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gameface_one
09-17-2007, 08:49 AM
Seven habits of highly successful cage team
THE GAME OF MY LIFE By Bill Velasco
Monday, September 17, 2007
Philstar.com


To pass or not to pass, that is the question.

Thus goes the first chapter of a lengthy treatise by San Miguel Beer and Ginebra skills coach Kirk Collier. Collier, whose latest success story is Larry Turner, the 6’11” rookie center of the Los Angeles Lakers, is a passionate purist for the sport.

“No matter what team sport one plays, be it soccer, volleyball, ice hockey or basketball passing is one of the most effective, efficient and productive weapons that can be used to put players into scoring position. We have all heard basketball coaches scream emphatically at players during practice and during games ‘pass the ball, the defense can’t run faster than the ball can be passed’,”Collier notes.

“Why is it so hard for most basketball players to give up the ball and why do so many basketball players feel that they must have the ball in their hands in order to make an offensive contribution?”

Collier, who conducted basketball camps in the US before being imported here by Red Bull, provides a conceptual framework for basketball, which he feels players today have already forgotten.

“Players should not equate scoring with offense. Scoring is not offense, it’s the culminating activity of offense. The great architects of this magnificent game we call basketball designed the pass as a method of advancing or moving the ball into better scoring, but in the today’s modern game of basketball from a western vantage that principle has been lost.

Collier says that passing is a highly skilled craft, and is not accorded the time and effort required to master it.

“If one ever watched or participated in a soccer, ice hockey or volleyball practice, one would undoubtedly notice that a large percentage of the offensive practice time is allotted for passing. But if you have ever participated in or watched a United States influenced basketball practice you would observe that only a small percentage of the practice time – if any at all – is allocated for passing.

“I’ve always found it hard to understand why in volleyball, a team sport where players are only allowed a maximum number of two passes before they must try to score almost always utilize those two passes as opposed to basketball, which is also a team sport but where players are allowed an unlimited number of passes,” Collier continues. “Basketball players rarely use the pass to set up the shot. This concept of play ultimately results in poor team rhythm, bad shots and a low field goal percentage.”

Collier observed that Korean and European players are known to be great shooters, but if you analyze the Korean and European styles of basketball, it’s not that they are great shooters, as much as they get great shots because of great passing.

According to his research, basketball teams win 80 percent or more of games wherein they create 24 or more assists. He surmises that the goal of offense should not be to score. The goal of offense should be to create effective, efficient and consistent scoring opportunities via assists.

“When an offense is characterized by great passing it is thing of beauty to watch,” Collier elaborates. “All five players are happy and in rhythm because their appetite and desire to touch the ball is being fed. The shooters get shots in open spaces, with enough time to score.”

On the other hand, bad shots have a profoundly negative effect on a team’s offensive and defensive efficiency, because they lower the team’s shooting percentage and they result in easy fastbreak opportunities for the defense. When the ball slows down the defense is allowed to slow down and slowing down the defense allows the defense to rest and reset, gives them time to make reads and allows the offside defense to sit in the land and protect the route to the basket.

One stat that Collier suggests teams make is what he calls “passes per possession” or 3p count.

“There is a direct positive correlation between the number of passes a team makes before they attempt a shot, the number of assists they create, their field goal percentage and their winning percentage,” he explains.

“Using the recently completed FIBA Asian Basketball Championships which is the Asian qualifying tournament for the 2008 Beijing Olympics as a case study, there were 60 games played during the tournament and four of the 60 games ended with both teams accumulating the same number of assists. Of the remaining 56 games, the teams which created more assists won 42 times and the team which created less assists only won 14 times.”

“With seventy-five percent of the games being won by the team that created the most assists, it becomes overwhelmingly clear that the higher the number of points a team scores via assist, the higher percentage chance they have of winning.”

That’s why Coach Kirk is planning a book on great offense. And passing is only Chapter One.

Sam Miguel
10-01-2007, 01:15 PM
24 assists in a game. Hmm... can't quite remember when any team in the PBA or the UAAP had that many assists in a game. I can't even recall a game in the recent Eurobasket and Stankovic Cups where a team had that many assists consistently. No doubt there is much to be gained by passing the ball around well and finding scoring opportunities constantly, but how much passing is actually needed?

oca
10-01-2007, 01:19 PM
...and passing is a SKILL.

mighty_lion
10-01-2007, 05:38 PM
24 assists in a game. Hmm... can't quite remember when any team in the PBA or the UAAP had that many assists in a game. I can't even recall a game in the recent Eurobasket and Stankovic Cups where a team had that many assists consistently. No doubt there is much to be gained by passing the ball around well and finding scoring opportunities constantly, but how much passing is actually needed?


Parang meron PG sa PBA na naka-28 assist sa isang laro sometime 90's. Taob si Steve Nash at Jason Kidd. Nakalimutan ko na ang pangalan.

yokam
10-16-2007, 07:15 PM
It was Eugene Quilban, and he still holds that record until now.