PDA

View Full Version : ghost stories, urban legends, and the paranormal thread



Kid Cubao
07-14-2007, 01:23 PM
this thread was created in order for us to discuss the things that made the hairs on your back stand on end. as thread starter, i encourage you to share your most unforgettable experiences about the strange, the sinister, the terrifying, and the inexplicable. first-person experiences are always welcome.

atenean_blooded
07-14-2007, 01:29 PM
Terrifying?

Bonbon Custodio biting the railing at the EAC gym.

Posterized
07-14-2007, 06:48 PM
The UST sportscaster reporting.

Kid Cubao
07-14-2007, 08:28 PM
ok before the clever inmates overrun the nuthouse, here's my story:

i was once asked to liaison for a small team of european scientists that visited the facilities of the international rice research institute in los baños. part of my job is to look after and babysit this foreign group for the length of their stay here.

so we picked them up at NAIA and proceeded straight to our destination in the university town south of manila. after pansol, we made a quick right turn and made the steady climb to mt. makiling, since the danish expert on rice hybrids asked if he can go take up the sights in the said mountain.

when we got to the jamboree area, we formed two groups of three. i took care of one group, and it turned out that these european scientists wanted to go on a walking tour to survey the plant diversity in makiling. so up and down i followed them, tagging along and sharing their "excitement" over the discovery of a new flower breed or a hitherto unrecorded subspecies of vines or shrubs. however, as they carried on their merry ways, i noticed one of them began picking plants that piqued his interest off the ground and stuffing them in his small bag.

after a while we met up in the parking area and boarded our vehicle to bring them to the IRRI guest house. it wasn't long, though, that one of them, who was the same scientist i saw picking all those pants on the wayside, was under great distress. initially he complained of burning itchiness in his groin area, but we became alarmed when his face reddened and then exhibited acute shortness of breath. our driver floored the pedal and rushed to the los baños doctors hospital just outside the UPLB campus on lopez avenue.

we brought him to the ER and an attending doctor performed first aid on our patient. a more senior doctor approached me and asked what happened. after my story, he said to me, "kunin mo lahat ng halamang pinitas nya at ibalik sa pinagkunan. 'wag ka nang magtanong, tumatakbo ang oras."

this crisis situation wasn't much for too many questions, so i and our driver ran to our vehicle carrying his stash and sped back to the jamboree area, leaving behind the rest of our concerned european guests. once there, we returned those plants in their natural habitats the best we could. our worries weren't over yet since we have to check up on our patient back at LBDH.

it was with great relief when we were met outside the hospital by the same scientist who was close to dying on us. we greeted each other with, "what happened, what the hell was that?" i sought out the doctor who advised us on what to do, and he simply said, "next time, wag kayong mamimitas ng mga halaman kung saan-saan dyan sa makiling. alam mo sigurong maraming hiwaga dyan. pero di ito maiintindihan ng mga kasama mo, kaya sana ikaw na lang ang umintindi."

the medical report said our guest had a bad case of "poison ivy-like allergic reaction." we never told anyone else the real reason. the european scientists spent their days in IRRI without any more incident.

muddatrucker
07-15-2007, 08:13 PM
the medical report said our guest had a bad case of "poison ivy-like allergic reaction." we never told anyone else the real reason. the european scientists spent their days in IRRI without any more incident.

Couldn't this be the real reason?

Bennie Bangag
07-16-2007, 07:02 AM
probably so, otherwise the medical report wouldn't have stated it as such. still...

there's also this story, back in the early 70s, of a tupperware lady who got invited to a stately home in new manila. she walked into a party, but it was not any kind of party she attended in the past. the reason is that the people there were all wearing period dresses and suits of an era she couldn't place. there was dancing, the clinking of glasses, laughter. it was just different, as she later recalled. *

after the tupperware lady's enthusiastic presentation, the party host asked her to return the following week so she can invite a few more of her friends to come over. thrilled, the tupperware lady prepared for days, hoping for that one big sale and her sizable commission. finally the day came for her return, but upon her arrival at the gate, she could see there was nobody home. she knocked the gate loud enough for anyone to hear, and then an old man who identified himself as the property's caretaker let her in.

the tupperware lady stated her purpose for the visit, and the caretaker stifled a giggle. he explained why: "ale, alam nyo bang wala nang nakatira rito? sigurado ka bang may mga tao dito nung nakaraang linggo?" she insisted there were people having a party that time, so the caretaker led her to the house from the back, where he also showed the outhouse he and his family were staying. once inside, though, she was shocked to see the decrepit, crumbling condition of the interiors, which was so unlike its well-maintained state just a week ago. as she frantically jogged her memory, the tupperware lady was led to the staircase, where above it hung a number of dusty oil portraits.

suddenly, she pointed to a particular painting and said she was the one who invited her back that day. this time, the caretaker blanched and hurriedly led her out of the house.

once outside, the caretaker said that the lady in the painting has been dead since the fifties, and that the property has been up for sale since her kids migrated to the US a few years after her death. he wished she was a real estate agent, so that the property can have a new owner and they finally move out of that creepy place.

MonL
07-16-2007, 08:14 AM
How about the story of the ghost of Mango Drive in Cebu City?

One story I heard was that a taxi driver was flagged down by a pretty lady in the dark of night along Mango Drive. The lady sat at the front passenger side of the cab and was very quiet during the ride. The she spoke to the driver: "Alam mo, sana maging kamukha mo ako."* The driver, who kept his eye on the road suddenly felt his neck hair stand up as the voice sounded very eerie. With increasing dread he slowly began to look at his passenger.What he saw no longer had the face of a pretty lady. He was now looking at an "umaapoy na bungo"- a flaming skull! He looked back at the road in sheer terror and after mustering enough courage to look back at his passenger, he saw that his lady passenger had vanished.

First person accounts? I used to work as an accountant at a branch in Pasay City in the late 80s. I was all alone in the office in the dead of night on overtime trying to finish work to meet a deadline.*It was so quiet in the office and I had no radio to listen to. It was past midnight already. I suddenly heard a soft "sssst!" behind me. Not thinking about it, not wanting to think about it, I tried to ignore it and went on with my work.* Suddenly I heard a much louder "SSSSSSST!!!!" behind me. That's when my neck hairs stood up and blood seemed to rush to my head,* and,* not wanting to press my luck, I packed up my stuff and left for home.

LION
07-16-2007, 10:11 AM
^ Baka naman si misis mo yon at pina pauwi ka na. If that's the case, I can understand the terror you felt. ;D

MonL
07-16-2007, 11:06 AM
^ Baka naman si misis mo yon at pina pauwi ka na.* * If that's the case, I can understand the terror you felt.* *;D


"OISSST!!!!" kapag tumawag yun, at maliwanag na maliwang na utos yan at hindi "suggestion." :D

pio_valenz
07-16-2007, 12:33 PM
One of my supervisors was alone in the women's CR one night. it was the end of the workday, and the rest of us were already downstairs having a smoke before going home. She was sure she was the only one in the CR when she entered, so it came as a suprise to her when she heard the toilet bowl in the adjoining cubicle flush. Thinking another officemate had entered the CR without her noticing, she very innoncently asked aloud, "Ay, sino yan? Pahintay naman."

To which a very deep and chilling female voice replied, "No one."

When she came out of her cubicle, no one was indeed there. Actually,there was no one left on the entire floor.

My own experience with our office ghost came when I rode alone the elevator going down. We are on the third floor of the building, and the second floor is vacant. So I was totally surprised when the elevator stopped at the second floor and when the doors opened, there was no one there. When I got off, the elevator closed, then went back up to the second floor! I quickly ran up the stairs to see if perhaps someone was playing a joke on me, but when I got there, the whole floor was empty. Later I was told that a former worker once experienced the same thing, except that she had a third eye, and when the doors opened, a young woman walked in. The worker was alone in the elevator with a ghost.

bluewing
07-16-2007, 12:37 PM
ang tindi mo manong pio.

pinanik mo pa talaga ha!?! ;D

Bennie Bangag
07-16-2007, 05:08 PM
^^ the thing about paranormal experiences is that many times, hindi mo alam na may kababalaghan na palang nagaganap. hangga't di ka pa nauunahan ng takot, your natural instinct is to find out.

other experiences:

1. back in fifth grade, me and my classmate were playing pingpong on one of the tables outside our corridor after class. parang kami na lang ang natira nung oras na yun, but we were having so much fun going at each other that we didn't really notice or care. then my classmate whacked the ball hard but wide. talagang napalakas yung palo nya kaya pinulot ko sa malayo yung bola. so i picked up the ball, walked back, and threw it back to him since he held serve. and then, inexplicably, the end of my table lifted slightly, and rotated an inch or two to my right. FREAK OUT, GAME OVER!!!

2. the UP college of education building is reportedly so spooky that security guards walk in pairs whenever they make their rounds at night. from what i gather, the building was used as a prison hospital by the japanese occupying forces in WWII... and a torture chamber where some evil doctors conducted the most gruesome experiments on living patients.

BigBlue
07-16-2007, 05:16 PM
-deleted-

bluewing
07-16-2007, 05:17 PM
kahit nung nag-UP ak, ayokong pumupunta sa educ pag gabi. kaya kung mang-chi-chicks ako doon, nagihihintay lang ako sa kotse. *;)

JonarSabilano
07-16-2007, 05:25 PM
My mother passed away in 1999, just a few days after I graduated from HS. A few months before she died, she bought a Casio electronic keyboard as a "Christmas gift to herself". She had it kept at my room, knowing that I was a music freak. I used to sleep at the master's bedroom, though, because it had air conditioning.

The night after she was buried, I was sleeping alone in my room. Suddenly, I heard a siren coming from the keyboard. I leapt out of bed to turn it off, only to find out that it wasn't turned on in the first place.

A few months after, I was back to sleeping in the master's bedroom because my kuya claimed my room for himself. Just half past 2 a.m., I thought I heard someone knocking at the door. When I opened the door, I saw that my room was already in flames (my kuya was sleeping in the sala that night). I woke up everyone and dashed to safety. We were able to salvage only a few possessions, but at least everyone was safe. I told this story to a psychic friend of mine and she said that it was my mom who was knocking on our door that night.

lekiboy
07-16-2007, 07:56 PM
My mother passed away in 1999, just a few days after I graduated from HS. A few months before she died, she bought a Casio electronic keyboard as a "Christmas gift to herself". She had it kept at my room, knowing that I was a music freak. I used to sleep at the master's bedroom, though, because it had air conditioning.

The night after she was buried, I was sleeping alone in my room. Suddenly, I heard a siren coming from the keyboard. I leapt out of bed to turn it off, only to find out that it wasn't turned on in the first place.

A few months after, I was back to sleeping in the master's bedroom because my kuya claimed my room for himself. Jut half past 2 a.m., I thought I heard someone knocking at the door. When I opened the door, I saw that my room was already in flames (my kuya was sleeping in the sala that night). I woke up everyone and dashed to safely. We were able to salvage only a few possessions, but at least everyone was safe. I told this story to a psychic friend of mine and she said that it was my mom who was knocking on our door that night.



eto ang pang- kwentong bayani - ASTIG!

Bennie Bangag
07-17-2007, 09:35 PM
a good friend of mine who originally enrolled at the UP college of music as a guitar major but wound up becoming a baritone in the singapore opera house told me this story:

once there were three guitar majors from UP who were invited to conduct a workshop/recital for the weekend in a college somewhere down south. so they left friday noon and arrived later that evening.

the following day was a blur: they spent all morning and early afternoon teaching the finer points of tablature and guitar techniques, while they rehearsed for their recital from three to six in the evening. they grabbed a quick dinner, washed up, and at 7.30 held their recital with select students.

now in the after-recital party, one of the students told the guests that there was a certain room in the dorm they were staying that is off-limits because it was haunted. of the three music majors, one of them, an avowed skeptic, scoffed at the story and dared to stay overnight to debunk those haunted claims. the dare was on.

the skeptic was led to that haunted room, and waited. getting impatient, he dared whoever was in there to make its presence felt. almost immediately, ghostly manifestations occurred one after the other. terrified, he cried out "kung magpapakita ka, huwag mo na sana akong takutin pa!" then it stopped. quickly he ran back to his buddies.

the story doesn't end there, however. a week later, the skeptic-turned-believer was out malling at SM north. he bought some stuff at a music store, then he walked to a cigarette kiosk to buy his smokes. unexpectedly he felt a tap from behind, and when he turned, he saw a very beautiful girl with a strange smile.

she said to him, "nakakatakot ba?"

bluewing
07-17-2007, 11:05 PM
she said to him, "nakakatakot ba?"




AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRGGHHH!!!!!!!!! ! :o

pio_valenz
07-18-2007, 02:08 PM
kahit nung nag-UP ak, ayokong pumupunta sa educ pag gabi. kaya kung mang-chi-chicks ako doon, nagihihintay lang ako sa kotse. *;)


Tama yung educ building daw nag most haunted in Diliman. And almost all the security guards who were assigned there swear that the giant portrait of Conrado Benitez, which hangs in the main lobby at the entrance and after whom the building was named, has done everything from staring at them coldly to winking at them.

fujima04
07-18-2007, 03:10 PM
In addition to Kid Cubao's Mt. Makiling Adventure.

I was a member of UST Mountaineering Club since 1998. It was my first time to climb a mountain so I am a bit excited.

We met at UST Grandstand at 5:00am as we schedule to depart at 6:00am to do last minute preparation. Dahil nga excited. I came there at 4:00am. Surprised to see excited mountaineers like me to be there as early too. We joke a little while waiting for time. One of us joked that he will bring with him a fairy on his way back to Manila after our climb to the peak of the Mt. Makiling.

So we left UST and travelled up to UPLB. We started to trek from there from 8:00am. At first the climb is smooth and hassle-free. Around 2:00pm, the guy who joked about the fairy earlier on complained that he cannot continue the trek as his limbs are already aching. We offered to help him to walk as we believed it is only a case of cramps and we cannot afford any delays, as the climb will be difficult if night falls. As we are helping him, he keeps on complaining of pain and suddenly we saw him excruciating in pain. We laid him down and touched his limbs, it's very stiff already. Stiff as a wood. We immediately call for help from senior mountaineers and we carried him already off our back. He's got fever already. Upon reaching the peak. The seniors learned of his joke earlier that day. Two of the seniors left and when they returned, they told us to let him rest and he'll be okay now. Some seniors says that the two asked for forgiveness for what he had done. When we woke up in the morning, surprisingly the sicked guy is already fine and we came down off the mountain hassle-free.

We scheduled our next climb at Mt. Banahaw and I am not surprised that he did not joined us anymore. :D

joelex
07-18-2007, 03:17 PM
wala bang ateneo ghost stories? or any school for that matter

Uncle Toots
07-18-2007, 04:03 PM
sa ateneo, ang balitang-balita ay ang mga kababalaghan sa department of communications building, which is across the college covered courts. the spirit questors say the building stands smack dab right into a portal to another dimension, kaya labas-pasok daw ang mga elemento. in my days at ateneo, when the building used to house the educational media center, ang madalas mabalitaan ko noon ay yung mga nawawala nang maraming oras, tapos pagbalik ay walang recollection kung ilang oras silang nawala o kung ano yung nangyari sa kanila nila nung mga oras na yun. pero ngayon daw mas nakakatakot yung mga insidente.

isa pang kwento ay yung walang-katapusang staircase sa sacred heart novitiate sa novaliches. they say there's a staircase that goes on and on, leading nowhere, if you get caught there on the wrong side of midnight...

JonarSabilano
07-18-2007, 04:14 PM
Meron ding kuwento tungkol sa PIPAC (Philippine Institute for Pure and Applied Chemistry) building. Ang sabi sa kuwento, minsan daw may isang nagtatrabaho sa laboratory nang magdamagan. Hindi niya alam na meron palang scheduled vacuuming, as in tinatanggal ang hangin at oxygen, every week. Ayun, na-suffocate ang kawawang scientist.

Meron din tungkol sa Schmitt Hall, 'yung Chemistry building. Meron daw isang estudyanteng pinatay ang prof niya dahil bumagsak siya sa isang subject. Sa main staircase nangyari ang patayan. Tuwing anniversary ng patayan, may mga natatagpuang patak ng dugo sa hagdanan. Ewan ko kung ano'ng nahihitit ng mga Chem major na ito at madaming nangyayaring kababalaghan...

BigBlue
07-18-2007, 04:38 PM
wala bang ateneo ghost stories? or any school for that matter


same for schools with "older" campuses like DLSU and UST. Those two campuses served as camps during the Japanese occupation. the DLSU Chapel was the site of a horrendous massacre, was it not?

Posterized
07-18-2007, 05:30 PM
Matatalo tayo sa NU sa Sabado tapos sa Lasal sa Huwebes. Matatapos ang 1st round na 2-5 ang Ateneo. Scared enough?

Joke lang. Sorry OT. ;D

BigBlue
07-18-2007, 05:34 PM
Matatalo tayo sa NU sa Sabado tapos sa Lasal sa Huwebes. Matatapos ang 1st round na 2-5 ang Ateneo. Scared enough?

Joke lang. Sorry OT. ;D


ang pangalan ng ghost na yan, Mark Molina. Pinatay nya coaching staff ng Ateneo tapos sya uli nag-coach.

bluewing
07-18-2007, 07:36 PM
lintek na comm building yan.


kakaiba talaga ang aura doon. eerie.

sa macho at tapang kong ito, pag nandoon ako, nakatayo pa rin balahibo ko.


minsan umihi ako doon. alone. ako na lang tao sa loob. nag-lunch na lahat. i swear na habang umiihi ako, may naglakad sa likod ko. ang direksyon ng lakad ay yung opposite ng pinto ha, so hindi sya palabas. paglingon ko, wala naman. sinilip ko yung mga ibang ihi-an, wala pa rin. so hayun, tumakbo na lang ako palabas, sabay sindi ng yosi.

Bennie Bangag
07-25-2007, 12:29 PM
when it comes to pinoy urban legends, one that really scared and disturbed me when i was young was the broadway centrum incident.

the story goes that a couple went out on a date one night somewhere along new manila. then their car breaks down; good thing they were able to steer it to the broadway centrum parking lot. the boyfriend gets out of the vehicle and tries to fix the problem, but fails. so he tells the girlfriend to stay in the car, close the windows, and lock the doors while he's looking for help.

an hour later, the girl was getting anxious waiting for her boyfriend to arrive when she notices a strange man watching from the shadows. this man approaches the car and starts banging on the windows and trying to force open the doors. terrified, the girl honks the car horn to get attention and scare the man off. He stopped and hurriedly left, only to return a few minutes later. then he circled the car, deliberately, holding something in his hand, which he raises to the window.

to her absolute horror, the girl realizes it was her boyfriend's decapitated head! that's not all: she was even more horrified to see what the man lifts up in his other hand: the boyfriend's car keys.

allegedly the poor girl was so traumatized by the experience that she lost her mind.

Jaco D
07-25-2007, 10:04 PM
Speaking of New Manila, you guys heard the story of a Balikbayan named Mark who did the unthinkable and jogged around the area close to midnight?* Mark leaves his relatives' house on the side of New Manila close to E. Rodriguez and jogs towards Aurora.* Five minutes into his jog he hears his name.

"Mark"..."Mark"

He looks around, doesn't see anyone.* So he continues with his jog.* A minute later, ayun na naman.

"Mark"..."Mark"

Looks around, wala pa rin siyang nakita.* That scares the bejesus out of him so his jog morphs into a sprint.* Ganoon pa man, he still hears his name being called so he runs faster.

As he reaches the Broadway Centrum area and the lights of Aurora brighten up the road behind him, Mark turns around to face whatever spooky fate awaits him.

Sinusundan pala siya ng asong ngo-ngo.* *::)

Have a nice day!

christian
07-26-2007, 11:06 AM
Mark Mark! hehehe

Meron pa kuwento dyan, tungkol naman sa may church malapit sa broadway centrum, yung procession, i just don't know the whole story. sorry :)

bluewing
07-27-2007, 01:47 AM
^

ang tindi, nambitin ka pa eh, no? >:(

mangtsito
07-27-2007, 02:07 AM
minsan umihi ako doon. alone. ako na lang tao sa loob. nag-lunch na lahat. i swear na habang umiihi ako, may naglakad sa likod ko. ang direksyon ng lakad ay yung opposite ng pinto ha, so hindi sya palabas. paglingon ko, wala naman. sinilip ko yung mga ibang ihi-an, wala pa rin. so hayun, tumakbo na lang ako palabas, sabay sindi ng yosi.


Buti yun lang ang nangyari sa iyo.

Nabasa ko sa Guidon dati, tungkol din sa Comm building - merong guard na nag-jebs doon sa banyo at hindi nag-buhos ng pinag-jebs-an. Paglabas niya, di niya maintindihan kung bakit sumusunod yung amoy ng jebs sa kanya. Nung may nakasalubong siya, saka lang niya nalaman na yung likod niya (puti ang pang-itaas niya), puro pahid ng jebs.

============

Personal experience:

Noong nagtatrabaho pa ako sa isang government office sa Pasay, mahilig akong magpa-gabi minsan hanggang 12MN dahil solo ko ang computer at walang istorbo sa trabaho. Marami na akong naririnig noon tungkol sa mga multo daw doon, at hindi ko naman pinapansin dahil lahat naman ng opisina may mga kwento-kwento tungkol diyan. I'm more of the "to see is to believe" type as far as ghost stories is concerned. It's not that I was a sceptic, it's just that I was reserving my judgment on the matter until I encounter an actual ghost experience that would be very hard to explain scientifically.

One evening, I was deep into typing the first draft of my research when I heard the unmistakable sound of an office chair (the one with wheels on the legs) being moved nearby. Thinking that there might still be an officemate around, I didn't give it much thought. I concentrated on my research and heard the chair being dragged right behind me (3 meters away) towards an area that I believed was the fire exit, then it stopped.

As I was in the thick of my first draft, it was a good five seconds before it occurred to me that while there was a sound of a chair being dragged, there was actually no sound of footsteps. Like a line from a corny horror tagalog movie, I called out "sino andiyan?" and when no one answered, that's when I began to get scared. It took all my courage to stand up and actually look towards the direction where I last heard the chair. The chair was there, but there was no one. And unless there had been a "someone" who could either (a) disappear; (b) teleport; or (c) turn invisible, there was absolutely no reason why i will not see him/her walking back. The path towards the fire exit was a dead end, and there was no way he/she could have hidden anywhere. Oh, and the fire exit was padlocked too.

And so, fright won over curiosity, and on that night, I cursed the day that it took Windows 95 too long to shut down. And as if to taunt me, I again heard the chair being dragged (this time in the opposite direction) while I was shutting down the PC. I hurriedly left the office and prayed hard that the same thing won't follow me to the elevators. It didn't.

I was already at the ground floor when I remembered that I forgot to swipe my ID in the office clock. As I didn't want to have any problems in my payroll (which, in a government office, was more dreadful than any ghost experience), I resolved to go back up and swipe my ID. It's a good thing that that one of the guards volunteered to go back up with me and check the area if everything is already turned off (they do it every night once they ascertain that there's no one in the office anymore). At least I had an excuse to go back up with someone.

When we were back upstairs, I hurriedly swiped my card and joined the guard in doing his rounds. "Sige na sir, mauna na kayo, ako na ang bahala dito." he said. I claimed that I just wanted to check if I left something, but my real reason was to see if the guard would find anyone there. No one. And curiously, the chair was not were it was left by who/whatever was dragging it.

On our way down, I was asked by the guard, "Sir, madalas pala kayo magpa-gabi dito. Wala bang nagpaparamdam sa iyo dito?"

I gave a nervous laugh and said "Wala naman, eh ikaw?"

He also gave me a nervous laugh. But he said no more.

I swear, everything of the preceding is true.

bluewing
07-27-2007, 02:35 AM
On our way down, I was asked by the guard, "Sir, madalas pala kayo magpa-gabi dito.* Wala bang nagpaparamdam sa iyo dito?"

I gave a nervous laugh and said "Wala naman, eh ikaw?"

He also gave me a nervous laugh.* But he said no more.



mas maganda sana kung ganito ang ending:


On our way down, I was asked by the guard, "Sir, madalas pala kayo magpa-gabi dito. Wala bang nagpaparamdam sa iyo dito?"

I gave a nervous laugh and said "Wala naman, eh ikaw?"

He didn't say a word. When I looked at him, his face was covered in blood and he was staring straight at me...

mangtsito
07-27-2007, 06:22 AM
^ Mas dramatic nga. Pero namatay na siguro ako sa takot kung iyon ang nangyari :)

christian
07-28-2007, 10:00 AM
Sir bluewing pasensya ka na, nakalimutan ko talaga (baka lasing ako nung kinu-wento sa akin) :) hehehe
Sa may Mt. Carmel church yun.

Kid Cubao
08-03-2007, 09:11 PM
there is this large mango tree somewhere in proj.2 that stands in the middle of a main road. over the years it has survived countless uprooting attempts by the barangay council and the DPWH because they say it's protected by a curse. for unknown reasons equipment intended for its uproot and relocation like tractors, payloaders, chainsaws and pickaxes break and fall apart in the middle of the project, while many of those involved from the contractors and engineers all the way down to the day laborers get stricken by sudden illness or bad luck. some have been reported to have gone mad.

bluewing
08-03-2007, 11:38 PM
there is this large mango tree somewhere in proj.2 that stands in the middle of a main road. over the years it has survived countless uprooting attempts by the barangay council and the DPWH because they say it's protected by a curse. for unknown reasons equipment intended for its uproot and relocation like tractors, payloaders, chainsaws and pickaxes break and fall apart in the middle of the project, while many of those involved from the contractors and engineers all the way down to the day laborers get stricken by sudden illness or bad luck. some have been reported to have gone mad.



ah ganun ba? asar na asar pa naman ako sa punong yon. sagabal sa daan eh.

joelex
08-16-2008, 01:19 PM
meron na kayang ghost story sa philo dept ng ateneo college campus? balita ko'y may nag suicide dun mismo kamakailan lang.

Lucas Palaka
08-17-2008, 10:32 AM
^^ Yes, although it's being downplayed as per the request of the bereaved family. As far as the pangmumulto resulting from that death is concerned, mukhang wala pang nababalitaan.

aircanda
10-30-2008, 08:23 PM
wala bang nakakilabot na stories ngayong halloween? :)

salsa caballero
10-31-2008, 12:19 AM
^Ask gamefacers ghostrider, dioning or point forward to tell the story of the "haunted elevators" at PLDT. There was an episode that occurred last week, the day a secretary chose to take her life by leaping from the 15th floor of the Makati head office.

aircanda
10-31-2008, 01:54 PM
tsk.. bilis niya magparamdam.. may she rest in peace

isa-teresa
11-15-2008, 01:39 AM
My dad died of cancer 11 years ago. My mom was so heartbroken she would cry every night the whole year after he passed away, talking to his painting, telling him na "magpakita ka sa akin". Dad never made his presence felt to us, but his secretary told us stories that he would make "paramdam" in his office, which is now occupied by my half brother. A sudden gush of cold wind would allegedly close his office door when it is left open by my brother after he leaves for the day, stuff like that.

A few years after that, when I was in 4th year college I had to stay in a dorm in Dapitan because of thesis work. It was the 1st time that I was away from my mom for a long time and she then again had the habit of "talking" to my dad when she's alone in the house. Suddenly, the aircon in the master's bedroom opened, which surprised my mom. She started "talking" to my dad again saying, "Daddy, nasa dorm lang si Isa. Okay yung dorm niya, I checked. Graduating na din siya and we miss you until now." After 5 minutes, the aircon was switched off.

A few months after that, during the week of my birthday and while I was slaving away for my 1st midterm examinations in law school, I was in the master's bedroom alone, studying. The aircon was switched on, but I was not really surprised. I just cried and realized that it was my birthday in a few days. Ack, I know it's supposed to be scary, but it's different when you know the person making paramdam. ;D It would recur during special occasions, coincidentally. I think it's my dad telling us that he's just around the house looking after us. :)

pio_valenz
11-16-2008, 09:19 PM
kahit nung nag-UP ak, ayokong pumupunta sa educ pag gabi. kaya kung mang-chi-chicks ako doon, nagihihintay lang ako sa kotse. *;)

Napabisita lang ako sa thread na ito and I decided to backread. Naalala ko, kahit nung elementary pa lang ako sa UPIS, ang dami nang ghsot stories about the educ building. Supposedly yung portrait ni Conrado Benitez in the main hall does so many things at night that unnerve the guards.

Sari-saring uri ng sundalo na din ang nakita sa vicinity ng educ at UPIS grade school building. May Katipunero, Hapon, Amerikano...

bluewing
11-17-2008, 12:43 AM
Napabisita lang ako sa thread na ito and I decided to backread. Naalala ko, kahit nung elementary pa lang ako sa UPIS, ang dami nang ghsot stories about the educ building. Supposedly yung portrait ni Conrado Benitez in the main hall does so many things at night that unnerve the guards.

Sari-saring uri ng sundalo na din ang nakita sa vicinity ng educ at UPIS grade school building. May Katipunero, Hapon, Amerikano...



ok lang sa akin kung mga lalake ang nag-a-apparition. ang nakakikilabot para sa akin ay yung mga babaeng dumdugo ang mukha, magulo ang buhok, nanlilisik ang mata, ganun. mas iskeyri. ;D

Emon74
11-20-2008, 07:39 PM
Ask ko how about yun iyak ng Aso, can a dog really see a ghost, My Dad passed away only this July, he was clinically dead around 12 midnight but he breath his last early morning, when my brother and I were on our way sa hospital about 1 am, yun asawa ng utol ko who stayed with their kids at home tumawag sa cel and said bat ganun ang tahol ng aso namin yun nakakatakot na tahol ba, signs na may ghost sa bahay, we assumed baka naglalakbay na ang father namin mga oras na yun, and our mom would told us the same case about their lola long time ago when she passes, kakaiba din ang tahol ng aso nila.

and quite a coincidence was that our dog nakawala sa gate and was lost when we went home that morning and we never found him.

CM_Punk
11-23-2008, 08:51 AM
First Person
Ghosts of State U

By Catherine Grace de Leon
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 07:07:00 11/23/2008

MANILA, Philippines – The University of the Philippines is known to be many things, both true and untrue. Now, let’s delve into the supernatural landscape and reputation of the Diliman campus, even the urban legends that have been told and retold so many times over that they now have several versions and variations.

Abelardo Hall

The UP College of Music has a curfew. At exactly 8 p.m., the bell will ring and all who are still inside must exit the building before the guard locks it up. People used to be able to stay as long as they wanted as we music majors are addicted to practice. So understandably, many of us were disgruntled when the 8 p.m. rule was first imposed.

Several weeks ago, we happened to mention to one of our professors, a College of Music alumna, how we envied the earlier batches because they could practice well into the night since there was no building curfew. “Oh, but we had a natural curfew,” she replied. “Once you start to hear someone playing, singing, or dancing along to your solitary music, ay, umuwi ka na (head for home)!”

Janitors claim that they sometimes hear passionate piano playing in one of the classrooms, but when they go to check it out, they find the room empty. They also say that in the gamelan room, the biggest gong in the ensemble (gong ageng) vibrates by itself at 12 midnight. Every gamelan set is believed to have its own identity and to be inhabited by spirits whom one must not offend—which is why the instruments must always be treated with care and respect. Piano professors also claim there’s a little girl who wanders around the second floor of the annex building at night, especially if you’re the only one left on the premises.

Read complete article here-- http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/sim/sim/view/20081123-173865/Ghosts-of-State-U

aircanda
11-25-2008, 08:24 PM
True Story:

Merong prep school sa lugar namin.. Merong isang bata dun na pumapasok na cute na babae. Makulit, bibo, nakakatuwa siyang bata pero may sakit siya. Then one day, just like any other day. Pumasok na yung bata sa school, pero tahimik lang daw yung bata na nakaupo at nginitian lang ang teacher nung tinawag siya then naguwian na. After school, pmunta yung parents ng said student. Sinabe nila sa teacher na namatay daw yung anak nila the night before. So talagang kinilabutan kame kasi parang nagpaalam lang yung student na yun.

May she rest in peace

isa-teresa
11-28-2008, 11:10 AM
^ That happens talaga, no?

I heard a lot of stories similar to that. Real stories. As in they would see the dead going to work, or going around the street, tapos they'll hear from the relatives that they passed away na. When my dad died nagpakita pa siya sa guards in his office's building. Siguro it's their way of saying goodbye, or they do not know that they're dead yet, or they just roam around the place that they are most familiar with.

My dad's still OC around the house way after he died. Our maids would see a "man in a suit" fixing the living room pillows after my nephew (the Tazmanian Devil incarnate) is finished playing there. My cousin, when she came home from Singapore for a vacation, even saw my dad welcoming him when she came home really late from a gimmick. Then she realized later on that my dad died a few years ago. It never happened naman to me. ;D

genom222
09-30-2011, 05:02 AM
when it comes to pinoy urban legends, one that really scared and disturbed me when i was young was the broadway centrum incident.

the story goes that a couple went out on a date one night somewhere along new manila. then their car breaks down; good thing they were able to steer it to the broadway centrum parking lot. the boyfriend gets out of the vehicle and tries to fix the problem, but fails. so he tells the girlfriend to stay in the car, close the windows, and lock the doors while he's looking for help.

an hour later, the girl was getting anxious waiting for her boyfriend to arrive when she notices a strange man watching from the shadows. this man approaches the car and starts banging on the windows and trying to force open the doors. terrified, the girl honks the car horn to get attention and scare the man off. He stopped and hurriedly left, only to return a few minutes later. then he circled the car, deliberately, holding something in his hand, which he raises to the window.

to her absolute horror, the girl realizes it was her boyfriend's decapitated head! that's not all: she was even more horrified to see what the man lifts up in his other hand: the boyfriend's car keys.

allegedly the poor girl was so traumatized by the experience that she lost her mind.


up ko lang to kasi one month na lang Halloween na ule :)

the broadway centrum story is also part of the Balete drive stories that I use to hear when I was a kid. I used to live in that area and very near Balete drive, creepy talaga dun dati kasi walang ilaw and parang ang haba ng daan. I would not even dare take a bike ride after 530pm dun. There's other stories like the house that had a cannibal as a resident and a mystical tree, di ko lang maalala yung details. One thing I remember though is that we always advise taxi drivers not to take Balete after we get dropped off in our house, if they insist we strongly advise them not to stop if someone is flagging them down and dont stare at the rear view window while driving...

maroonmartian
10-29-2011, 02:09 PM
UP's New Math Building. So many dreams are broken. At ang layo talaga.

And note: It's very isolated so may mga slay victims na dun tinatapon.

Eto na lang. We went to an Art Studies field trip in Rizal and Laguna. A guide lead us to a church (nakakatakot talaga). He recounts the story of a sacristan who always took care of a cross. Then he vanished.What remains was a cross with a Christ nailed to it. Wala daw Christ yung cross dati.

Joescoundrel
03-05-2013, 10:18 AM
Underworld saint becoming more popular in US

(philstar.com) | Updated March 5, 2013 - 9:05am

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A follower in New Orleans built a public shrine in her honor. An actor in Albuquerque credits her with helping him land a role on the TV show "Breaking Bad." She turns up routinely along the U.S.-Mexico border at safe houses, and is sighted on dashboards of cars used to smuggle methamphetamine through the southwest desert.

Popular in Mexico, and sometimes linked to the illicit drug trade, the skeleton saint known as La Santa Muerte in recent years has found a robust and diverse following north of the border: immigrant small business owners, artists, gay activists and the poor, among others — many of them non-Latinos and not all involved with organized religion.

Clad in a black nun's robe and holding a scythe in one hand, Santa Muerte appeals to people seeking all manner of otherworldly help: from fending off wrongdoing and carrying out vengeance to stopping lovers from cheating and landing better jobs. And others seek her protection for their drug shipments and to ward off law enforcement.

"Her growth in the United States has been extraordinary," said Andrew Chesnut, author of "Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint" and the Bishop Walter F. Sullivan Chair in Catholic Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. "Because you can ask her for anything, she has mass appeal and is now gaining a diverse group of followers throughout the country. She's the ultimate multi-tasker."

Exact numbers of her followers are impossible to determine, but they are clearly growing, Chesnut said.

The saint is especially popular among Mexican-American Catholics, rivaling that of St. Jude and La Virgen de Guadalupe as a favorite for miracle requests, even as the Catholic Church in Mexico denounces Santa Muerte as satanic, experts say.

Her image has been used on prayers cards citing vengeance and protection, which are sometimes found at scenes of massacred bodies and on shipments of drugs.

U.S. Marshal Robert Almonte in West Texas said he has testified about La Santa Muerte in at least five drug trafficking cases where her image aided prosecutors with convictions. Last year, Almonte testified that a Santa Muerte statue prayer card, found with a kilogram of methamphetamine in a couple's car in New Mexico, were "tools of the trade" for drug traffickers to protect them from law enforcement. The testimony was used to help convict the couple of drug trafficking.

Almonte has visited shrines throughout Mexico, and given workshops to law enforcement agencies on the cult of the saint.

"Criminals pray to La Santa Muerte to protect them from law enforcement," Almonte said. "But there are good people who pray to her who aren't involved in any criminal activity, so we have to be careful."

Small statues of La Santa Muerte have been spotted in religious stores as far as Minneapolis, and an art show in Tucson, Ariz. features all La Santa Muerte images.

Devotees said La Santa Muerte has helped them find love, find better jobs and launch careers.

Gregory Beasley Jr., 35, believes he landed acting roles on "Breaking Bad" and the 2008 movie "Linewatch" after a traditional Mexican-American healer introduced him to La Santa Muerte.

"All my success ... I owe to her," he said. "She cleansed me and showed me the way."

Some devotees pray to the saint by building altars and offering votive candles, fruits, tequila, cigarettes — even lines of cocaine in some cases — in exchange for wishes, Chesnut said. A red La Santa Muerte, her best-selling image, helps in matters of love. Gold ones aid with employment and white ones give protection. Meanwhile, a black Santa Muerte can provide vengeance.

"She's my queen," said Arely Vazquez Gonzalez, a Mexican immigrant and transgender woman who oversees a large altar inside her Queens, New York apartment. Against one wall of her bedroom altar is a tall, sitting Santa Muerte statue in a black dress surrounded by offerings of tequila.

Gonzalez, who sports a tattoo of La Santa Muerte on her back, holds an annual event in August in the saint's honor, with mariachis and a feast.

"All I have to do I ask for her guidance and she provides me with what I need," she said.

The origins of La Santa Muerte are unclear. Some followers say she is an incarnation of an Aztec goddess of death who ruled the underworld. Some scholars say she originated in medieval Spain through the image of La Parca, a female Grim Reaper, who was used by friars for the later evangelization of indigenous populations in the Americas.

For decades, though, La Santa Muerte remained an underground figure in isolated regions of Mexico and served largely as an unofficial Catholic saint that women called upon to help with cheating spouses, Chesnut said.

It wasn't until 2001 when a devotee unveiled a public La Santa Muerte shrine in Mexico City that followers in greater numbers began to display their devotion for helping them with relationships and loved ones in prison. Economic uncertainty and a violent drug war against cartels that has claimed an estimated 70,000 lives also are credited for La Santa Muerte's growth.

Oscar Hagelsieb, assistant special agent in charge for Homeland Security Investigations in El Paso, said agents have found that most members of the Gulf and Zeta Cartels mainly pray to Santa Muerte while those from the Sinaloa and Sonora Cartels honor folk saint Jesus Malverde.

"Altars are very intricate. We have found some with food and others with blood from animals," Hagelsieb said.

The association with cartels and denunciations by some priests has resulted in some non-devotees destroying makeshift roadside altars. Recently, assailants smashed a life-size statue of La Santa Muerte in a South Texas cemetery. Police in Pasadena, Calif. recently found human bones at a home with a Santa Muerte altar outside. The owners say they bought the bones online.

But the vast majority of devotees aren't crooks.

Kiko Torres, owner of the Masks y Mas art store in Albuquerque, said sales of La Santa Muerte statues, incense, and oils have skyrocketed in recent months.

"Most people who buy the stuff are regular people who just recently found out about her," he said. "Some probably have no idea about her connection to that other world."

One such devotee is Steven Bragg, 36, who said he was introduced to La Santa Muerte in 2009 and began praying to her for a variety of different reasons, including a plea for a life companion. Recently, the New Orleans man built a public chapel to her and holds rosary services that attract around a dozen people.

He also just formed a nonprofit to support the "New Orleans Chapel of the Santisima Muerte," the official name of his public altar.

"It's something I decided to do after all that La Santa Muerte has provided," Bragg said. "She has never failed me."

Joescoundrel
10-31-2019, 11:00 AM
The exorcist is in

By: Cody Cepeda - @CCepedaINQ

INQUIRER.net / 08:00 AM October 31, 2019

Fr. Jose Francisco “Jocis” Syquia knew he wanted to become a priest as early as third grade. He entered high school, then college, and for a while this vocation dissipated.

This was during the regime of the late President Ferdinand Marcos, he recalled, a time of social unrest that saw him and other student leaders involved in political activism. His foray into the New Age as a young man also led to his exploration of other religions, and in opening his “third eye.” By then, he already had plans to take up law, but was compelled to turn to his faith when he started experiencing diabolical harassments and attacks.

“Every night I would see, before I would close my eyes, images of the devil. I’ve experienced a lot of harassments, even during the day, I would experience his presence,” said Fr. Syquia. “I would always feel cold. My body would really be always cold and I was afraid to sleep already and because of that, I turned to my Catholic faith in order to find help.”

He prayed more thereafter and began going to mass everyday, as well as regularly visited shrines and convents. The attacks and the nightmares stopped after around eight months. This was a turning point of his life, as discovering the reality of God’s presence reignited his childhood inclination to priesthood. And so, about a year later, he entered the seminary.

The Office of Exorcism of the Archdiocese of Manila, housed in the Lay Formation Center of the San Carlos Pastoral Formation Complex in Makati. Image: INQUIRER.net/Joseph Garibay

The Office of Exorcism of the Archdiocese of Manila

Syquia is the chief exorcist of the Office of Exorcism of the Archdiocese of Manila today. The office, housed in the Lay Formation Center of the San Carlos Pastoral Formation Complex in Makati, was established in 2006 in response to the growing cases of Filipinos in need of liberation or deliverance from demonic attacks. The office is composed of a team of exorcists, psychiatrists, psychologists, volunteers, and would also have priests sent by bishops from other dioceses for training.

There are over 150 exorcists today in the Philippines, according to Syquia. They also have an association, the Philippine Association of Catholic Exorcists, which is under the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines. The PACE is connected with the International Association of Exorcists in Rome, Italy, which was officially recognized by the Vatican in 2014.

Syquia, who also has a Master’s degree in Psychology, was given the faculty to practice exorcism by the now-retired bishop Teodoro Buhain in 2003. He had been assigned as a new priest in Quiapo church then, which is known to have a lot of occult practitioners in its vicinity.

“People started coming, asking for help… And at first I didn’t want to deal with these cases precisely because of my previous experience with the devil,” said Syquia. “I didn’t want to have anything to do regards to him, but there was no choice because these are people asking for help.”

It was also around this time when Syquia chanced upon a book written by the late Fr. Gabriele Amorth, chief exorcist of the Vatican. Eventually, he went to Rome to study more about the ministry of exorcism and has been back and forth since 2008 to attend their courses.

“I saw how needed this ministry was especially today, how many people were seeking help from the church,” he said. “Therefore, reading [and] learning about him and his writings, it spurred me to learn more about it, para makatulong ako sa mga tao na lumalapit sa akin (so I can help the people who come to me).”

The ministry of exorcism and extraordinary demonic attacks

For the unknowing, Syquia explained exorcism as a ministry wherein Jesus himself expels evil spirits from a person through the instrumentality of a priest. By focusing on the expulsion of evil spirits, the ministry aims to reconnect or deepen a person’s relationship with God.

“As we see in the gospel, it is simply a continuation of this ministry of Jesus when he was doing exorcisms and it is given to a priest in the diocese,” he said. “It is a delegated office given by a bishop to a priest to be an exorcist, and this exorcist uses the Roman Ritual of Exorcism which is a manual of prayers that only an exorcist can pray over a possessed person.”

The office receives calls from three to five cases every day, but since there are already exorcists in other dioceses, the office refers the cases to their diocesan exorcists instead. Syquia added that they do not immediately perform an exorcism on a person and properly interview them first to determine if they are truly in need of deliverance from a demonic attack or psychologically ill.

He estimated that there is some spiritual dimension in around 80% of the cases they receive, while the other 20% is more psychological than spiritual. However, this is not always so black and white, as some cases are both spiritual and psychological at the same time.

“The devil doesn’t simply attack. If there’s a vacuum there, he cannot create, he cannot just possess a person or attack a person unless there are certain openings there,” he said. “So usually, [it is] if the person has some psychological vulnerability, psychic vulnerability, emotional vulnerability, relational vulnerability, but most especially, spiritual vulnerability.”

When it comes to the diabolical cases that they do accept, Syquia said that a huge percentage of these, around 30% to 40%, would be oppression. Oppression, he said, are diabolical attacks on the physical body of a person, as well as one’s emotions, mind and memory. These include kulam and barang, as well as bangungot.

“With cases that we have to pray over them and we exorcise the spirit, the spirit leaves through the expulsion of objects from the mouth of the person, like nails, mga pako, needles, pins…” he said. “Sometimes when you pray over them, the insects start to come out of their body like ants, sometimes sand, mga buhangin, that means these persons have been cursed.”

Another 20% would be infestation, such as haunted or manifested houses. These are usually places where the religious atmosphere is lacking, such as a home that has a lot of sin, abuse and relational problems among its members.

Twenty percent is also possession, which is the full takeover of a person’s body by a demon. A possessed person would be heavily under the power and bondage of a demon, who is able to control the person’s physical body. The person usually does not remember anything after being possessed, as if they were asleep or in a hypnotic trance.

Cases of diabolical obsession make up the other 20%. It usually happens when a person would live in an infested house which would cause them to suddenly hear voices or have obsessive thoughts.

Joescoundrel
10-31-2019, 11:01 AM
^ (Continued from above)

How Syquia differentiates a possessed person from someone who has a mental illness is a painstaking process in itself. To test if someone is possessed, Syquia said he would try to give a person holy water to drink. The person would usually suddenly vomit or be unable to drink the water, or if the person does, he or she would have a burning sensation in the throat. Syquia would also place a relic, a sacred object connected with a saint, nearby to see if the demoniac would react to it.

But what really determines if a person is possessed, he said, is when he recites the Roman Ritual of Exorcism, which is written in Latin.

“We start to use Latin when we command the spirit and usually we see the reaction there. When I command the spirit to manifest itself in Latin and the person starts to react there, nagkakaroon ng (the person starts to have) convulsions siya, then that means that there is something in the person that understands what I’m saying,” he said. “Or if I command it to tell its name while I’m speaking Latin and the person answers back and understands what I’m saying, that’s another indication.”

A possessed person usually becomes quite strong during pray overs, even if they are a young child. This is why there should be around seven people who take part in an exorcism, as others would have to help in holding the person down. Two are usually exorcists, although if there are priests in training, there would be three of the latter. Meanwhile, three to four laypersons are present to assist, while one or two family members may stay at the back of the prayer room. There is also a CCTV camera during exorcisms for times when a person would become too violent.

“ is also for our protection because sometimes, after the exorcism, may mga (the person would have) bruises yung tao ‘cause nagwawala yung tao talaga, malakas (because the possessed would be violent and strong), so we have to hold the person down,” said Syquia. “And therefore, the CCTV shows that what we’re doing is simply doing a pray over and we’re not touching the person in any violent manner, and the priest is simply touching, placing his hands, on the head of the person.”

A person then receives counseling after being exorcised, but just how long the aftercare would last depends on each case. Many of the cases the office receives are victims of sexual abuse, according to Syquia, and the demons could return again if there is a lot of hatred and unforgiveness. In these instances, counseling would be given to the person once or twice a month for almost a year. Others whose cases were not so heavy would usually have one or two meetings with a counselor before their cases are concluded.

“We call the person after one week, kamusta na siya (check up on how the person is doing), especially his relationship with the Lord, and the manifestations, the complaints and why the person came to us,” explained Syquia. “Pag wala na (If there would be no further incident) after one week, then one month wala pa rin (and there is still nothing), we close the case.”

What they make certain of in the end is for the person to reconnect or have an even deeper relationship with God, so the office introduces those who have been liberated to their respective parishes. These people, in turn, end up serving the church and becoming involved in its organizations and activities.

“We make sure the person, after the pray over, is still followed up,” he said. “Yung kaniyang relasyon sa Diyos ay mananatili, deepens, even, so that permanent talaga yung liberation.” (The relationship with God is maintained, it deepens even, so that the liberation would be permanent.)

[I]State of exorcism in the Philippines

The more than 150 exorcists currently under the Catholic church are not enough to address the rising cases of demonic attacks in the Philippines, especially now, more than ever, when many Filipinos no longer live faith-filled lives, Syquia explained.

“We have so many broken homes, there’s a lot of unforgiveness, negativity now,” he lamented. “There are so many broken relationships, dysfunctional families. We see a lot of hatred and violence, and I mean, there are so many people [who] are wounded spiritually [and] emotionally.”

Around 86% of the Philippine population is Roman Catholic, according to non-profit educational organization Asia Society, thus making the country one of the biggest Christian nations in Asia. This, perhaps, is the irony here, as Syquia believes that only a very few truly live out their Christian faith.

“One [exorcist] reported in our last conference that in one year, he had around 500 cases and that’s a lot, and we’re talking about possession,” he said. “We’re not only talking about lesser forms of extraordinary demonic attack like oppression or obsession, these are possession [cases].”

It is a good thing, then, that there a number of young seminarians who have expressed their interest in the ministry of exorcism. Some seminaries in the country have also started opening courses on exorcism and deliverance so Filipino priests and seminarians would no longer have to go to Rome for training.

Fear is surmised to be one of the main reasons why many priests do not want to go into exorcism, as Syquia shared that they were not taught about the devil and the ministry during his time in the seminary.

“The difficulty there is sometimes the priest, because we have not studied this and not really trained for it, medyo natatakot sila (they are a bit afraid),” he said. “But it’s more of lack of information, they don’t really know what to do.”

What is also lacking today, he believes, is the proper catechism or proper teaching of the Catholic faith, particularly when it comes to the spirit world, the spiritual life and the devil. Thus, proper dissemination of information regarding demonology and angelology is not just crucial, but necessary.

Syquia no longer feels afraid of the devil, but it seems that even this fearlessness did not come instantly, as he remembered wanting to quit within two years of becoming an exorcist in 2003. Being the only exorcist in the Philippines then, he almost buckled as the work of the ministry seemed too heavy for just one man. Then there was the bit of excitement in witnessing the preternatural in the beginning, which is itself momentary. Almost two decades on and countless of cases later, much of the ministry’s work has become routine for Syquia, but why exactly he continues to stay never differed from the very reason he entered the practice in the first place.

“I cannot leave the ministry if there are people who are still seeking help from this type of ministry. Now, if there’s no more need, then I’ll focus on my more normal priestly duties,” said Syquia. “No exorcist really desires this ministry. He simply accepts it because people come to him and he has to know how to deal with this. As [priests], we bless, we journey, but we also have to protect the flock.” - JB