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gameface_one
08-28-2007, 07:30 AM
CLEAN LIVING
When will RP produce another Loyzaga?


By Manolo Iñigo
Inquirer
Last updated 03:45am (Mla time) 08/28/2007


MANILA, Philippines -- There is no question that Carlos “Caloy” Loyzaga is the greatest Filipino basketball player in history, but little else is known about how he started his checkered career.

Loyzaga, who marks his 77th birth anniversary on Wednesday, was born on Aug. 29. 1930 to a family with a penchant for sports in San Jose, Mindoro. There, the Loyzaga boys organized a basketball team, with the tall and gangling Caloy at the helm.

Already showing signs of greatness and towering at 6-foot-3 (a rarity among local players at that time), the young Loyzaga moved from sandlot basketball in Mindoro to the big time in Manila by joining the star-studded Sta. Mesa Aces in 1942.

Among his teammates were Pablo and Vicente Cuna, Ramon Lopez, former chair of the Letran College Sports Hall of Fame; Vicente Ayllon of Insular Life, brothers Bobby and Al Tuason and Dick Taylor of radio broadcast fame. Their coach was Jose “Pepe” Lansang, who also became famous as a topnotch referee.

After finishing his elementary education at the P. Burgos elementary school in Sta. Mesa and high school at the National University in 1948, Loyzaga wanted to enroll at Letran, but he backed out at the last minute when the coach gave him a cold shoulder. He was about to enroll at the University of Santo Thomas but this did not materialize when former Olympian Fely Fajardo, then the San Beda College coach, spotted Loyzaga and took him to Mendiola where he polished his style.

* * *

In his prime, Loyzaga was called the “Big Difference” because his absence from his team could mean defeat and he could turn defeat into victory with his presence.

In the NCAA cage wars for the coveted Zamora Trophy in the 1950s, San Beda lost its title bid when Loyzaga did not see action due to scholastic reasons. But when Loyzaga returned to play for the Red Lions, San Beda retired the Zamora Trophy by winning the championships three times in 1951, 1952 and 1955.

Excelling as a shooter, rebounder and center, Loyzaga led the powerhouse Yco Painters team to several Manila Industrial Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) championships and a record 10 straight victories in the National Open.

* * *

In 1954, Loyzaga spearheaded the Philippine team that finished third in the Second World Basketball Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He capped that memorable year by landing a berth in the tournament’s Mythical Selection.

He made his Olympic debut in Helsinki in 1952 and saw action in the 1956 Melbourne Games. He missed the trip to the Rome Olympics in 1960 due to a wrist injury he suffered while playing softball.

In the Asian Games, Loyzaga sparked the Philippines to four consecutive championships (1951 New Delhi, 1954 Manila, 1958 Tokyo and 1962 Jakarta). He was also the team captain of the winning RP squad to the ABC championship (now FIBA Asia) in the 1960 Manila and 1963 Taipei tournaments. As a coach, he piloted the Philippine quintet to the 1967 ABC crown and to 13th place in the 1968 Mexico Olympics.

A former Manila councilor, Loyzaga is now based in Australia. He is married to the former Vicky Cuerva with whom he has four children: Chito, Joey, Teresa and Bing.

mighty_lion
08-28-2007, 07:43 AM
Sana si Japeth Aguilar.

pachador
08-28-2007, 08:43 AM
well, another loyzaga would mean the Philippines needs to find a new awesome big man. the young candidates with proper training would be japeth, Eman, slaughter, Ray parks, Gian chiu, based on height, and potential at the center position. sino pa?

Wang-Bu
08-28-2007, 01:24 PM
Baka naman hinid kailangan ng eksaktong gaya ni King Caloy, mahirap sundan ang pagiging magaling na big man ni Big Difference lalo sa international competition ngayon. Ang mga gaya nina Slaughter, Eman, Aguilar at Chiu ay milya-milya pang layo sa mga gaya nina Dwight Howard ng America, Tiago Splitter ng Brazil, Marc Gasol ng Spain, Fabricio Oberto ng Argentina, Yi Jianlian ng China, at kahit nung Ha Seung Jin ng Korea.

Malayo sa lakas, liksi at pangkalahatang skill ang mga matatangkad natin kumpara sa mga international big man. Si Howard na lang kayang mag-dead lift ng 400 pounds, halos katumbas na ng dalawang Japeth 'yon. Alam ko si Jap kahit sa training ng Western Kentucky nasa 180 pounds pa lang ang dead lift, malayo-layo pa 'yan sa katotohanan. Si Slaughter ni hindi maka-consistent na dominating performance sa mga ligang Visayas, papano na lang siya kung si Oberto o si Jianlian ang makatapat niya?

Si King Caloy kasi kaya ng makipagsabayan sa kahit sinong internaitonal player nung panahon niya, kumbaga wala na siyang kailangang habulin pagdating sa liksi at lakas at pangkalahatang skill. Pero kung sa matchup at matchup rin lang medyo mahirap yata na makipagsabayan ng ganun-ganun lang ang kasalukuyan nating mga bigs.

oca
08-28-2007, 01:50 PM
Was Mr. Iñigo referring to another "big man"?

Or, is he simply asking when will we produce another "player" who is good enough to make the Mythical Five at the World Championships, at the very least ?

He refers to Caloy as the "greatest Filipino basketball player". No emphasis on the position he played.

From where I sit, I think Mr. Iñigo was referring to "player".

oca
08-28-2007, 02:04 PM
Bago tayo mangarap na may susunod sa yapak ni Caloy, tatanghalin bilang isa sa pinakamagaling en todo el mundo, dapat baguhin kung paano nilalaro ang basketball dito sa kasalukuyan.

Our players play the game as allowed for by the rules. Our rules are certainly not consistent with FIBA rules.

Kahit gaano pa kagaling ang players natin, kung laging travelling, di makakilos kontra sa bunguan, hawi as allowed by FIBA rules, the Pinoy baller will be constantly adjusting whenever he is at an international game.

No one will excel playing under conditions he is not accustomed to.

Some predators prowl the grasslands. It is there where they hunt and lord over. But others prefer the swamps or are right there in the middle of the forest.

Pwede tayo mangarap AFTER we have amended the way we allow our players to play here.

During the time of Caloy, it was practically one and the same game here and abroad. So, all our players need to do is play and assert themselves.

Let us first "calibrate" our game to FIBA rules. Pagkatapos niyan, I am sure lulutang ang galing ng basketbolistang Pinoy sa int'l game.

Howard the Duck
08-28-2007, 03:33 PM
PBA lang naman ang hindi FIBA rules eh... halos lahat naman FIBA rules, kahit sa college... except lang sa rectangular key...

oca
08-28-2007, 04:32 PM
PBA lang naman ang hindi FIBA rules eh... halos lahat naman FIBA rules, kahit sa college... except lang sa rectangular key...


Fact is our best players are playing in the PBA. Yung mga magagaling na wala sa PBA ay nasa PBL. From this leagues we source our players for the NT....

BigBlue
08-28-2007, 05:20 PM
PBA lang naman ang hindi FIBA rules eh... halos lahat naman FIBA rules, kahit sa college... except lang sa rectangular key...


to an extent,yes, you're correct. but what about the actual implementation of the rules as well as the conduct of refs and officials?

mighty_lion
08-28-2007, 05:49 PM
PBA lang naman ang hindi FIBA rules eh... halos lahat naman FIBA rules, kahit sa college... except lang sa rectangular key...


to an extent,yes, you're correct. but what about the actual implementation of the rules as well as the conduct of refs and officials?


Hehe.. Pati ba naman tong thread na ito hindi nakaligtas kay refs. ;D

Howard the Duck
08-28-2007, 08:12 PM
ang laki talaga ng problema nyo sa referee ;D

irateluvmachine
08-29-2007, 09:58 AM
PBA lang naman ang hindi FIBA rules eh... halos lahat naman FIBA rules, kahit sa college... except lang sa rectangular key...


i strongly agree with sir oca.

sensya na po kung makulit pero KELANGAN NA TALAGA MA-IMPLEMENT ANG (pure) FIBA RULES SA PBA...just like the first 2 conferences of 2002. implement it ASAP...habang malayo pa ang 2012, when hopefully the likes of chiu, aguilar, etc. will be in the RP team...

MICAA days? the philippines was arguably among asia's finest.

PBA days? with all due respect...even with players bigger and more talented than ever before, even the lowly borats :D of kazakhstan have an edge on us these days.

so for me, it's not a question of producing another caloy loyzaga...it's producing another player who can thrive in a system played round-the-world...not a bastardization like NBA/PBA rules... (again, with all due respect...)

Howard the Duck
08-30-2007, 06:50 PM
Not all other countries has "pure FIBA" rules:

1. Aussie NBL has 4 12-min quarters
2. The Euroleague used the jumpball, not the crappy possession arrow rule.
3. The Korean KBL I heard uses a mix of NBA and FIBA rules too.

The question is if we'll adopt pure FIBA rules, pure NBA rules or predominantly NBA/FIBA with slight modifications.

IMHO, the most vital aspect of the rules is the key/shaded area/restricted area, since almost every possession, the ball travels to the key. Should it be the FIBA trapezoid or the NBA/PBA rectangle?