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pachador
04-28-2007, 12:42 AM
Hi,

maybe someone can help please please. My father, Antonio "joker" Faustino played for the National University Bulldogs college team in the late 1940s . I have a bulldogs pic with him circa 1948 to 1949.
He also played in a manila-based commercial league in the 1950s ,and I dont know if it was MICAA or another league. I had a pic of him when he was in the commercial league but i lost it =(* i think the team was either Philippine Air lines, STANVAC or MOBIL. my memory is hazy on this.
I was dumbfounded the other day when I saw on the internet that apparently he also coached a team with Caloy Loyzaga as one of the players. ( i do know that caloy went to high school at National university too). in fact, my papa grew up in santa mesa where Caloy also grew up.
Anyway, I was wondering if anyone has any info or stats about my Papa either or both while he was playing for NU and later when he played in the commercial league(MICAA)
He died when he was only 43 ,and i was only a little kid , thats why there is this missing info in his life I would like to know. does anyone also know caloy loyzaga's email address?* Thanks !* :)

Kid Cubao
04-28-2007, 10:04 AM
hi pachador, i would suggest you get in touch with the more venerable posters here in gameface such as monL and escalera jr. maybe they can help you piece together the missing pieces of your father's basketball career. medyo mahihirapan lang tayong maghanap ng mga stats tungkol sa dad mo. if you're up to it, maybe you can try visiting public libraries in your area and inquire if they have back issues of the free press and sunday times magazine from the late 40s to the 50s. i recall those publications had the most extensive sports coverage in that era. am sorry to hear that he died at a very young age.

pachador
04-28-2007, 12:20 PM
Thank you kid cubao. actually nasa los angeles na ako pero hopefully, monl or escalera can help me kahit man lang to find out what commercial or micaa tean he played for. sana someone will write a book about the history of micaa




hi pachador, i would suggest you get in touch with the more venerable posters here in gameface such as monL and escalera jr. maybe they can help you piece together the missing pieces of your father's basketball career. medyo mahihirapan lang tayong maghanap ng mga stats tungkol sa dad mo. if you're up to it, maybe you can try visiting public libraries in your area and inquire if they have back issues of the free press and sunday times magazine from the late 40s to the 50s. i recall those publications had the most extensive sports coverage in that era. am sorry to hear that he died at a very young age.

ESCALERA JR.
04-28-2007, 02:09 PM
Thank you kid cubao. actually nasa los angeles na ako pero hopefully, monl or escalera can help me kahit man lang to find out what commercial or micaa tean he played for. sana someone will write a book about the history of micaa




hi pachador, i would suggest you get in touch with the more venerable posters here in gameface such as monL and escalera jr. maybe they can help you piece together the missing pieces of your father's basketball career. medyo mahihirapan lang tayong maghanap ng mga stats tungkol sa dad mo. if you're up to it, maybe you can try visiting public libraries in your area and inquire if they have back issues of the free press and sunday times magazine from the late 40s to the 50s. i recall those publications had the most extensive sports coverage in that era. am sorry to hear that he died at a very young age.


(/quote)
Hello there pachador,

Being a nut-crazy basketball fanatic, i will try during my free time to do some "research" on your dad's history during the 50's...mind you, thats decades way way ahead of my time. Hindi ako ganon katanda pero lets see what we can find.

In today's highly advance info technology, everything seems to be within the grasp of our fingertips...might even just be a Google away.

I'm in Sydney, and from bits n pieces of news i've read, the elder Loyzagas have migrated & are now residing here in Australia.
This alone could be a tip for you in case you want to do your own research.

Caloy L. "The Big Difference" is such a great basketball icon, why not click on this topic and maybe it could lead you to some valuable information regarding your Dad who lived a very short life but lucky enough to be able to witness one of the most exciting era in Philippine Basketball...the era when our very own RP Team placed 3rd in the World Basketball Championship held in Brazil.* *

pachador
05-24-2007, 09:14 AM
Thanks Escalera,

In my research i found out that one of my dad's teammates at National university Bulldogs in college was Florentino Bautista who was also one of Caloy Loyzaga's teammates on the famous 1954 Philippine national team that won the bronze medal at the World championships.* . I also have another pic of my dad when he was still in high school. handwritten on the pic were the words "Sardonyx junior basketball" team, and in the background was him and his teammates who were all white spanish or american mestizo. at the back of the players is a faint plaque of some sort of coat of arms which made me think that maybe my dad played in one of the catholic schools near sta. mesa(?) since my Dad grew up in Sta Mesa area . The names(handwriting is fading) of his teammates in what appears to be his high school or intramural team are:
mike soques
buly earnshaw
chuchi ventosa
_ely paredes
__bby alberto
Poch martinez
bebe ventosa
mari alvarez
m____ ventosa
tony faustino
danding gomez
pepito serrano
pepet raquisa
terry chico
johnny ventosa

the only other pic i have is of his days with NU bulldogs. the pic says "1949 NU blue and gold bulldogs", and the teammates handwritten on the back ofthe pic were:
Sunga, Escober, Romero, Yabot, Magsino, Nerit, Faustino, Calinog, Messina, DE Villa, Bautista, Sambrano, Geron, Villamor, Barrios.

Loyzaga only played high school varsity at NU then did his college varsity at San Beda.

Sorry for bearing with me. i was just hoping that other posters will know something to fill this gap in my life.
thanks





Thank you kid cubao. actually nasa los angeles na ako pero hopefully, monl or escalera can help me kahit man lang to find out what commercial or micaa tean he played for. sana someone will write a book about the history of micaa




hi pachador, i would suggest you get in touch with the more venerable posters here in gameface such as monL and escalera jr. maybe they can help you piece together the missing pieces of your father's basketball career. medyo mahihirapan lang tayong maghanap ng mga stats tungkol sa dad mo. if you're up to it, maybe you can try visiting public libraries in your area and inquire if they have back issues of the free press and sunday times magazine from the late 40s to the 50s. i recall those publications had the most extensive sports coverage in that era. am sorry to hear that he died at a very young age.


(/quote)
Hello there pachador,

Being a nut-crazy basketball fanatic, i will try during my free time to do some "research" on your dad's history during the 50's...mind you, thats decades way way ahead of my time. Hindi ako ganon katanda pero lets see what we can find.

In today's highly advance info technology, everything seems to be within the grasp of our fingertips...might even just be a Google away.

I'm in Sydney, and from bits n pieces of news i've read, the elder Loyzagas have migrated & are now residing here in Australia.
This alone could be a tip for you in case you want to do your own research.

Caloy L. "The Big Difference" is such a great basketball icon, why not click on this topic and maybe it could lead you to some valuable information regarding your Dad who lived a very short life but lucky enough to be able to witness one of the most exciting era in Philippine Basketball...the era when our very own RP Team placed 3rd in the World Basketball Championship held in Brazil.* *

lekiboy
05-24-2007, 10:51 AM
pacahdor,
looking at the hints from the line up -

1. the ventosa clan is a solid RED clan. SBC games are being attended still by memebrs of the clan. Archie ventosa I think is the son of MON VENTOSA ( founder of SBCA and the Little Red indians). The miising letters below could be "ON". Mon has been very active during the late 40s up to the 50s- thsi tells you that you have a big chance. You wll be able to see them in the NCAA games this season 83 and we can arrange a meeting with you to check. Teka, nandito ka ba sa Pinas?
2. You may want to scan the pic and post it here so that we can check the coat of arms. Juts adjust the granularity and contrast so that we can check properly.
3. Another one is Messina- he may be related to Jenkins messina- who used to be a Red Cub and a Maroon and then a Red LIon again. He is I think active in the SBC Alumni league in CA, US.
4. Another tip is that clans usually stay in our Mighty Red School and you can still see their descendants in GS,HS and College. This is a long shot but still a possibility.

pachador
05-24-2007, 11:33 AM
thanks lekiboy,

hmmm baka san beda pala si papa sa high school :) anyway, i'll try to get hold of a scanner then i'll post the pics here.



pacahdor,
looking at the hints from the line up -

1. the ventosa clan is a solid RED clan. SBC games are being attended still by memebrs of the clan. Archie ventosa I think is the son of MON VENTOSA ( founder of SBCA and the Little Red indians). The miising letters below could be "ON". Mon has been very active during the late 40s up to the 50s- thsi tells you that you have a big chance. You wll be able to see them in the NCAA games this season 83 and we can arrange a meeting with you to check. Teka, nandito ka ba sa Pinas?
2. You may want to scan the pic and post it here so that we can check the coat of arms. Juts adjust the granularity and contrast so that we can check properly.
3. Another one is Messina- he may be related to Jenkins messina- who used to be a Red Cub and a Maroon and then a Red LIon again. He is I think active in the SBC Alumni league in CA, US.
4. Another tip is that clans usually stay in our Mighty Red School and you can still see their descendants in GS,HS and College. This is a long shot but still a possibility.

irateluvmachine
07-25-2007, 01:16 PM
damn, if only i can find my old research material... :(

i'm hardly "venerable" at 28, but i did read up a lot on the old MICAA days during my bum squad days...mga 4-5 years ago. hoping to resume...or redo my research in the near future, provided the national library still has those jurassic-era newspapers, and provided i can find spare time from my work... :D but if i do scrounge up something, it'll be posted here. :D

pachador - malamang sa PAL naglaro yung father mo, i don't remember a STANVAC or Mobil team in the MICAA. though i might be wrong... ???

pachador
07-26-2007, 09:53 PM
hi irateluvmachine,

thanks for any info you can find..... :)

irateluvmachine
08-24-2007, 01:36 AM
http://mypba.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=4464

suddenly bumped into this thread a few minutes ago. nagpost pala ako dyan, using the nick "sayotemilkshake"...damn, it's been that long since i last logged into mypba! ;D

ok dun yung mga posts ni jay mercado at percival flores...they have some interesting stories about the immediate pre-PBA days...

pachador
08-24-2007, 06:50 AM
I'll try to contribute to this uaap/micaa historical collection by scanning my papa's 2 pics. tinatamad kasi ako pumunta sa scanning shop. the funny thing is that i used to work in the IT dept of Epson in long beach,ca where we had Epson scanners up to my ears, but i never bought one even though i was entitled to a discount as an epson employee . even up to now i dont have a scanner. :D

irateluvmachine
10-05-2007, 05:37 AM
^this just in. i've recently resumed/restarted my basketball history research, and found some of my old excel files...and i've gotten some information on your dad's playing career.

antonio (joker) faustino played for the NU Bulldogs from the '46-'47 season up to '49-'50...his best year was in '47-'48 when he averaged 5.8 points, with a season high of 8 points. at 5'10, he was listed as a center - tall for a basketball player in those days, and 5.8 was considered a decent scoring average in those days for a starting player...if you scored over 10 ppg (like UST's ramoncito campos, who led the UAAP that year with 12.3 ppg), you'd be considered as an "adding machine"...sign of the times. in his junior and senior years, the NU lineup was boosted by some of their more talented players in the junior ranks, and he averaged only 3.3 as a junior and 2.0 as a senior.

joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines. unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.

got a few pics of the postwar NU lineup on my 6600, snapped from the old manila bulletin/philippines herald papers which usually had the more reliable and complete UAAP boxscores...i dunno if those are the same pics you have.

easter
10-05-2007, 07:29 AM
Ang galing irateluvmachine! You solved this mystery with average points information for added measure! 8). Para kang Hardy Boys!

bchoter
10-05-2007, 12:37 PM
Ang galing nga. I thought this mystery won't be solved for a long time.

OT: Hardy Boys, may nagbabasa pa ba niyan ngayon?

pachador
10-05-2007, 12:47 PM
.

pachador
10-05-2007, 12:53 PM
Irateluvmachine,

i owe a big one . you made my day !!! if ever I' visit manila, i'll treat you out . I think the pics you have are different from mine. maybe one day when you get the time you can send it to gameface coz gameface is starting a gallery of pics or you can also email them to me when you have the time. i'm going to send my pics to gameface too. thanks uli !!




^this just in.* i've recently resumed/restarted my basketball history research, and found some of my old excel files...and i've gotten some information on your dad's playing career.

antonio (joker) faustino played for the NU Bulldogs from the '46-'47 season up to '49-'50...his best year was in '47-'48 when he averaged 5.8 points, with a season high of 8 points.* at 5'10, he was listed as a center - tall for a basketball player in those days, and 5.8 was considered a decent scoring average in those days for a starting player...if you scored over 10 ppg (like UST's ramoncito campos, who led the UAAP that year with 12.3 ppg), you'd be considered as an "adding machine"...sign of the times.* in his junior and senior years, the NU lineup was boosted by some of their more talented players in the junior ranks, and he averaged only 3.3 as a junior and 2.0 as a senior.

joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines.* unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.

got a few pics of the postwar NU lineup on my 6600, snapped from the old manila bulletin/philippines herald papers which usually had the more reliable and complete UAAP boxscores...i dunno if those are the same pics you have.

irateluvmachine
10-12-2007, 01:24 AM
^walang anuman, pachador...fyi, i have great things planned for all this basketball history research, if only i can come up with a good feasibility study and get out of the call center industry by next year...

pachador
10-12-2007, 03:01 AM
why dont you write a book about micaa and the UAAP/NCAA from the 1930s till the 1970s. I dont think anyone has done that before. you might be able to get funding from UAAP/NCAA and PBA/SBP for that. or you might be able to get a funding grant from history institutions or companies who played in the olden days like meralco, PAL, museums.* kung ok lang sa iyo, isali mo naman tatay ko sa libro mo. alam mo he died when i was still a little kid =( so i never got to know him.
thanks uli.



^walang anuman, pachador...fyi, i have great things planned for all this basketball history research, if only i can come up with a good feasibility study and get out of the call center industry by next year...

evil_fish
10-12-2007, 08:42 PM
wow! Only in Gameface huh? hardcore talaga tong site na to' ;D

gameface_one
10-13-2007, 12:56 AM
^^^^hmmmm. We might be interested to partner with that kind of project. :)

danny
10-13-2007, 01:13 AM
^^^^hmmmm. We might be interested to partner with that kind of project.* :)


Good idea. A collaboraton with hardcore gamefacers (with their network) will surely produce an authoritative book. A non-partisan book that celebrates the beauty of collegiate sports!

Mukhang sa intellectual resources ng mga "KUYA" dito, maganda ang kalalabasan ng libro.

Diba mga kuya? Magsalita naman kayo. :D

irateluvmachine
10-14-2007, 06:57 AM
^^^^hmmmm. We might be interested to partner with that kind of project. :)


Good idea. A collaboraton with hardcore gamefacers (with their network) will surely produce an authoritative book. A non-partisan book that celebrates the beauty of collegiate sports!

Mukhang sa intellectual resources ng mga "KUYA" dito, maganda ang kalalabasan ng libro.

Diba mga kuya? Magsalita naman kayo. :D


^hmmm, not a bad idea. pero di naman ako gaanong ka-kuya...hehe. ;) nasa kalendaryo pa naman ako, at least for the next 2 years. what i'm thinking is something like an encyclopedia on cd that could be sold...say, at PBA, UAAP or NCAA games.

i'll post more interesting research material in this thread every now and then...but right now, it's pretty much a hobby, owing to my busy sched...

thanks for the support! ;D

irateluvmachine
10-15-2007, 09:29 AM
pachador - i found some of my old research from the early '50s MICAA, though i still have to re-read up on it and gather a bit more info when i visit the national library again this week. looks like your dad played for a championship PAL team in the 1951 MICAA season. one of the least-exposed players, but he did play alongside such legends as murder inc. (CSJL) standout louie tabuena and the late moro lorenzo...and probably the first-ever fil-ams in philippine commercial basketball, the veloso twins alfredo and mario, who apparently hailed from san francisco.

more signs of the times...the lineup that i got from the philippines herald back then lists your dad as a 5'10 guard...back then, forwards were usually around 5'8 and under, taking most of the shooting/scoring duties...centers were usually the best rebounders, about 5'10-plus, while guards were the team's best defenders, regardless of size...but were usually wide-bodied and around 5'9-5'11.

pachador
10-15-2007, 10:10 AM
I'll be the first one to buy your CD. thanks a lot for the info. keep it coming in. according to my mom(who was not into basketball), my dad did not play long in the MICAA because he had to get a 'real job' to feed the family. however, he still played during his spare time on the weekends daw. for example, he played with american jesuit priests at ateneo de cagayan(xavier university) during the 1960s when his company assigned him to cagayan de oro. my mom also said he also played a lot of basketball against american soldiers who were in the tens of thousands when they liberated manila as he was a USAFFE guerilla detailed with the american 37th division that helped liberate Sto Tomas concentration camp.* i believe, a lot of the collegiate players in the late 1940s might have possibly also gotten a lot of experience playing against american soldiers after the liberation of the philippines . i can imagine some of this kanos might have played in the US NCAA. the elevated experience the 1940s era local cagers got from playing against the kano might have possibly helped our national team when they got 3rd place in the FIBA worlds in 1954. imagine playing against rough war experienced american soldiers. there must have been a lot of physical plays. this are just my conjectures. a similar situation exists today wherein the local homegrowns are elevating their game playing against fil-ams.
by the way, there is a signature drive among older alumni of xavier university(cagayan) to revert back to its old name of ateneo de cagayan. i dont know it it will be successful.





pachador - i found some of my old research from the early '50s MICAA, though i still have to re-read up on it and gather a bit more info when i visit the national library again this week.* looks like your dad played for a championship PAL team in the 1951 MICAA season.* one of the least-exposed players, but he did play alongside such legends as murder inc. (CSJL) standout louie tabuena and the late moro lorenzo...and probably the first-ever fil-ams in philippine commercial basketball, the veloso twins alfredo and mario, who apparently hailed from san francisco.*

more signs of the times...the lineup that i got from the philippines herald back then lists your dad as a 5'10 guard...back then, forwards were usually around 5'8 and under, taking most of the shooting/scoring duties...centers were usually the best rebounders, about 5'10-plus, while guards were the team's best defenders, regardless of size...but were usually wide-bodied and around 5'9-5'11.*

easter
10-15-2007, 10:26 AM
^^^^hmmmm. We might be interested to partner with that kind of project. :)


If Gameface is going to be serious about this (and I hope they are ;) ) then I suggest they also contact some of the guys at the MYPBA forum like Jay P.Mercado and Percival Flores. These guys have extensive knowledge about the history of MICAA and the PBA.

Of course irateluvmachine should definitely be there!

This could be a book or a CD but I prefer the former for this one.

RedKfir
10-15-2007, 04:26 PM
^ That sounds very interesting, I hope it takes off the ground and be produced.

Here is one incident that happened the 80s, I was lounging in the old San Beda Alumni Association Office and I decided to look at the old pictures and articles. I came across an old picture (circa 1950s) showing the Yco team led by Caloy Loyzaga going up against the Spanish national team in Spain! :o If I remember it correctly, the old black and white picture showed the Spanish team in white and Yco was in dark. In addition, King Caloy was in the picture wearing his legendary number 14.

oca
10-15-2007, 04:43 PM
^ That sounds very interesting, I hope it takes off the ground and be produced.

Here is one incident that happened the 80s, I was lounging in the old San Beda Alumni Association Office and I decided to look at the old pictures and articles. I came across an old picture (circa 1950s) showing the Yco team led by Caloy Loyzaga going up against the Spanish national team in Spain! :o If I remember it correctly, the old black and white picture showed the Spanish team in white and Yco was in dark. In addition, King Caloy was in the picture wearing his legendary number 14.



..and if you read the caption or accompanying writeup, Yco won over the NT of Spain.

Caloy and a good number of contemporaries are very much alive. Kahit wala na sila sa Pilipinas, with the advances in communications, they can easily be contacted as resource persons. Provide a few questions as guidelines, but give them the liberty to make a narrative of what they recall. Maniwala kayo, mahaba ang mga sagot niyan at magsasanga-sanga.

Maniwala rin kayo it will not be limited to their own era.

For sure they have something to say about those who came before them, those who they looked up to as aspiring players; and also about those upcoming players as they themselves were at the tail end of their careers.

bchoter
10-16-2007, 05:57 PM
I'd also love to have a copy of that. Kuya Jay P Mercado should be a good resource person.

pachador
10-22-2007, 02:18 PM
Alright, I finally found the time to scan papa's photos(Antonio 'Joker' Faustino):

Its now posted at:
http://www.gameface.ph/gallery.htm under 'personal collections'

danny
10-24-2007, 03:10 AM
^ That sounds very interesting, I hope it takes off the ground and be produced.

Here is one incident that happened the 80s, I was lounging in the old San Beda Alumni Association Office and I decided to look at the old pictures and articles. I came across an old picture (circa 1950s) showing the Yco team led by Caloy Loyzaga going up against the Spanish national team in Spain! :o If I remember it correctly, the old black and white picture showed the Spanish team in white and Yco was in dark. In addition, King Caloy was in the picture wearing his legendary number 14.





..and if you read the caption or accompanying writeup, Yco won over the NT of Spain.

Caloy and a good number of contemporaries are very much alive. Kahit wala na sila sa Pilipinas, with the advances in communications, they can easily be contacted as resource persons. Provide a few questions as guidelines, but give them the liberty to make a narrative of what they recall. Maniwala kayo, mahaba ang mga sagot niyan at magsasanga-sanga.

Maniwala rin kayo it will not be limited to their own era.

For sure they have something to say about those who came before them, those who they looked up to as aspiring players; and also about those upcoming players as they themselves were at the tail end of their careers.



Yes, the old-timers are very much around. Recently , Caloy Loyzaga e-mailed the Bedan alumni from different generations just to say hello. He is enjoying life in Australia.

The resource and network from gamefacers alone are enough to produce an objective and authoritative book in print or CD version.

pachador
10-24-2007, 03:58 AM
Hi Danny,

any chance you can ask Caloy loyzaga if i can email him? according to a news article, my dad coached caloy so i just wanted to ask caloy if this was true and if he has any stories or anecdotes to share with me about my dad. he died when i was a toddler so thats why i'm really interested to know what kind of man my father was. the article that mentions my father coaching caloy's team is shown below:. Thanks !!!

CALOY LOYZAGA
Greatest Filipino cager ever (by Inquirer News Service, July 2006)

WITH his seemingly endless repertoire of playing skills and flawless harmony of mental and physical coordination, Carlos Matute Loyzaga is, by any measure, the greatest Filipino basketball player of all time.

Voted by his peers as the No. l choice--in secret balloting--for the first batch of local basketball legends that will be enshrined to the first ever National Basketball Hall of Fame, Loyzaga's dazzling record speaks for itself.

Born on Aug. 29, 1930 in San Jose, Mindoro, Loyzaga had the natural ability to turn what seemed to be an impending defeat to victory, thus earning for himself the monicker: ''The Big Difference,'' a sobriquet made popular by the incomparable sportscaster Willie Hernandez, now deceased.

Loyzaga, as a player, had the gifts of size, towering at 6-foot-3, a rarity among Filipino players during his time, shooting and rebounding prowess, not to mention that he was also a fantastic center. And with his Spanish features, he was handsome. Truly, he stood clearly above the rest.

''Loyzaga is one in a million,'' said an enraptured cage fan of his. ''He would have been phenomenal as a pro in the Philippine Basketball Association,'' the fan added. Unfortunately, he never got the chance to play in the PBA, having retired from active competition when Asia's first play-for-pay league was born in 1975.

His most memorable achievement was accomplished in 1954 as a member of the amazing Philippine team that placed third in the second World Basketball Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a feat that has now become impossible to duplicate.

Loyzaga was also named to the Mythical Selection of the tournament won by the highly-favored United States, which beat host Brazil, 62-41, in the finals. in the other game, the Philippines copped third place by beating pre-game favorite Uruguay, 67-63, after trailing, 33-32, at the half.

Coached by master bench strategist Herminio ''Herr'' Silva, the other members of the Philippine team were Bayani Amador, Rafael Barretto, Florentino Bautista, Napoleon Flores, Benjamin Francisco, Antonio Genato, also a Hall of Famer; Lauro Mumar, the team captain; Ramon Manulat, Francisco Rabat, Ponciano Saldana and Mariano Tolentino. Francis Wilson and Fred Sagarbarria were alternates.

Loyzaga also played for the Philippine team that landed eighth in the world cagefest in Chile in 1959.

Then a gangling cager, Loyzaga launched his colorful cage career in 1942 as a virtual unknown, playing for the Sta. Mesa Aces whose roster included the Cuna brothers, Pablo and Vicente; Ramon Lopez, chair of the Letran Hall of Fame; Vicente Siyllon, who became president of Insular Life; and brothers Bobby and Al Tuazon. Their coach was Jose ''Pepe'' Lansang, who later made a name for himself as a referee.

After the Liberation of Manila, Loyzaga played for a team called Bulldogs which was coached by Joker Faustino. He studied at the P. Burgos Elementary School in Sta. Mesa and National University for his high school.

Loyzaga was about to enroll at UST for his college education but before he could wear the UST jersey, noted player and coach Felicisimo Fajardo, also a Hall of Famer, took him to San Beda where Fely polished his playing style. Loyzaga had wanted earlier to play for Letran but backed off when the coach gave him the cold treatment.

Loyzaga honed his skills at the Tervalac playground in Sta. Mesa before making waves in the NCAA, then the country's most colorful and glamorous league, as a member of the fabled San Beda Red Lions in the 1950s.

He also played for the multi-titled Pratra, then coached by Gabriel ''Gabby'' Fajardo, Fely's brother and a fellow Hall of Famer. Pratra won the MICAA crown in 1951.

In the NCAA, Loyzaga lived up to his billing as ''The Big Difference'' when he engineered San Beda's successful bid to retire the coveted Zamora trophy by winning the NCAA championship three times -- in 1951, 1952 and 1955.

After his NCAA campaign, Loyzaga joined the fabulous, Elizalde family-owned YCO Painters, winners of 10 consecutive National Open titles and numerous MICAA crowns.

Loyzaga made his Olympic debut in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics and played in the 1956 Melbourne Games. However, he missed the 1960 Rome Olympics due to a wrist injury he suffered while playing softball. Loyzaga coached the Philippine team that placed 13th in the 1968 Mexico Games.

In the Asian Games, Loyzaga sparked the Philippines to four straight championships -- in New Delhi in 1951, Manila in 1954, Tokyo in 1958, and Jakarta in 1962.

Capping his checkered career, Caloy skippered the Philippine team to twin victories in the ABC tournament -- in 1960 in Manila and in 1963 in Taipei -- and coached the national selection to a dramatic triumph in the 1967 ABC in Seoul.

Now based in Australia, Loyzaga, who also served as councilor of Manila, is married to Vicky Cuerva. They have four children -- Chito, Joey, Teresa, and Bing - who are all celebrities in their own right.








^ That sounds very interesting, I hope it takes off the ground and be produced.

Here is one incident that happened the 80s, I was lounging in the old San Beda Alumni Association Office and I decided to look at the old pictures and articles. I came across an old picture (circa 1950s) showing the Yco team led by Caloy Loyzaga going up against the Spanish national team in Spain! :o If I remember it correctly, the old black and white picture showed the Spanish team in white and Yco was in dark. In addition, King Caloy was in the picture wearing his legendary number 14.





..and if you read the caption or accompanying writeup, Yco won over the NT of Spain.

Caloy and a good number of contemporaries are very much alive. Kahit wala na sila sa Pilipinas, with the advances in communications, they can easily be contacted as resource persons. Provide a few questions as guidelines, but give them the liberty to make a narrative of what they recall. Maniwala kayo, mahaba ang mga sagot niyan at magsasanga-sanga.

Maniwala rin kayo it will not be limited to their own era.

For sure they have something to say about those who came before them, those who they looked up to as aspiring players; and also about those upcoming players as they themselves were at the tail end of their careers.



Yes, the* old-timers are very much around.* Recently , Caloy Loyzaga e-mailed the Bedan alumni from different generations just to say hello. He is enjoying* life in Australia.*

The resource and network from gamefacers alone are enough to produce an objective* and authoritative book in print or CD version.

irateluvmachine
10-24-2007, 03:13 PM
pachador - the MICAA lineup you posted doesn't seem to ring a bell. doesn't seem to match any of the photos i've snapped recently from the immediate postwar seasons...

anyways...the research rolls on during my free time. some of the few challenges i've encountered...

1. medyo may discrepancy sa box scores...like the individual scores not adding up at times. i oftentimes end up making wild guesses who's individual score was mistakenly printed...

2. the national library's manila times collections are all f**ked up...so brittle that the staff don't allow me to take them out for reading. dati di siya ganun...i remember manila times had the most complete player lineups for commercial and collegiate ball (complete with height/position), while philippines herald (at least while eduardo perez de tagle was sports editor) had great MICAA/NCAA previews.

3. regardless of where you look, the "loose conference" NCAA season of 1964 is impossible to track! newspapers only show complete boxscores for the opening week. since the league implemented a home-and-away system and was pretty much "unofficial" (the NCAA was called off in '62 due to excessive violence, before returning full swing in '65), i don't think the newspapers gave much of a damn. in fact, philippines herald only displayed the final scores, other papers would print a very brief, one-paragraph sidebar. such a pity, i believe this is the season where former MICAA/PBA player egay gomez put up monster numbers for JRC...

4. the MICAA is defunct, so i guess i can content myself with just points per game for that league. but how far does the NCAA and UAAP keep records? ateneo has a great archives department...did some research there a few years back...la salle and letran's collection of old school papers isn't too bad either...but what i'm looking for is the actual stats...

5. my brother won't lend me his camera. so i'm stuck with rather lo-res pictures from my 6600...

...but on the other hand, the national library staff (after giving me a few quizzical looks on my first trip back) has been quite tolerant of my hardcore research...letting me walk in without assistance to pull out the binders of smelly, stinky...yet informative old newspapers. i'm more than willing and able to do the dirty work...now i'm hoping for some co-collaborators (not as of the present, though) to take care of interviews with some of the old names and faces around the pinoy basketball scene.

easter
10-24-2007, 05:41 PM
Irateluvmachine di ba uubra yung mga newspapers in micro-fiche gaya sa Ateneo. At least you can just print hem out.

gameface_one
10-24-2007, 08:10 PM
Ok guys, enough of all the talk and let's do the walk.

Reading your posts just makes me salivate more for a realization of this very promising project. This could be the first of its kind to be published in the country although I understand that Beth Celis previously published a book about the Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball.

Who is interested to venture with us on this? It might entail some huge investments so an invitation to pool all resources among those who are willing and capable is hereby declared open.

First, let's all meet up and brainstorm and assess the commitment of those who will participate. Second, we have to draw up the blue print on how we are going to do it. Third, we have to draw-up the business case so that at the end of the day, we will all be satisfied and laughing our way to the bank. ;D

Our Chief Editor, Sam Miguel, can lead the content side. We will need contributors. Some of the members here can already be picked to contribute for some topics like Kid Cubao, MonL, Escalera, mighty_lion, pachador, irateluvmachine, danny, oca, Lion, Blue Horse, cackler, GreenArrows, Rektikano, nel, pio valenz, mateen cleaves, bchoter, yungha, AnthonyServinio, thadzonline, atenean_blooded, easter, etc.

Of course, we also have to look at the business and operations side like distribution, printing, packaging, etc.

This will be a lot of work but we are writing history here.

Who's in?

pachador
10-25-2007, 02:43 AM
Heres my suggestions:

1.) Contact all the companies that were involved in the MICAA: Crispa, PAL, etc, and ask for funding grants. In return, their teams will be prominently discussed or mentioned in the book. the bigger the funding , the more pages alloted to them(although this will go against writer's privileges and preferences what to write about.

2.) get funding grants from entities not connected with the MICAA but still interested, e.g. museums, foundations, PBA, SBP, school alumni associations., e.g. Ayala musuem

3.) try also to get funding from the Govt , e.g.* http://www.ncca.gov.ph/

4.) individual donations from families whose kin played in the MICAA, then list all the donors at the back of the book(parang school yearbook =)

5.) get all the interested writers and resource persons together then divide them into teams then meet regularly in person or via a discussion forum then dump the results, meeting minutes, articles, researches in a password secured website.

6.) the mypba forum has several resource person on the MICAA.

irateluvmachine
10-25-2007, 02:58 AM
thanks for the support, guys... ;D as of this moment though, everything's on a "side project" basis. but yes, i'm also hoping this could eventually amount to something substantial (and be my ticket out of the drudgery of call center life), and maybe getting together to brainstorm over this (hopefully over a few beers ;) ) before the year ends would be a great idea.

percival flores and jay mercado from mypba.com have a wealth of information on the late-period MICAA and early PBA, and their contributions would be much welcome...

...as for ateneo's microfilm department, i didn't know you can print them out...i might be doing some research there next month, so i'll consider that too.

maraming salamat ulit. in the meantime, the research goes on, and i'll try to post more interesting stuff as the days go by. ;D

pachador
10-25-2007, 03:21 AM
I also suggest that irateluvmachine be made one of the prime movers for this book since he started the ball rolling.

pachador
10-25-2007, 03:28 AM
Hi irateluvmachine,

your probably right. most of the players in the so-called micaa photo are also in the NU photo so baka the 'micaa' photo is just the NU photo but with the players wearing their jackets. the problem is that my papa did not write a caption in the back of this 'micaa' photo so i am just guessing on this one. i did notice that the nu players in this 'micaa' photo appear older na so it might be still be a micaa photo. thanks for the responses !!!





pachador - the MICAA lineup you posted doesn't seem to ring a bell.* doesn't seem to match any of the photos i've snapped recently from the immediate postwar seasons...

anyways...the research rolls on during my free time.* some of the few challenges i've encountered...

1.* medyo may discrepancy sa box scores...like the individual scores not adding up at times.* i oftentimes end up making wild guesses who's individual score was mistakenly printed...

2.* the national library's manila times collections are all f**ked up...so brittle that the staff don't allow me to take them out for reading.* dati di siya ganun...i remember manila times had the most complete player lineups for commercial and collegiate ball (complete with height/position), while philippines herald (at least while eduardo perez de tagle was sports editor) had great MICAA/NCAA previews.

3.* regardless of where you look, the "loose conference" NCAA season of 1964 is impossible to track!* newspapers only show complete boxscores for the opening week.* since the league implemented a home-and-away system and was pretty much "unofficial" (the NCAA was called off in '62 due to excessive violence, before returning full swing in '65), i don't think the newspapers gave much of a damn.* in fact, philippines herald only displayed the final scores, other papers would print a very brief, one-paragraph sidebar.* such a pity, i believe this is the season where former MICAA/PBA player egay gomez put up monster numbers for JRC...

4.* the MICAA is defunct, so i guess i can content myself with just points per game for that league.* but how far does the NCAA and UAAP keep records?* ateneo has a great archives department...did some research there a few years back...la salle and letran's collection of old school papers isn't too bad either...but what i'm looking for is the actual stats...

5.* my brother won't lend me his camera.* so i'm stuck with rather lo-res pictures from my 6600...

...but on the other hand, the national library staff (after giving me a few quizzical looks on my first trip back) has been quite tolerant of my hardcore research...letting me walk in without assistance to pull out the binders of smelly, stinky...yet informative old newspapers.* i'm more than willing and able to do the dirty work...now i'm hoping for some co-collaborators (not as of the present, though) to take care of interviews with some of the old names and faces around the pinoy basketball scene.*

pachador
10-25-2007, 03:52 AM
i have a copy of the legends heroes book. its a good book as far as pics are concerned because it has lots of pics, but it is sorely lacking in terms of statistics or stories or anecdotes of the MICAA and other older leagues. the book is basically a collection of autobiographies of the leading players but no discussion or stories, statistics of the MICAA or the 1940s , 1950s to 1970s era of NCAA and UAAP.

if you guys push through with this MICAA book , it is definitely gonna be different from that legends heroes book

pachador
10-25-2007, 06:20 AM
here's 10 pages of MICAA posts:

http://mypba.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=4464

By the way one of my-inlaws is Leonardo Del Pilar . In college he played for UST then he played for Crispa in the MICAA in the 1960s. His greatest acomplishment was playing on the 1960 Philippine basketball National team that became the Asian Basketball Confederation(ABC) champion.He is from Bohol and currently living in cebu. His teammates included Carlos loyzaga, Kurt Bachmann, Edgardo Ocampo, Mariano Tolentino, Carlos Badion, Narciso Bernardo and Loreto Carbonell. Next time, I visit Cebu, I'll look up Tio Leonardo and take his pic so I can post it here.

irateluvmachine
10-25-2007, 07:04 AM
pachador - actually, i'm planning for this to be in CD format...not sure if this would be more lucrative than selling it in book format. but me, a prime mover? nah...i may have "started the ball rolling", but i'm most comfortable doing the dirty work and crunching the numbers...back-office work, if you may...

leonardo del pilar played for mapua, ewan ko lang kung nag-transfer siya sa UST. what i do know is, he succeeded charlie badion as mapua's top player in the late '50s. pero tama ka, naglaro nga sa crispa nung early '60s...didn't have that long a MICAA career, as is usually the case...most MICAA players in the '50s and '60s, especially those from the so-called "glamour" schools, would usually play about 5 years tops in the commercial leagues before retiring from competitive ball. kurt bachmann, for instance...i think he only played about 4 or 5 years in the MICAA, despite being the most recognizable name in college basketball in the late '50s.

about the players looking "older"...that does remind me, a lot of those who played collegiate ball in the late '40s and early '50s were over 30 years old, or close to...guess that's because of WWII interrupting their studies. case in point...1948 olympian francisco vestil, he's listed as 37 years old in the 1951 MICAA preview for PAL. which means, when he played for UST in the immediate postwar years, he would've been around 32...or 33!

pachador
10-25-2007, 07:16 AM
your right !, I just called now his cousin who is also here in california and , yes !!! Leonardo Del Pilar did play college ball for Mapua . thanks uli for responding.

well, the advantage of CD format is that, you can make a CD as an order comes in so you don't necessarily need to have inventory whereas with paper book format, you have an inventory which you are not sure will get sold out. However, if donors or money grants/donations can be found to pay for a paper book publishing run, then it does not matter because your money was not involved in the publishing.






pachador - actually, i'm planning for this to be in CD format...not sure if this would be more lucrative than selling it in book format.* but me, a prime mover? nah...i may have "started the ball rolling", but i'm most comfortable doing the dirty work and crunching the numbers...back-office work, if you may...

leonardo del pilar played for mapua, ewan ko lang kung nag-transfer siya sa UST.* what i do know is, he succeeded charlie badion as mapua's top player in the late '50s.* pero tama ka, naglaro nga sa crispa nung early '60s...didn't have that long a MICAA career, as is usually the case...most MICAA players in the '50s and '60s, especially those from the so-called "glamour" schools, would usually play about 5 years tops in the commercial leagues before retiring from competitive ball.* kurt bachmann, for instance...i think he only played about 4 or 5 years in the MICAA, despite being the most recognizable name in college basketball in the late '50s.

about the players looking "older"...that does remind me, a lot of those who played collegiate ball in the late '40s and early '50s were over 30 years old, or close to...guess that's because of WWII interrupting their studies.* case in point...1948 olympian francisco vestil, he's listed as 37 years old in the 1951 MICAA preview for PAL.* which means, when he played for UST in the immediate postwar years, he would've been around 32...or 33!

oca
10-25-2007, 08:19 AM
Heres my suggestions:

1.) Contact all the companies that were involved in the MICAA: Crispa, PAL, etc, and ask for funding grants. In return, their teams will be prominently discussed or mentioned in the book. the bigger the funding , the more pages alloted to them(although this will go against writer's privileges and preferences what to write about.

2.) get funding grants from entities not connected with the MICAA but still interested, e.g. museums, foundations, PBA, SBP, school alumni associations., e.g. Ayala musuem

3.) try also to get funding from the Govt , e.g.* http://www.ncca.gov.ph/

4.) individual donations from families whose kin played in the MICAA, then list all the donors at the back of the book(parang school yearbook =)

5.) get all the interested writers and resource persons together then divide them into teams then meet regularly in person or via a discussion forum then dump the results, meeting minutes, articles, researches in a password secured website.

6.) the mypba forum has several resource person on the MICAA.




IMHO, I think this should be approached by first identifying where source materials can be obtained. PICTURES, NEWS CLIPPINGS, COMPANY NEWLETTERS, FAMILY ALBUMS. Identify the individuals and companies who will agree to share whatever extant material they have. If this can be established beforehand, it would be easier to get the needed funding.

For if I will be approached for funding, I will ask you one simple question - "Ano ang mga sources ninyo?"

Basketball teams in the 50s and 60s, even up to the early 70s, were very much "family owned and managed". Unlike the corporate set up we have nowadays. Usually, one basketball enthusiast in the family would have a direct hand in forming and managing and even coaching the team.

Kaya mas malamang ang mga pics and clippings ay makukuha sa mga miembro ng mga pamilyang iyan. Tiyak marami ring mga anecdotes ang mga iyan.

Edited to add:
Irateluvmachine already has the list of libraries. But, lets admit it, the word "library" doesn't generate much interest. ;D Pero if you have a list of individuals and families who have agreed to share their albums and stories, aba, tiyak mas interesante yan!

When these "sources" are identified, given the respectability and standing in society of most of these families, getting the funding will be, imo, not much of a problem.

Maliit na halaga muna for mobilization is what is needed to accomplish the above.

oca
10-25-2007, 08:21 AM
I also suggest that irateluvmachine be made one of the prime movers for this book since he started the ball rolling.




At pagpalain si irateluvmachine ng mga dios ng Olympus! ;)

oca
10-25-2007, 09:31 AM
Just to put emphasis on the importance of having a list of individuals and families as sources for this endeavor, aside from names of libraries, allow me to raise this point-

If we are to write a chapter about basketball teams and players from the south, particularly from Cebu, where or how do we go about it?

Para sa akin, any story about the south’s contribution to Philippine basketball will have to start with the University of the Visayas. They were the first school from outside Manila to have won the National Intercollegiate. I think this was in the 1950s, can’t remember the exact year. But that event should be considered a milestone in Philippine basketball. (That national champion team had for one of its star players a young man with the surname Cabahug. He’s the father of current UV coach Elmer Cabahug. The Cabahug family may even be able to contribute something here.)

Now, I don’t know what were the local papers published in Cebu at that time. But UV and its basketball team was very much a family affair among the Gullas. Their coach then, kung di ako nagkakamali, was the young Ed Gullas, who is now the President of the university.

Yan ang ibig kong sabihin nang individuals and families who can provide materials for this project.

In Cebu, the Gullas are highly respected and well loved across all sections of society. You give “their team” prominence in that chapter about basketball teams and players from Cebu, it will be a sure ticket to get one or two Cebu based corporations as sponsor.

gameface_one
10-25-2007, 09:36 AM
thanks for the support, guys... ;D as of this moment though, everything's on a "side project" basis.* but yes, i'm also hoping this could eventually amount to something substantial (and be my ticket out of the drudgery of call center life), and maybe getting together to brainstorm over this (hopefully over a few beers ;) ) before the year ends would be a great idea.

percival flores and jay mercado from mypba.com have a wealth of information on the late-period MICAA and early PBA, and their contributions would be much welcome...

...as for ateneo's microfilm department, i didn't know you can print them out...i might be doing some research there next month, so i'll consider that too.

maraming salamat ulit.* in the meantime, the research goes on, and i'll try to post more interesting stuff as the days go by.* ;D




You have an idea if they already registered as gameface members?

Seriously, I think the first step in making this a reality is let's all meet personally, brainstorm on a strategy, and then ACT.

amdgc82
10-25-2007, 10:15 AM
Just to put emphasis on the importance of having a list of individuals and families as sources for this endeavor, aside from names of libraries, allow me to raise this point-

If we are to write a chapter about basketball teams and players from the south, particularly from Cebu, where or how do we go about it?

Para sa akin, any story about the south’s contribution to Philippine basketball will have to start with the University of the Visayas. They were the first school from outside Manila to have won the National Intercollegiate. I think this was in the 1950s, can’t remember the exact year. But that event should be considered a milestone in Philippine basketball. (That national champion team had for one of its star players a young man with the surname Cabahug. He’s the father of current UV coach Elmer Cabahug. The Cabahug family may even be able to contribute something here.)

Now, I don’t know what were the local papers published in Cebu at that time. But UV and its basketball team was very much a family affair among the Gullas. Their coach then, kung di ako nagkakamali, was the young Ed Gullas, who is now the President of the university.

Yan ang ibig kong* sabihin nang individuals and families who can provide materials for this project.

In Cebu, the Gullas are highly respected and well loved across all sections of society. You give “their team” prominence in that chapter about basketball teams and players from Cebu, it will be a sure ticket to get one or two Cebu based corporations as sponsor.



It was not University of the Visayas who won the first National Intercollegiate but it was Colegio de San Carlos (now University of San Carlos) in 1946. Coach was Manuel Baring Sr.

You could try "The Freeman" newspaper in Cebu as a good source. It is founded and owned by the Gullas family.

oca
10-25-2007, 10:40 AM
Just to put emphasis on the importance of having a list of individuals and families as sources for this endeavor, aside from names of libraries, allow me to raise this point-

If we are to write a chapter about basketball teams and players from the south, particularly from Cebu, where or how do we go about it?

Para sa akin, any story about the south’s contribution to Philippine basketball will have to start with the University of the Visayas. They were the first school from outside Manila to have won the National Intercollegiate. I think this was in the 1950s, can’t remember the exact year. But that event should be considered a milestone in Philippine basketball. (That national champion team had for one of its star players a young man with the surname Cabahug. He’s the father of current UV coach Elmer Cabahug. The Cabahug family may even be able to contribute something here.)

Now, I don’t know what were the local papers published in Cebu at that time. But UV and its basketball team was very much a family affair among the Gullas. Their coach then, kung di ako nagkakamali, was the young Ed Gullas, who is now the President of the university.

Yan ang ibig kong* sabihin nang individuals and families who can provide materials for this project.

In Cebu, the Gullas are highly respected and well loved across all sections of society. You give “their team” prominence in that chapter about basketball teams and players from Cebu, it will be a sure ticket to get one or two Cebu based corporations as sponsor.



It was not University of the Visayas who won the first National Intercollegiate but it was Colegio de San Carlos (now University of San Carlos) in 1946. Coach was Manuel Baring Sr.

You could try "The Freeman" newspaper in Cebu as a good source. It is founded and owned by the Gullas family.


Ma-o ba?* ;)

The NCAA didn't resume until 1947, though the UAAP did so in 1946. But how likely was it that this Nationals was played in 1946 when it was traditionally held in the second semester after Christmas. Even if it was indeed held in 1946, the absence of the NCAA schools would have not made it a legit National Intercollegiate.

Well, the moment this project gets going, things like this will be threshed out as a matter of consequence.

Btw, na-a na bay Freeman adto na tuig?. It would be a blessing if the Freeman was already in circulation as early as then. An additional source material.

Sino kaya ang pwedeng mag-research sa Cebu, just in case. Anthony Servinio, volunteer kita!* ;D

pachador
10-25-2007, 11:41 AM
that would include lhuillier, the french-cebuano family and also Mama's love team . I believe, Anthony Servinio can help a lot with the cebu basketball.
cebuana lhuillier team:
http://www.cebuanamoneymen.com/

Lhuillier and the RP women's team:
http://www.pjlhuillier.com/press.asp





Just to put emphasis on the importance of having a list of individuals and families as sources for this endeavor, aside from names of libraries, allow me to raise this point-

If we are to write a chapter about basketball teams and players from the south, particularly from Cebu, where or how do we go about it?

Para sa akin, any story about the south’s contribution to Philippine basketball will have to start with the University of the Visayas. They were the first school from outside Manila to have won the National Intercollegiate. I think this was in the 1950s, can’t remember the exact year. But that event should be considered a milestone in Philippine basketball. (That national champion team had for one of its star players a young man with the surname Cabahug. He’s the father of current UV coach Elmer Cabahug. The Cabahug family may even be able to contribute something here.)

Now, I don’t know what were the local papers published in Cebu at that time. But UV and its basketball team was very much a family affair among the Gullas. Their coach then, kung di ako nagkakamali, was the young Ed Gullas, who is now the President of the university.

Yan ang ibig kong* sabihin nang individuals and families who can provide materials for this project.

In Cebu, the Gullas are highly respected and well loved across all sections of society. You give “their team” prominence in that chapter about basketball teams and players from Cebu, it will be a sure ticket to get one or two Cebu based corporations as sponsor.

amdgc82
10-25-2007, 11:52 AM
^^UV's first title in the national intercollegiate was in 1957, coached by now Cong. Eduardo Gullas. Team captain of that squad was his brother now UV President Jose Gullas. They won over the NCAA champion Ateneo Blue Eagles in the finals.

UV has won 11 national intercollegiate title.

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2004/02/07/sports/oyson.sports.legends.into.hall.of.fame.html

AnthonyServinio
10-26-2007, 01:22 AM
Sino kaya ang pwedeng mag-research sa Cebu, just in case. Anthony Servinio, volunteer kita!* ;D

* * *It's really sad that the dean of Cebuano sportswriting, Atty. Manuel Oyson, wrote "30" a couple of years back.* *:'(

* * * Atty. Oyson could have been a valuable resource person.

irateluvmachine
10-26-2007, 03:18 PM
oca - in a way...you do have a point. the word "LIBRARIES" does not elicit much interest (in fact...it reminds me more of cramming for school, studying and other things i never liked doing). neither does "STATISTICS", unless you combine it with the word "BASKETBALL". my original vision...and it still remains a goal of mine...is to create a resource to view every available statistic for everyone who's played in the PBA, PBL, MICAA, UAAP and NCAA - both senior and junior division.

but basing on a few observations and a few people i've talked to...stats won't sell as much interest as it would detailed articles coming from first-hand sources. kaya nga kahit madaming typo, i consider the book "Total Basketball" to be the definitive american basketball encyclopedia...the complete stats for everyone who's played in the NBA and its ancestors is a good selling point, but even more so the great articles on basketball history and trivia.

and one additional focus of attention i've added recently to my research is trying to look up info on season-ending mythical teams, as well as creating a "champion's corner" on my excel files, which lists the winning team for each tournament, the head coach, and the (most likely) starting five/top reserve. hardcore fans would salivate if they have a way to find out...say for example, renren ritualo's stats as a san beda red cub, or the stats (ppg only, though) of the dominating yco and ysmael steel teams of the 1960's MICAA. but the average Jose, as i've observed...considers CHAMPIONSHIPS WON by schools, teams, and coaches as the most interesting and meaningful stat out there.


gameface_one - no idea if atty. percy and jay are gamefacers...i do see jay's posts on "the other forum", though...one of the few people who makes sense over there. ;)


again, many thanks for the support and suggestions. i may be a busy man as of the present, but my hopes remain this could be a breakthrough... ;D

irateluvmachine
10-26-2007, 03:26 PM
on basketball in the visayas/mindanao region, i think the first big name to come out of the southern basketball scene was lauro mumar, who starred for university of san carlos before transferring to letran...followed by ildefonso senas (of UV), cristobal ramas (also from UV, if i'm not mistaken...dad of former PBA player kevin) and julian macoy (he of the 126-point game for USC) in the '50s. a lot of MICAA teams had about one or two southern players in their lineup for most of the '60s. but the real "Visayan Invasion" came circa 1969 or 1970, when the likes of estoy estrada, manny paner, dodie miego, etc. made their debuts for SMB...outplaying many top names in the manila-based NCAA and UAAP who were also starting their commercial league careers...

pachador
10-26-2007, 11:56 PM
irate,

so how are you getting your info? don't tell me you laboriously, take down the stats from those old newspapers and manually enter them into your spreadsheets??if thats the way your doing it, I have to admire your prodigous tenacity.

for me it would be nice if you can copy both the articles and stats to the CD. As a suggestion, if you do use a scanner to scan articles, its important you scan the articles as OCR or as text and not as an image , otherwise, your hard drive( and CD) will up up pretty quick..txt files as you know is many times smaller than even jpeg files. Now, with respect to scanning articles as OCR, the quality depends on the OCR software you use. some OCR software are better than others, but they are all windows apps anyway and mouse driven(easy to use). A nice OCR software is Textbridge PRO( this was back in the early 2000s) when I last used OCR) so there might be something better now. The best though is if the library already stores their newspapers digitally so you can just download it to your flash drive. ....One last thing, scanning articles as text may not give you a 100% perfect copy so you still end up having to manually enter missing text in the article that the OCR scan missed. Still, its better than having to manually type the whole article word for word. .....keep it up!!!





author=irateluvmachine link=topic=1186.msg67956#msg67956 date=1193383121]
oca - in a way...you do have a point.* the word "LIBRARIES" does not elicit much interest (in fact...it reminds me more of cramming for school, studying and other things i never liked doing).* neither does "STATISTICS", unless you combine it with the word "BASKETBALL".* my original vision...and it still remains a goal of mine...is to create a resource to view every available statistic for everyone who's played in the PBA, PBL, MICAA, UAAP and NCAA - both senior and junior division.*

but basing on a few observations and a few people i've talked to...stats won't sell as much interest as it would detailed articles coming from first-hand sources.* kaya nga kahit madaming typo, i consider the book "Total Basketball" to be the definitive american basketball encyclopedia...the complete stats for everyone who's played in the NBA and its ancestors is a good selling point, but even more so the great articles on basketball history and trivia.*

and one additional focus of attention i've added recently to my research is trying to look up info on season-ending mythical teams, as well as creating a "champion's corner" on my excel files, which lists the winning team for each tournament, the head coach, and the (most likely) starting five/top reserve.* hardcore fans would salivate if they have a way to find out...say for example, renren ritualo's stats as a san beda red cub, or the stats (ppg only, though) of the dominating yco and ysmael steel teams of the 1960's MICAA.* but the average Jose, as i've observed...considers CHAMPIONSHIPS WON by schools, teams, and coaches as the most interesting and meaningful stat out there.


gameface_one - no idea if atty. percy and jay are gamefacers...i do see jay's posts on "the other forum", though...one of the few people who makes sense over there.* ;)


again, many thanks for the support and suggestions.* i may be a busy man as of the present, but my hopes remain this could be a breakthrough... ;D

irateluvmachine
10-27-2007, 01:46 AM
^yup...tama ka. i copy the lineups, then copy the individual boxscores to paper...then transfer them to excel. pero kung may paraan nga para i-scan yung mga lumang articles...i found a good one the other day, where then-philippines herald sports editor eduardo perez de tagle (is this the same tito tagle who used to write sports columns up to the '90s?) lamented the philippine olympic team's subpar performance in the 1960 olympics...

as the saying goes, it's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it! ;D

pachador
10-27-2007, 02:20 AM
yup yup, after you connect the scanner to your computer, install the OCR software,then just laydown the paper article on the scanner then start up the OCR software and start scanning the article as text(txt) ! kung merong mga words na -namiss nung OCR software , then just open the newly created text file of the article and manually enter the missing words. kung minsan, merong mga articles na ayaw talaga ma-scan as text lalo na if the paper article is a bad photocopy(too dark or too light) then you have no choice but to scan it as an image such as jpeg. yung lang.




^yup...tama ka.* i copy the lineups, then copy the individual boxscores to paper...then transfer them to excel.* pero kung may paraan nga para i-scan yung mga lumang articles...i found a good one the other day, where then-philippines herald sports editor eduardo perez de tagle (is this the same tito tagle who used to write sports columns up to the '90s?) lamented the philippine olympic team's subpar performance in the 1960 olympics...

as the saying goes, it's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it! ;D

ESCALERA JR.
10-27-2007, 09:21 AM
why dont you write a book about micaa and the UAAP/NCAA from the 1930s till the 1970s. I dont think anyone has done that before. you might be able to get funding from UAAP/NCAA and PBA/SBP for that. or you might be able to get a funding grant from history institutions or companies who played in the olden days like meralco, PAL, museums.* kung ok lang sa iyo, isali mo naman tatay ko sa libro mo. alam mo he died when i was still a little kid =( so i never got to know him.
thanks uli.



^walang anuman, pachador...fyi, i have great things planned for all this basketball history research, if only i can come up with a good feasibility study and get out of the call center industry by next year...


Suddenly, this thread comes alive again! :)

Marami talagang die-hard basketball fanatics kahit nung mga unang panahon pa man.

Let me contribute even in my own small way to the success of this campaign...na sana magbunga at pare-pareho tayong makinabang. ;D

Firstly, why don't we put an apt title for the Book or CD version...

"The First 50 Years of Philippine Basketball...The Golden Years"

What you think guys? Lets keep the ball rollin!

pachador
11-01-2007, 06:52 AM
April 23, 2005

Oyson: CIT players in the Micaa

By Manuel N. Oyson, Jr.
Counter Punch

WHEN our newsroom executive assistant Rose Yumol told me that a certain Owen Sanchez was on the phone, I immediately sensed why he would be calling me for the first time after almost 50 years.

“Do you still remember me, Atty. Oyson?”

Yes, yes, of course, I replied. Who does not remember Owen Sanchez, one of the stalwarts (6-foot tall) of the Cebu Institute of Technology Wildcats, the 1955-56 Cebu Collegiate Athletic Association champions? Also 1957 Zone VII titlist.

That was the year when coach Antonio “Jimmy” Bas sparked CIT to an upset over the UV combination of Eddie Cabahug, Eddie Mendoza, Guillermo Bas, Dodong Gullas, Marvin Najarro and Alfonso “Boy” Marquez to capture the CCAA Men’s championship. That was CIT’s first championship in the CCAA. The Green Lancers would win their first national inter-collegiate crown on December 1957.

BOY FUENTES. Owen said he had read my column (“Former collegians who played in the Micaa,” 4-16-05) and said he had something to amplify if I would allow him to do so. I already issued a disclaimer that there are some former CCAA players whom ex-UJS-R Jaguar Pabling Cañoneo failed to mention, this column is really to acknowledge them. On the phone, Owen said that of his batch of 1955, ’56 and ’57, there are only five of them still alive, including Sigfredo “Boy” Fuentes.

The name immediately rang a bell. Who does not remember “Boy” Fuentes, another six-footer (a rarity at the time) and a former candidate to the RP team to the 1960 Rome Olympics?

Only a freak accident at the plant where he works after becoming both an electrical and mechanical engineer and the loss of three fingers on his right hand, ended his promising basketball career.

Over rounds of beer and much sumsuman at Baseline Restaurant, and for almost four hours, Owen and “Boy recalled their glory days at CIT (it was then located at C. Padilla St.).

LIVING ‘5’. Joining us later was former City Councilor Erning Elizondo, a die-hard San Josenian. Another friend of Owen, Ciso Aballe, was also with us.

I said that I saw some of their games because I was then already in my second year of law studies at the UV.

Joining us then were engineers Eddie Planas and Anecito Chambers, who were their teammates in the CIT squad . It was also their first reunion of sorts after their CCAA days.

They certainly had tons of stories to recollect and retell. The fifth living member of that famous team is Benjamin Rosello, who now lives quietly in Seattle, Washington There were originally 12 of them.

Before his accident, Fuentes had stints with U-Tex and Seven-Up. But for 14 years after that, he became driver-navigator alternately with the former Toyota Coach Dante Silverio or Pocholo Ramirez from 1966 to 1980 in various international car rallies in Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia and Malaysia.

He is a member of the Automobile Rally Association Philippines. To the uninitiated, a rally is a competitive long-distance automobile run of sport cars over long distance and under ordinary traffic rules.

LUCENTE, TOO. The object is to maintain a specified exact average speed between checkpoints over a route unknown to the participants until the start of the run.

Fuentes has a home in Mabolo.

While Chambers had stints with Crispa, U-Tex and Yellow Taxi lasting for three years. He later migrated to Las Vegas. Nevada.

Rosello himself played for three years with PAL Sky Masters and Yellow Taxi. He now lives quietly in Seattle, Wash.

Planas, who played right forward, was a former chief mechanical/electrical engineer of the Air Transportation Office in Mactan. He dabbles as an amateur photographer. Owen owns a string of pawnshops in Metro Cebu.

On this page, they have requested me to publish a photograph of four of the survivors of the CIT team of 1955-56 who paid a courtesy call on their alma mater on April 20 at the office of CIT president Gregorio L. Escario.

That is, 50 years after they wore the familiar maroon and yellow Wildcats colors. Incidentally, Elizondo informed me that Manoling Lucente, formerly a teammate of his at USJ-R, also played briefly for Mariwasa Tiles in the Micaa in 1959-60.

pachador
11-01-2007, 06:56 AM
January 29, 2004

Oyson: The legend of Julian Macoy

By Manuel N. Oyson Jr.
Counter punch

At the lobby of the USC Gym on Sanciangco St. stands a tall glass-encased scroll proclaiming Julian C. Macoy as a national record holder in Philippine basketball. I have seen it many times. Inside is also a framed replica of his No.6 USC jersey. The honoree himself, Macoy, has seen it. It was erected some two years ago. Sad to note, it is an error. Even Macoy himself says so. The marker says:

“Julian Macoy:
Title: Legendary Warrior
Year started: 1957

Year ended: 1961
n Scored 126 points in 29 minutes in a game played between USC and Cebu School of Arts and Trades during the 19th (sic) CCAA tournament.

n Cited as Basketball Player of the Year and University Athlete of the Year by the University of San Carlos in the year 1957-1958.

n Awarded a diploma of merit by the CCAA board for scoring 101 points in one of the games in the year 1956-1957”

ELEVENTH. If USC won the first national intercollegiate Men’s basketball title in 1946, it stands to reason that when Macoy achieved his phenomenal feat in 1957, the CCAA was then in its 11th year, not 19th as the marker proclaims.

For the last 33 years, Macoy was a resident of Oak Park, Chicago. We met by chance on the eve of the “Sinulog” at the lobby of the Waterfront-Lahug Hotel. This is what he told me:

He scored 101 points in 29 minutes as a rookie player of the USC Green and Gold Warriors against Cebu Normal School in the 1957-58 CCAA tournament.

CNS was coached by a woman. She could have been Miss Encarnacion Perez.

In his second year, he established the all-time individual scoring record in Philippine basketball by scoring 126 points against Cebu School of Arts and Trades in the same tournament.

227 POINTS. He did it in just 28 minutes. Macoy recalled that because of his spectacular scoring spree, three guards were sic-ed on him in the first half.

CSAT had only three men left on the floor in the last three minutes just trying to stop him. In these two games in the then Cebu Collegiate Athletic Association, the 5-foot-11 native of Dumanjug, scored a total of 227 points, also an RP record that still stands.

In a next scheduled meeting against CSAT, the latter’s coach had a simple message for then USC coach Juan Aquino Jr: that if Macoy would again be fielded as a loose cannon, CSAT was willing to just forfeit the game. The coach did not want to be humiliated. Macoy was included in the first batch of inductees to the Cebu Sports Hall of Fame in 1990 as a sports legend..

MYTHICAL. He was a member of the champion RP team to the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Pesta Sukan Games, all held in Singapore. He was the only player outside Manila whom sportswriters named as a member of the collegiate mythical selection in 1960.

Now 64-years-old, he is a U.S. citizen and has two adult children with Pernita Dano of Daanbantayan, Cebu. He now wants to retire permanently in Cebu. His personal effects and memorabilia in 10 balikbayan boxes set him back by P180,000 in freight costs.

irateluvmachine
11-07-2007, 02:11 PM
^nice articles on the visayan basketball scene of the '50s and '60s...although julian macoy seems to have parallels to a latter-day cebuano hotshot, felix duhig. though macoy scored over 100 points twice in the cebuano collegiate scene, he was a good, but not great player when he got to the MICAA. duhig played well in his first few years in the PBL, but sadly never got to make a PBA lineup...guess that's because when alaska drafted him, they already had an instant-offense 11th/12th man in roel gomez...

after the all-saints break, research resumes on friday morning, provided i'm not too hung over from thursday night. ;D if i'm hung over, eh di friday afternoon na lang...

irateluvmachine
12-02-2007, 02:36 PM
January 29, 2004

Oyson: The legend of Julian Macoy

By Manuel N. Oyson Jr.
Counter punch

At the lobby of the USC Gym on Sanciangco St. stands a tall glass-encased scroll proclaiming Julian C. Macoy as a national record holder in Philippine basketball. I have seen it many times. Inside is also a framed replica of his No.6 USC jersey. The honoree himself, Macoy, has seen it. It was erected some two years ago. Sad to note, it is an error. Even Macoy himself says so. The marker says:

“Julian Macoy:
Title: Legendary Warrior
Year started: 1957

Year ended: 1961
n Scored 126 points in 29 minutes in a game played between USC and Cebu School of Arts and Trades during the 19th (sic) CCAA tournament.

n Cited as Basketball Player of the Year and University Athlete of the Year by the University of San Carlos in the year 1957-1958.

n Awarded a diploma of merit by the CCAA board for scoring 101 points in one of the games in the year 1956-1957”

ELEVENTH. If USC won the first national intercollegiate Men’s basketball title in 1946, it stands to reason that when Macoy achieved his phenomenal feat in 1957, the CCAA was then in its 11th year, not 19th as the marker proclaims.

For the last 33 years, Macoy was a resident of Oak Park, Chicago. We met by chance on the eve of the “Sinulog” at the lobby of the Waterfront-Lahug Hotel. This is what he told me:

He scored 101 points in 29 minutes as a rookie player of the USC Green and Gold Warriors against Cebu Normal School in the 1957-58 CCAA tournament.

CNS was coached by a woman. She could have been Miss Encarnacion Perez.

In his second year, he established the all-time individual scoring record in Philippine basketball by scoring 126 points against Cebu School of Arts and Trades in the same tournament.

227 POINTS. He did it in just 28 minutes. Macoy recalled that because of his spectacular scoring spree, three guards were sic-ed on him in the first half.

CSAT had only three men left on the floor in the last three minutes just trying to stop him. In these two games in the then Cebu Collegiate Athletic Association, the 5-foot-11 native of Dumanjug, scored a total of 227 points, also an RP record that still stands.

In a next scheduled meeting against CSAT, the latter’s coach had a simple message for then USC coach Juan Aquino Jr: that if Macoy would again be fielded as a loose cannon, CSAT was willing to just forfeit the game. The coach did not want to be humiliated. Macoy was included in the first batch of inductees to the Cebu Sports Hall of Fame in 1990 as a sports legend..

MYTHICAL. He was a member of the champion RP team to the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Pesta Sukan Games, all held in Singapore. He was the only player outside Manila whom sportswriters named as a member of the collegiate mythical selection in 1960.

Now 64-years-old, he is a U.S. citizen and has two adult children with Pernita Dano of Daanbantayan, Cebu. He now wants to retire permanently in Cebu. His personal effects and memorabilia in 10 balikbayan boxes set him back by P180,000 in freight costs.



i have yet to tally the national collegiate tournament (later natl. seniors) stats i'm working on now, but julian macoy's stats with USC in the national collegiate tournaments of the late '50s look surprisingly "human"...

irateluvmachine
12-06-2007, 04:36 AM
anyone know where i can get a copy of beth celis' book "legends and heroes of philippine basketball"? or old NCAA/UAAP primers/media guides...

as of now, i'm almost finished tallying stats up to the '50s...maybe adding some of the minor collegiate/high school leagues would be overkill, "too much information", but when you see seemingly hard-to-find pre-fame stats of a player like charlie badion with jose abad santos high...or romy diaz (yes, the same pinoy action movie villain and paquito's brother) with the pre-NCAA san sebastian staglets...it suddenly becomes an option to include these minor leagues...

somebody (amdgc82, i believe) sent me a PM before asking me for a list of champions for the national seniors tournament...just to let you know, dude...i'm working on it. ;D with most MICAA, NCAA and UAAP stats complete up to 1962, i'm now focusing on the national secondary and collegiate tournaments...i think "national collegiate" was what they used to call the national seniors tournament...as well as the national open, where collegiate and commercial league teams are faced up against each other.

oca
12-06-2007, 08:31 AM
anyone know where i can get a copy of beth celis' book "legends and heroes of philippine basketball"?* or old NCAA/UAAP primers/media guides...

as of now, i'm almost finished tallying stats up to the '50s...maybe adding some of the minor collegiate/high school leagues would be overkill, "too much information", but when you see seemingly hard-to-find pre-fame stats of a player like charlie badion with jose abad santos high...or romy diaz (yes, the same pinoy action movie villain and paquito's brother) with the pre-NCAA san sebastian staglets...it suddenly becomes an option to include these minor leagues...

somebody (amdgc82, i believe) sent me a PM before asking me for a list of champions for the national seniors tournament...just to let you know, dude...i'm working on it.* ;D with most MICAA, NCAA and UAAP stats complete up to 1962, i'm now focusing on the national secondary and collegiate tournaments...i think "national collegiate" was what they used to call the national seniors tournament...as well as the national open, where collegiate and commercial league teams are faced up against each other.*


What I can recall is, magkaiba ang national collegiate from national seniors.

The national collegiate or national inter-collegiate is strictly a school competition. While the the national seniors is "open" to both collegiate and commercial/club teams, but I don't remember it being called the national open.

There was time when collegiate teams would rule the national seniors. This was in the years before WW2 and probably a few more years into the 50s.

I think at one time or another on separate instances, both Ateneo and San Beda have ruled the NCAA, National Inter-Collegiate and National Seniors all at the same year. Kung hindi trifecta, I am sure they ruled 2 of 3 in more than one instance.

By looking at the list of champions of both the Inter-Collegiate and Seniors tournament, it would be a good way of knowing if my memory has completely failed me or not. As it is, I find it hard to recall details. ;D ;D ;D ;D

Ghostrider
12-06-2007, 10:04 AM
anyone know where i can get a copy of beth celis' book "legends and heroes of philippine basketball"?*

The book can be bought at any National Bookstore.

It doesn't contain much information on the older players though. Its usually limited to a one or two paragaraph description and some old pictures. That's it. No stats, nothing.

Hope that helps and good luck on your research.

irateluvmachine
12-07-2007, 09:51 AM
ghostrider - old pictures and description of players, like a brief bio, would be fine, thank you...fortunately, i got all the stats i need thanks to these weeks of patiently compiling them from the old papers... ;D might score myself a copy within the next few days...

oca - tama ka...national collegiate and secondary tournaments are strictly inter-scholastic affairs, but the tournament where collegiate and commercial teams can compete with one another WAS called national open, at least up to the '60s. di pa umaabot ang research ko sa '70s, so i still haven't tracked down when the name and/or the rules had changed. based on what i've researched recently, yco was the dominant national open team of the '50s, subject to rabid booing and heckling from the pro-underdog crowds...nung '40s ata yung dominant period ng collegiate teams sa national open.

i don't recall ateneo or san beda pulling off a "grand slam" in all eligible tournaments, but ateneo came quite close in the 1953 season, winning the NCAA, national collegiate and Challenge To Champions tournaments...the Challenge To Champions was a brief tournament usually held between the NCAA/UAAP and National Collegiate, featuring the top two teams from the NCAA, UAAP and MICAA, and sometimes all-star selections from the collegiate and commercial ranks...by '53 (actually the '54 natl. open), yco was beginning their stranglehold on the natl. open...

gameface_one
12-07-2007, 11:54 AM
CLEAN LIVING
What sparked RP mania in basketball


By Manolo Iñigo
Inquirer
Last updated 06:35am (Mla time) 12/04/2007


You may forget but let me tell you this: someone in some future time will think of us -- Sappho

MANILA, Philippines -- Several weeks ago, reader Isabelo Filomeno of Cagayan de Oro City wrote this corner requesting for a list of Filipino basketball Olympians from 1936 up to the time we last played in the Olympic Games.

In his letter Mr. Filomeno said, “I’m sure many of your readers would be interested to know them.”

I agree. There is question that basketball is the Filipinos’ national pastime.

In my view, what sparked the country’s mania in basketball was the Philippine team’s fifth-place in the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936, when the dash-and-dribble sport made its debut as an Olympic event. The game’s inventor, Dr. James A. Naismith, opened the tournament which drew a motley field of 12 countries. The games were played outdoors.

The RP team, captained by Ambrosio Padilla, who later became a senator and president of the defunct Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation (forerunner of the Philippine Olympic Committee), won four of its five games, losing only to the United States, 56-23. The US won the gold medal -- as expected -- but the Philippines was ranked fifth while Mexico, which was beaten by the Filipinos, 32-30, copped the bronze, a faulty ruling which had been amended since then by the sport’s ruling body.

However, that fifth-place finish was the best performance by any Philippine basketball team in the Olympics.

Coached by battle-tested Dionisio “Chito” Calvo, the members of the powerhouse RP team -- aside from Padilla -- were Jacinto Ciria Cruz, Charles Borck, Primitivo Martinez, Franco Marquicias, Jesus Marzan, Amador Obordo, Bibiano Quano, John Worrell and Fortunato Yambao. The alternates were Miguel Pardo and Antonio Carillo.

After beating Mexico, the Philippines defeated Estonia, 39-22, before losing to the US. The Philippines wrapped up its assignments by whipping Italy, 32-14, and Uruguay, 33-23.

The rest of our participation in the Olympic Games:

1948 LONDON -- Lauro Mumar, Manolet Araneta Jr., Ramon Campos Jr., Andy dela Cruz, Eduardo Decena, Fely Fajardo, captain; and his brother Gabby Fajardo, Edgardo “Ding” Fulgencio, Antonio Martinez and Francisco Vestil. The coach was again Chito Calvo, with Tito Eduque and Luis Gavierres as alternates.

The Philippines finished 12th, with the US bagging the gold anew.

Results in London: RP d. Iraq, 102-30; RP d. Korea, 35-33; RP lost to Chile, 39-68; RP d. China, 51-32; RP lost to Belgium, 35-37; RP d. Argentina, 45-43; RP lost to Peru, 29-40; RP lost to Belgium, 34-38.

1952 HELSINKI -- Carlos Loyzaga, Ramon Campos Jr., Antonio Genato, Rafael Hechanova, Eduardo Lim, Florentino Bautista, Antonio Martinez, captain; Jose Gochangco, Ponciano Saldaña, Meliton Santos, Antonio Tantay and Mariano Tolentino. Fely Fajardo was the team coach while no alternate was named.

The Philippines placed ninth, with the US winning its third title in a row.

Results in Helsinki: RP d. Israel, 57-47; RP d. Hungary, 48-35; RP lost to Argentina, 59-85; RP lost to Brazil, 52-71; RP d. Canada, 81-65. (To be continued)

easter
12-07-2007, 03:35 PM
but basing on a few observations and a few people i've talked to...stats won't sell as much interest as it would detailed articles coming from first-hand sources. kaya nga kahit madaming typo, i consider the book "Total Basketball" to be the definitive american basketball encyclopedia...the complete stats for everyone who's played in the NBA and its ancestors is a good selling point, but even more so the great articles on basketball history and trivia.


I think this actually opens more opportunities than challenges for this project.

The current trend for publishing today is to make a book with a corresponding website with it. Now we can have the detailed articles as printed materials with a slight dash of statistics thrown in, konti lang.

But if they want to get detailed stats, they can go to the book's website. Doon madali na maglagay ng database of stats na people can access.

Bahala na mga webmasters ng Gameface on how they can make money on the site. ;)


Alam naman po natin na karamihan sa dapat interbyuhin ay may edad na so it will be good to start this one ASAP.

irateluvmachine
12-08-2007, 08:49 AM
^i did discover a fan website for the american CBA, where the webmaster sells PDF copies of statistics for $4 per season...and CBA stats are very, very hard to find, as he himself would say on the website.

my desired format still remains CD, as it's easy to carry around and can hold lots of info. i dunno, must be the gen-X'er in me that still insists on a (relatively) newfangled format despite several suggestions to make a book out of it...

and for the interviews? as i said, it may be best if i find someone who can work with me on this...i'm pretty much the comedian over at work, and in my 10 years of playing music have only a few times experienced stage fright, but i'm almost sure i'll be at a loss for words when faced up with the basketball heroes whose stats i've been researching faithfully for the past couple months (and previously, for a span of several months 5 years ago)...

boy, i really need to take this more seriously if i want to make money out of it...if only i could. unfortunately, i've got work, music (i may be active in the band scene again soon...as a musician AND manager!) and my significant other as my main priorities...

easter
12-08-2007, 08:59 AM
^i did discover a fan website for the american CBA, where the webmaster sells PDF copies of statistics for $4 per season...and CBA stats are very, very hard to find, as he himself would say on the website.


Actually you can do four things with this.

a. Free Access to the stats. Put advertising on it.
b. A Paid Subscriber Access - People pay to access the stats on the site itself.
c. Paid Downloads - Download stats in PDF
d. Sell CD-ROM of the Stats

irateluvmachine
12-08-2007, 10:19 AM
^actually, all four are good ideas...as they say, i'll cross the bridge when i get there. ;D ain't no joke squeezing this research work in my busy sched...

nga pala, para makapag-vent out ng konti...kahit na wala lang ito, "walang kinalaman sa basketball"...i would prefer behind-the back haters to kibitzers! had an old dude and a bunch of kolehiyalas reading behind my back (and the old guy even tried to start conversation, to which i politely replied i'm doing research for a book) while i was researching yesterday...

gameface_one
12-11-2007, 09:09 AM
CLEAN LIVING
How RP cagers fared in the Olympics


By Manolo Iñigo
Inquirer
Last updated 00:13am (Mla time) 12/11/2007


HERE IS A CONTINUATION TO THE list of Filipino basketball Olympians as requested by reader Isabelo Filomeno of Cagayan de Oro City.

In the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, the much-respected Leo Prieto called the shots for the Philippine national team. The country finished seventh, with the United States winning its fourth straight Olympic gold since 1936 when the sport made its Olympic debut in Berlin.

Composing Prieto’s team were the fabled Carlos Loyzaga, Ramon Campos Jr., Antonio Genato, captain; Loreto Carbonell, Carlos Badion, Rafael Barretto, Eduardo Lim, Ramon Manulat, Leonardo Marquicias, Mariano Tolentino, Martin Urra and Antonio Villamor. Francis Wilson and Mario Ballesteros were the alternates.

Results in Melbourne: RP d. Thailand, 55-44; RP d. Japan, 76-61; RP lost to US, 53-121; RP lost to Uruguay, 70-79; RP d. France, 65-58; RP lost to Chile, 69-88; RP lost to Bulgaria, 70-80; while RP d. Chile, 75-68.

The other RP Olympic teams:

1960 ROME—Kurt Bachmann, Geronimo Cruz, Alfonso Marquez, Edgardo Pacheco, Carlos Badion, captain; Emilio Achacoso, Narciso Bernardo, Edgardo Ocampo, Constancio Ortiz, Cristobal Ramas, Edgardo Roque and Roberto Yburan. The coach was Arturo “Luli” Rius. No alternate was named.

The Philippines placed 11th while the US won its fifth consecutive basketball title.

Results in Rome: RP lost to Poland, RP d. Spain, 84-82; RP lost to Uruguay, 76-80; RP d. Puerto Rico, 82-80; RP d. Bulgaria by default; RP lost to Hungary, 70-81; RP lost to France, 75-122; RP d. Mexico. 65-64.

1964 TOKYO—Arturo Valenzona, Alfonso Marquez, Edgardo Pacheco, Alberto Reynoso, Elias Tolentino, Engracio Arazas, Narciso Bernardo, Edgardo Ocampo, captain; Manuel Jocson, Felix Flores, Renato Reyes and Edgardo Roque. Valentin Eduque mentored the team while no alternate was named again.

The Filipinos landed sixth and did not qualify. The Americans won—as expected—nailing their sixth straight gold.

Results in Tokyo: RP lost to Mexico, 85-90; RP d. Malaysia, 85-55; RP d. Republic of China, 95-71; RP lost to Indonesia, 66-98; RP lost to Cuba, 69-84; RP lost to Australia, 69-71; RP d. Thailand, 98-71; RP lost to Canada, 63-68; and RP d. South Korea, 90-58.

1968 MEXICO—Robert Jaworski, Orlando Bauzon, Danilo Florencio, Jaime Mariano, Alfonso Marquez, Alberto Reynoso, captain; Elias Tolentino Jr., Edgardo Ocampo, Adriano Papa Jr., Renato Reyes, Rogelio Melencio and Joaquin Rojas. Carlos Loyzaga was the coach, while Freddie Webb and Roehl Nadurata were the alternates.

The Philippines finished 13th, with the US winning its seventh title in a row.

Results in Mexico: RP lost to Italy, 66-91; RP lost to Spain, 79-108; RP lost to US, 75-96; RP lost to Panama, 92-95; RP lost to Puerto Rico, 65-89; RP d. Senegal, 80-68; RP lost to Yugoslavia, 68-89; RP d. Morocco, 86-57; and RP d. South Korea, 66-63.

1972 MUNICH—Freddie Webb, William Adornado, Rosalio Martires, Jaime Mariano, Manuel Paner, Edgardo Ocampo, captain; Narciso Bernardo, Ricardo Cleofas, Danilo Florencio, Rogelio Melencio, Adriano Papa Jr. and Marte Samson. Ignacio Ramos handled the team. There was no alternate.

The Philippines placed 13th but the biggest news was Russia’s victory over the US in their battle for the gold.

Results in Munich: RP lost to Poland, 75-90; RP lost to Puerto Rico, 72-92; RP lost to West Germany, 74-93; RP lost to Yugoslavia, 76-117; RP d. Senegal, 68-62; RP lost to Russia, 80-101; RP lost to Italy, 81-101; RP d. Egypt by default, 2-0; and RP d. Japan, 82-73.

irateluvmachine
01-19-2008, 03:38 PM
...well, guess you can call this the first update of the new year.

still very deep into the research...this time focusing on the national open (later renamed national seniors sometime in the '60s...now i know, and knowing is half the battle! ;D ) and national secondary/collegiate. my phone got stolen on the 2nd of january (together with it, some 200 pics snapped from late '50s/early '60s national opens/NCAA/UAAP), but i've got a new one, and it shouldn't be much of a problem to get the "lost" pics again.

another good source of info, if i may add, would be rick olivares, who has lots of great articles on atenean basketball in the ateneo website...any info on the guy, except from being a frequent contributor to ateneo's website, and the man behind the "bleacher's brew" blog?

pachador
09-24-2008, 01:50 PM
King Caloy

Manila Times
15 April 2006

Tacing “King Cardinal” Tanquintic, Chole “Blue Cyclone” Gaston, Larry “The Fox” Mumar and the Big Difference, all got those monikers courtesy of Willie Hernandez, reminisced Caloy, who, we now know, is ambidextrous.

His father, we learned, was a national soccer player and so he had wanted to be a soccer player himself. But, “para kang kawayang tsina,” reed-thin Caloy would hear. He got his wind in soccer. Having shot up, basketball was a natural alternative for the kid who grew up in the Teresa-Valenzuela area where Tervalac (for Teresa Valenzuela Athletic Club) became famous.

Caloy would have been an Atenean if his family had money. Father James Donelan could not give him an athletic scholarship in Padre Faura. Bedan alumni answered for Caloy’s tuition, as he was recruited by another legend, Idelfonso Tronqued. For me, beyond Mendiola and Legarda, from Pasig, the fare would have been an unaffordable 20 centavos. It was only 15 before that. In Rizal High, I in fact rooted for Ateneo, and indeed even earlier, in Makati Elementary, because of Luis “Moro” Lorenzo.

The Lord is wise and good.

Caloy’s memory, for one in his 70s, is terrific. He rattled off the names of Tony Genato, Floren-tino Bautista, Bayani Amador and Ramon Manulat as the guards on a national team he headed. Caloy was obviously quite fond of fellow Bedan Tony.

In Caloy’s time, we only had a feeder, a guard, maybe a court general, not the confusing guards we have a proliferation of today, which also discombobulated Walt Frazier, another legend.

It was edifying the way Caloy conducted a clinic beginning with the way he learned from the Tanquintics. I am reminded of Coach George Toliver—who guided his daughter Kristi, who just led Maryland to the top in the recent US NCAA women’s tournament. He had made her watch tape with him of the great NBA stars “who have a high basketball IQ and are never afraid to fail. Kristi’s never been afraid to make a mistake and move on.”


In Pasig, I remember, when I was young, at tip-off, someone like Edo Hernandez, brother of great boxing ref Felipe, father of the late sportscaster Ben, would make sahod without any provocation whatsoever. If you cried, you went home. That was how Tacing mentored Caloy and Co. at Tervalac.

Caloy proudly showed his Yco ring after winning seven straight national championships for Yco. But, most of all, I like the way the Loyzagas exemplify family values. Caloy tried to be cariñoso, as his Vicky was there, the way I do, which is another way of showing being super-takusa, as one who knows.

Caloy, in his charming interview, showed why he will be in our hearts forever, a true champ in more ways than one. Many of our national “leaders” are simply legends in their own minds.

Maybe King Caloy indeed, once we go parliamentary.

Have a blessed Easter.

pachador
09-24-2008, 01:52 PM
September 2, 2008

Five minutes with Caloy Loyzaga

By Rick Olivarez

The first thing I noticed is Caloy Loyzaga despite putting on some weight seems t be powerfully built. The handshake -- he's got a powerful vise-like grip -- confirms that. And he looks you in the eye when he talks to you. And he is sincere and very polite and friendly. A true gentleman of an era gone by. The man has a lot of stories to tell and there's so much that I wanted to ask him, but we didn't have time. His son, Chito, was a teammate named for an old foe of his father at that time, Team (Frankie) Rabat in the Ateneo Basketball League. We also worked together for some baseball coverage when I was with Solar Sports and have kept in touch about hoops and sports. It helps too that I was a fan of Toyota and Ginebra.

Rick: How are you, sir?
Caloy Loyzaga: I am good! Good. And you?

Rick: Fine, sir. How are you enjoying the game (Ateneo vs UE second round)?
Caloy Loyzaga: I am enjoying it. It’s a different game now, yeah? Not what we played in the day.

Rick: You came here to watch Ateneo – your old rival? Have you seen San Beda yet this year?
Caloy Loyzaga: Well, I… we have a history with Ateneo. And Chito (his son) also went there. So we also root for our old rival. (laughs) You’ve had a lot of very good players over the years. The Ateneo center… what’s his name?

Rick: Rabeh Al-Hussaini.
Caloy Loyzaga: Ah. Robbie?

Rick: Rabeh.
Caloy Loyzaga: Rabeh. He can be more dominant if he improves his footwork and moves a lot faster. He is getting double-teamed so he must make faster decisions with the ball. You see, when you get the ball, don’t give the defense a chance to think. If you can take your man, take him out fast. I don’t think anyone can guard him. But he brings down the ball, you see?

Rick: So you think Ateneo will beat UE?
Caloy Loyzaga: UE’s playing good defense, but I expect Ateneo will adjust. You have intelligent players. It’s going to be a good game.

Rick: How about San Beda; have you watched them lately?
Caloy Loyzaga: Not yet. Tomorrow we will. Not since… what’s his name? The African?

Rick: Sam Ekwe.
Caloy Loyzaga: Yes, Sam. Not since his first year in the NCAA. I heard he’s even better now.

Rick: Do you still follow basketball?
Caloy Loyzaga: Not so much. Don’t ask me too much about the game today (laughs). I don’t know much about it. It’s not the game I played. I play golf. I’m playing golf with my son on Saturday. But I followed the Boston Celtics’ championship season in the NBA. They have a good big man in (Kevin) Garnett. I love the Celtics. I’m glad they’re back. It brings back memories.

Rick: (pleasantly surprised) You’re a Boston Celtics fan? Cool.
Caloy Loyzaga: Oh yes. All the way to the Bill Russell era. I played against him (in the 1954 World Basketball Championships) and (pausing to enunciate) he is the best basketball player who ever lived.


http://bleachersbrew.blogspot.com/2008/09/five-minutes-with-caloy-loyzaga.html

pachador
09-24-2008, 02:00 PM
When will RP produce another Loyzaga?

By Manolo Iñigo / Inquirer 08/28/2007

MANILA, Philippines -- There is no question that Carlos “Caloy” Loyzaga is the greatest Filipino basketball player in history, but little else is known about how he started his checkered career.


Loyzaga, who marks his 77th birth anniversary on Wednesday, was born on Aug. 29. 1930 to a family with a penchant for sports in San Jose, Mindoro. There, the Loyzaga boys organized a basketball team, with the tall and gangling Caloy at the helm.

Already showing signs of greatness and towering at 6-foot-3 (a rarity among local players at that time), the young Loyzaga moved from sandlot basketball in Mindoro to the big time in Manila by joining the star-studded Sta. Mesa Aces in 1942.

Among his teammates were Pablo and Vicente Cuna, Ramon Lopez, former chair of the Letran College Sports Hall of Fame; Vicente Ayllon of Insular Life, brothers Bobby and Al Tuason and Dick Taylor of radio broadcast fame. Their coach was Jose “Pepe” Lansang, who also became famous as a topnotch referee.

After finishing his elementary education at the P. Burgos elementary school in Sta. Mesa and high school at the National University in 1948, Loyzaga wanted to enroll at Letran, but he backed out at the last minute when the coach gave him a cold shoulder. He was about to enroll at the University of Santo Thomas but this did not materialize when former Olympian Fely Fajardo, then the San Beda College coach, spotted Loyzaga and took him to Mendiola where he polished his style.

In his prime, Loyzaga was called the “Big Difference” because his absence from his team could mean defeat and he could turn defeat into victory with his presence.

In the NCAA cage wars for the coveted Zamora Trophy in the 1950s, San Beda lost its title bid when Loyzaga did not see action due to scholastic reasons. But when Loyzaga returned to play for the Red Lions, San Beda retired the Zamora Trophy by winning the championships three times in 1951, 1952 and 1955.

Excelling as a shooter, rebounder and center, Loyzaga led the powerhouse Yco Painters team to several Manila Industrial Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) championships and a record 10 straight victories in the National Open.

In 1954, Loyzaga spearheaded the Philippine team that finished third in the Second World Basketball Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He capped that memorable year by landing a berth in the tournament’s Mythical Selection.

He made his Olympic debut in Helsinki in 1952 and saw action in the 1956 Melbourne Games. He missed the trip to the Rome Olympics in 1960 due to a wrist injury he suffered while playing softball.

In the Asian Games, Loyzaga sparked the Philippines to four consecutive championships (1951 New Delhi, 1954 Manila, 1958 Tokyo and 1962 Jakarta). He was also the team captain of the winning RP squad to the ABC championship (now FIBA Asia) in the 1960 Manila and 1963 Taipei tournaments. As a coach, he piloted the Philippine quintet to the 1967 ABC crown and to 13th place in the 1968 Mexico Olympics.

A former Manila councilor, Loyzaga is now based in Australia. He is married to the former Vicky Cuerva with whom he has four children: Chito, Joey, Teresa and Bing.

pachador
09-24-2008, 02:03 PM
CALOY LOYZAGA Greatest Filipino cager ever

by Inquirer News Service, July 2006

WITH his seemingly endless repertoire of playing skills and flawless harmony of mental and physical coordination, Carlos Matute Loyzaga is, by any measure, the greatest Filipino basketball player of all time.

Voted by his peers as the No. l choice--in secret balloting--for the first batch of local basketball legends that will be enshrined to the first ever National Basketball Hall of Fame, Loyzaga's dazzling record speaks for itself.

Born on Aug. 29, 1930 in San Jose, Mindoro, Loyzaga had the natural ability to turn what seemed to be an impending defeat to victory, thus earning for himself the monicker: ''The Big Difference,'' a sobriquet made popular by the incomparable sportscaster Willie Hernandez, now deceased.

Loyzaga, as a player, had the gifts of size, towering at 6-foot-3, a rarity among Filipino players during his time, shooting and rebounding prowess, not to mention that he was also a fantastic center. And with his Spanish features, he was handsome. Truly, he stood clearly above the rest.

''Loyzaga is one in a million,'' said an enraptured cage fan of his. ''He would have been phenomenal as a pro in the Philippine Basketball Association,'' the fan added. Unfortunately, he never got the chance to play in the PBA, having retired from active competition when Asia's first play-for-pay league was born in 1975.

His most memorable achievement was accomplished in 1954 as a member of the amazing Philippine team that placed third in the second World Basketball Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a feat that has now become impossible to duplicate.

Loyzaga was also named to the Mythical Selection of the tournament won by the highly-favored United States, which beat host Brazil, 62-41, in the finals. in the other game, the Philippines copped third place by beating pre-game favorite Uruguay, 67-63, after trailing, 33-32, at the half.

Coached by master bench strategist Herminio ''Herr'' Silva, the other members of the Philippine team were Bayani Amador, Rafael Barretto, Florentino Bautista, Napoleon Flores, Benjamin Francisco, Antonio Genato, also a Hall of Famer; Lauro Mumar, the team captain; Ramon Manulat, Francisco Rabat, Ponciano Saldana and Mariano Tolentino. Francis Wilson and Fred Sagarbarria were alternates.

Loyzaga also played for the Philippine team that landed eighth in the world cagefest in Chile in 1959.

Then a gangling cager, Loyzaga launched his colorful cage career in 1942 as a virtual unknown, playing for the Sta. Mesa Aces whose roster included the Cuna brothers, Pablo and Vicente; Ramon Lopez, chair of the Letran Hall of Fame; Vicente Siyllon, who became president of Insular Life; and brothers Bobby and Al Tuazon. Their coach was Jose ''Pepe'' Lansang, who later made a name for himself as a referee.

After the Liberation of Manila, Loyzaga played for a team called Bulldogs which was coached by Joker Faustino. He studied at the P. Burgos Elementary School in Sta. Mesa and National University for his high school.

Loyzaga was about to enroll at UST for his college education but before he could wear the UST jersey, noted player and coach Felicisimo Fajardo, also a Hall of Famer, took him to San Beda where Fely polished his playing style. Loyzaga had wanted earlier to play for Letran but backed off when the coach gave him the cold treatment.

Loyzaga honed his skills at the Tervalac playground in Sta. Mesa before making waves in the NCAA, then the country's most colorful and glamorous league, as a member of the fabled San Beda Red Lions in the 1950s.

He also played for the multi-titled Pratra, then coached by Gabriel ''Gabby'' Fajardo, Fely's brother and a fellow Hall of Famer. Pratra won the MICAA crown in 1951.

In the NCAA, Loyzaga lived up to his billing as ''The Big Difference'' when he engineered San Beda's successful bid to retire the coveted Zamora trophy by winning the NCAA championship three times -- in 1951, 1952 and 1955.

After his NCAA campaign, Loyzaga joined the fabulous, Elizalde family-owned YCO Painters, winners of 10 consecutive National Open titles and numerous MICAA crowns.

Loyzaga made his Olympic debut in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics and played in the 1956 Melbourne Games. However, he missed the 1960 Rome Olympics due to a wrist injury he suffered while playing softball. Loyzaga coached the Philippine team that placed 13th in the 1968 Mexico Games.

In the Asian Games, Loyzaga sparked the Philippines to four straight championships -- in New Delhi in 1951, Manila in 1954, Tokyo in 1958, and Jakarta in 1962.

Capping his checkered career, Caloy skippered the Philippine team to twin victories in the ABC tournament -- in 1960 in Manila and in 1963 in Taipei -- and coached the national selection to a dramatic triumph in the 1967 ABC in Seoul.

Now based in Australia, Loyzaga, who also served as councilor of Manila, is married to Vicky Cuerva. They have four children -- Chito, Joey, Teresa, and Bing - who are all celebrities in their own right.

pachador
10-21-2008, 08:00 AM
Hi Leki

You are right !. I was able to get hold of one of the Ventosa brothers, Mr. J. Ventosa. He is now 84 years old, but still strong . J. Ventosa actually played for San Beda in 1950-51 with Caloy. We talked for about an hour by long distance phone, and ,yes, Papa hanged out and played with the Ventosa brothers of San Beda. I'm thinking of writing an article for Gameface about this as a 'flashback to the past' kind of article but this is gonna be a lot of longdistance calls and time. I can already come up with an article but it wont be that long and in-depth. anyway, lets see. Thanks again to everyone for their understanding and help.




pacahdor,
looking at the hints from the line up -

1. the ventosa clan is a solid RED clan. SBC games are being attended still by memebrs of the clan. Archie ventosa I think is the son of MON VENTOSA ( founder of SBCA and the Little Red indians). The miising letters below could be "ON". Mon has been very active during the late 40s up to the 50s- thsi tells you that you have a big chance. You wll be able to see them in the NCAA games this season 83 and we can arrange a meeting with you to check. Teka, nandito ka ba sa Pinas?
2. You may want to scan the pic and post it here so that we can check the coat of arms. Juts adjust the granularity and contrast so that we can check properly.
3. Another one is Messina- he may be related to Jenkins messina- who used to be a Red Cub and a Maroon and then a Red LIon again. He is I think active in the SBC Alumni league in CA, US.
4. Another tip is that clans usually stay in our Mighty Red School and you can still see their descendants in GS,HS and College. This is a long shot but still a possibility.

Emon74
11-02-2008, 06:05 PM
Im very interested sa MICAA history that I'd come up with these piece, mga MICAA players and their respective teams, around 1958-1961, some may have played earlier, marami sa atin dito must have a relative or uncle who played in this league way back in the late 50s and the names mentioned here might help.

San Miguel Brewery – Carlos Ballesteros, Francis Arenas, Antonio Arce, William Sy, Renato Reyes
Seven up Marauders – Ildefonso Senas, Teodoro Arriola, Evaristo Flores, Napoleon Flores, Ramon Ascue, Jose Oyson, Agapito De Castro, Joselito Juni, Filomeno Pumaren, Mario Uson
Heacocks – Eddie Marquicias
Philippine Airlines – Agustin Salgado, Tine Hardemann, Antonio Villamor, Miguel Dela Concepcion, Paulino Quiel
Crispa redmanizers – James Yap, Cesar Dignos, Francisco Henares, Aniceto Chambers, Guillermo Baz, Constancio Ortiz jr, Roberto Yburan, Mike Tanquintic, Robert Flores, Priscilo Gabuya, Abelardo Ortiz, Tomas Paredes, Dominador Servillano, Roehl Nadurata , Bienvenido Papa, Leonardo Del Pilar
Yco Painters – Robert Littaua, Carlos Badion, Loreto Carbonell, Carlos Loyzaga, Eddie Lim, Francis Wilson, Kurt Bachmann, Emilio Achacoso, Edgardo Ocampo, Mariano Tolentino, Jose Laganson, Cristino Arroyo
Yutivo chevrolets – Eugenio Sarabia, Ildefonso Senas (played for Yutivo in 1960), Abelardo Ilano, Dominador Dawal, Rudolfo Lotuaco, Jorge Naron
Ysmael Steel – Serafin Vida, Narciso Bernardo, Edgardo Roque, Nicolas Carranceja, Manuel Jocson, Cristobal Ramas, Alfonso Marquez, Geronimo Cruz, Cesar Jota, Eduardo Pacheco
U-Tex Spinners – Mike Littaua, Richard Johnson, Nap Flores, Emilio Lee, Teodoro Arriola (also played for Seven up), Luis Tan, Reynaldo Arenas

MICAA coaches includes:

Baby Dalupan - Crispa
Lauro Mumar - Yutivo
Richard Tillman - San Miguel
Enrique Crame - Ysmael
Carlos Loyzaga - Playing Coach of Yco

pachador
11-04-2008, 02:58 AM
My dad , Antonio Faustino played for PAL. I have some questions:
1.) The Antonio Villamor in the PAL roster, is he the same Villamor who played for NU Bulldogs in the 1940s???. My dad had two Villamor teamates at NU Bulldogs

2.) The PAL roster you listed was for what year??

3.) Do you have any other info about the PAL Skymasters such as what year they started playing in the MICAA and what year they stopped playing in the MICAA?

4.) what year did they win the MICAA championships? hindi ba 1950 or 1951 ba yun ?

5.) any more bits of info about the PAL skymasters?

BTW, Other MICAA teams are U.S. life insurance and Caltex

salamat !!!



Im very interested sa MICAA history that I'd come up with these piece, mga MICAA players and their respective teams, around 1958-1961, some may have played earlier, marami sa atin dito must have a relative or uncle who played in this league way back in the late 50s and the names mentioned here might help.* *

San Miguel Brewery – Carlos Ballesteros, Francis Arenas, Antonio Arce, William Sy, Renato Reyes
Seven up Marauders – Ildefonso Senas, Teodoro Arriola, Evaristo Flores, Napoleon Flores, Ramon Ascue, Jose Oyson, Agapito De Castro, Joselito Juni, Filomeno Pumaren, Mario Uson
Heacocks – Eddie Marquicias
Philippine Airlines – Agustin Salgado, Tine Hardemann, Antonio Villamor, Miguel Dela Concepcion, Paulino Quiel
Crispa redmanizers – James Yap, Cesar Dignos, Francisco Henares, Aniceto Chambers, Guillermo Baz, Constancio Ortiz jr, Roberto Yburan, Mike Tanquintic, Robert Flores, Priscilo Gabuya, Abelardo Ortiz, Tomas Paredes, Dominador Servillano, Roehl Nadurata , Bienvenido Papa, Leonardo Del Pilar
Yco Painters – Robert Littaua, Carlos Badion, Loreto Carbonell, Carlos Loyzaga, Eddie Lim, Francis Wilson, Kurt Bachmann, Emilio Achacoso, Edgardo Ocampo, Mariano Tolentino, Jose Laganson, Cristino Arroyo
Yutivo chevrolets – Eugenio Sarabia, Ildefonso Senas (played for Yutivo in 1960), Abelardo Ilano, Dominador Dawal, Rudolfo Lotuaco, Jorge Naron
Ysmael Steel – Serafin Vida, Narciso Bernardo, Edgardo Roque, Nicolas Carranceja, Manuel Jocson, Cristobal Ramas, Alfonso Marquez, Geronimo Cruz, Cesar Jota, Eduardo Pacheco
U-Tex Spinners – Mike Littaua, Richard Johnson, Nap Flores, Emilio Lee, Teodoro Arriola (also played for Seven up), Luis Tan, Reynaldo Arenas

MICAA coaches includes:

Baby Dalupan - Crispa
Lauro Mumar - Yutivo
Richard Tillman - San Miguel
Enrique Crame - Ysmael
Carlos Loyzaga - Playing Coach of Yco

pepman
11-04-2008, 09:50 PM
James Yap playing for Crispa?

Who is he?

Emon74
11-06-2008, 06:33 PM
James Yap playing for Crispa?

Who is he?


yes, there was a James Yap that played for Crispa in the MICAA in the late 50s, surely di naman siya siguro as good looking or had that celebrity status of the current James Yap playing for Purefoods.

pachador
01-04-2009, 05:48 AM
Which teams were the MICAA champions from 1938 to 1960 ????

can someone fill in the blanks below:
1938- HE Heacock - correct ba ??
1939 -Manila Port terminal - correct ba ??
1942 to 1945 - World War 2
1946- Maurice Enterprises - tama ba ???
1947- Olympic Sporting Goods -??? or is this Manila Sporting Goods ??
1948 - ???
1949 - ???
1950 - PRISCO
1951 - PAL
1952 - ???
1953- Seven-Up - correct ba ??
1954 to 1960- Yco

Thanks

Emon74
03-07-2009, 10:21 AM
Coached by master bench strategist Herminio ''Herr'' Silva, the other members of the Philippine team were Bayani Amador, Rafael Barretto, Florentino Bautista, Napoleon Flores, Benjamin Francisco, Antonio Genato, also a Hall of Famer; Lauro Mumar, the team captain; Ramon Manulat, Francisco Rabat, Ponciano Saldana and Mariano Tolentino. Francis Wilson and Fred Sagarbarria were alternates.


Benjamin Francisco's wife was Mrs. Felicitas "Cettie" Francisco, UAAP's Secretary-Treasurer back in the 90s and first woman director of the P.E. Department of UST.

pepman
03-11-2009, 04:30 PM
Coached by master bench strategist Herminio ''Herr'' Silva, the other members of the Philippine team were Bayani Amador, Rafael Barretto, Florentino Bautista, Napoleon Flores, Benjamin Francisco, Antonio Genato, also a Hall of Famer; Lauro Mumar, the team captain; Ramon Manulat, Francisco Rabat, Ponciano Saldana and Mariano Tolentino. Francis Wilson and Fred Sagarbarria were alternates.


Benjamin Francisco's wife was Mrs. Felicitas "Cettie" Francisco, UAAP's Secretary-Treasurer back in the 90s and first woman director of the P.E. Department of UST.


Kaya pala nagka-interes rin sa basketball si Boss Gerard Francisco.

Emon74
04-01-2009, 11:31 AM
Hot start for Crispa
June 23, 1963

Crispa got off to a booming start in this year's MICAA basketball series by spilling defending champion Ysmael Steel, 67-65, at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
An opening day crowd of 9,000 fans saw the redmanizers rally in the last 55 seconds to fashioned out a come-from-behind victory.
And to add insult to Ysmael Steel's defeat. It was a former admiral Roehl Nadurata who delivered the clincher two ticks before the final buzzer.
Baby Dalupan's cagers methodically cut down the admirals lead with heads-up play and clutch shooting from the free throw line, Nadurata, a veteran of the last Asian Games, came in with the marginal basket after teammate Romeo Yanga had dumped in three charities to give Crispa a 65-63 advantage, 13 seconds left.
Narciso Bernardo knotted the count with two gift shots and with only five ticks, Ramon Figueroa received the throw in then riffled the ball to Nadurata at midcourt for the marginal goal.
In the first tussle, Yco hammered out a convincing 91-71 triumph over Yutivo.

Lopsided win by Ysmael
July 4, 1963

Ysmael Steel put an impressive display of firepower as it mowed down U-Tex, 115-82, in a lopsided MICAA basketball match at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
Leaning on the crest of a 29-point binge by Narciso Bernardo, the Admirals smashed the century mark for the second time this season to post their second win in three starts.
Four other Admirals; Eduardo Pacheco, Geronimo Cruz, Cesar Jota and Engracio Arazas, chalked up double figures to pace the defending champion Ysmael.
In the nightcap, Yutivo mangled Grepa-Life, 94-71, coach Lauro Mumar's charges exploded with 55 points in the final half to win the game and keep their third place in the standings.

Crispa snares Group A plum
July 13, 1963

Crispa and defending champion Ysmael Steel convincingly triumphed over their respective rivals in the conclusion of the elimination round of the MICAA cage series at the Rizal Memorial coliseum.
The Redmanizers routed U-Tex, 90-65, to win Group A flag with a 4-0 record, while the Admirals blasted Philippine Air Lines, 90-76, to finish second with a 3-1 card.
The lopsided wins made official the entry of Ysmael and U-Tex (2-2) in the six-team final round. The other qualifiers are Crispa and the Group B teams of Yco (4-0), Yutivo (3-1) and San Miguel Brewery (2-2)

Emon74
04-01-2009, 11:38 AM
joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines.* unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.


In the Book "Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball" I saw a picture of this Caltex team in action, so hindi pala Shell ang only Gasoline Company to play in a Commercial League. nauna pa Caltex in the MICAA before Shell in the PBA.

pachador
04-17-2009, 01:34 AM
hi Emon

sure ka? in what page did you see it? kasi i have the book e thanks






joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines.* unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.


In the Book "Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball" I saw a picture of this Caltex team in action, so hindi pala Shell ang only Gasoline Company to play in a Commercial League. nauna pa Caltex in the MICAA before Shell in the PBA.

pachador
04-24-2009, 12:50 AM
i found it. its on page 123 yata




hi Emon

sure ka? in what page did you see it? kasi i have the book e* thanks






joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines.* unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.


In the Book "Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball" I saw a picture of this Caltex team in action, so hindi pala Shell ang only Gasoline Company to play in a Commercial League. nauna pa Caltex in the MICAA before Shell in the PBA.

Emon74
04-24-2009, 09:28 AM
i found it. its on page 123 yata




hi Emon

sure ka? in what page did you see it? kasi i have the book e* thanks






joker spent a few years in the postwar MICAA, suiting up for U.S. Life Insurance (with a few of his NU teammates), Caltex and Philippine Airlines.* unfortunately, all i have for now is his U.S. Life Insurance stats from '46, he averaged 5.2 ppg with a high of 11, and his Caltex stats from '54, where he scored 2 points each in the 2 games where he was fielded.


In the Book "Legends and Heroes of Philippine Basketball" I saw a picture of this Caltex team in action, so hindi pala Shell ang only Gasoline Company to play in a Commercial League. nauna pa Caltex in the MICAA before Shell in the PBA.





yes, wala kasi ko time pumunta sa national bookstore but I knew I saw it in one of the pages,

amdgc82
04-28-2009, 10:58 PM
anyone has a list of MICAA champions from 1939 to 1970 ?

and another list of the seniors open champions ?

thanks


NATIONAL OPEN SENIOR CHAMPIONS
1924 Manila Sporting Goods
1925 Manila Sporting Goods
1926 University of the Philippines
1927 University of the Philippines
1928 University of the Philippines
1929 University of the Philippines
1930 Manila Interscholastic AA
1931 National Collegiate AA
1932 Meralco Athletic Club
1933 no award
1934 60th Coast Artillery
1935 University of Santo Tomas
1936 San Beda College
1937 University of Santo Tomas
1938 Visayan Institute (now University of the Visayas)
1939 De La Salle College
1940 University of Santo Tomas
1941 University of Santo Tomas
1942 none
1943 none
1944 none
1945 none
1946 none
1947 none
1948 no award
1949 De La Salle College
1950 PRATRA (Philippine Relief and Trade Rehabilitation)
1951 University of Santo Tomas
1952 San Beda College
1953 PRISCO (Price Stabilization Corporation)
1954 YCO (Ynchausti y Compañía) Athletic Club
1955 YCO Athletic Club
1956 YCO Athletic Club
1957 YCO Athletic Club
1958 YCO Athletic Club
1959 YCO Athletic Club
1960 YCO Athletic Club
1961 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1962 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1963 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1964 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1965 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1966 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1967 YCO Athletic Club

Emon74
05-07-2009, 01:45 PM
More MICAA Recollections

Crispa, SMB lead winners
April 8, 1960

Come-from-behind victories by Crispa-Floro and San Miguel Brewery triggered off first-round competition in this year's MICAA basketball series at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The Redmanizers rallied in the last quarter to repulse spunky Seven-Up, 94-88, while the Braves shaved away an eight-point deficit for a 67-61 upset of Philippine Airlines.
Constancio Ortiz Jr, Roberto Yburan, James Yap, Mike Tanquintic, Roberto Flores and Priscilo Gabuya pulled Crispa out of a 66-57 jam, Maroons Ramon Ascue, Jose Oyson, Agapito de Castro, Joselito Juni and Filomeno Pumaren had put in the third quarter. Ortiz canned in 36 points, only two less than what Mario Uson poured in for Seven-Up.

Painters rout Seven-Up, 105-61
April 18, 1960

The Yco Painters made a big bang on giant Carlos Loyzaga's debut as a playing coach by routing the Seven-Up marauders, 105-61, in the ongoing MICAA basketball tournament at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The victory, aside from Loyzaga's first as a coach, was also Yco's first in the loop and it installed the Painters in a two-way percentage tie for first place with the idle Crispa Redmanizers in Group A competition. The Painters, displaying a well-knit switching man-to-man defense, held the Marauders virtually basket-less in the first half. they piled up a 36-point, 56-20, lead at halftime.
San Miguel Brewery tightened its grip on Group B reins by ripping Heacock, 70-59, in the first game.

Badion powers Yco over Crispa, 113-94
April 20, 1960

Bulky Charlie Badion boomed for 42 points and powered the Yco Painters to a 113-94 rout of the Crispa Redmanizers in the MICAA basketball series before 2,000 fans at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The 24-year old Yco forward, hailed by the sportswriters as one of Asia's top five dribblers, triggered 11 baskets alone in the crucial first half when the Painters turned the tide of the match. Badion's output eclipsed the 38-point mark set by Seven-Up forward Mario Uson for the cage tournament this year.

Crispa, Ysmael banner winners
April 29, 1960

Hard-earned nine-point victories by Crispa and Ysmael Steel unveiled group B of the MICAA basketball series first round at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
Powered by Roberto Yburan, the Redmanizers demolished the Philippine Airlines Viscounts, 94-85. The Admirals, on the other hand, repulsed San Miguel Brewery, 77-68. In the second game. Crispa, unable to stop Tine Hardemann with a switching man-to-man defense, trailed 18-22, early in the first quarter, but on Yburan's shooting, they claimed advantage at halftime, 52-47, and then erected a 10-point lead, 67-57, early in the second half.
Entering the third quarter, however, Hardemann forged a 69-all deadlock and until Yburan and Constancio Ortiz Jr canned eight points, Crispa was kept on its toes. The disqualification of Hardemann and Agustin Salgado on five fouls apiece gave the Redmanizers their first breather in the last minutes of play.

Emon74
05-08-2009, 12:30 PM
Ysmael defangs U-Tex
June 25, 1961

Ysmael Steel hurdled its first obstacle so far in the MICAA basketball series with a 78-69 success over newcomer U-Tex at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The victory was the Admirals' second straight win and it gave them solo hold of the lead in Phase A because Seven-Up, which shared the lead with the Admirals last week, fell to trigger-happy Crispa, 102-91, in an earlier encounter.
The Admirals held away throughout and kept comfortable margins. But the Spinners rallied with seven minutes left in the regulation. Teodoro Arriola, 6-5 American import Lowery Kirk and Nap Flores broke through for a cluster of five points to hack Ysmael's lead down to four, 54-58. However, the Admirals quickly quelled the rally on sheer guts and outside shooting. Triggerman Narciso Bernardo and Cristobal Ramas paced Ysmael by scoring 16 and 15 points, respectively.
Earlier, the star-studded Crispa Redmanizers survived sporadic rallies by the Marauders to fashioned out a hard-earned triumph. The win was the first for Baby Dalupan's charges as they dropped their opening assignment to U-Tex.

Yco, Ysmael post one-sided triumphs
July 24, 1961

Yco and Ysmael Steel romped off to easy victories to keep their respective positions atop the two groups in the MICAA cage series at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The seven-time and defending champion Yco smothered Heacock's, 120-93, for a new season record. The Admirals, on the other hand, fashioned out a 98-67 triumph over Seven-Up. Yco's output topped the 114 points scored by Ysmael Steel five over the same team last June 29.
The win was the fifth straight for the Redshirts and kept them on Group X' top rung with unblemished slate followed by U-Tex with six win, one loss scorecard. The Admirals lead Group Y with five victories and one defeat. Crispa, which topped the group before bowing down to Yutivo Chevrolets, dropped to second place with five wins and two setbacks.

Ysmael five faces Yutivo Chevrolets
August 18, 1961

Ysmael Steel plays its final game in Phase B of the MICAA circuit Thursday when it collides with the Yutivo Chevrolets in the second tilt of a twinbill at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The opener at 6 PM pits the Heacock's Speed Merchant against the San Miguel Brewery Greenshirts, two also-runs in the loop's first group.
Nothing but prestige is at stake in the Ysmael-Yutivo setto for both the Admirals and Chevrolets have been assured of berths in the final round. The Admirals made sure of that last Saturday by eliminating the Crispa Redmanizers with a hard-earned 66-59 triumph. The other two teams which made the loop's final phase are the defending champion Yco Painters and the U-Tex Spinners.
The Spinners, with import William Koehler's record-breaking 36-point performance, routed the lowly Grepa-Life Underwriters, 103-81, also last Saturday. Koehler's output lifted from the books the 34-point record established by Reynaldo Arenas, also of the U-Tex five, last July 29. The Spinners will meet the Painters in a much-awaited showdown Saturday.

Emon74
05-08-2009, 04:10 PM
Yco rips Crispa, 75-72, in opener
April 1, 1962

Yco trounced Crispa, 75-72, to lead opening day winners in this year's MICAA cage tournament at the Rizal Memorial coliseum.
In the first game, San Miguel Brewery stopped Manila Yellow Taxi, 85-78, while the Yutivo Chevrolets bumbed off the U-Tex Spinners, 89-69, in the other tussle. The Painters encountered rough sailing against the tough Redmanizers all throughout and had to lean on 6-foot-7 Joseph Lee Braun, their bulky import from San Jose State College, in the homestretch.
Braun caught fire after an anemic first half and turned sure defeat to victory by delivering the goods in the last minute of play.

Ysmael nips SMB, 67-63
April 13, 1962

National Open champion Ysmael Steel came from behind to nip San Miguel Brewery, 67-63, in the MICAA basketball series at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The Greenshirts built up a 36-24 cushion in the fifth minute of the second half but fell apart in the homestretch to had the Admirals their second straight triumph. Rome Olympics veterans Eduardo Pacheco and Narciso Bernardo paced the Admirals with their accurate outside shooting.
In the Nightcap, Yco routed Heacock's, 126-57, behind the guns of comebacking Carlos Badion, Robert Littaua, Edgardo Ocampo, Roberto Yburan, Carlos Loyzaga and Amado Martelino.

Ysmael, Crispa easy victors
April 23, 1962

National Open Champion Ysmael Steel and Crispa triggered second-round competitions in the MICAA with easy wins at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
The Admirals ran down Grepalife, 95-53, while Crispa rolled back Yellow Taxi, 104-63. Ysmael kept Grepalife in check with a switching man-to-man defense. Then Narciso Bernardo and Cesar Jota led the Admirals to their first big margin in the opening half when they exploded for 31 points against eight by Grepalife. Former FEU hotshot Romeo Diaz poured in 24 points as he paced the Redmanizers to victory. Crispa used its height advantage over the undermanned Cabbies.

Yco wins, enter finals
May 2, 1962

Yco bagged one of the four title-round berths in the MICAA basketball series by rolling back San Miguel Brewery, 92-64, at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
It was the Painters fifth straight victory in the series. The Greenshirts put a mighty stand in the opening half and held Yco to a three-point margin, 40-37, at lemontime. But in the final half, they fell apart when they ran out of wind against the elongated Painters, who were paced by Carlos Loyzaga and Joe Braun.
Ysmael Steel came to within one win of clinching a title-round spot by subduing Seven-Up, 68-63, in the nightcap. The defending National Open champions Admirals broke the game wide apart in the last minute of play when Alberto Reynoso and Engracio Arazas got loose and scored six points.

pachador
05-09-2009, 12:42 AM
any MICAA news stories from 1946 to 1954 ????

Emon74
05-12-2009, 09:20 AM
any MICAA news stories from 1946 to 1954 ????



How I wish I had, yun mas earlier years pa ng MICAA, but I think it maybe difficult to find stories or basketball results from the 1940s.

irateluvmachine
05-20-2009, 12:02 PM
any MICAA news stories from 1946 to 1954 ????



hopefully next month. ;D

thursday-friday off ko next month, so i guess that means i can sneak off a few visits to the national library...and resume my research...

Emon74
03-23-2012, 06:25 PM
I just found a blogspot on MICAA clippings from the Manila times in early 1950s, try google search Philippine Basketball 1940s-1950s, ang galing ng site na to para sa mga mahilig sa atin basketball history.

bluegreen
03-24-2012, 08:55 PM
Thank you kid cubao. actually nasa los angeles na ako pero hopefully, monl or escalera can help me kahit man lang to find out what commercial or micaa tean he played for. sana someone will write a book about the history of micaa




hi pachador, i would suggest you get in touch with the more venerable posters here in gameface such as monL and escalera jr. maybe they can help you piece together the missing pieces of your father's basketball career. medyo mahihirapan lang tayong maghanap ng mga stats tungkol sa dad mo. if you're up to it, maybe you can try visiting public libraries in your area and inquire if they have back issues of the free press and sunday times magazine from the late 40s to the 50s. i recall those publications had the most extensive sports coverage in that era. am sorry to hear that he died at a very young age.



Is this Babel?

bluegreen
03-24-2012, 08:58 PM
pacahdor,
looking at the hints from the line up -

1. the ventosa clan is a solid RED clan. SBC games are being attended still by memebrs of the clan. Archie ventosa I think is the son of MON VENTOSA ( founder of SBCA and the Little Red indians). The miising letters below could be "ON". Mon has been very active during the late 40s up to the 50s- thsi tells you that you have a big chance. You wll be able to see them in the NCAA games this season 83 and we can arrange a meeting with you to check. Teka, nandito ka ba sa Pinas?
2. You may want to scan the pic and post it here so that we can check the coat of arms. Juts adjust the granularity and contrast so that we can check properly.
3. Another one is Messina- he may be related to Jenkins messina- who used to be a Red Cub and a Maroon and then a Red LIon again. He is I think active in the SBC Alumni league in CA, US.
4. Another tip is that clans usually stay in our Mighty Red School and you can still see their descendants in GS,HS and College. This is a long shot but still a possibility.


Are you referring to Jenkins Messina who played in the PBA? He is coaching at Southville International College in Las Pinas.

bluegreen
03-24-2012, 09:00 PM
CALOY LOYZAGA Greatest Filipino cager ever

by Inquirer News Service, July 2006

WITH his seemingly endless repertoire of playing skills and flawless harmony of mental and physical coordination, Carlos Matute Loyzaga is, by any measure, the greatest Filipino basketball player of all time.

Voted by his peers as the No. l choice--in secret balloting--for the first batch of local basketball legends that will be enshrined to the first ever National Basketball Hall of Fame, Loyzaga's dazzling record speaks for itself.

Born on Aug. 29, 1930 in San Jose, Mindoro, Loyzaga had the natural ability to turn what seemed to be an impending defeat to victory, thus earning for himself the monicker: ''The Big Difference,'' a sobriquet made popular by the incomparable sportscaster Willie Hernandez, now deceased.

Loyzaga, as a player, had the gifts of size, towering at 6-foot-3, a rarity among Filipino players during his time, shooting and rebounding prowess, not to mention that he was also a fantastic center. And with his Spanish features, he was handsome. Truly, he stood clearly above the rest.

''Loyzaga is one in a million,'' said an enraptured cage fan of his. ''He would have been phenomenal as a pro in the Philippine Basketball Association,'' the fan added. Unfortunately, he never got the chance to play in the PBA, having retired from active competition when Asia's first play-for-pay league was born in 1975.

His most memorable achievement was accomplished in 1954 as a member of the amazing Philippine team that placed third in the second World Basketball Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a feat that has now become impossible to duplicate.

Loyzaga was also named to the Mythical Selection of the tournament won by the highly-favored United States, which beat host Brazil, 62-41, in the finals. in the other game, the Philippines copped third place by beating pre-game favorite Uruguay, 67-63, after trailing, 33-32, at the half.

Coached by master bench strategist Herminio ''Herr'' Silva, the other members of the Philippine team were Bayani Amador, Rafael Barretto, Florentino Bautista, Napoleon Flores, Benjamin Francisco, Antonio Genato, also a Hall of Famer; Lauro Mumar, the team captain; Ramon Manulat, Francisco Rabat, Ponciano Saldana and Mariano Tolentino. Francis Wilson and Fred Sagarbarria were alternates.

Loyzaga also played for the Philippine team that landed eighth in the world cagefest in Chile in 1959.

Then a gangling cager, Loyzaga launched his colorful cage career in 1942 as a virtual unknown, playing for the Sta. Mesa Aces whose roster included the Cuna brothers, Pablo and Vicente; Ramon Lopez, chair of the Letran Hall of Fame; Vicente Siyllon, who became president of Insular Life; and brothers Bobby and Al Tuazon. Their coach was Jose ''Pepe'' Lansang, who later made a name for himself as a referee.

After the Liberation of Manila, Loyzaga played for a team called Bulldogs which was coached by Joker Faustino. He studied at the P. Burgos Elementary School in Sta. Mesa and National University for his high school.

Loyzaga was about to enroll at UST for his college education but before he could wear the UST jersey, noted player and coach Felicisimo Fajardo, also a Hall of Famer, took him to San Beda where Fely polished his playing style. Loyzaga had wanted earlier to play for Letran but backed off when the coach gave him the cold treatment.

Loyzaga honed his skills at the Tervalac playground in Sta. Mesa before making waves in the NCAA, then the country's most colorful and glamorous league, as a member of the fabled San Beda Red Lions in the 1950s.

He also played for the multi-titled Pratra, then coached by Gabriel ''Gabby'' Fajardo, Fely's brother and a fellow Hall of Famer. Pratra won the MICAA crown in 1951.

In the NCAA, Loyzaga lived up to his billing as ''The Big Difference'' when he engineered San Beda's successful bid to retire the coveted Zamora trophy by winning the NCAA championship three times -- in 1951, 1952 and 1955.

After his NCAA campaign, Loyzaga joined the fabulous, Elizalde family-owned YCO Painters, winners of 10 consecutive National Open titles and numerous MICAA crowns.

Loyzaga made his Olympic debut in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics and played in the 1956 Melbourne Games. However, he missed the 1960 Rome Olympics due to a wrist injury he suffered while playing softball. Loyzaga coached the Philippine team that placed 13th in the 1968 Mexico Games.

In the Asian Games, Loyzaga sparked the Philippines to four straight championships -- in New Delhi in 1951, Manila in 1954, Tokyo in 1958, and Jakarta in 1962.

Capping his checkered career, Caloy skippered the Philippine team to twin victories in the ABC tournament -- in 1960 in Manila and in 1963 in Taipei -- and coached the national selection to a dramatic triumph in the 1967 ABC in Seoul.

Now based in Australia, Loyzaga, who also served as councilor of Manila, is married to Vicky Cuerva. They have four children -- Chito, Joey, Teresa, and Bing - who are all celebrities in their own right.



He actually has 5 children - Princess is one daughter who has been looked over, and Mrs. Loyzaga has pointed that out repeatedly.

Emon74
06-17-2013, 03:10 PM
Chelsea wins MICAA crown
July 2, 1959

The Chelsea Clippers, reinforced by two americans, tripped the Yco Painters, 94-92, in a pulse-pounding contest to win this year's MICAA basketball championships before 20,000 fans at the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.
All-American cager Lou Pucillo carved a niche for himself in Philippine Basketball annuals as he powered the Clippers to their first MICAA title, Pucillo, the 5'9" court wizard from North Carolina University, buffled all the guards assigned to him, including Emilio Achacoso, Edgardo Ocampo, Eduardo Lim and Eduardo Rivera.
Pucillo single-handidly tore Yco's vaunted zone defense to shambles with his accurate flip shot from the quartercourt, his deceptive drive-ins and carpet shots, scoring a total of 30 points, there were other Chelsea heroes: Mike Littaua, Whitey dela Penas, Hector Gamboa, Danilo Arcega, Fred Sagarbarria, and all-american John Richter.
Chelsea coach Mateo Adao, who was coaching in the MICAA for the first time, was all tears after the game, And the Chelsea manager, who just couldnt believe what happened, lost control of himself and passed out.

Emon74
10-23-2013, 03:38 PM
1975 San Miguel Braves roster in the MICAA when the PBA was born

Guards:
Heracleo Pidor #16
Alejandro De Leon #4
Alejandro Intalan #12
Roberto Santiago #14
Cesar Bauto #15

Forwards:
Ruben Sumala #7
Jose Fresnosa #13
Herminio Kalaw #9
Porfirio Rodriguez #5
Angelito Artadi #6
Teofilo Diaz #8

Centers:
Napoleon Burcelis #10
Romeo Santos #11
Moises Cunanan #17

The SMC line-ups were virtually unknown with only Rodriguez the only one making it to the PBA.

Emon74
07-29-2014, 08:56 PM
A well-earned Crown for Crown
April 22, 1977

Crown Motors, in its third try in the MICAA, has finally succeeded in capturing the not-so-elusive MICAA title via an exciting elimination, pressure-laden semifinals, and nerve-wracking championship. It nipped the debuting Solid Mills, 95-92, in the titular clash.
In the semifinal round of four, Crown trounced Solid Mills, 116-92, and ITM, 89-84, but lost to Yco, 125-129, tying Yco and Solid Mills with identical 2-1 won-loss record, Crown nevertheless topped the semis by a strong output via the quotient system.
Solid Mills and Yco's sudden-death playoff for second place saw the former prevail, 89-88. Solid Mills however had to beat Crown twice to fashion a cinderella clincher. Crown never got to give Solid Mills the second chance, after a stirring tussle, Crown was declared MICAA champion.

Members of the Car Dealers:

Emerito Legaspi
Chito Mistades
Federico Lauchengco
Anselmo Ana
Abe King
Leopoldo Herrera
Joey Marquez
Pablo Javier
Jaime Reynoso
Errol David
Giovanni Arceo
Rolando Pineda
Manuel Palanca
Ramon Cruz

Coach: Nat Canson

Emon74
11-21-2014, 03:01 PM
The Cellar-dwelling Uncolas
1977 or 1978?

Seven-Up doesn't have any plans in its campaign this year in the MICAA to break its tradition of being the perennial cellar-dweller, It's performance shows.
It lost all its games in the first round: to CFC, 110-91; Villar, 97-90; San Miguel, 102-98; ITM, 112-71; Crispa, 96-88; Solidmills, 103-89; Crown, 111-94; Yco, 95-82; and Manilabank, 107-96. It broke into the win column after an extended match against CFC, 119-118, in the second round, but lost all its other games.
The Uncolas: Renato Sidamon, Leonardo Aranzaso, Rolando Marquicias, Lony Dones, Jose Casanova, Jr, Raymundo Basilio, Bienvenido Sagmit, Edgardo Paguia, Manuel Balani and Riquito Dela Cruz. Coach is Danny Macahilig; the team manager is Joe Janairo.

Emon74
09-30-2015, 09:21 AM
NATIONAL OPEN SENIOR CHAMPIONS
1924 Manila Sporting Goods
1925 Manila Sporting Goods
1926 University of the Philippines
1927 University of the Philippines
1928 University of the Philippines
1929 University of the Philippines
1930 Manila Interscholastic AA
1931 National Collegiate AA
1932 Meralco Athletic Club
1933 no award
1934 60th Coast Artillery
1935 University of Santo Tomas
1936 San Beda College
1937 University of Santo Tomas
1938 Visayan Institute (now University of the Visayas)
1939 De La Salle College
1940 University of Santo Tomas
1941 University of Santo Tomas
1942 none
1943 none
1944 none
1945 none
1946 none
1947 none
1948 no award
1949 De La Salle College
1950 PRATRA (Philippine Relief and Trade Rehabilitation)
1951 University of Santo Tomas
1952 San Beda College
1953 PRISCO (Price Stabilization Corporation)
1954 YCO (Ynchausti y Compañía) Athletic Club
1955 YCO Athletic Club
1956 YCO Athletic Club
1957 YCO Athletic Club
1958 YCO Athletic Club
1959 YCO Athletic Club
1960 YCO Athletic Club
1961 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1962 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1963 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1964 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1965 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1966 Ysmael Steel Athletic Club
1967 YCO Athletic Club

Im trying to complete the list from 1970-1990

1970: Crispa
1971: ?
1972: ?
1973: San Miguel Braves (beat Mariwasa AKAI for the title)
1974: ?
1975: Crispa
1976: San Miguel Corporation
1977: YCO
1978: YCO
1979: YCO
1980: Apcor (I assumed)
1981: Apcor
1982: Paul Jordan
1983: De La Salle
1984: Masagana 99
1985: Masagana 99 (beat ESQ for the title)
1986: Masagana 99 (beat Rizal Athletic Club for the title)
1987: Lhuillier Jewelers (beat Magnolia for the title)
1988: RFM-Swifts
1989: Magnolia Ice Cream
1990: Magnolia Ice Cream

*Sta.Lucia was runner-up from 1988-1990

Emon74
09-30-2015, 09:26 AM
Which teams were the MICAA champions from 1938 to 1960 ????

can someone fill in the blanks below:
1938- HE Heacock - correct ba ??
1939 -Manila Port terminal - correct ba ??
1942 to 1945 - World War 2
1946- Maurice Enterprises - tama ba ???
1947- Olympic Sporting Goods -??? or is this Manila Sporting Goods ??
1948 - ???
1949 - ???
1950 - PRISCO
1951 - PAL
1952 - ???
1953- Seven-Up - correct ba ??
1954 to 1960- Yco

Thanks

1947: Olympic Sporting Goods
1955: Seven-Up
YCO Painters were champions in 1954, 1956, 1957 and 1960
Ysmael in 1958
Chelsea in 1959

Emon74
08-30-2017, 09:09 AM
Luis "Chito" Gavieres
He's got a lifetime of basketball behind him
By Eddie R. Ticzon

If records would not lie, probably the longest basketball career for a local cager belongs to 61-year old Luis 'Alikabok' Gavieres, a retired Manila Police Department Officer. Chito, as he is called by his basketball colleagues, played the game for 27 years, starting at the age of 12.
Born in September 24, 1915 at Paombong, Bulacan, and married to the former Antonia Punzalan of Taguig, Rizal, Gavieres has three offsprings who all play basketball, two short of a team. In 1927, he played with the Ateneo midgets while in the elementary school. He enrolled at Mapa High in 1931 and among his contemporaries were Gabby Fajardo, Nilo Verona, Herminio Gonzaga and Fred Penaloza.
In 1936, he played for one year with La Salle upon graduation from high school. Due to unavoidable circumstances beyond his control, he stopped studying until the outbreak of the last war. But this did not stop his playing because in 1938, he joined the Manila Ports Terminal team in the MICAA. Came Liberation and he joined the Manila Police Department in 1946 and played with the famed Manila's Finest team coached by Major Domingo de Guzman.
In 1947, he resumed playing in the MICAA with the Sampaguita Pictures quintet which had in its lineup three brother-combinations: Cady and Tacing Tanquintic; Fely and Gabby Fajardo; and Luis and Jose Gavieres; plus Francisco Vestil and Ramoncito Campos. So strong was their lineup that Sampaguita Pictures was favored to romp away with the 1947 MICAA championship, but Maurice Enterprises five bannered by Ding Fulgencio, Cesar Baldueza, Kiko Calilan and the two GI's, Jim Turner and Frankie Nicolai - foiled its bid to win the title.
In 1948, he enrolled at Far Eastern University to finish his course. For three years, FEU was UAAP and inter-collegiate champions (1948-1950). Among his teammates were ex-Olympians Ding Fulgencio, Jose Gochangco, Andy dela Cruz and Manolet Araneta; former Manila Vice-Mayor Herminio Astorga; Gov.Francisco Nepomuceno; Atong Suarez, Eddie delos Reyes, Rufino Loberiza and Olympic boxer Mariano Veles Jr. Their coach was the late Captain Martin Dino.
He was a member of the 1954 Republic Super Market Greyhounds of the late William Liyao, which almost bagged the MICAA title, losing only to the Carlos Loyzaga-led YCO Painters. This was his last stint in major competition. He last saw action in 1955 in the Professionals' Invitational Basketball Association tournament of 'Has Beens' with the FEU Tired Tams.
In 1972, he got a liking to coaching basketball because the game was still in his blood. But he elected to coach a women's team and got an appointment to handle the Centro Escolar team in the WNCAA. His coaching star rose to greater heights when the BAP appointed him mentor of the RP Youth team that saw action in 1974 in Manila. Two years later, he was again the mentor of the RP Women's team that participated in Hongkong in the Asian Basketball Confederation (ABC) meet.

*Rewrite from January 1977 article