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gameface_one
06-19-2007, 11:22 AM
Origins of NCAA, UAAP


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SPORTS FOR ALL By PHILIP ELLA JUICO
Philippine Star

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Dr. Regino Ylanan, then the physical director of the University of the Philippines (UP), founded in 1924, the NCAA, composed of UP, University of Sto. Tomas (UST), University of Manila, National University (NU), De La Salle, Ateneo de Manila and Institute of Accounts. Interestingly, the NCAA in the US was organized in 1916 or only eight years earlier than its counterpart in the Philippines.


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As stated in last week’s column, I will continue Tuesday to provide a historical sketch on the early roots of Philippine physical education and school sports. The account draws from research earlier done by a number of people, including former Philippine Sports Commission chairman Perry Mequi.

Last week’s column appeared on Independence Day and I had tied in that milestone in Philippine history the impact it had on Philippine sports and the physical education system. It is also to be noted that the formation of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is intertwined with the coming of the Americans. Incidentally, both leagues will start in the next few weeks their respective seasons with basketball as the kick off sport.

In the beginning, the Thomasites did not teach the rudiments of baseball, track and field, tennis, indoor baseball and basketball in formally organized physical education classes. What these early American teachers did was to organize playing teams, teach members how to play and conduct intra team competitions. Since sporting activity in the school system began with teams competing against each other, this practice laid down the foundation of competitive sports and not physical education or school sports that focuses on participation by the greatest number.

Celia Bocobo-Olivar stated "in the beginning there was no definite policy towards the promotion of athletics. Rather, individual teachers exerted their enthusiasm and lent their prestige to events. American teachers, many of whom were former varsity lettermen in the US, took charge of coaching the teams at their own initiative and during their free time. The teachers trained school athletes. To enlist the interest of a greater number of pupils, athletic color competitions patterned after those of the Public Schools Athletic League of New York were introduced."

The American teachers, noting the Filipinos fondness for celebrating town fiestas, a practice inherited from the Spaniards, utilized these occasions for promoting sports competitions. The strategy proved to be very successful that up to now, sports competitions are regular activities that compliment the religious festivities of town fiestas.

So pervasive was the encouragement given to competitive sports that, as Bocobo-Olivar reports, "a credit of one percent on the general average was granted to pupils who had done regular and systematic work in athletics and who took part in provincial (athletic) meets. As an alterative, five percent was added to the average in any single subject in which the student was deficient. Under similar conditions, two percent was added to the general average of (athletes) who represented the Bureau of Education in the carnival interscholastic and open meet."

Collegiate sports was likewise given special attention, and the formation of two collegiate leagues that up to the present are the dominant movers of intercollegiate sports were founded by two Filipino physical educators who went to the US to take up graduate studies. Both these pensionados acquired their master’s degrees from Springfield College, which was then the leading institution that trained physical educators in North America and all over the world.

Dr. Regino Ylanan, then the physical director of the University of the Philippines (UP), founded in 1924, the NCAA, composed of UP, University of Sto. Tomas (UST), University of Manila, National University (NU), De La Salle, Ateneo de Manila and Institute of Accounts. Interestingly, the NCAA in the US was organized in 1916 or only eight years earlier than its counterpart in the Philippines.

Professor Candido Bartolome who subsequently became physical director of the UP when Ylanan assumed the position of national physical director, was responsible for organizing the UAAP which was popularly known then as the "Big Three." A take-off from similar sports leagues in America. The association members were UP, UST and NU.

The formation of national sports associations (NSAs) further reinforced the primacy of sports competition over physical education and the still-to-emerge principle of "Sports for All" after the creation of the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation (PAAF).

The PAAF was created in 1911 for the main purpose of controlling amateur sports in the Philippines.

atenean_blooded
06-20-2007, 03:12 AM
Dadagdagan ko lang ng stuff on popular rivalries.

Prior to the founding of the NCAA, the games between schools were pretty informal, until the eventual establishing of the now-defunct Catholic League, which featured such schools as the Ateneo, UST, and others. At this time (way before 1924), the Ateneo de Manila's main rival was UP, and teams from both schools would troop to each others' campuses to play basketball. UP's team at the time, as was UST's, was one of the toughest basketball teams, which made them great competition for the Ateneo players. Since the UP players did manage to beat the Ateneans on several occassions, the Jesuits noted that the Ateneo had a better chance of beating the competition if the crowd got into things. Hence, the Ateneo de Manila introduced cheerleading to the Philippines by fielding the first-ever pep squad and band. Many of the cheers in use at the time are still used today (examples being "fight," "animo," "halikinu," "fabilioh," etc.). And at the time, the use of unintelligible cheers delivered at high speed were meant to intimidate and confuse the opposing players and gallery. And this worked.

Eventually, the NCAA was established, and the Ateneo took home the first midgets title, La Salle took the first juniors title, and UP took home the first of three straight seniors titles. There were still some games outside the NCAA, but this is where the Ateneo-UP games took center stage. Sometime in the late 1920s, the Ateneans noticed that some students of another NCAA school watched Ateneo games even if their team wasn't playing against Ateneo, and the Ateneans were later surprised when they started having a pep squad and band, with pep squad members doing pumps very similar to the Ateneans' own. That school was La Salle, very young compared to the Ateneo which was at the time around 70 years old.

There was really no Ateneo-La Salle rivalry to speak of at the time, since La Salle's basketball teams weren't that competitive. They were nowhere near the level of the teams from the Ateneo, UP, UST, and even San Beda. But the Thomasians and Lasallites were kings of the the football fields (I find this ironic today, since La Salle's Taft campus has what, 3/4 of a football field?) in the various levels (juniors, seniors, etc.). Other schools dominated other areas.

Eventually, UP, UST, and NU left the NCAA, leaving the battle for basketball dominance between the Ateneo and San Beda (the Lasallites became the undisputed kings of the football pitch, since after UST had 4 straight crowns, it was practically all La Salle from then on). Ateneo had 4 crowns (the same as UP), and San Beda had 3, and together, they had the most number of championships between them at the time. After San Beda's first 3-peat (after the Ateneo's own 3-peat), Letran took the crown. In 1939, the Ateneo fielded one of the strongest basketball teams of the time, but lost to La Salle for the championship. This upset would start a rivalry that would live until today.

Why was this so interesting? My theory is this. In the late 1930s, when school mascots were chosen, the original names which the schools had for their teams were based on colors or whatever else they could think of. I personally think the Ateneo pissed a lot of people off when it chose blue and white as its school colors, but that's just me. Anyway, at around that time, the Ateneo was the first school to choose a mascot, the Blue Eagle. The upset in 1939 by the Greenies, I imagine, was seen as shooting down the eagles. And what more fitting image for that sort of task than an Archer? I guess another fitting image, if the urban legends are true, is that of a bunch of Lasallites trooping over to the Ateneo campus (then located along Padre Faura) and throwing pieces of fried chicken at the Ateneo campus after that championship.

I've often been asked if this is supposed to be the beginning of the Ateneo-La Salle rivalry. My honest answer is that I don't know--I wasn't alive at the time. But this certainly was one of the key events that may have led to the rivalry betwen the Ateneans and Lasallites until today. Another possible theory is based on an article in Hilites magazine (the official magazine of the Ateneo High School): Ateneans pissed the La Sallites off by calling them "bobo" (stupid), and the Lasallites have never stopped calling the Ateneans "mayabang"(proud/arrogant, which we are, hahahaha). The same article goes on to say that in one of the following years, the Ateneans played against the Lasallites, and after they won the game, they pointed out to the officials that there was an ineligible player among the greenies, which led to La Salle's disqualification (and hence, its inability to defend its crown, which would be taken not by the Ateneo, but by the Ateneo's basketball rival at the time, San Beda!).

But what could have made this even more sore was the fact that the Ateneans won the basketball crown in 1941, and also won the football title that year. This was an event that would stick, because after that, the war entered the Pacific theater, and the games ground to a halt. The Lasallites would pay the Ateneans back in 1947, when they won both the basketball and football crowns.

The 1950s saw some of the greatest student athletes this country ever produced play for their respective schools. In basketball, Letran had Murder, Inc., which was one of the best Letran teams ever assembled. Players like Frankie Rabat (Ateneo), Carlos Loyzaga (Beda), and Lauro Mumar (Letran) played during this time (trivia: Paquito Diaz was a Blue Eaglet sometime during this decade). The Ateneans and Bedans eventually tussled for basketball supremacy, exchanging streaks. La Salle won in 1956, breaking the trend (although I think they faced and lost to Ateneo before 1956). Beda took the Crispulo Zamora Cup, the most coveted trophy of its time (it was also a huge trophy, about as tall as a man), when it beat the Ateneo in 1955. Ateneo won two more in 1957 and 1958, and then San Beda spoiled the Ateneo's becoming a university somewhat when it beat the Ateneo for the 1959 title.

The 60s and 70s saw the Letran-La Salle games heat up, as well as those between the Ateneo and La Salle. The late 70s were still an Ateneo-San Beda affair, which ended when the Ateneo left the league in 1978 , after losing a closed-door championship match versus San Beda in 1977, due to the widespread violence and hooliganism and proliferation of ineligble players that marked that time. The Ateneo joined the UAAP in 1978. At the time, the Ateneo had 14 men's basketball titles, the most in the league, versus San Beda's 11, and La Salle's 5. There are other records for other sports, such as La Salle's 21 men's football titles (they had 20 juniors titles) against Ateneo's 5 (San Beda, as of last season, only has 14 titles), Ateneo's 6 track and field titles (17 juniors) against La Salle's 7, and so on. Some records were unsurpassed until recently (Letran only tied and surpassed the Ateneo's record in the 2000s), and some remain unsurpassed (La Salle still has the most number of NCAA football titles as of today).

The Ateneo's leaving the NCAA effectively ended the Ateneo-San Beda bastketball rivalry for NCAA crowns (the championship in 1977 was the last one Beda would win until 2006), and, for lack of a better term, suspended the emerging Ateneo-La Salle rivalry. At this time, La Salle's games versus Letran got pretty heated. The violence eventually led to La Salle's leaving the NCAA in 1981, beginning a "drifting" period when La Salle was not a part of any major school league. The Lasallites would join the UAAP in 1986. In 1987, the Ateneo beat UE for the crown, and in 1988, the Ateneans met the Lasallites again for the championship, which the Jun Reyes-led Blue Eagles won over the Dindo Pumaren-led Green Archers. That would be the last time the Ateneo and La Salle would meet in the finals until 2001, when La Salle beat the Blue Eagles in 3 games, and in 2002, when the Blue Eagles beat La Salle for the championship.

There has been, interestingly enough, a reversal of sorts. The Ateneo has the most number of UAAP men's football titles, but La Salle has more UAAP finals appearances and championships than the Ateneo.

Old rivalries are active again today: Ateneo vs. UP (called "The Battle of Katipunan"), Ateneo-La Salle. There have been some Ateneo-Beda friendship games, and there are now leagues where old NCAA rivals can play against each other. There are also some newer rivalries, in different events, such as how UP and UST are at each others' throats for cheerdancing.

SIMBA
06-20-2007, 10:48 PM
it's San Beda or SBC not "beda". FYI :)

Thanks

Howard the Duck
06-21-2007, 12:00 AM
it's San Beda or SBC not "beda". FYI :)

Thanks

At the end of the day, there's no right or wrong on conversations so why insist?
Even the Bedan yell only has "Beda"

danny
06-21-2007, 12:22 AM
OT lang ha.





it's San Beda or SBC not "beda". FYI :)

Thanks

At the end of the day, there's no right or wrong on conversations so why insist?
Even the Bedan yell only has "Beda"


We have an internal campaign to honor the Venerable Bede. We do not want San Beda to be known as "Beda". A lot of elder Bedans would like to correct this one. The alumni are trying to correct this revisionism by younger Bedans.

I know you guys have no problem with "USTE" nor those from SSC about "BASTE". At least here in gamefece, we request your understanding.

Simba,

Baka kasi masyadong imposing ang dating. It's better if we humbly request them to understand the campaign.

Cool ka lang Howard. This is gameface. ;D

danny
06-21-2007, 12:35 AM
Hey, blooded, thanks for that piece.

Also, it has to be noted that the UAAP was founded as a reaction, an outcry, against the seeming commercialization of the NCAA.

Back then, prior to the entry of Ateneo and La Salle, the UAAP was teased as blue-collar while the NCAA as the white collar league. Sabi lang naman sa amin ni Manong Rene Saguisag. ;D

Have you come across an article that disputes the official narrative regarding UP's Dr. Ylanan as the brains behind the NCAA?

atenean_blooded
06-21-2007, 01:29 AM
Danny:

I haven't found anything that says that. I don't think it's important.

One account says that the "seeming commercialization" was actually the NCAA's proposal to file incorporation papers.

Jump_Shooter
06-21-2007, 07:12 PM
There has been, interestingly enough, a reversal of sorts. The Ateneo has the most number of UAAP men's football titles, but La Salle has more UAAP finals appearances and championships than the Ateneo.


Blooded, are you sure about this? Because UP has won something like 13 or 14 men's football titles. And since Ateneo is just about to enter its 30th season in the UAAP, in order for it to have the most football crowns it would have to have won at least 15 (which is highly unlikely since UST has also won a number of championships).

Howard the Duck
06-21-2007, 08:47 PM
OT lang ha.





it's San Beda or SBC not "beda". FYI :)

Thanks

At the end of the day, there's no right or wrong on conversations so why insist?
Even the Bedan yell only has "Beda"


We have an internal campaign to honor the Venerable Bede. We do not want San Beda to be known as "Beda". A lot of elder Bedans would like to correct this one. The alumni are trying to correct this revisionism by younger Bedans.

I know you guys have no problem with "USTE" nor those from SSC about "BASTE". At least here in gamefece, we request your understanding.

Simba,

Baka kasi masyadong imposing ang dating. It's better if we humbly request them to understand the campaign.

Cool ka lang Howard. This is gameface. ;D



you maybe right, but this "SIMBA" and/or "SIMBA-SCAR" guy pops up out of nowhere like those popup ads its getting annoying.

and at the end of the day, at normal conversation, there is no wrong or correct term for beda.

baguhin muna ang lyrics ng indian yell papayag pa ako ;D

as for the item, I hate it when it's a series, parang binibitin ka pa. paano kung nakalimutan mong bumili ulit ng dyaryo? :D

Howard the Duck
06-21-2007, 09:04 PM
There has been, interestingly enough, a reversal of sorts. The Ateneo has the most number of UAAP men's football titles, but La Salle has more UAAP finals appearances and championships than the Ateneo.


Blooded, are you sure about this? Because UP has won something like 13 or 14 men's football titles. And since Ateneo is just about to enter its 30th season in the UAAP, in order for it to have the most football crowns it would have to have won at least 15 (which is highly unlikely since UST has also won a number of championships).

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UAAP_Football_Champions but it is INCOMPLETE, hanggang 1978 lang (the year ADMU joined) at parang mali pa ang tabulation.

Dati sa uaapgames.com may complete table sila ng champs pero wala na siya ngayon.

Jump_Shooter
06-21-2007, 09:09 PM
^Their tabulation is erroneous. UP won the title in 1986-87 and in 1989-90. At imposibleng 1978 lang nag-umpisa ang football sa UAAP. What a misleading site.

Howard the Duck
06-21-2007, 09:22 PM
^Their tabulation is erroneous. UP won the title in 1986-87 and in 1989-90. At imposibleng 1978 lang nag-umpisa ang football sa UAAP. What a misleading site.
well, most of the tallies on wikipedia had 1978 as its starting date. sa basketball lang ang nagpatuunan ko ng pansin kaya tama....

toti_mendiola
06-21-2007, 10:38 PM
The Indian Yell's first line actually goes "San Beda Beda Beda Beda fight fight fight fight hey u kim kum kawa". There was the word "San" before the name of the venerable "Beda" though not as loudly shouted and sang compared to the succeeding lines of the song.More,the word "Beda" is being chant repeatedly, like the word "fight", as a lyrical tone and echo for the song and cheer's desired musical and indian warpath effect.Originally, Indians tap their mouths repeatedly (the most common of these practices as shown in various films cinematic or documentary is when they chant wooooo as they tap their mouths, creating a fastly repeated chant of the original word.The end result is a "owowowowow" soundeffect which is an entirely different pattern of sound compared to a non mouthtapping yell) as they chant a number of native songs and rituals or prayers creating the same effect. The Indian Yell's author patterned and sticked, i believe so, truthfully to those practices when he wrote this San Beda's famous and most re(d)cognized cheer.

Howard the Duck
06-22-2007, 12:42 AM
The Indian Yell's first line actually goes "San Beda Beda Beda Beda fight fight fight fight hey u kim kum kawa". There was the word "San" before the name of the venerable "Beda" though not as loudly shouted and sang compared to the succeeding lines of the song.More,the word "Beda" is being chant repeatedly, like the word "fight", as a lyrical tone and echo for the song and cheer's desired musical and indian warpath effect.Originally, Indians tap their mouths repeatedly (the most common of these practices as shown in various films cinematic or documentary is when they chant wooooo as they tap their mouths, creating a fastly repeated chant of the original word.The end result is a "owowowowow" soundeffect which is an entirely different pattern of sound compared to a non mouthtapping yell) as they chant a number of native songs and rituals or prayers creating the same effect. The Indian Yell's author patterned and sticked, i believe so, truthfully to those practices when he wrote this San Beda's famous and most re(d)cognized cheer.

reviewing my "lyrics" of the indian yell, the first line goes:
"Beda… Beda… Beda… Beda…. Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Hey-U Kim kum ka wa (twice)"

"San Beda" appears on the last line:
"Shyrack Mise-ravigable (3x) Rah! San Beda Rah-Rah (2x) Lama-Lama-rica-naca-su-ma! Miseravigable Rah! San Beda Rah-Rah (twice) Fight!"

Ergo, "Beda" and "San Beda" are perfectly OK since it used on Bedan cheers (although other Bedan cheers do not use "Beda" without "San" before it.)

danny
06-22-2007, 12:51 AM
Eto na naman si Howard. :D

Una si blooded ang kausap ni Simba. Bigla ka na lang sumulpot na parang kabute. Pangalawa, sumusunod kami sa hiling ng mas nakatatandang alumni. Respeto sa mga seniors namin. Taga-USTE ka kaya hindi mo talaga maiintindihan yan.

Tutal gusto mo pala ang "beda". Walang problema. Basta ang kampanaya namin sa kapwa Bedista at* mga kaibigan sa gameface, " San* Beda". ;D

OT na naman ako.

atenean_blooded
06-22-2007, 12:53 AM
There has been, interestingly enough, a reversal of sorts. The Ateneo has the most number of UAAP men's football titles, but La Salle has more UAAP finals appearances and championships than the Ateneo.


Blooded, are you sure about this? Because UP has won something like 13 or 14 men's football titles. And since Ateneo is just about to enter its 30th season in the UAAP, in order for it to have the most football crowns it would have to have won at least 15 (which is highly unlikely since UST has also won a number of championships).


I actually referred to the Wikipedia article that Howard was talking about. If the Ateneo records there are correct, then we do have 12 men's football titles, the most in the league at least as of 1978.

(I think it was jancarlo who originally put up that Wikipedia page.)

Mikhail
06-22-2007, 12:56 AM
OT: You can edit the contents of Wikipedia to make it more accurate.

danny
06-22-2007, 01:37 AM
Is Howard the Duck the one "maintaining" the NCAA and UAAP wikipedia entries?

atenean_blooded
06-22-2007, 01:51 AM
OT: You can edit the contents of Wikipedia to make it more accurate.


I know. If I had the documents, I would.

Howard the Duck
06-22-2007, 12:51 PM
Is Howard the Duck the one "maintaining" the NCAA and UAAP wikipedia entries?


basketball lang

danny
06-24-2007, 12:52 AM
Is Howard the Duck the one "maintaining" the NCAA and UAAP wikipedia entries?


basketball lang


Thanks. Have you across a list of NCAA finalists since inception?

atenean_blooded
06-24-2007, 02:23 AM
There's a list on the NCAA website. The Wikipedia list more or less reflects that. But it only states who the champions are, and does not include the runners-up.

Howard the Duck
06-24-2007, 12:52 PM
There's a list on the NCAA website. The Wikipedia list more or less reflects that. But it only states who the champions are, and does not include the runners-up.
The NCAA website is now a complete ripoff of Wikipedia.
And I've been looking for the runners-up list for the longest time and I can't find it. :D

atenean_blooded
06-24-2007, 02:07 PM
There's a list on the NCAA website. The Wikipedia list more or less reflects that. But it only states who the champions are, and does not include the runners-up.
The NCAA website is now a complete ripoff of Wikipedia.
And I've been looking for the runners-up list for the longest time and I can't find it. :D


One of the athletics people in JRU is said to have the complete list. He was the former head, I think.

Howard the Duck
06-24-2007, 03:26 PM
There's a list on the NCAA website. The Wikipedia list more or less reflects that. But it only states who the champions are, and does not include the runners-up.
The NCAA website is now a complete ripoff of Wikipedia.
And I've been looking for the runners-up list for the longest time and I can't find it. :D


One of the athletics people in JRU is said to have the complete list. He was the former head, I think.

It'll be interesting to see that full list... it'll be interesting to see past finals matches.

casual_observer
06-24-2007, 05:26 PM
it is nice to read that the University of the Philippines is one of the founders of both the NCAA and the UAAP. ;)

gameface_one
06-26-2007, 10:09 AM
The NCAA and college sports


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SPORTS FOR ALL By PHILIP ELLA JUICO
Philstar.com
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With the establishment of the PAAF, the formation of NSAs followed. The birth of the PAAF further reinforced the competitive aspect of sports which by itself has indisputable merit were it not done at the expense of participation by the greatest number or physical education.


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In last week’s column, I wrote, among other things, that the formation of National Sports Associations (NSAs) after the creation of the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation (PAAF) further reinforced the primacy of sports competition over physical education and "sports for all."

The PAAF was created in 1911 for the purpose of controlling amateur sports in the Philippines and for the next 60 years it was primarily responsible for guiding and nurturing amateur sports development and the country’s participation in international competitions. The original officers of the Federation were all prominent American sportsmen.

So pervasive was the influence of America in all aspects of Philippine life that even the local version of the US National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) came to life a mere 10 years after the original NCAA was established in the US.

The establishment of the US NCAA was precisely to rationalize and put more order into a sports situation that had put too much emphasis on competition and winning thus threatening athletics itself.

As Derek Bok, former Harvard University president, said in his book "Universities in the Marketplace," college sports grew rapidly after the Civil War. By the end of the 19th century, most of the trappings of big-time athletic programs were already visible: professional coaches, training tables, admission charges, paid recruiters and scholarships for promising athletes.

Schools had become so obsessed with winning that some resorted to "dressing up the butcher’s boy, the iron molder, the boiler maker, or even the bond salesman in football clothing." One university president hired a coach (who would soon be a legend) with the instructions to "develop teams which we can send around the country and knock out all colleges."

Bok says that the football played in the early 20th century was even more violent than today. Observers recall watching team members "jumping on downed players with their knees, while striking with closed fists." In 1904 new formations and tactics resulted in 21 deaths. A year later, President Theodore Roosevelt called a meeting of college presidents at the White House to consider ways of stopping the mayhem. Out of such concerns, what is now the NCAA was born in 1906 to develop uniform rules to guide college sports.

With the establishment of the PAAF, the formation of NSAs followed. The birth of the PAAF further reinforced the competitive aspect of sports which by itself has indisputable merit were it not done at the expense of participation by the greatest number or physical education.

The earliest among these charter members, the original Non Government Organizations or NGOs, were the Philippine Amateur Baseball Association, Basketball Association of the Philippines, Gymnastics Association of the Philippines, Amateur Softball Association of the Philippines and the Philippine Amateur Swimming Association. At present there are about 42 NSAs affiliated with the Philippine Olympic Committee and they constitute a body of stakeholders that projects in the public psyche that elite competitive sports is more important than mass-based sports.

In "The History and Development of Physical Education and Sports in the Philippines" Regino and Carmen Ylanan wrote, "To carry out the main objective of the PAAF, physical fitness through sports, the NSAs are committed to two fundamental tasks: developmental and promotional.

They add: "In the development of sports, the aim is to have able-bodied citizens of both sexes, especially the young, participate in the sport of their choice regularly and intensively. It is of primary importance however that competition for the youth should be according to age levels and the rules of the game modified to conform to their capabilities.

"All the sports associations (must) conduct annually the usual meets and tournaments in their respective regions, national elementary, secondary and collegiate championships, open championships and also participate in international competitions here and abroad."

Howard the Duck
08-09-2007, 11:47 PM
this page (http://ncaa.org.ph/about_ncaa.html)is now a wikipedia ripoff :D >:(

genom222
10-28-2007, 10:11 PM
I thought San Beda was one of the original/founders of the NCAA?

danny
10-31-2007, 02:25 AM
I thought San Beda was one of the original/founders of the NCAA?


Yes. Just like the the Zamora Cup which was almost forgotten if not for the stories of our seniors, the fact that we were among the founders of the NCAA almost became extinct.

With the back-to-back title, reclaiming history has become easier since some sports journalists have started digging NCAA history.

We are the only remaining founding member of the NCAA who hasn't left the league.

genom222
10-31-2007, 04:16 AM
I thought San Beda was one of the original/founders of the NCAA?


Yes. Just like the the Zamora Cup which was almost forgotten if not for the stories of our seniors, the fact that we were among the founders of the NCAA almost became extinct.

With the back-to-back title, reclaiming history has become easier since some sports journalists have started digging NCAA history.

We are the only remaining founding member of the NCAA who hasn't left the league.


Well just like the saying goes; History is the present. That's why every generation writes it anew. But what most people think of as history is its end product, myth.

2sc1
10-31-2007, 05:55 PM
The following were websites which contained a complete list of championships (all sports) for the NCAA (Srs/Jrs) and the UAAP Seniors division. These now exist only as archived pages in http://www.archive.org/web/web.php

NCAA Champions - http://web.archive.org/web/20070313181939/www.ncaa.org.ph/aboutncaa2.php

UAAP Seniors Champions - http://web.archive.org/web/20031205063346/http://www.uaapgames.com/champscoreboard.shtml

danny
11-01-2007, 01:41 AM
I thought San Beda was one of the original/founders of the NCAA?


Yes. Just like the the Zamora Cup which was almost forgotten if not for the stories of our seniors, the fact that we were among the founders of the NCAA almost became extinct.

With the back-to-back title, reclaiming history has become easier since some sports journalists* have started digging NCAA history.

We are the only remaining founding member of the NCAA who hasn't left the league.



Well just like the saying goes; History is the present. That's why every generation writes it anew. But what most people think of as history is its end product, myth.


All I know is that history is written by the victors.

Present version of history reflects the world-view of the current "rulers". That distiction must always be taken into consideration. It's not the whole generation per se, but the "masters" of that generation. The myths are created to glorify the past, real or imagined.

oca
06-05-2009, 12:14 PM
I thought San Beda was one of the original/founders of the NCAA?


Yes. Just like the the Zamora Cup which was almost forgotten if not for the stories of our seniors, the fact that we were among the founders of the NCAA almost became extinct.

With the back-to-back title, reclaiming history has become easier since some sports journalists have started digging NCAA history.

We are the only remaining founding member of the NCAA who hasn't left the league.



Well just like the saying goes; History is the present. That's why every generation writes it anew. But what most people think of as history is its end product, myth.


All I know is that history is written by the victors.

Present version of history reflects the world-view of the current "rulers". That distiction must always be taken into consideration. It's not the whole generation per se, but the "masters" of that generation. The myths are created to glorify the past, real or imagined.




Ngayon ko lang ito napansin...

"Victors", as applied to the old saying, refers to the invader, subjugator, conquistador... the last tribe or nation standing.

But in contemporary times, even those who would lose would have venues to have their story heard.

Madalas nga, yung mga humble victors would leave to third parties the writing of their stories. But the arrogant who were defeated would willfully write a version giving a twist that gives them a victory created in their imagination.

danny
09-03-2009, 03:01 AM
Ngayon ko lang ito napansin...

"Victors", as applied to the old saying, refers to the invader, subjugator, conquistador... the last tribe or nation standing.

But in contemporary times, even those who would lose would have venues to have their story heard.

Madalas nga, yung mga humble victors would leave to third parties the writing of their stories. But the arrogant who were defeated would willfully write a version giving a twist that gives them a victory created in their imagination.





That's why there are two versions of the story. "Victors" in that case may have lost the battle in one front but can still claim victory in another sphere. If their story still hold sway despite their loss, then they are truly not yet vanquised. Eventually the fabricated dominant story will be forgotten.

Truth will be told and retold even by the few. However, the onus will be on the reader who will have to meticulously discern the "truth".