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pachador
09-15-2007, 12:25 AM
Learning from the best

THE GAME OF MY LIFE By Bill Velasco
Saturday, September 15, 2007

The first BAP-SBP National Coaches Conference at the Astoria Plaza was a refreshing experience, in terms of the willingness of the best coaches from all over the country to participate and share their knowledge with the body. The tone was set from the start by executive director Pato Gregorio, who stressed the philosophy of working together to build a successful system that will outlast any personalities involved.

National team head coach Chot Reyes spoke candidly about the experience in Tokushima, and once again took responsibility for our defeat there, while at the same time acknowledging that the team was not prepared to play every day in a big international tournament.

Chot emphasized three things to the body, after the grassroots and juniors programs had been explained. The first thing he stressed was that we had to teach our big men to shoot.

“We say we don’t have big men,” Reyes began. Let me correct that: we don’t have big men who can shoot. Let’s teach the few big men we have how to shoot the three-pointer.”

The second thing he stressed was passing, which is efficiently and effectively done in Europe. The third, which was based on the FIBA-Asia experience, was to train players to be able to play every day. We have leagues in the Philippines, but not tournaments where we play every day. The former San Miguel Beer head coach elaborated, “If at an early age, players learn how to prepare not just physically, but mentally and psychologically, to play every day, it will make things a lot easier.”

Fourth, Reyes wanted us to get out of training players rote. Let’s teach concepts, so the player won’t just know plays, but the reason behind it. Making players smarter should be our ultimate goal.

Lastly, Reyes emphasized that the basketball community should make it a solemn vow never to be suspended from international competition again.

The highlight of the morning session was a taste of what it was like to listen to the European perspective from a highly successful practitioner. Former Serbian national coach Vlade Djurovic, who met the Philippine team in Belgrade in June, spoke briefly and in a very entertaining fashion about how difficult it has been for American coaches to win in Europe. They have very few concerns in American, and are blessed with talented players whom they can just throw the ball into when they get into trouble in close games.

The first of four things Djurovic stressed was rebounding.

“It’s okay to miss, but if you do not rebound when you have a good opportunity, that is criminal,” said Djurovic in his heavy accent. “If you do not rebound, I will cut you and I will replace you.”

The second thing was turnovers. Djurovic said that, in Europe, 12 turnovers are an acceptable number for a team in one game, far less that the 20 or so which seem to be the norm in local college basketball.

The third item was free throw shooting, but not percentages. Coach Djurovic said that the number of free throws was important, because it affects the outcome of a game in a big way.

“We may both shoot 50 percent free throws,” he explained. “But if you make five out of 10 and I make 10 out of 20, that means you only missed five, but I missed 10. It is not the same.”

The last item on his list was luck. Luck, as he described, was getting bad referees or having them make bad calls (such as the RP-Iran game in the FIBA-Asia tournament wherein a Greek referee – a friend of Djurovic – called a technical foul that determined the outcome of the game. It was also losing because of a lucky shot, or having a player slip on the floor in a crucial situation.

Djurovic said that if you have three of those four, you will win games.

More on the European philosophy in an upcoming piece.

pachador
09-18-2007, 03:28 AM
make sure to read the last paragraph of this article. Also, based on his comments we need to take games very very seriously kahit exhibitions games daw:

Sept 17, 2007 Business Mirror

Quite frankly: Serbian coach minces no words in describing state of RP hoops

By Dennis Principe
Correspondent

Vlade Djurovic may have put it bluntly in saying that Filipino basketball players are having a false sense of commitment to flag and country.

In an interview on Sunday inside his posh unit at the Astoria Hotel, the Serbian coach didn’t mince his words about his thoughts on Philippine hoops, especially on the players.

“Your philosophy is that, you play the game, you lose, so what?” he said. “In Europe every lost game is a tragedy, a real tragedy. If a coach loses a maximum of three games then he must go.”

Djurovic is in the country, obliging an invitation sent by the BAP-Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas in the national federation’s first coaches’ conference during the weekend.



Reportedly the frontrunner for the post of national-team consultant, Djurovic was one of the speakers in a seminar held Friday at the Astoria Hotel in Pasig City. On Saturday, he conducted a coaching clinic at the Fort in Taguig City.

“I think Filipino coaches love basketball and every question they asked were very good questions,” said Djurovic “I’ve been to a lot of countries and I heard many questions without sense, without connection to basketball but here, all questions were very good.”

About 80 coaches attended the Friday seminar, much to Djurovic’s surprise.

“My question is how did they become coaches?” Djurovic asked. “In Europe, you go to school and earn a permit to coach. If you don’t have proper papers you cannot coach.”

On his last day in Manila Sunday, Djurovic observed the game between Talk ’N Text and a visiting team from Korea. The Serbian coach didn’t like what he saw.

“It’s only an exhibition game but the players are smiling and they are losing by 25 points,” said Djurovic. “You must change the behavior of the players.”

Djurovic, 59, joined BAP-SBP executive director Patrick Gregorio and Talk ’N Text governor Ricky Vargas.

“You must change that mentality whether it’s a friendly game or practice, you must win games. You cannot win every time but you try to win,” said Djurovic. “And only through that can you have a winning mentality.”

Djurovic said the keys are getting a good coach with a good philosophy and who knows how to motivate his players to give it all both in an actual game and in practice.

“I think you have good coaches here,” Djurovic said. “But they have an NBA approach.”

The Serbian coach, like many European mentors agree that the NBA style solely won’t work in world basketball.

“In the NBA you have the point guard, you give him a screen, pass and then shoot. And they play one-on-one,” he said.

“In Europe they play five-on-five to get open shots. You must make seven to eight moves without the ball,” he added. “If you can mix like 40-percent European, 40-percent American and 20-percent local basketball that will be the best combination and maybe Philippine basketball can compete in Asia.”

In contrast, Djurovic praised the Korean team.

“I think they have a good coach. He is good also because he is respected by his players. I saw him shout and order his player to go in one spot and the player follows the order. That’s the sign of a good coach.”

And that’s exactly why the BAP-SBP invited Djurovic in the first place, because he might be seen as someone who can help the Philippines improve in international play.

“As I understood they invited me because they want to learn the European style,” said Djurovic, who left the country Sunday night but expressed his willingness to come back and contribute to the Philippines’ improvement.

“I think I’ll be able to do that and I think it is a good solution to Philippine basketball,” he added.

Gregorio said Djurovic’s long-term involvement in RP basketball is still being evaluated by the federation, but he feels positive about the hiring of Djurovic as consultant.

“One good thing about coach Vlade is that he is willing to help the Philippines which he hopes to be one of his great legacies as an international coach.”

And what would be Djurovic’s priority programs be?

“A youth program is important. That is another very good step,” he said. “All leagues in Europe are professionals, but they all use FIBA rules. No NBA rules at all. NBA rules are used only in the NBA and here in the Philippines,” added Djurovic.

About the country’s chances of beating an Asian powerhouse again, Djurovic said a team must be formed that will reach its peak once China’s Yao Ming ends his basketball career.

“China is the best team because of Yao Ming but he can’t play for 30 years. You must prepare a team after Yao Ming,” said Djurovic.

Djurovic said a country like the Philippines with a population of 80 million is an advantage in terms of tapping the best talent available.

“How can you allow countries like Lithuania with three million people, or Serbia with seven million, or Greece with 10 million people be better than your country,” said Djurovic “Eighty million Filipinos? That is great power that you have.”

Kid Cubao
09-18-2007, 11:04 AM
it would have been better if borat himself was the one interviewed ;D

seriously, though, this serbian coach strikes me as being full of himself. what about those times when we used to beat the crap out of these guys in the mid-60s, during the time of the great olympians like boy marquez, narciso bernardo, and yoyong martirez? back in those days, they played like robots and automatons. under national coach baby dalupan, we were the envy of the basketball world because we used to score over a hundred points a game when these european clunkers were lucky to score 60 in overtime! sa tingin ninyo walang naging impact ang uptempo approach ni maestro dalupan sa estado ng european basketball ngayon? imposible. now it seems they want us to believe that all there is to basketball is following their system. whattaguy ;D

para sa akin, pana-panahon lang yan. what's important is to set in place a year-round, fully-integrated program that draws the best basketball talent in the land, expose them to international tournaments, and be more active in the international coaching community.

oca
09-18-2007, 12:13 PM
Ano raw?

Rebounding, less turnovers, free throw shooting and luck.

Ano ang bago ryan? Matagal nang alam yan ng mga ka-generation ko.

Ang pinag-iba ng laro ng Pinoy ngayon ay yaong over emphasis on defense. That "D" has been made a mantra to the detriment of our game.

The emphasis on defense, imo, is due to lack of good skills coaches.

Kung hindi marunong mag shoot, pero matangkad and/or may katawan, pakinabangan sa depensa! Ang daming big kids sa Jrs ranks, pagdating sa college, nakatatlong taon na wala paring short jumper. Mahina pa rin ang pivot moves. Ano ang ginagawa ng mga yan at hindi umuusad ang skills proficiency? Pero hanep makipagpalitan ng mukha sa depensa!

Defense requires athleticism and determination. Is athleticism a skill? Is determination a skill?

Pero and rebounding, passing, dribbling, shooting..ano ang mga iyan?

Tama! Skills ang tawag dyan!

Mas mahirap turuan ang bata ng skills that will result to putting points in the score board. But in defense, pag marunong tumakbo at willing makipagbanggaan, pwede nang ipasok yan.

As a remedy, dapat maturuan ang mga coaches at trainers kung paano magturo ng skills sa mga bata. Kung ang pagbuo ng Youth Program ang kinabukasan natin, walang tututol dyan. Pero pag nandyan na ang mga bata, baka pulos "paglaro" lang ang atupagin.

Skills. Skills. Skills. This is not learned during the game.

Kaya una, teach our coaches and trainers how to teach the very basic skills of the game.

Ultimo free throw, short cut na ang training. Sa dulo ng practice, players will line-up sa guhit ang take turns in making 5 or 10 FTs. Ano ang mapapala mo sa 10 ft at the end of the session? Kahit 20 pa yan, walang kwenta yan. Sino ang mga coach who will make each player take minimum of 100 fts per session?

Tapos pag nagmintis ng FT ang bata sa game, buntong hininga kayo! Nasisisi pa ang bata. Eh, binigyan niyo ba ng oras nag bata na mag-train shooting FTs? Yes, daw, yung 10 shots to end the practice session. T@ng ewan niyo!

We put so much time on scrimmage. Bawasan yan. Dagdagan ang oras sa skills.

After the skills training at naging proficient na ang mga bata saka nyo ipasok yung mga philosophy ek-ek!

Lintek, pinatulog pa sa Astoria!

pachador
09-18-2007, 12:25 PM
you are right in a sense. this guy is controversial but apparently he produces results. From what i see on the net, he is abrasive *and a disciplinarian like Joe Lipa so in the context of philippine culture , its probably best to hold off potential conflicts and for him to remain as consultant *and not as a national coach. I feel our coaches can learn something from him. Not only Chot Reyes but the national team members have all praises for this guy. *Here's an interview with him by a Euro magazine:

http://www.adriaticbasket.com/finalfour2004/reflex_coach_en.shtml

VLADE DJUROVIĆ

Vlade Djurovic was always considered as a flamboyant coach. Still is. A man whose behaviour is authentic, very sharp in his talk and thinking. In his own words his character costed him a more distinguished career. And he accomplished so much. Last april, after barely a month at the helm of Reflex, Djurovic won the Radivoj Korać Cup title. Many true basketball fans were rejoycing the triumphant return of the famous Djura, who never liked to be average in anything he did nor would such a result be in the proportion with the amount of energy he spends on the court.

After the big win he made a nice paralel with the italian football league, trying to make a statement with comparing Reflex to Partizan and Red Star, the serbian basketball institutions. Djurovic has a big passion for Calcio, especcialy AC Milan.

I feel like the coach of Parma, a well organized and expanding club. Still, we need time to come hand to hand with clubs like Milan or Inter. I am convienced that we will be there one day. With such good club facilities and comitment, we must succed. Also, we must find our small and devoted army of fans.

Born and raised in Belgrade, Djurović was a backup-player for OKK Belgrade. So, sitting on the bench, he simply stayed there.

Even than I was thinking of the moves of my coach and thinking what did he do right or not. I was than already prepearing myself for the coaching job. My teachers were Branislav Rajačić, Bora Cenić, Slobodan Ivković, Alexandar Nikolić and Ranko Žeravica, but above all Borislav Stanković.

When he coached Zadar, in the play-off finals in 1986, Djurović made a huge upset of the famous Cibona team with the great late Dražen Petrović at the helm. Many years later, as a coach of Reflex, he was greeted with great honours in Zadar.

I played the tape with that famous game in Zagreb to my players in Reflex. I wanted them to see brilliance of Petar Popović and Stojan Vrankovič, to see how smaller clubs can beat the great ones if they have more heart.

Djurović is never afraid to talk about the mistakes that he made.

Greatest one was turning down Panathinaikos while working in Greece. Also, I decided to go to Red Star after Zadar, instead of going to Jugoplastika of Split. That way I missed the oportunity to work with Dino Radja and Toni Kukoč, leaders of the team that won three consecutive European Champions Cups. The hardest defeat for me is from 1982. French Limoges was better than my team Sibenka in the Radovoj Korač Cup final by 3 points. I still don`t doubt we were a better team.

Coching is a great passion for Djurović.

There isn`t a job that I would rather do. It brings so much sweat, tears, hard work and great satisfaction in your life. You gotta work on yourself, learn, but also rely on your insinct. What seperates good and great coaches is that great ones see the solution of the problem before the problem itself.

Reflex is playing a great season so far. Got far in the ULEB cup, almost won the national Radivoj Korac Cup. Goodyear league final four is a chance for a trophy.

I am very satisfied with the plays we have been producing threw the whole season. If we won the Korač Cup it would be perfect. We just needed a foul at the finish. Askrabić is a leader, Ffriend is putting in some very big plays, Zoroski, Freeman, Plisnić and Stefanović also. Youngsters are becoming better every day. Still, our goal has not been reached yet – trophies. The only thing that counts.

His predictions for the final-four outcome are.

Cibona is the favorit because of the home crowd. We are prepearing just for the semi-final game with Red Star. If we reach the final, the chances are 50-50, no metter who is playing. Those are good chances.

pachador
09-23-2007, 01:48 PM
I think the perfect job for Vlade, that serbian coach is to head a new SBP coaching academy where local coaches will be trained . For this SBP coaching academy, Vlade might have to get 2 or more euro or serbian coaches to assist him. Then the 2nd duty of this Serbian/Euro coach is to be a consultant to Chot or whoever is the RP national team coach and correct him. The Serbian will also accompany the national coach and the RP team during practice and actual tournaments to serve as a steadying hand . In other words , it will be on-the-job training for the national coach and long-term training for other coaches who are still coaching in college or high school or in the PBA teams.

This way, there will be no controversy and envious/jealous protests from the philippine coaches group since the Serbian will be hired as a consultant and not as a coach plus the SBP coaching academy gets jumpstarted while the RP national team coach has a 'steady hand' or 'guardian angel' assisting him behind the scenes.

pachador
09-25-2007, 01:57 AM
if only home-grown coaches were doing their jobs of molding and training the young homegrown players properly in bball funadentals at a young age, then there would have been much less fil-am players in the PBA , UAAP, NCAA and PBL.

The very fact that Fil-am players are a big percentage of the top Philippine leagues is a stinging indication of how far behind the homegrown coaches(except for a few) are in terms of training homegrown players in bball fundamentals.

This by itself, should goad the SBP to form a coaching academy headed by Euro coaches such as Vlade from Serbia, to re-train the hard-headed "top coaches" kuno of the leading bball leagues. This is the only way to get around the opposition of this fossilized obsolete homegrown coaches who insist they are good and oppose the hiring of foreign coaches. The question is, can you still teach old dogs new tricks? or do we have to start training a new generation of young coaches?

Now to all you home-grown coaches, if you think I am wrong, then let your actions speak louder than your protests. Start giving the Philippines more and more homegrown players that can compete with the Fil-am players to the point that a situation will be reached where it will be the fil-ams that will have a very difficult time getting into the top home-grown leagues like the PBA.

XsandOs
09-25-2007, 04:26 AM
if only home-grown coaches were doing their jobs of molding and training the young homegrown players properly in bball funadentals at a young age, then there would have been much less fil-am players in the PBA , UAAP, NCAA and PBL.

The very fact that Fil-am players are a big percentage of the top Philippine leagues is a stinging indication of how far behind the homegrown coaches(except for a few) are in terms of training homegrown players in bball fundamentals.

This by itself, should goad the SBP to form a coaching academy headed by Euro coaches such as Vlade from Serbia, to re-train the hard-headed "top coaches" kuno of the leading bball leagues. This is the only way to get around the opposition of this fossilized obsolete homegrown coaches who insist they are good and oppose the hiring of foreign coaches. The question is, can you still teach old dogs new tricks? or do we have to start training a new generation of young coaches?

Now to all you home-grown coaches, if you think I am wrong, then let your actions speak louder than your protests. Start giving the Philippines more and more homegrown players that can compete with the Fil-am players to the point that a situation will be reached where it will be the fil-ams that will have a very difficult time getting into the top home-grown leagues like the PBA.


That's quite a statement. I have to agree with this post. I advocate for the approach to start giving new, innovative coaches the opportunity to coach at the highest levels and develop players. Having a SBP Coaching Academy is a great idea, and one that I am pushing for, but as we can see, status quo is the path of least resistance. I am sure there are Filipino & Filipino American coaches who do not hold true to the current standard that are willing to put their money where their mouth is and coach teams, but who is willing to take a risk to give them a chance?

Me...I have no problem with Filipino Americans competing for spots on UAAP, NCAA, PBL, and PBA teams. It should be an inspiration to Filipino players to continue to improve and work on their game in order to beat them. There will continue to be room for these players. But it is obvious that the players and the system have not risen to the challenge. The system has decided that it is easier to pluck Fil-Foreigners to fill roster spots, and players have gotten by on reputation or have settled for less than what they could earn if they put forth an honest effort.

IMO, I don't think that you need a Serbian coach to come in to run a coaching academy. I think that there are capable people in SBP who can administrate that project...there just has to be a set plan and strategy for it. At essence, this is about professional development. Send coaches to other countries to observe practice and training techniques of other coaches. Invite well-known coaches to come to the Philippines to conduct coaching clinics. Develop the coaching network. I believe that foreign coach won't offer the cure that seems so seductive to many...but a paradigm shift from within and without can offer the long term solutions and all important BUY-IN of coaches to make coaching development viable.

pachador
09-25-2007, 04:57 AM
Definitely, Fil-am players should always be allowed to compete for spots in the RP national team and league teams. May the best man win ! The fact that Fil-Am players come from a Fil-am overseas immigrant pool of only 3 million or so Fil-Ams whereas homegrown players come from a homegrown filipino population of 80 million(or is it 90 million filipinos now?) means that the development and training of homegrown players leave a whole lot to be desired even if we factor in the mixed blood genes(african and white) in these Fil-ams , for how do we account for the success of Fil-Am players who do not have african or white blood like Alapag, Helterbrand, Cabagnot, Caguioa , etc...





if only home-grown coaches were doing their jobs of molding and training the young homegrown players properly in bball funadentals at a young age, then there would have been much less fil-am players in the PBA , UAAP, NCAA and PBL.

The very fact that Fil-am players are a big percentage of the top Philippine leagues is a stinging indication of how far behind the homegrown coaches(except for a few) are in terms of training homegrown players in bball fundamentals.

This by itself, should goad the SBP to form a coaching academy headed by Euro coaches such as Vlade from Serbia, to re-train the hard-headed "top coaches" kuno of the leading bball leagues. This is the only way to get around the opposition of this fossilized obsolete homegrown coaches who insist they are good and oppose the hiring of foreign coaches. The question is, can you still teach old dogs new tricks? or do we have to start training a new generation of young coaches?

Now to all you home-grown coaches, if you think I am wrong, then let your actions speak louder than your protests. Start giving the Philippines more and more homegrown players that can compete with the Fil-am players to the point that a situation will be reached where it will be the fil-ams that will have a very difficult time getting into the top home-grown leagues like the PBA.


That's quite a statement.* I have to agree with this post.* I advocate for the approach to start giving new, innovative coaches the opportunity to coach at the highest levels and develop players.* Having a SBP Coaching Academy is a great idea, and one that I am pushing for, but as we can see, status quo is the path of least resistance.* I am sure there are Filipino & Filipino American coaches who do not hold true to the current standard that are willing to put their money where their mouth is and coach teams, but who is willing to take a risk to give them a chance?

Me...I have no problem with Filipino Americans competing for spots on UAAP, NCAA, PBL, and PBA teams.* It should be an inspiration to Filipino players to continue to improve and work on their game in order to beat them.* There will continue to be room for these players.* But it is obvious that the players and the system have not risen to the challenge.* The system has decided that it is easier to pluck Fil-Foreigners to fill roster spots, and players have gotten by on reputation or have settled for less than what they could earn if they put forth an honest effort.*

IMO, I don't think that you need a Serbian coach to come in to run a coaching academy.* I think that there are capable people in SBP who can administrate that project...there just has to be a set plan and strategy for it.* At essence, this is about professional development.* Send coaches to other countries to observe practice and training techniques of other coaches.* Invite well-known coaches to come to the Philippines to conduct coaching clinics.* Develop the coaching network.* I believe that foreign coach won't offer the cure that seems so seductive to many...but a paradigm shift from within and without can offer the long term solutions and all important BUY-IN of coaches to make coaching development viable.*

XsandOs
09-25-2007, 01:20 PM
Definitely, Fil-am players should always be allowed to compete for spots in the RP national team and league teams. May the best man win ! The fact that Fil-Am players come from a Fil-am overseas immigrant pool of only 3 million or so Fil-Ams whereas homegrown players come from a homegrown filipino population of 80 million(or is it 90 million filipinos now?) means that the development and training of homegrown players leave a whole lot to be desired even if we factor in the mixed blood genes(african and white) in these Fil-ams , for how do we account for the success of Fil-Am players who do not have african or white blood like Alapag, Helterbrand, Cabagnot, Caguioa , etc...


For players like that, the one thing that they have in their corner is the fact that these players have played against a higher level of competition.* For Filipino American players, especially those that are easily identified as Pacific Islander because of their physical features, there is a stigma attached to their skill level and athletic ability.* For many, Filipino American players are seen as lower level athletes and are not given much notice outside their own communities.* The general American basketball world does not recognize them as a consistent source of recruitable talent at the next level.*

So for those that truly aspire to make basketball a part of their life in an organize setting, they have to prove themselves to anyone and everyone.* They have to play with a chip on their shoulder, play with a mental edge.* That mental toughness can be seen in the way Filipino American players can dominate over their counter parts in the Philippines, even though they may possess the same level of talent.*

Is it necessarily training techniques?* Maybe, maybe not.* For I have seen the National Team training in Los Angeles at Home Depot Center in preparation for the FIBA Asian Championships and the Fil-Am players, who should be used to working hard, did not display the work ethic that I would have expected from professional basketball players.*

So what it the difference, at least as it relates to being a good player in the Philippines, is that they can turn on a mental edge borne out having to prove themselves against guys who thought they didn't belong.* The Fil Ams do not have the edge in international play, but they can certainly draw on that swagger when they go against their fellow countrymen.*

If there is one thing that Filipino Coaches are not fostering well is a "killer's mentality".* What it turns into is animosity towards an opponent and inappropriate behavior, not a sincere belief that when I step on the court, man to man, team to team, that I will destroy you or die trying.* In a land where hardship is a part of daily life for so many, you would think that this would be more prevalent, but it is not.

This is how I would account for a large part of Filipino Americans' success.

pachador
09-25-2007, 02:03 PM
as they say, playing with bano opposition makes you bano ;D





Definitely, Fil-am players should always be allowed to compete for spots in the RP national team and league teams. May the best man win ! The fact that Fil-Am players come from a Fil-am overseas immigrant pool of only 3 million or so Fil-Ams whereas homegrown players come from a homegrown filipino population of 80 million(or is it 90 million filipinos now?) means that the development and training of homegrown players leave a whole lot to be desired even if we factor in the mixed blood genes(african and white) in these Fil-ams , for how do we account for the success of Fil-Am players who do not have african or white blood like Alapag, Helterbrand, Cabagnot, Caguioa , etc...


For players like that, the one thing that they have in their corner is the fact that these players have played against a higher level of competition.* For Filipino American players, especially those that are easily identified as Pacific Islander because of their physical features, there is a stigma attached to their skill level and athletic ability.* For many, Filipino American players are seen as lower level athletes and are not given much notice outside their own communities.* The general American basketball world does not recognize them as a consistent source of recruitable talent at the next level.*

So for those that truly aspire to make basketball a part of their life in an organize setting, they have to prove themselves to anyone and everyone.* They have to play with a chip on their shoulder, play with a mental edge.* That mental toughness can be seen in the way Filipino American players can dominate over their counter parts in the Philippines, even though they may possess the same level of talent.*

Is it necessarily training techniques?* Maybe, maybe not.* For I have seen the National Team training in Los Angeles at Home Depot Center in preparation for the FIBA Asian Championships and the Fil-Am players, who should be used to working hard, did not display the work ethic that I would have expected from professional basketball players.*

So what it the difference, at least as it relates to being a good player in the Philippines, is that they can turn on a mental edge borne out having to prove themselves against guys who thought they didn't belong.* The Fil Ams do not have the edge in international play, but they can certainly draw on that swagger when they go against their fellow countrymen.*

If there is one thing that Filipino Coaches are not fostering well is a "killer's mentality".* What it turns into is animosity towards an opponent and inappropriate behavior, not a sincere belief that when I step on the court, man to man, team to team, that I will destroy you or die trying.* In a land where hardship is a part of daily life for so many, you would think that this would be more prevalent, but it is not.

This is how I would account for a large part of Filipino Americans' success.

onggok
09-26-2007, 04:00 AM
as they say, playing with bano opposition* makes you bano* ;D





Definitely, Fil-am players should always be allowed to compete for spots in the RP national team and league teams. May the best man win ! The fact that Fil-Am players come from a Fil-am overseas immigrant pool of only 3 million or so Fil-Ams whereas homegrown players come from a homegrown filipino population of 80 million(or is it 90 million filipinos now?) means that the development and training of homegrown players leave a whole lot to be desired even if we factor in the mixed blood genes(african and white) in these Fil-ams , for how do we account for the success of Fil-Am players who do not have african or white blood like Alapag, Helterbrand, Cabagnot, Caguioa , etc...
Pachador do you have a new information regarding Jericho De Guzman and Slaughter? If SBP whats to hire
the Serbian coach they need to introduce this two to him.

For players like that, the one thing that they have in their corner is the fact that these players have played against a higher level of competition.* For Filipino American players, especially those that are easily identified as Pacific Islander because of their physical features, there is a stigma attached to their skill level and athletic ability.* For many, Filipino American players are seen as lower level athletes and are not given much notice outside their own communities.* The general American basketball world does not recognize them as a consistent source of recruitable talent at the next level.*

So for those that truly aspire to make basketball a part of their life in an organize setting, they have to prove themselves to anyone and everyone.* They have to play with a chip on their shoulder, play with a mental edge.* That mental toughness can be seen in the way Filipino American players can dominate over their counter parts in the Philippines, even though they may possess the same level of talent.*

Is it necessarily training techniques?* Maybe, maybe not.* For I have seen the National Team training in Los Angeles at Home Depot Center in preparation for the FIBA Asian Championships and the Fil-Am players, who should be used to working hard, did not display the work ethic that I would have expected from professional basketball players.*

So what it the difference, at least as it relates to being a good player in the Philippines, is that they can turn on a mental edge borne out having to prove themselves against guys who thought they didn't belong.* The Fil Ams do not have the edge in international play, but they can certainly draw on that swagger when they go against their fellow countrymen.*

If there is one thing that Filipino Coaches are not fostering well is a "killer's mentality".* What it turns into is animosity towards an opponent and inappropriate behavior, not a sincere belief that when I step on the court, man to man, team to team, that I will destroy you or die trying.* In a land where hardship is a part of daily life for so many, you would think that this would be more prevalent, but it is not.

This is how I would account for a large part of Filipino Americans' success.

Semenelin
11-21-2007, 11:20 AM
this is the guy who said we need a 7foot rebounder right? i was browsing through rivals.com and other scouting sites and I see a 7'2 sudanese by the name of John Riek. I haven't read if this guy has played for Sudan(may NT ba yun?), if not, maybe we can naturalize this guy. I am not big on the naturalization thingie pero habang iniintay natin madevelop sila slaughter, de guzman, aguilar, chiu, etc; maybe this guy would fit the bill.