PDA

View Full Version : UAAP teams now following scientific training



pachador
06-11-2007, 04:56 AM
The things they did last summer

By Jasmine W. Payo
Inquirer
Last updated 02:48am (Mla time) 06/10/2007


MANILA, Philippines - In the sweat-filled school gym, coach Dindo Pumaren looks on intently from the sidelines as the University of the East Red Warriors go through their regular scrimmage.

“Our big guys have been working on their dribbling this summer,” he says. “Most teams have a year-long program. For us, we work on certain skills and particular areas of the body every two weeks or every month. We also join summer basketball leagues. And if there's an available opportunity to train abroad, we take it.”

The Warriors' training is indicative of a new and welcome trend in collegiate basketball, says Tony Atayde, sports marketing executive of Nike. Training has turned scientific and complex, he notes.

“It's definitely a lot more different now. You see more teams hiring strength and conditioning coaches, coaches who specialize in offense, those who focus on defense and others who zero in on making players quicker and stronger,” Atayde says. “It's not just about basketball anymore. Teams have become more scientific in the sense that they break the game down. It's really about getting the guys in tip-top shape for a premium performance.”

The San Beda Red Lions, the titlist in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), even flew to the United States for training last month. So did the Ateneo Blue Eagles, the UAAP runner-up last season. Another reigning champion, the University of Santo Tomas Growling Tigers, also packed up for Malaysia a month before the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) kicks off.

Before the team's departure, new San Beda coach Frankie Lim assesses that his team still has the chops to capture another cage crown. “We're looking at another NCAA championship,” Lim declares. “I'm banking on my players' dedication. They have to sacrifice to win a championship again. It's never easy to win.”

The Tigers' coach, Pido Jarencio, likewise believes that the team has an even more well-planned pre-season than their championship run. “Our practices are more on drills. We're doing new things that we didn't get to do last year because I was new with the team and we only had four months,” he says.

Not all teams, though, are as lucky in tapping the international pipeline this summer. “We got tournament invites abroad that didn't work out, but that doesn't mean that we're training any less,” says Pumaren.

“We're making do with what we have here; whatever is available that we think will help the team,” says Pumaren. “We do aquathlon training where we run and do breathing ladders in the pool. If we lack equipment, we use the stairs, we do lunges. And we also join the summer league to gauge our performance against the other teams.”

And, despite the Warriors' recent loss to perennial UAAP powerhouse La Salle Green Archers in the Nike Summer League, Pumaren says he likes what he has been seeing in his boys' game form. “It was closely fought, they played a good game,” he notes. “At this point, we usually look at which match ups are more effective or what plays we have to adjust.”

Says Atayde: “Most coaches look at their team's efficiency. Even if the team were to practice seven days a week, there's really a difference between practice shape and game shape. This is a platform for the kids to be able to at least hone their skills within the game environment aside from the practice environment.”

The youthful sports executive cites another key advantage of teams honing their skills at the local front. “One of the benefits is exposure to the other teams,” says Atayde. “During the summer, pretty much the entire roster that is on the team is a preview of what you'll see in the UAAP and the NCAA. You'll be pretty familiar with the different teams' game play. It also gives the players a platform to shine. If I'm on Team B and I want to be on Team A, I can use the summer league to show my coach that I can play.”

The past months, the Warriors also found ways to tweak their lineup. “There will be changes in our game,” Pumaren points out. “For the past seasons, a lot of people have been saying that we're mostly good at the perimeter, but we lack real big men.. But we now have a post threat. We have guys who may not be that tall, but they're wide-bodied.”

With the collegiate season only weeks away, Atayde reminds that most teams are now heading into the final stretch of their training.

“The end of the summer league is pretty much when teams are getting the players into game shape and into a frame of mind that focuses on the big league,” says Atayde.

For the Warriors, it's also the time to get psychologically pumped up. As Pumaren notes: “A lot of the game is also mental. Players have to train both mind and body even before the big games start. They face a lot of pressure during the UAAP season, so it's the best way to get the boys ready.”

skopy
06-11-2007, 10:38 AM
i think most collegiate teams now train as scientifically as the pros

Wang-Bu
06-14-2007, 11:53 AM
Dapat lang naman. Sa tindi ng kumpitensya ngayon sa basketball mapag-iiwanan ang koponan na hindi pinag-iibayo ang ensayo at ginagamitan ng makabagong mga pamamaraan. Tignan na lang natin ang bilang ng mga player na kayang-kayang dumakdak ngayon kontra sampu o dalampung taon ng nakalipas. Kahit mga punggok na 5'6" hanggang 5'8" minamani na ang pagdakdak ngayon.

Mahahalata din sa resistensya ng katawan kapag makabagong mga pamamaraan na ang ginagamit sa ensayo ng isang manlalaro. Tignan natin ang isang typical na player na galing sa mas maliit at hindi gaanong sikat na paaralan at ikumpara natin sa mga UAAP schools. Anlayo ng agwat nila pagdating sa resistensya, pwera na lang kung may angking tibay at liksi talaga ang player.

Mateen Cleaves
06-14-2007, 01:22 PM
Mahahalata din sa resistensya ng katawan kapag makabagong mga pamamaraan na ang ginagamit sa ensayo ng isang manlalaro. Tignan natin ang isang typical na player na galing sa mas maliit at hindi gaanong sikat na paaralan at ikumpara natin sa mga UAAP schools. Anlayo ng agwat nila pagdating sa resistensya, pwera na lang kung may angking tibay at liksi talaga ang player.


Noong umpisa ng summer, may dinalang bata sa UP ang isang dating player ni Coach Joe. Kakagradweyt lang ng high school sa probinsiya. Pinasabay siya sa iba pang mga baguhan, sila Gamboa, yung mga taga-FEU, at si Wong ng Letran. Siempre, para makilatis ng husto yung bata, babad siya sa mga scrimmage.

Pagkatapos ng dalawang laro. Pinagpahinga na siya. Hingal kabayo na umupo sa tabi ng resbak niyang kaklase ng high school. Pag-upo, ang unang binitiwan na salita ay "Iba nga pala talaga ang laro dito sa Maynila e!" Yung kaibigan, parang gusto atang bigyan ng moral support ang kabarkada, humirit ng "Matatanda na ata ang mga 'yan e... Ilang taon na kaya ang mga 'yan?" Sagot ang kaibigan: "Ka-edad lang natin ang mga 'yan!" ;-)

Hindi lang nga pala sa teknik ng pag-ensayo, nakakalamang ang mga taga-Metro Manila. Malaking bagay din na halos buong taon mag-ensayo ang mga bata. Lalo na kung taga NCAA o UAAP high school ka. Yung probinsyanong kinuwento ko, nag-tryout sa UP bandang Abril. Ang huling laro/ensayo daw niya, noong Pebrero pa nang matapos ang kanilang District Meet.