third-place game.

China has won 14 of the 24 Asian championships and won four straight prior to Iran's win. They have won all but three titles since the eighth Asian championship in 1975.

Korea has been the Asian champion twice, in 1969 and 1997.

Head coach Hur's team will begin training on Friday for the William Jones Cup Tournament to be held in Taiwan from July 18-26, which will serve as tune-up. It's expected that Hur will make one or two changes as veteran Choo Seung-gyun of the KCC Egis is injured.

yc@koreatimes.co.kr

oca
06-24-2009, 06:48 PM
pasensiya na po sa comment ko kay lion at sa inyo din kuya oca. mental lapses lang po. he! he! gusto ko lang po matuloy iyong laban natin sa fiba asia para may mag-qualify sa world basketball championship. baka kasi ma-suspend na naman tayo sa dispute na ito. puwede po ba malaman bakit nasa rank 65 tayo sa fiba ranking at mas mataas pa ang malaysia?


Pasensya na tapal king18 kung dito ko sasagutin ang tanong mo. Masalimuot na ang mga isyu sa SBP hwag na nating guluhin ang usapan dun with a question better taken up at another thread.

Your question... bakit nga ba.

I dont follow the rankings but I know for a fact na "point system" yan. Kapag sumali ang isang NT sa isang FIBA event, whatever be your placings, you will earn points.

Now, remember suspendido tayo na mga 2 taon. Di tayo makasali sa mga FIBA events, kaya malinaw na wala tayong puntos sa loob ng panahon na iyon.

Kailan lang ba tayo nagsimula sumali uli?

Noon yatang panahon na hawak ni Chot Reyes ang NT. Kaya dun lang tayo magsisimula makakuha ng ranking points. Pero ilang events lang ang nasalihan ng NT na iyon.

Nagsimula tayo sa zero matapos ang 2 taon na suspension, kaya kung 2 o 3 events pa lang ang nasalihan natin, kakaunti pa lang ang ranking pts natin.

Yan lang ang maibabahagi ko sa iyo.

tapal_king18
06-24-2009, 09:17 PM
MARAMING SALAMAT SIR OCA! I hope 5 years from now hindi na tayo bababa sa rank 30 at may pag-asa talagang mangyari iyon. We are better than malaysia at kaya nating talunin ang iba pang asian countries na nasa taas ng fiba ranking ngayon. Magkaisa na sana ang buong basketball communities natin at maging stable na ang leadership ng legitimate basketball organization ng Pilipinas. God help us!

amdgc82
07-09-2009, 07:23 AM
http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2907108
Chalk and cheese off court but a slick combination on

[Sports Talk]
¡®He didn¡¯t have the best shot in his younger days but he has improved that aspect of his game to possess an all-around game.¡¯
July 08, 2009

http://joongangdaily.joins.com/_data/photo/2009/07/08021254.jpg
Joo Hee-jung looks to make a pass to a teammate during a practice game against Sangmu at the KCC gym in Yongin, Gyeonggi, on July 3.

A rounded inside and outside game is pivotal to the success of a basketball team. The Korean national team is no different as they fed off the energy of veteran point guard Joo Hee-jung and promising forward Kim Min-soo at the East Asia Championship in Nagoya, Japan last month.

Having won the tournament without a loss, the squad is now preparing for the William Jones Cup in Taipei, Taiwan (July 18-26) and the Asia Championship in Tianjin, China (Aug. 6-16). On a humid Friday afternoon, the national team had a practice game against the military squad, Sangmu, at the KCC gymnasium in Yongin, Gyeonggi.

The serene atmosphere of the remote gymnasium located on the grounds of KCC¡¯s research center was in stark contrast to the scene inside the gymnasium. Amidst the squeaks of basketball sneakers on polished hardwood and shouts of coaches giving instructions, Joo and Kim were busily preparing for the practice game in pregame warm ups and exercises. Joo was meticulous in his preparations while Kim, sporting a new tattoo on his right bicep, showed off his fluid layups and reverse dunks. While Joo is polite and humble in the manner in which he speaks, Kim is laid back and easy-going.

The teammates on the national team and newly anointed teammates on the SK Knights - Joo was traded to the Knights at the end of last season - click well together on the court but their demeanor and credentials could not be anymore different.

http://joongangdaily.joins.com/_data/photo/2009/07/08021312.jpg
Kim Min-soo drives to the basket against a Sangmu forward. By Park Sang-moon

Joo is a 32-year-old decorated veteran and captain of the national team and has won his share of accolades and awards since completing the 1997-98 Korean Basketball League season as the top rookie, and deservedly so. In taking the KBL¡¯s most valuable player honor last season, Joo was dominant in posting 14.8 points, 8.5 assists, 4.7 rebounds and 2.3 steals in 38.2 minutes of play.

While Joo logged heavy minutes throughout the season, playing close to full games on most nights, he shows no sign of tiring due to a tough offseason circuit training workout involving cardiovascular training.

¡°I work the weights in the offseason more than before but more than anything else, I think the circuit training I do with my trainer for two to three hours a day has allowed me to perform at my peak without tiring,¡± explained Joo. National team head coach Hur Jae said Joon is not a young player anymore but his knowledge of the game and his ability to lead the team is excellent.

¡°He didn¡¯t have the best shot in his younger days but has improved that aspect of his game to possess an all-around game,¡± Hur said.

Joo, whose level of humility is uncommon for players of his stature, said he still sees areas of the game he can improve on. ¡°I like to watch other guards in the KBL and take positive aspects of their game and make it my own,¡± he said.

Kim, on the other hand, is a 27 year-old forward/center from Argentina, who muscles his way inside the paint and takes shots from the perimeter. He also completed an impressive season, finishing as the runner-up for the rookie of the year honors behind KCC¡¯s Ha Seung-jin. He averaged 14.3 points and 5 rebounds per game. Born to an Argentine father and Korean mother, Kim was born and raised in Argentina and came to Korea to play university ball for Kyung Hee University.

¡°He is a talented player who has improved his offensive moves a lot but he must improve his defense. I can see there are times when he lacks focus on the court. He positions himself well when he has possession but the same cannot be said about his movement and positioning without the ball,¡± explained Hur.

The combination of an on-court general making crisp passes and a budding big man showing flashes of brilliance provided the national team with baskets in key situations throughout the recent East Asia Championship tourney in Nagoya. ¡°Min-soo showed the desire and the passion to play well and we clicked well in pick-and-roll and screen plays situations,¡± explained Joo while icing his right knee after the practice game.

Kim, in turn, attributed much of the latest success of the national team to Joo whom he refers to as hyung, or older brother. ¡°He is always giving us advice and tips on how to better our game,¡± said Kim with a firm nod.

As Kim would explain it, he had a difficult time adjusting to life in Korea at first. ¡°The four-a-day practices in university and the hectic lifestyle were a bit too much at first. I still miss my friends and family but I¡¯ve grown accustomed to the way of life here,¡± said Kim with a smile.

The team needs to finish in the top three in Tianjin to advance to the world championships in Turkey and with the return of Kim Joo-sung and Ha Seung-jin still up in the air, the team needs to make a few adjustments.

¡°In order to compensate for the height disadvantage, we will need to play an up-tempo game. Teams such as Iran have stronger guards and therefore a switch from a man-to-man defense to zone defense will be needed,¡± explained Joo.

No doubt much of the success of the team will rest on the shoulders of Joo¡¯s leadership and all-around play as well as Kim¡¯s smooth inside/outside game. And with high expectation for the SK Knights in the upcoming KBL season, fans will get a taste of what¡¯s to come next season in Taipei and Tianjin this summe

by Jason Kim [jason@joongang.co.kr]

insulares
07-15-2009, 04:06 AM
National Team Assesses Qatar Tourney Results

July 12, 2009
By Aline Bannayan, Jordan Times, Amman

AMMAN -- The national basketball team is back home and has less than a week to regroup before heading to Taipei for the William Jones Tournament.

The squad returned on the weekend after finishing second at the Qatar International Tournament where they beat Arab champs Tunisia, 75-73, Pan-Arab Games champs Egypt, 73-66, but suffered a shock defeat to hosts Qatar, 80-48.

The last result and the team's inability to maintain a consistent form has undoubtedly cast a shadow on preparedness for upcoming major events.

"Our defeat to Qatar and with this wide a margin was a surprise to all. We have never lost by this margin to any team in years,'' Jordan Basketball Federation board member Ayman Samawi told The Jordan Times in a phone interview, adding: "We will be discussing the tournament and the team's status in the next two days.''

He also said the injury of playmaker Wisam Sous turned out not to be that serious, and would require a couple of days rest. Samawi said the team was far more impressive in friendlies last month where they lost to Croatia, Greece and Italy, adding that the William Jones tournament as well as a training camp in China following that would help fix mistakes and take the team to better form.

Both the Qatar tournament and the 31st edition of the William Jones Tournament from July 18-26 lead up to the 25th FIBA Asia Championship in China from August 6-16 for which Jordan qualified after winning the 2nd FIBA Asia "Borislav Stankovic" Cup last year.

Jordan is a two-time titlist at the William Jones Tournament where the team will play eight consecutive matches against the Philippines, Lebanon, Taipei A, South Korea, Iran, Taipei B, Japan and Kazakhstan. South Africa pulled out.

At the FIBA Asia Championship Jordan will play in Group 4 alongside reigning runner-up Lebanon, the UAE and Indonesia. Group 1 includes South Korea, Japan, the Philippines and Sri Lanka. Group 2: Iran, Kuwait, Taiwan and Uzbekistan, and Group 3: China, Kazakhstan, Qatar and India.

The Championship's top three advance to the World Championship in Turkey in 2010.

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/yb/132864742

amdgc82
07-15-2009, 07:31 PM
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/terrapins-insider/2009/07/another_terrapin_basketball_pl.html

After Name Change, Choi to Compete for Korea

On Friday, Maryland sophomore forward Jin Soo Kim returned home to South Korea to join the Korean national team as it prepares to take part in the upcoming FIBA Asia championships. Except he didn't leave the United States as Jin Soo Kim; he left as Jin Soo Choi.

According to a source close to the player, Jin Soo legally changed his last name to Choi in February, though all of the necessary documents were not completed until late May when he returned to South Korea following the end of Maryland's school year.

Choi's biological father, Uyootak Kim, was a famous basketball player in Korea during his career, and until recently Choi's last name reflected his biological father's heritage. Uyootak Kim was formerly an assistant on the Korean national team, and now has taken a position with a professional team in the region.

But Choi's parents separated when he was an infant, and Choi was raised by his mother and stepfather, Ilsung Choi. According to the source, Jin Soo desired to acknowledge the impact his stepfather has had on his life, which prompted the last name change. Ilsung Choi's basketball background is not extensive (he used to coach a middle school team), but that did nothing to diminish the role he played in Jin Soo's upbringing.

Jin Soo Choi wished to have his name changed prior to the beginning of last season, his first in College Park, but the necessary paperwork could not be completed in time, according to the source. Choi returned to South Korea in late May to finalize the name change by obtaining a new license and filling out a new I-20 form (the document that allows foreign students to receive a visa to attend school in the United States).

There was some initial confusion when Jin Soo Kim (who by then was officially Jin Soo Choi) tried to return to the United States, and a delay caused him to be late for the start of summer school, the source said. But once everything was straightened out, Choi returned and had been attending summer school and working out with his fellow Terrapins ever since.

Now he has returned home once more, where he will compete on the Korean national team in the upcoming FIBA Asia championships. Choi is the only amateur player on a national team that will play Aug. 6-16 in Tianjin, China. Korea is in Group A along with Japan, the Phillipines and Sri Lanka. The top three teams from the tournament will advance to next year's FIBA world championships in Turkey.

Choi joins Maryland senior Greivis Vasquez (Venezuela) as Terrapins who will be representing their home countries in FIBA competitions over the next month.

salsa caballero
07-15-2009, 09:08 PM
The writer got his facts wrong. Japhet is still an amateur and will be competing in Taiwan as well. Hype-rbole.

amdgc82
07-17-2009, 07:23 PM
American David Hobbs out as Japan basketball coach
(AP) – 1 hour ago

TOKYO (AP) — The Japan Basketball Association has terminated the contract of former Alabama coach David Hobbs, who was on leave due to health problems.

The 60-year-old Hobbs will be replaced by Osamu Kuraishi for the Asian Championships from Aug. 6-16 in Tianjin, China. The top three finishers at the 16-nation tournament will win berths in next year's world championships in Turkey.

Hobbs, who coached the Crimson Tide from 1992-98, was hired to lead Japan's national squad in February, after it failed to qualify for the Beijing Olympics and finished 20th out of 24 teams at the 2006 World Championships.

He guided a rebuilt team to a second-place finish at last month's East Asia Championships.

Hobbs spent seven years as an assistant at Alabama before taking over in 1992. He led the Crimson Tide to a pair of 20-win seasons before resigning in 1998 with a record of 110-76.

Hobbs joined Tubby Smith's staff at Kentucky in 2000 and served two years as an associate head coach before Smith left for Minnesota. Hobbs then spent two years as a scout for the Charlotte Bobcats.

amdgc82
07-18-2009, 05:09 AM
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/

Saturday, July 18, 2009
JBA's reputation sinks lower after Hobbs' dismissal
By KAZ NAGATSUKA
Staff writer

Here's what the Japan Basketball Association set forth in new policies about the men's national team for its restart in January: It wanted to establish a strong squad and eventually gain a spot in an Olympics.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/images/photos2009/sk20090718a1a.jpg
Short parnership: Japan national team chief Osamu Kuraishi (left) introduces David A. Hobbs as the squad's new head coach in February. Earlier this month, the Japan Basketball Association announced that the American was replaced by Kuraishi. KAZ NAGATSUKA PHOTO

Although the qualifiers for the London Games will not be held this year, it seems doubtful that any of the goals will be met with the status quo.

The latest example is the abrupt dismissal of head coach David A. Hobbs, who was replaced by Osamu Kuraishi, the former national team chief, a month before the FIBA Asia Championship (ABC), which will be held Aug. 6-16.

The JBA said that Hobbs stepped down due to health problems that the 60-year-old American coach had claimed since the East Asia Championship.

But for some reason, it wouldn't reveal precisely what kind of illness he had or what sort of symptoms he carried.

"(Hobbs) is under treatment," Kuraishi, 53, ambiguously said, responding to a question on Hobbs' physical status, last week.

But he would not add more words. Instead, he ended up saying with a bitter smile, "I can't say anything specific because I'm not a doctor. I want you guys to speculate about this."

So why doesn't the JBA want to reveal more details about Hobbs' condition if he really was sick?

Apparently, even the players were not notified about the coaching change until the day after the announcement.

Veteran shooter Takehiko Orimo said that he learned about it while surfing the Net on his cell phone.

Orimo, who has played in two World Championships, said he had mixed feelings about this sudden substitution.

"It's a shame, because Hobbs came to a practice and asked me in person to join the national team," he said.

Shunsuke Ito, a 204-cm center, said of Hobbs: "He was reasonable in practice. And he was so good at bringing our motivation up."

Hobbs is not so young at 60. So it is not strange at all he reportedly has health issues. But at the same time, Kuraishi said when Hobbs was introduced as head coach in February that the JBA chose him over numerous other candidates because he was so passionate about the challenge.

But it is too hard to believe that Hobbs suddenly lost his enthusiasm and health.

Then, this doubt came up: He might have been fired for another reason.

Meanwhile, however, there is no clear-cut reason why Hobbs would have had to be let go. He at least met the minimum requirement by qualifying for the ABC in the East Asia Championship last month, guiding Japan to a second-place finish. Why? The JBA perhaps would say it explained already. But fans are not convinced as if many don't believe that Lee Harvey Oswald assassinated John F. Kennedy by himself.

It is such a bygone way to decide things in a closed room and not make them public.

If the JBA is truly serious and desperate about making the men's national team move competitive, being honest might be the first step. Otherwise, the goals it set will never be achieved.

Schortsanitis
11-22-2009, 06:16 PM
* The first two games of the Kazakhstan Division 1 Men's Basketball League on Saturday, November 21, 2009, at the Atyrau Sports Complex in Kazakhstan.

FIRST GAME:

* BK Atyrau beat BK Almaty, 80-65. Atyrau, wearing white, led by 15 at the half, but lost its outside shooting touch at the third quarter, while Almaty, wearing dark blue, relied on its inside plays to cut down the lead to just two at the end of the third quarter. BK Atyrau found its range again in the fourth, while tightening its inside defences to blow the game wide open and win by fifteen points.

* Crowd was pretty lean, less than fifty people inside the small basketball arena, considering the fact that one of the teams was carrying the name of the city where the game was held.

* Notable player for Atyrau was number 6, not listed on their Asia-Basket roster, broad-chested 6'1" (approx.) with good outside shot and nice drive in plays.

* For Almaty, notable player was 7'0" Center Rau Kiril, wearing jersey number 12. Not very quick or fast, but very good coordination and motor skills, good spin moves and good positioning under the basket. Even made a three-point shot late in the game for the big man.

* Here are the rosters of both teams from the Asia-Basket website:
- BK Atyrau Team Roster: http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=Kazakhstan&Team=14624&Page=1http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=Kazakhstan&Team=14624&Page=1 (http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=Kazakhstan&Team=14624&Page=1)
- BK Almaty Team Roster: http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=Kazakhstan&Team=1675&Page=1

* Both teams employed nice, Euro-ball type of passing, screening, etc., games, but Atyrau clearly was the faster team on the floor with their fastbreak plays, and in the end, with their nifty outside shooting.

* I wasn't impressed with Almaty's starting Point Guard, number 6 Yagodkin Azim. Looked old, and either made dribbling errors, or nearly made a dribbling error, especially when bringing the ball down court in a fastbreak situation. Must've easily had at least four turnovers in the game.


SECOND GAME:

* Kaspiy Aktau beat Kostanay Tobol (you would never hear a Visayan team named like that) by a single point in an exciting game, 73-72. Tobol, wearing dark blue and tan, initially had a fourteen point lead at the end of the first quarter, but Kaspiy, wearing royal blue and white, slowly but surely chipped away at that lead during the course of the game.

* At this time, there was around 200 people inside the small arena, which made it about 60% full, which probably pretty good already by Kazakhstan standards.

* Notable player for Tobol was number 4, 6'6" Guard Yaya Adamou, an import who has athleticism and grace that stands out compared to his more mechanical-moving teammates and opponents. He can do it all, hit the three point shot, drive to the basket, finish fastbreaks, etc., he even had a dunk off a fastbreak opportunity in the game.

* Another notable player for Tobol was number 14, 6'11" Sergei Kazantcev. The guy is lean, tall, and yet very mobile and coordinated. Started off the game with a one handed dunk in traffic off a drive in play. Deadly underneath once he got going, but never really had a lot of touches of the ball in this game.

* For Kaspiy, the most notable player was number 10, 6'10" Andrei Malyshev. Lean, and not very athletic, but very hard working, very mobile, and has a lot of skills underneath the basket. Fakes off his opponents underneath the boards, and hits difficult layups. Just constantly in motion, grabbing rebounds, getting passes, or creating his own shots. The force that carried his team in this game, overshadowing his taller counterpart, Sergei Kazantcev.

* Here are the rosters of both teams at the Asia-Basket website:
- Kaspiy Aktau Team Roster: http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=KAZAKHSTAN&Team=7380&Page=1
- Kostanay Tobol Team Roster: http://www.asia-basket.com/team.asp?Cntry=Kazakhstan&Team=7371&Page=1

Schortsanitis
05-27-2010, 11:43 PM
India has never been a strong, basketball country, but that could very well change, with these two guys around:

********************************

http://highschool.rivals.com/content.asp?CID=1087336

7-foot brothers stand out in a crowd

When basketball players Sim and Tanveer Bhullar visited Saltsburg (Pa.) The Kiski School last summer, they were awestruck at the size of the sprawling, 350-acre campus replete with a golf course, Tudor-style dormitories and hiking trails.

"I was like, 'Wow, this is big,'" Tanveer said.

Others react the same way when they meet them.

Sim, 17, is 7-4, 285 pounds.

Tanveer, only 15, is 7-2, 260 pounds.

Both have solid skills and are developing quickly on the court.

They have a chance to become top college basketball players. They have the opportunity to become national sports heroes in India.

"Their potential is unlimited," Joe Lewandowksi, one of their first prominent coaches, said.

Either way, they are determined to get a good education, which is how they ended up at a school in Western Pennsylvania known for a lot of things - but not basketball.

Until now.

********

The Bhullars dwarf the last notable pair of 7-foot brothers to play basketball together on the high school level - Brook and Robin Lopez, who went from San Joaquin Memorial (Calif.) from 2003-2006 to Stanford to the first-round of the 2008 NBA Draft.

Sim Bhullar

And while the Bhullars are still growing into their large frames, they both are nimble and have skills to complement their height.

Sim, who just completed his sophomore season, averaged about 16 points, 14 rebounds and eight blocks. He has three-point range and is a strong passer, but he also can run the floor and finish strong with power dunks.

"You just don't find big guys that agile," Kiski School head coach Daryn Freedman said. "There's nothing like him in the country right now."

Tanveer averaged about 12 points, 11 rebounds and five blocks during his freshman season. He possesses a smooth 15- to 17-foot jumper and has quick feet and soft hands, key attributes to low-post success.

They both have improved immensely at Kiski School under Freedman, a longtime college and NBA assistant who arrived at the school about a month before the Bhullars did. They have since remade their bodies, regularly working out at 5 a.m. with the Kiski wrestling coach.

Sim, who has lost 30 pounds, could not run the court more than two or three times. Tanveer, who started last season as a backup, needed a month before he could dunk after a running start.

And while they both have areas to work on - Tanveer must resist the urge to shoot fadeaway jumpers and improve his foot speed; Sim needs to be a more active rebounder and to maintain his composure after committing a silly foul - there have been glimpses of greatness.

Sim displayed his tantalizing skill during an AAU open gym session featuring top Pittsburgh-area prep players. He stole the ball at half court, dribbled between two defenders and then threw down an acrobatic dunk.

"Everyone was just kind of shocked," Freedman said. "That was the first time I was like, 'Wow, he's really come far.'"

Far is an appropriate term.

********

The Bhullars' road to Kiski School is a long one - and started more than two decades ago when their father Avtar (who stands 6-1), moved from Amritsar, India, to Toronto. His wife, the 5-foot-10 Varinder, joined him later.

They had three children - the boys plus older sister Avneet, who attends law school in England.

"They left their home to a whole new country so their future family would have a better life," Avneet said. "All three of us are very grateful to them."

The brothers were playing with the Youth Association for Academics, Athletics and Character Education (YAAACE), an inner-city Toronto program for which Lewandowski assists.

Their parents, however, knew that their basketball opportunities were limited in Canada.

Varinder asked Lewandowski if he could help them find an American school where her sons could better develop their basketball ability.

The Bhullars considered other schools, including well-known basketball schools DeMatha (Md.) Catholic and Montrose (Md.) Christian. Then Lewandoski, a former Pittsburgh-area high school coach and player at Slippery Rock University, suggested The Kiski School, where Freedman had just taken over as coach.

The Kiski School - an all-boys, prep school of 210 students located 30 miles east of Pittsburgh and just a six-hour drive from Toronto - turned out to be the perfect combination of academics, location and coaching.

Freedman, who has coached at various Division 1 schools and with both the Nets and the Sixers in the NBA, has been a perfect fit.

His background not only allows him to develop the kids as players but prepare them for the recruiting process that's ahead.

********

West Virginia has already offered Sim a scholarship. Duke plans to visit him.

Duquesne, Florida State, Kentucky, LSU, Penn State, Pittsburgh, Stanford, Texas, UMass, USC and Washington State have expressed interest in both brothers.

Tanveer Bhullar

Because Freedman spent eight years as an assistant under John Calipari in college and the pros - "He was my mentor, my coaching idol," Freedman says - some assume Kentucky has the inside track. Freedman just laughs.

"They're going to wind up wherever they want to go," he said. "I know way too many people in basketball to tell a kid where to go... I can't do that. It would be unfair to too many people."

The Bhullars are looking for a strong academic school that excels at developing big men and is close to Toronto. And they'd like to play together.

"If we could," Sim said, "we most likely would do it."

Anyone who has seen them together, understands why.

"Everyone thinks they're twins," Freedman said. "They're really, really tight... They definitely have each other's backs all the time."

Avneet used to drive her brothers to and from a Toronto-area gym. But on the one day that she could not pick them up and the boys had to walk, Tanveer rolled his ankle. Sim's shoulder would later ache because he served as a crutch, supporting Tanveer the whole way home.

"Had it been another older brother, he'd probably laugh at his younger brother for his foolishness," Avneet said via e-mail. "But Sim was more worried than amused for the well-being of his little brother."

********

The brothers are serious about their future - and would welcome roles as Indian basketball pioneers.

The NBA had players from 36 countries and territories this season, but none from India.

The brothers already have a following. When they visited the Golden Temple, a Sikh spiritual and cultural center, last summer, about 100 people crowded them.

"If I was able to make the NBA," Sim said, "that would be something big for India."

That, however, can wait.

This summer will be spent in Canada playing for the AAU team, Team Takeover, and the Canadian national teams.

In 2010-11, the Bhullars will return to a loaded Kiski School squad, which went 16-4 last year and also includes Serbian Stefan Jankovic, a super-talented 6-9 forward who grew up in Toronto.

It's reason enough for Freedman to be thrilled with his career move.

"I love this," he said. "It's just such a great situation.

"I have no interest right now in going back to college."

Why should he? With a pair of brothers such as the Bhullars, the colleges will be coming to him.

Schortsanitis
07-28-2010, 07:25 AM
The "National Geographic Channel" has a show called, "Don't Tell My Mother", and on one of the shows, they featured the country, "Iran".

The host of the show said that while Football is the country's national sport, Basketball is really their true love. Just like in the Philippines, Basketball is very popular there, with games being shown in fully packed venues, with very animated and noisy crowds.

Unlike the Philippines, Iranians have height, and couple that with their passion for the game, I think Iran will continue to be a major basketball power in Asia from hereon.

MonL
07-28-2010, 08:18 AM
The "National Geographic Channel" has a show called, "Don't Tell My Mother", and on one of the shows, they featured the country, "Iran".

The host of the show said that while Football is the country's national sport, Basketball is really their true love. Just like in the Philippines, Basketball is very popular there, with games being shown in fully packed venues, with very animated and noisy crowds.

Unlike the Philippines, Iranians have height, and couple that with their passion for the game, I think Iran will continue to be a major basketball power in Asia from hereon.


The very first Iranian player that caught my attention was 6'7" Nosratolla Iliavi of their national team which we barely defeated in the 1974 Asian Games held in Tehran. The overthrow of the Shah later on stunted their development as a basketball power. China was just beginning to flex its muscles then, and overtook the Iranians as a regional power. But they've closed the gap some, as we have seen of late, even having a player good enough to play NBA ball.

yungha
11-11-2010, 09:14 AM
in 5 years india will be a major hoops power with the Bullar brothers and this kid.

link - http://nba.fanhouse.com/2010/11/10/nba-awaits-satnam-from-india-so-big-and-athletic-at-14/?ncid=txtlnkusspor00000002

mighty_lion
11-11-2010, 10:58 AM
He looks like a Indian version of Sylvester Stallone.

thadzonline
10-20-2011, 10:45 AM
I did a research on China's big men and here are the guys who are 6'10" and above, some of them very young:

7'2" Li Muhao
7'1" Wang Zhelin
7'0" Pan Ning
7'2" Zhou Qi
7'3" Zhang Zhaoxu
7'3" Sun Zhe
7'2" Zhang Dayu
7'0" Ted Wang
6'11" Xu Tao
6'10" Sun Tonglin
6'10" Yan Pengfei
6'11" Su Wei
7'1" Jiang Liyang
7'2" Wang Zheng
7'1" Zheng Zhun
7'3" Zhang Jiadi
7'0" Tang Zhengdong
6'11" Xu Zhonghao
6'11" Mo Ke
6'10" Hu Ke
6'10" De Lehei
6'10" Yang Genglin
6'11" Chen Longkan
6'10" Lu Benqiang
6'11" Liu Wei
7'1" Han Dejun
6'11" Xu Jinlong
6'11" Zhang Hao
7'0" Zhang Kai
7'6" Yao Ming
7'9" Sun Mingming
7'1" Yi Jianlian
7'1" Wang Zhizhi
6'11" Mengke Bateer

According to some sources, there are about 100 of them in Chinese basketball academies

Sam Miguel
05-10-2013, 02:33 PM
Search for basketball's next great 7-foot center leads to India and China

Les Carpenter

Wed, May 8, 2013 2:42 AM EDT

BRADENTON, Fla. – Inside a gym, at a sports school first built for the minting of young tennis prodigies, a group of basketball coaches conduct an experiment of sorts. This is not an experiment like most experiments, with charts or doctors or a system of controls. Instead it is the testing of a vision, the affirmation of the coaches' belief that there is a right way to build a certain basketball player today.

The two subjects of this experiment stand over 7 feet tall. In basketball language they are "super bigs" – men who loom like sequoias above the rest of their teammates. Only these super bigs aren't men but rather 17-year-old boys. The tallest of them, Meng Xiang Yu, is 7-foot-2 and from China. The other, Satnam Singh, is 7 feet. He is from India. And since they are young and raw and from places where basketball is new, they are blank canvases for the coaches at the IMG Academy, where Meng and Satnam have come to learn basketball.

Because inside this gym the coaches are determined to bring Meng and Satnam along in a way no one has before. They will not push their boy giants. They will not shove them hard toward a college and NBA future many want to project. Not right away. Not while their bodies are young, their bones are still growing and overzealousness can destroy a career before it ever begins.

"What do you do with these big kids at these sizes at these young ages?" asks Nate Vander Sluis, IMG's national varsity team coach. "How do you develop them from a basketball standpoint and from a physical standpoint? Developing a 7-2 Chinese kid is not the same as trying to develop a 6-foot, 16-year-old kid. Those two muscle groups are two different things given how much growth they have already had."

The answer:

"Very slowly," he says.

Which goes strong against human nature. For the temptation is to look at 7-foot teenagers with their snowshoe feet and monster truck voices and consider them invincible even when they are the most vulnerable players on the court. Their bones aren't ready for their size. In the high school and AAU world they are forced to play dozens of games on fragile feet, almost assuring them of serious foot problems later in life. In Europe they are hurried onto top-level professional teams to play with men in their 20s and 30s long before they are socially ready for such a lifestyle.

Breakdowns and burnout are common. Many get hurt before they get to college, let alone the NBA.

"I think it's learning from mistakes," says Dan Barto, the head skills trainer at IMG. "Think about a triathlon runner or a marathon runner. You don't go out and run 26 miles, you run 10 one day and 18 another. It's the same thing here. We are taking our time."

So the coaches study. They look at what has worked in building super bigs in the past. They draw up workout plans designed to open new skills. They emphasize growth over victories. They build in long stretches of rest for Meng and Satnam when their feet get sore. They save them now in the hope of strengthening them for the future.

The coaches are confident in their approach. Barto has been preparing prospects for the NBA in predraft camps for a decade. Vander Sluis, at 6-foot-10, is pretty close to a super big himself. And the program's director, Kenny Natt, was also the coach of Satnam's national team in India, as well as a longtime assistant in the NBA. For 58 games in the 2008-09 season, he coached the Sacramento Kings. They have worked with giants before, many from other countries.

They also have seen injured American super bigs and unprepared Europeans. Barto has worked with enough Chinese prospects to know there's a reason more haven't flooded to the NBA after Yao Ming. Now they have two fresh, untested, uncorrupted players they can mold.

"There is not a next project, and I have a fascination with training the human body to get guys to move better," Barto says. "To take a kid who was 15 and now he's 19 and he's not injured and he's performing at a high level?"

Barto stops. He is an enthusiastic man with a wide face and eyes that pierce when expressing a point that he is sure is right.

In Meng and Satnam they have the next.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Late on a spring afternoon, Meng and Satnam are practicing with IMG's top national travel team. They do layup lines. They do rebounding drills. They help run pick and rolls. For much of the time they stand together: "the IMG twin towers," Natt likes to call them. They seem to lean on each other as if each is the only person who can understand the other's predicament in life. But as they stand together, like enormous bookends on the edge of the court, there is something else that becomes clear. They are nothing alike.

Satnam is strong, with arms and legs that are the thickness of small trees. The basketball in his hand almost looks like a softball. He has size 22 feet that require specially made shoes. He weights almost 300 pounds. His head is enormous and his forehead juts menacingly. When he talks, his voice sounds like a muscle car starting on a cold winter morning.

His English is not strong. The words get lost in the depths of his voice. But his dark eyes are bright. Inside the weight room he is the loudest of everyone, his chuckles booming in a low throaty roar. He is the funny one, they say, even as his scowl could send shivers through a room.

He looks at Meng, who has barely grown into his frame, ponders his teammate's slender arms and spindly frame spread over 230 pounds and smiles.

"I could bench-press him," he says.

Meng is finesse to Satnam's power. His feet are smaller, which makes him more agile. His game is born of China's more open style of play, almost a European form of the game in which big men hang on the perimeter, avoiding the scrum under the rim and shooting 3-pointers.

"I like jump shot because I am not strong," he says in a broken English that he has diligently learned in his 15 months in the U.S. "That doesn't mean I am scared. My jump shot is better than the post because I am not that strong. When I first come here I don't like any physical [contact]. Right now I get better."

Each is burdened by a man neither has met. The visage of Yao Ming looms large in their lives. Meng grew up idolizing China's great center who became the country's lone NBA star. He says Yao is his favorite. And like many young players in China he wants to be like him. He wants to be China's next Yao Ming.

Oddly, a similar line is used to describe Satnam. When he first arrived at IMG in the summer of 2010, a swarm of Indian journalists descended upon Florida. Satnam was news. Despite its 1.2 billion people, India has never produced an NBA player. And because Satnam was so large, wasn't it a certainty that he would be the first? No one mentioned his awkwardness, his difficulty getting into a defensive crouch or the fact he can't move from side to side. They all spoke of the same lofty goal no matter how distant. Satnam was their basketball hope. They called him India's Yao Ming.

Neither Meng nor Satnam speaks much of Yao. They are so far away from their homelands now that the comparison rarely arises. Meng likens his game to Lakers forward Pau Gasol – someone who can play both inside and out. Satnam relates more to true power centers like Dwight Howard and Shaquille O'Neal.

They are oddities at a school where most of the kids are some kind of oddity. They walk around the campus with backpacks, dodging 10-year-old tennis stars and relatives of famous athletes. They lunch with future Olympians. Yet they can't help but stand out the most. Satnam needs a whole side of a classroom in which to spread his legs from a desk that looks like it could have come from a toy house once he settles into the chair. Meng tries to blend in, sitting with a group of kids in the front of a class, but all this does is emphasize the fact the top of everyone else's head is at his shoulder height.

"They understand, they're not stupid," Barto says. "They know they can be the next big thing. They've heard the conversation lots of times. Every kid in China wants to be the next Yao Ming or Yi Jianlian. Basketball needs it. The whole hemisphere over there needs it. Someone has got to break through some time."

More and more they have to wonder if it will be them.

Sam Miguel
05-10-2013, 02:35 PM
^^^ (Cont'd )

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Were Meng or Satnam from anywhere but India and China, they probably wouldn't be here. Basketball players this tall, holding this much promise, rarely slip from the grasp of European professional leagues or the American AAU system. In a place like Lithuania or Spain, a player like Satnam would have been snared by a club team and forced to play for the country's national team system. In the U.S., a lanky player like Meng might have been snared by hustlers and handlers. China probably wouldn't have allowed Meng to go to IMG had he been on the country's sports radar.

"They don't know me," Meng says with a shake of his head. "I was just a high school normal player."

Had he stayed home, who knows what could have become of Meng? He would have been used by the local club teams simply because of his height, but he wouldn't have been encouraged to lift weights or get heavier. No one would have taught him defensive rotations or showed him how to use his size to his advantage. He would have been locked to a club team. He might have been invited to try out for the national team, but the bigger possibility is that he wouldn't have become anything, just another kid lost in the labyrinth of China's sports machine.

"They turn these guys into pro machines like Ivan Drago," says Barto, who once trained Yi, a 7-foot forward in the NBA from 2007-12. "They leave their family and go to this training regimen rather than intrinsically love the sport. It becomes a job. That job gets you a [big] paycheck that you never thought you would see."

And who at 16 years old needs an adult job?

"We are wondering if patience and vision will change the culture of basketball everywhere," Barto says. "That's the goal. If we do it in the two biggest countries of the world, why can't we do it in Europe? Why not do it in the United States? What if [NBA commissioner] David Stern allows guys to go straight to the NBA again? You have to have a plan for a kid. You can't send him to the local high school and score 30 a game. He won't be psychologically ready."

So the IMG coaches obsess about their players. They worry about Satnam's feet. They see his development into a professional as a five-to-seven-year plan. They remind him he is only in his second year of a lengthy project. Then they sit him for long stretches, sometimes 10 games in a row. They tell him this is for his own good.

"There is a scientific plan and reasoning behind him being here instead of some high-level American high school where he would play with great teams and get a Division I scholarship," Barto says. "He needs to take care of his body so if he does two years of college and goes to the NBA, his body is ready to go as opposed to breakdown, breakdown, breakdown."

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The video was a mess; dark and grainy like something shot 40 years ago on a home camera. A gigantic boy clad in a green training outfit hovered in the shadows. He stood beside a half-bent basket in what is clearly China, towering over a group of children almost a foot and a half shorter. Across the picture appeared the words: "I am Meng. I am 16 years old." The letters were crooked. The words misspelled.

Meng's mother, Jingling He, shot the video with her phone early in 2011. Meng added the text with the help of Google translator. They made the film with the hope that Meng could be seen, that he could leave his club team in the Chinese city of Chaoyang and be able to attend school while also playing basketball – something China's basketball system didn't allow.

They passed the video to a cousin who lives in California and the cousin handed it to people he thought might have basketball connections. Eventually a friend of Barto's who works with Chinese players forwarded the clip to the trainer. Barto's excitement grew as he watched the video, which ran barely more than a minute.

"Even if the basket was 9-foot-7, you could see he was a legit 7-1, 7-2," Barto says. "It showed him running and it showed him taking some steps, and at 16 years old, I can project out what that body can do at 22 with the right kind of training."

Meng is the only child of parents who are tall by Chinese standards – his father, Fanping, is 6-4, his mother 6-2 – but the real height comes from his grandfather, Quingzhu, who stands 6-7 and played professionally for a time in China. Since Meng's parents both worked, he spent much of his childhood living with his grandparents.

When Meng was 6, Quingzhu took him to a court to show him the game he adored. At first Meng didn't like basketball, but Quingzhu forced him to keep playing. The grandfather loved Michael Jordan. He had, in his home, a small collection of Jordan videos he played endlessly. Meng watched as Quingzhu played Jordan's shot over Bryon Russell in the 1998 NBA Finals so many times the boy had memorized it. Slowly, Meng came to like his grandfather's game. At 14, he decided he wanted to play basketball for a living. Two years later, he and his mother made the tape.

"Before I came here I was in China. I was scared because nobody is there, no family," Meng says. "Also you can't speak any English. If you want help you want to say, but you can't say clearly. It's scary."

He looks down for a moment.

"The Chinese, we have a different culture," he says. "But America is the best basketball nation in the world. I come here because I want to learn the American way to play."

When Meng arrived in Florida, Satnam had already been at IMG for more than a year.

While Meng found IMG, it was IMG who found Satnam. In 2010, the basketball federation of India partnered with an IMG joint venture, IMG Reliance, to grow the sport. It worked to identify talent, hire coaches and oversee the national team’s operations.

Then Natt, in his first days as the Indian national coach, stood before a line of prospects in a New Delhi gym. The local organizers had lined up the kids in order of their height, and so the row stretched from small to modest-sized players to the last, who loomed like Sasquatch.

"How old is he?" Natt asked.

He was told Satnam was on the under-16 team.

"This guy, we definitely need him on our senior national team," Natt remembers saying.

Over time Natt would learn Satnam's story. He would hear of a father almost as big who owned a rice and cotton farm in a small village in the region of Punjab, which is in the far north of India, tucked up against Pakistan. He would be told that the father introduced Satnam to basketball despite knowing little about the game himself. He heard how the boy grew and grew as local clubs began to notice.

What surprised Natt most was how fundamentally sound the giant seemed to be and how well he could catch passes and hit hook shots. Yes, there were holes in Satnam's game. Huge holes. But holes could be fixed. Desire couldn't. His favorite moment came when he shook Satnam's hand and his palm felt like it was sliding into a human catcher's mitt. He looked with wonder upon one of the biggest 16-year-olds he had ever seen.

"He was so strong and he had no idea how big he was," Natt said. "I could see he had the body of an adult man, but his personality is so genuine in the way he said 'yes, sir' and 'no, sir' and 'can you really help me, coach?' That's how he presented himself to me. I cherished the opportunity."

Sam Miguel
05-10-2013, 02:35 PM
^^^ (Cont'd )

When IMG decided to bring a handful of Indian athletes to train in Florida, Natt wanted Satnam. So did Barto, who had worked with him at a camp even before Natt saw him. How could they not? Here was a blank canvas, a player they would otherwise never have, someone already tall and strong. Maybe, just maybe, with the right training, he could be his country's first to play in the league that so desperately wants India to love it.

Sitting in a room outside the gym, Satnam turns to his translator and says a few words. Then he smiles. It is a wide smile filled with gigantic teeth. If you held a basketball to his face, the smile would be bigger than the letters on the ball.

"He believes because he has the strength, the power and the advantage of training here, he thought he would be picked for the national team," the translator says. "He was satisfied with the way he worked. Also Coach Kenny saw his performance over a period of time."

So where does this experiment go? How does it end? IMG's coaches say they believe Meng and Satnam can play Division I basketball. They say the goal is to get both to the NBA or at least a professional team overseas. They also figure both can play for their national teams – something Satnam has been doing for years.

Without saying the words, they seem to suggest both have a chance to be the next Yao Ming.

But that is in the future. They seem divided on what level Meng and Satnam could play if they suddenly had to go to college today. The general consensus is a low Division I school as long as the coaches there play Satnam around the basket and monitor his workload while also resisting the temptation to make Meng a center.

"It's just difficult sometimes," Natt says. "[People] say: 'Why aren't they dominating? They should be dominating.' But as we learned, even at the pro level, you find it's very difficult. The game has moved away from the tall guys. The best teams are average-height teams with quickness and athleticism. Those are the teams that are really succeeding. The big guys are really fading away; just like everything, it's an evolution where it comes back."

NBA Hall of Famer and Detroit Pistons general manager Joe Dumars, who is prohibited by league rules from discussing high school prospects, says that, in general, NBA teams continue to look for 7-foot players, but there are fewer prospects coming along. Some of his colleagues have said they won't even draft American 7-footers, believing the high school and AAU system has ruined them.

That's what makes the IMG experiment so important.

The IMG people don't talk a lot about statistics. Press for Meng's and Satnam's statistics and the best that comes back is Satnam had 24 points, 13 rebounds and four blocked shots in the recent Philadelphia Jam Fest AAU tournament. Satnam himself boasts of playing 40 minutes a game in a series of games for the Indian national team in December. The focus isn't on numbers. It isn't on wins. The experiment isn't about results right now.

Standing inside the gym at IMG, Barto shakes his head. He thinks about Meng, about the things he hears from other coaches and observers who tell him Meng is too fragile to play Division I basketball or that he'll have to be a four-year player if he does.

"I'm seeing the vision [where] you have no idea what he will become when he gets into a college system or a pro system because he has things you can't teach," Barto says. "Yeah, he's one-second slow as a 17-year-old and he's one step behind and he gets dunked on by a super athletic 6-6 guy, but two or three years from now those mistakes will be gone.

"His English will understand the teaching. His body will have caught up. It will make up for those deficiencies. Most coaches aren't patient. They are 'win, win, win.' They aren't patient enough to see the project through."

Barto crosses his arms and sighs. Outside, on a small artificial turf field under an awning to block the sun, Meng and Satnam are pulling steel sleds with ropes that are tied around their waist. They grunt. They sweat. They exhale.

It is a sight to behold: two teenagers in the bodies of giant men tugging these sleds that are big for most but look like toys behind them. There is no rush. No hurry to practice. A small breeze rustles under the awning. They are children still learning a super big man's game. There are no clocks anywhere.

They have nothing but time.