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gameface_one
11-26-2006, 10:37 PM
Who for you are the greatest coaches of the game and why? You may include foreign coaches and those who were involved in amateur and pro teams.

oca
11-27-2006, 09:12 AM
Baby Dalupan.

Magaling kumilatis ng player. I don't think it was a coincidence that so many great players came out of UE the time he was involved with the schools basketball team. ( It was called "team" then, not "program".)

Magaling magbalasa ng tao. Sa mga laro na inaalat ang tinuringang magagaling na player niya, tiyak may huhugutin yan sa bench. One player who will, for that singular game or for another two, make things turn around to their favor and not be heard of again.

These two qualities I think sets him apart.

To see a walk-in aspirant or "isang nirekomenda" and say "Magaling ito...", Baby Dalupan never fails.

Fact is, have we ever heard of a player that Baby Dalupan suppossedly turned away and made it big? Yung tipo bang panghihinayang mo kung ikaw yung hindi kumuha sa player na iyon?

Wala.

Then, the Xs and Os of the game They are all pretty obvious. Kahit tayo, we can see and discuss them. The match up even, kahit mga gradeschoolers ngayon alam yan.

But, during games, may ugali yang huhugot ng isang "bangko". Itatapat sa kung sinong kumakamada sa kabila...ayun ilang minuto lang mag-iiba na ang takbo ng laro.* Hindi uso set plays ng panahon niya, pero bibigyan niya ng lisensya tumira. Ending... panalo sila.

redlion123
11-27-2006, 02:28 PM
TEMBONG MELENCIO- who would forget the architect of the '93 ragtag team that won the gold
ATO BADOLATO-sbc RED CUBS
ED OCAMPO

MonL
11-27-2006, 02:58 PM
Ron Jacobs, more than any other coach in the Philippines in the modern era has made the most impact on Philippine basketball. It was like the breaking of the vicious cycle of in-breeding: if we had continued passing old concepts (“gulang”) learned locally from mentors to players turned successor protégé coaches, we would have been left behind even further in playing the international game when those concepts inevitably become outmoded. Haphazardly forming a team on short notice proved disastrous. Even the Americans eventually learned this after a few decades when the rest of the world caught up with them when the awe of playing against the best individual players in the world faded. We weren’t even the best in the Asian region and we insisted on that manner in forming our national team.

Ron Jacobs was an outsider with new ideas or concepts when he came to our shores. He stressed the importance of role-playing and finding the right personnel for the right positions, disciplining these men to meet the team needs and keeping them together for the long haul. Role designation as we know it now, was starting to become the standard in the late 70s, and Ron implemented that upon his arrival. He and his assistants also scoured the world to scout the opposition, something unheard of in that time. If you’ve noticed the national teams formed under his watch, the players were not necessarily the best individually talented men there was that could have been drawn from the talent pool, but these teams were potent because each player knew his role when he was sent in. As a result, we often saw teams whereby the whole was greater than the sum of its parts. And what was good then was that former players and several assistants he took under his wing are now applying the concepts they have learned from him in their own coaching gigs. And with that experience came the realization that learning is a continuing process, hence more of our local coaches are now being sent overseas to study the latest concepts for application.

Of course, it didn’t hurt to have Jeff Moore, Chip Engelland and Dennis Still play for us then, have super homegrown players Samboy Lim and Allan Caidic who were perfect under his system come on board at the right time plus have Danding Cojuangco’s influence and money as Project Director for Basketball then to make things happen. But the winds of change in the political scene cut short what could have been a clear progression of Philippine basketball. Ron’s influence brought the technology gap in basketball a little closer, but it became a story of unfulfilled promises as we went back to old habits once more.

cub
11-27-2006, 10:49 PM
Tim Cone. Aces' tactician for 13 years. uses Phil's triangle offense. won 10+ championships with alaska..

Wang-Bu
11-27-2006, 11:09 PM
Siempre naman si Big J!

MonL
11-28-2006, 07:43 AM
Dante Silverio, as far as I know, was never known to have played the game even at the collegiate level, and was more known as a businessman. He first appeared as a newbie coach for the Komatsu/Toyota team in its final season in the MICAA, and its first coach in the PBA when it opened in 1975. Yet he steered the Comets to the PBA's First and Second Conference Championships in its maiden season, and the Comets/Silver Tamaraws/Tamaraws/Super Corollas were always perennial contender teams. He gained his coaching knowledge by studying concepts and* strategies developed mainly by legendary UCLA coach John "Wizard of Westwood" Wooden.

Nic Jorge was the earliest coach* that I heard of that didn't go the "hand-me-down," big-league basketball experience or* "drawing board" route to acquire knowledge to be successful in his time, but studied from successful foreign coaches, having gone abroad to attend training under Jerry West and others. He brought his knowledge here, became a national coach and PBA mentor for several years, and was one of the founders of B.E.S.T. (Basketball Efficiency and Scientific Training), the first school to scientifically teach fundamentals to kids. Many PBA superstars are products of this program, and owe their success to this.

Kid Cubao
11-28-2006, 09:39 AM
good insights, MonL. to add:

what ron jacobs brought to our shores was a more scientific approach to basketball coaching and training. he also introduced the five-man passing game and revolutionized how basketball was played here: in essence, ron jacobs taught us the motion offense. on defense, he was the father of the full-court pressing system now used to great effect especially in the college ranks.

he was also the first coach to demonstrate the effectiveness of the three-point shot as more than a gimmick. you see, pinoy coaches back in the day viewed the 3-pointer as nothing more than a contingency plan you resort to when you're behind double-digits in the 4th quarter. many of the game's early 3-point bombers like ricky brown, alfie almario, naning valenciano, franz pumaren, and, of course, chip engelland and allan caidic trace common roots to coach ron.

AnthonyServinio
11-28-2006, 11:19 AM
* * *JOHNY TAM -- the best coach in the history of Philippine basketball . . . sa sobrang galing, kahit ilang beses na niya binigyan ng napakalaking kahiyaan ang bansa, siya pa rin ang pinapadala ng BAP sa mga overseas junkets nila! >:(

MonL
11-28-2006, 11:41 AM
good insights, MonL. to add:

what ron jacobs brought to our shores was a more scientific approach to basketball coaching and training. he also introduced the five-man passing game and revolutionized how basketball was played here: in essence, ron jacobs taught us the motion offense. on defense, he was the father of the full-court pressing system now used to great effect especially in the college ranks.

he was also the first coach to demonstrate the effectiveness of the three-point shot as more than a gimmick. you see, pinoy coaches back in the day viewed the 3-pointer as nothing more than a contingency plan you resort to when you're behind double-digits in the 4th quarter. many of the game's early 3-point bombers like ricky brown, alfie almario, naning valenciano, franz pumaren, and, of course, chip engelland and allan caidic trace common roots to coach ron.


Kid,

He came at a time when the NBA had just adapted the 3-pointer (“I think that I shall never see a poem more lovely than a three.” :D) and the rest of the world followed suit. Naturally we took to it almost at once.* It made the game more exciting, and it gave teams new sets of options on offense. And the better teams made full use of those options to preserve or increase leads or to decisively put down a rally. And the line of thinking of progressive coaches then was that it would be easier to take the 3-pointer in the course of the game than in the endgame, as teams at this critical point would rather defend the long shooter and let go of close shots to avoid game ties and overtime opportunities.

We last won the ABC in 1985 when we defeated mighty China. We played with Moore and Still, but no Chip, but had Samboy and Allan, Hec Calma and all. At that time, we were too late with the citizenship recognition of the two to qualify for the 84 LA Olympics (we were disqualified when we fielded them in the ‘83 ABC), and way too early to qualify for Seoul in 1988, as the ABC was held every two years and the Olympic qualifier was in 1987. By then there was a change of government and we were once more watching from the sidelines as our basketball program got permanently dismembered and the core of the NCC squad (sans Moore and Still and Chip who were likewise swept away by the political storm) found its way to the pros to eventually dominate the league as San Miguel Beermen.

Joescoundrel
11-28-2006, 03:15 PM
I'm with Wang-bu on this one: BIG J FOREVER!

oca
11-28-2006, 03:48 PM
There is one drawback I see with our local coaches’ introduction to Ron Jacobs, though not the latter’s fault.

The man was very articulate, as he is able to explain in lay man's term the things he was introducing then, that succeeding/present generation of local coaches, even game commentators/panelists (how I miss Dick Ildefonso’s delivery…) , tries hard- very hard- to be as articulate.

Hindi man nila aminin, deep in them they must admire Jacobs so much, they want to be like him! Subconsciously, a great number from this present generation of coaches are aping him.

Anak ng ewan, kung ano-ano ang naririnig natin sa mga coaches pag pre-game interviews. Madalas naman hindi mo makita sa laro yung pinagsasabi nila.

Sa post game naman, sasabihin lang nila yung nangyari. Para que, napanood na natin diba?

But Jacobs, in both pre and post game interviews, would say things that are insightful.

One that I remember very well was the second time he won the Jones Cup. At a pre-game interview, he talked about "reducing the game to 20 minutes".

Paano ba yun?

He explained that we cannot outshoot the USA team if we intend to. We will not out rebound them even if we try to. But if we reduce their possessions and shoot well from the outside- we may have a chance.

Paano mo babawasan ang possession ng kalaban kung hindi mo kontrolado ang rebounds…

He wasn’t talking about slow break- but controlling the tempo. If we can do that and shoot well, he said, we may win. Just as he said it, we did won, aided by 15 3-point shots!

When he did the commentary later during the replay, did he talk about the 15 3-point shots? No, no need it was obvious. But he pointed out how important it was that we gained possession off the jump ball to start the overtime and* scored first and established an early lead. Seemingly trivial but it made great sense if you had seen the game.

Then, of course, the on game… non-stop… never-ending… constant complaining about the officiating now prevalent among local coaches.

Draw a timeline and you’ll probably trace its prevalence to the time Jacobs became a familiar fixture in the local basketball scene.

Yung tipo bang kahit pwedeng palagpasin – pupunahin pa rin ang referees. Ayun, para sa mga dakilang manggagaya na Pinoy coaches, halos wala nang tamang tawag ngayon ang mga referees.

But, weighing both the good and bad influences he had, yes, he is one great coach.

Joescoundrel
11-28-2006, 06:58 PM
Are Norman Black and the Big J the two most successful superstar-type players who also became successful superstar-type coaches? Big J has won at least four titles always as heavy underdogs with the then-La Tondena franchise of Ginebra (except perhaps the 1986 Open Conference Finals when he had Billy Ray Bates and Michael Hacket as imports). Norman Black is one of only four PBA coaches who have completed a Grand Slam season.

I recall Ramon Fernandez was once playing-coach of Purefoods in their maiden PBA season circa 1988, but he was removed as coach under less than clear circumstances.

Leo Austria was a good player but nowhere near the superstardom of these three aforementioned gentlemen, but he did become one heck of an amateur coach winning several PBL titles.

Leo Isaac is yet another midlevel-type player like Austria who made quite a name more as a solid amateur coach. Arguably his biggest success was the circa 1998 upset of Ana-Dr J over Eric Menk's star-studded Tanduay team in the PBL Finals.

Louie Alas was another midlevel player who became more successful as a coach, winning two titles for Letran and one for the Manila Metrostars in the MBA. I recall he also won at least one SEABA and one SEA Games title each. Was he also the coach when Rommel Adducul's and Eddie Laure's Batangas Blades won the PBL title circa 2002?

Joel Banal was quite the PBA role player before becoming a very successful coach in the NCAA with his alma mater Mapua and Bennie Cheng in the NCAA, the Ateneo Blue Eagles of Enrico Villanueva in the UAAP in 2002 and even in the PBA with Talk N Text (feel free to correct me on this one because I can't quite remember the exact circumstances), the only coach in my recollection to turn this particular trick.

And of course who can forget Pido Jarencio, the latest in the neverending Cinderella stories of local hoopdom. Jarencio was a superstar in the UAAP with Santo Tomas before becoming a long-running journeyman in the PBA. He led his Tigers to the UAAP Crown over the highly favored Blue Eagles of Norman Black.

BigBlue
11-28-2006, 09:21 PM
Joel Banal was quite the PBA role player before becoming a very successful coach in the NCAA with his alma mater Mapua and Bennie Cheng in the NCAA, the Ateneo Blue Eagles of Enrico Villanueva in the UAAP in 2002 and even in the PBA with Talk N Text (feel free to correct me on this one because I can't quite remember the exact circumstances), the only coach in my recollection to turn this particular trick.


when Joel Banal was introduced to the Ateneo community back in 2002, he was noted to be the only person in the country to have won the championship both as a player and as a coach in three different levels: collegiate, national and professional.

Kid Cubao
11-29-2006, 08:15 AM
Are Norman Black and the Big J the two most successful superstar-type players who also became successful superstar-type coaches? Big J has won at least four titles always as heavy underdogs with the then-La Tondena franchise of Ginebra (except perhaps the 1986 Open Conference Finals when he had Billy Ray Bates and Michael Hacket as imports). Norman Black is one of only four PBA coaches who have completed a Grand Slam season.

I recall Ramon Fernandez was once playing-coach of Purefoods in their maiden PBA season circa 1988, but he was removed as coach under less than clear circumstances.

coach norman won a total of 10 PBA titles as coach (9 with san miguel, 1 with sta lucia, grand slam in 1989), so he belongs to the upper echelon of PBA coaches such as baby dalupan (15 titles, grand slam in 1976) and tim cone (11 titles, grand slam in 1996).

pero tingin ko dapat ihiwalay si maestro kina tim cone and norman black. kung paramihan lang, ewan ko kung sino ang wawasak sa record ni baby D. 49 championships in all, including 9 with crispa, 5 with great taste, 1 with purefoods, 18 with UE (12 UAAP titles, 6 nat'l intercollegiate), 2 with ateneo, and 14 titles as national head coach. t@angin@.

Bennie Bangag
11-29-2006, 11:45 AM
naalala ko tuloy yung classic corny joke:

Q: anong baby ang matanda?
A: baby dalupan!

[agad dinampot ang tsinelas at kumaripas papalayo para makatakas sa gulpi ng mga nainis sa dyok..]

brian
11-29-2006, 12:06 PM
coach turo valenzona should be somewhere up there...* :-X

Wang-Bu
11-29-2006, 01:27 PM
May nagkwento sa akin minsan na si Coach Turo Valenzona ay naging resource person sa isang coaching clinic. Iisang play lang daw ang kanyang ibinahagi pero inabot daw ng limang oras ang kanyang pagpapaliwanag ukol sa play na iyon. Grabe...

LION
11-29-2006, 02:20 PM
May nagkwento sa akin minsan na si Coach Turo Valenzona ay naging resource person sa isang coaching clinic. Iisang play lang daw ang kanyang ibinahagi pero inabot daw ng limang oras ang kanyang pagpapaliwanag ukol sa play na iyon. Grabe...


Buti hindi niya pinagmumura yung mga hindi kaagad naka intindi sa paliwanag niya. Alam niyo naman si 'Turo.

Pati mga import niya sa PBA pina pare pare niya. Tuwing time out nga niya e hindi alam ng mga import kung ano yung play na pinapagawa ni 'Turo. Pare, pare.

Sam Miguel
12-01-2006, 03:38 PM
What makes a great coach?

Now there's a question that we have not yet answered definitively folks.

Dean Smith is considered a college coaching god in the US, but has won all of two NCAA National Championships in 20 or so years at Chapel Hill.

The same could be said for Mike Krzyzewski, Bobby Knight, Jerry Tarkanian, Lute Olsen, Rick Pitino and dozens of other US NCAA coaches. With the arguable exception of the famed Wizard of Westwood (who of course had the great fortune of having Lew Alcindor and then Bill Walton over the course of some eight odd years), there really isn't an NCAA championship factory among US NCAA coaches.

In the NBA Red Auerbach has the most number of championships as a coach, but was blessed with having Bill Russel, Tom Heinsohn and a bunch of other hall of famers on his Celtics teams. Phil Jackson had God wearing Number 23 for him in an admittedly watered down NBA. Pat Riley had wall-to-wall Hall of Famers. Where do Larry Brown and Lenny Wilkens come in to this mix?

Perry Ronquillo gave Benjie Paras his second career MVP and a stunning win over a highly favored Tanduay team in 1999. Sonny Jaworski supposedly never practised any play or any system as a coach, worked mainly with castoffs and retreads, yet won a number of PBA championships over teams that were always favored over his Ginebra/Anejo/Gordon's crews. Siot Tanquincen was practically a babe in the woods when his system brought Barangay Ginebra back to back championships in the Mark Caguioa era. How do these two stack up to the Grand Slam club of El Maestro, Norman Black, Tommy Manotoc and Tim Cone?

Speaking of Maestro, he also has the most number of UAAP titles as a coach. So how do the likes of Franz Pumaren, Aric Del Rosario, Cris Calilan, Fritz Gaston, Danny Gavieres and the latest Cinderella Man Pido Jarencio stack up? Joe Lipa hasn't won a major title in the last two decades, is he still a great coach? In the NCAA Turo Valenzona and Louie Alas are the most recent examples of coaches who have won multiple titles. How do the likes of Koy Banal, Junel Baculi and even Ari Lim hold up?

How about coaches who are not in any of the premiere leagues now, like Leo Isaac, Boni Tan and Nomar Isla?

Kid Cubao
12-01-2006, 08:53 PM
there are coaches who win multiple championships, so their place in the all-time greats are secure. meanwhile, there are also those whose contributions to the game are groundbreaking and immeasurable, so i think they should also be considered as all-time greats. the truly great ones are those who've won numerous titles and have likewise left a deep impact on how the game is played today. for me, the truly great ones are:

1. john wooden of UCLA
2. red auerbach of the boston celtics
3. baby dalupan of UE, ateneo, crispa, great taste, purefoods and countless national teams

nel
12-02-2006, 08:45 AM
Before Ron Jacobs, coaches ran their teams more by gut feel and their own personal experience. Jacobs was the first coach to bring the scientific approach to the local basketball scene. He brought his teams back to the fundamentals, breaking down each area to explain to each player what was needed. His preparation was unmatched, and his teams would come to each game knowing how what options they would use against each team. Very rarely, if ever, would he design a play on the fly, instead going back to his playbook and adapting a play to the situation. His innovative approach to coaching at the local level makes him one of the best ever.

Other foreigners who have made their mark on the local coaching scene are Norman Black and Tim Cone. Norman Black follows Jacobs' approach of methodical preparation. His teams are also well prepped for each game, with the game basics and philosophies drilled into them during the pre-season. Tim Cone has proven to be an able student of the game, and was able to adopt the triangle offense in Alaska with much success in the past. However, the longevity of his coaching philosophy has allowed local coaches to better understand how to counteract his pet triangle offense, and I read somewhere that a local PBA coach had once remarked that his offensive sets had become somewhat predictable and therefore a bit stale. This may have some basis in the fact that Alaska has not enjoyed as much success as they had in the 90s despite having very strong lineups.

Among the local coaches who enjoyed much success in the collegiate leagues are Baby Dalupan, who coached UE to successive crowns in the 60s, SSC's Valenzona, Aric del Rosario in the 90's and more recently, Franz Pumaren.

In the PBA today, there doesn't seem to be a coach who can get his team to dominate. Maybe it's because the quality of players entering the pro league has improved? Have we seen the last of the PBA grandslams?

Perhaps the mark of a really good coach today is his ability to get his team to the semi-finals no matter what kind of lineup he has. We've heard that some teams are one or two players away from being a championship calibre team. How true is this?

Kid Cubao
12-02-2006, 02:18 PM
one key difference between the amateurs and pro ranks is that the amateurs is a coaches' league, while the pros is a players' league. the reason is that in the amateurs, the best players get elevated to the pro ranks and players basically come and go, so it's usually the coaches who are the constants. on the other hand, in the pro ranks, the paying public come to watch the games not because of the coach but because of the players. in essence, the coach is there to make sure the stars play to the best of their abilities AND WIN CHAMPIONSHIPS. if a coach fails in both or either requirements, then his job will be on the line.

as far as winning grand slams are concerned, mahirap talaga mapanalunan yan because luck will always play a big factor. you can have a very good team on paper but if any of your stars comes down with an injury, then there's only so much you can do as a coach. another reason is the parity of the league. with the exception of welcoat and coke, teams today can match up with the rest. if red bull loses badly against talk n text on a given night, there's absolutely no assurance that the phone pals will be able to repeat against the barakos in their rematch.

in the pros, the mark of a good coach is his ability to read situations accurately and make the necessary adjustments. they have in their disposal a considerably larger number of timeouts (full and 20-seconders) as compared to their amateur and collegiate counterparts, so they can huddle their players in key moments of the game and diagram for any possible strategies. having the presence of mind to draw up successful plays on the bench, making the timely substitutions, anticipating the turning points, and motivating the troops for that final stand--a coach can never have too much of those.

Sam Miguel
12-07-2006, 10:11 PM
Can a guy who has never played the game become a great coach?

Or does one have to have been at least a regular varsity type - or better yet a pro - to be able to coach well?

I'm not saying they had to be great players. But should they at least have been players, on organized teams, playing in regular organized tournaments, in order to become great coaches? For instance, Chot Reyes is nowhere in the pantheon of PBA greats but is widely regarded as a great coach. Franz Pumaren was a career backup as a pro but is undoubtedly a great coach. I don't think Ron Jacobs and Pat Riley played basketball in this century (ahem...) but are considered great coaches.

Better question: Is there a great coach who never even made his high school team?

brian
12-08-2006, 12:42 AM
i've always wondered where tim cone played ball, or did he ever?....but there's one great coach, in my opinion..

joelex
12-08-2006, 02:06 AM
i remember Bill Bayno leading a very small lineup (and other teams' garbage) to the championship and pushing red bull to the limit.

kenny evans shone brightly under him and only under him. guys like belano and ibet demape were used effectively.

although he was also root of the "pure pinoy" only coach issue which eventually lead to his dismissal..

did he end up as ateneo's consultant? i remember some of my atenean friends telling me they see Bayno almost everyday in campus.

joelex
12-08-2006, 02:10 AM
speaking of great coaches...how could we forget alfrancis chua. ;D :D

one story about him i remember is him telling his assistants how good Tugade was in red bull's previous game (which his assistants scouted and he didnt but insisted he was on the other side of the coliseum). this left his assistants wondering what the hell was he talking about when lordy didnt suit up for that game.

numerous times he came to practice drunk..what's more is he had the same set of clothes in their morning practice as he had the previous night..

Ghostrider
12-13-2006, 01:09 PM
There is one drawback I see with our local coaches’ introduction to Ron Jacobs, though not the latter’s fault.

Then, of course, the on game… non-stop… never-ending… constant complaining about the officiating now prevalent among local coaches.

Draw a timeline and you’ll probably trace its prevalence to the time Jacobs became a familiar fixture in the local basketball scene.

Yung tipo bang kahit pwedeng palagpasin – pupunahin pa rin ang referees. Ayun, para sa mga dakilang manggagaya na Pinoy coaches, halos wala nang tamang tawag ngayon ang mga referees.

But, weighing both the good and bad influences he had, yes, he is one great coach.

A little known reason why Ron Jacobs could constantly complain is because no one outworked or outprepared him. He would devour the rulebook like a shark going after wounded prey. At the start of every season, he would go over the rules and take note of hypothetical situations which could occur applying a particular rule.

He was so diligent that he probably knew the nuances of the game rules even better than the referees or in some instances, the technical committee.

An example of this was the "injury timeout". Whenever he ran out of timeouts, he would instruct his players to fake a minor injury, thus allowing himself a freebie. This practice has been disallowed and has now metamorphosed into the 30 second timeout.

gameface_one
12-27-2006, 06:09 PM
The Jacobs legacy
SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson
The Philippine Star 12/27/2006

For over two decades, Philippine basketball was blessed by the influential presence of a man whose genius and passion for the game blazed a trail for others to follow.

When Ron Jacobs was invited to coach in the Philippines, he didn’t know what to expect.

It was in 1980 and Jacobs was fresh from being named West Coast Athletic Association Coach of the Year for piloting the Loyola Marymount University basketball varsity to the NCAA Tournament.

Jacobs became an overnight hero at the Loyola campus in Los Angeles. He turned the program around in just a season from a lowly 5-21 pushover to a legitimate contender. Jacobs’ star shone so brightly that there emerged a popular clamor for him to take over as Loyola athletic director, a turn of events that didn’t sit well with some old fogeys in the school’s Board of Trustees.

Jacobs eventually left Loyola, exasperated by the politics that smeared his climb to fame. He wanted no part of the campus intrigue.

Fate had other plans for Jacobs.

As Jacobs reassessed his future, an invitation to visit Manila fell on his laps. Ambassador Eduardo (Danding) Cojuangco, then project director for basketball, sent an emissary to the US to look for an American coach who could bring life back to the sport here. The emissary was Basketball Association of the Philippines secretary-general Honesto Mayoralgo, an Ateneo graduate who tapped his contacts in Jesuit schools to ask around for recommendations. Mayoralgo, who has since passed away, was pointed at Jacobs’ direction.

Jacobs had nothing to lose in accepting the free round-trip ticket to Manila. He took it as an opportunity to get away from campus politics and enjoy a brief vacation.

When the plane was about to land on the Manila runway, Jacobs looked out the window and saw ricefields, carabaos, thatched roofs and goats. It was a strange portrait of what was supposed to be a tropical paradise.

From the airport, Jacobs was whisked to a Makati office where he was introduced to Mr. Cojuangco. Jacobs had absolutely no idea of what was in store. He didn’t know if Filipinos even played basketball. And he surely had never met anyone quite like Mr. Cojuangco.

When he met Mr. Cojuangco, Jacobs knew this was no ordinary man. They hit it off. They talked about a vision for basketball. They shared a common view of sports as a source of national pride and a unifying factor to galvanize a fragmented society. They shook hands and began an enduring relationship that today, remains as strong as ever.

I met Jacobs during the Asian Basketball Confederation (ABC) championships in Calcutta, India, in 1981. I will never forget the moment because it changed the course of my own life. It was during the trip to Calcutta where I also met Mr. Cojuangco.

How I got to Calcutta was a story in itself but that will be for another column.

Jacobs fell in love with the Philippines. He staked his future here. He found himself slowly breaking away from the American way of life and becoming a Filipino at heart.

As a basketball coach, Jacobs revolutionized the way the game was played here. He showed how to win with science, hard work, team play and discipline. He raised the level of technology in playing the game and turned every contest into a learning experience.

Philippine basketball got a major boost when Jacobs arrived. He brought the Philippines back to prominence and was the only man feared by the Chinese powers in Asian hoops.

Who can forget Jacobs’ feat of sticking it to China in leading the Philippines to a 74-63 win for the Asian Youth championship before an overflow crowd of 25,000 at the Araneta Coliseum in 1982? Three of the players on the title team are now Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) coaches — Ginebra San Miguel’s Joseph Uichico, Talk ‘N’ Text’s Derick Pumaren and Welcoat’s Leo Austria.

Who can forget Jacobs’ feat of leading the Philippines back on the Asian throne via an 82-72 thrashing of China in Kuala Lumpur in 1986? Who can forget Jacobs’ feat of coaching Northern Cement to the 1981 Jones Cup crown and San Miguel Corp. to the 1985 title? Who can forget Jacobs piloting Northern Consolidated, an amateur guest club, to the 1985 PBA Third Conference championship?

Today, several Jacobs disciples are coaching or occupying front office jobs in basketball. Binky Favis coaches Coca-Cola. Eric Altamirano runs the successful Coach E basketball academy and is in charge of the San Miguel All-Stars project where retired players tour the country in promotional exhibitions. Hector Calma is San Miguel Beer team manager. Samboy Lim is Ginebra team manager and Allan Caidic, the Coca-Cola team manager. Elmer Reyes, Jun Tan and Tonichi Yturri are coaches, too.

His imprint in Philippine basketball is a legacy that will live forever.

On Dec. 22, 2001, Jacobs suffered a stroke while driving home to his Pasig apartment. He had just been renamed national coach and was on the verge of laying the groundwork for the country’s big comeback as an Asian cage power.

Jacobs is now confined to a wheelchair, unable to speak and walk. But his mind is alert. He motions with his fingers and smiles to show his appreciation for those who care. From the moment he suffered the stroke, his loving companion Menen has not left his side. She has been a solid rock for Jacobs in his time of need. Mr. Cojuangco has never left his side, too. And the millions whose lives have been touched by Jacobs in one way or the other continue to pray for his recovery.

Jacobs turns 64 today. On his birthday, let us thank the Lord for the gift of life and pray for his complete recovery.

1979
12-27-2006, 09:22 PM
i've always wondered where tim cone played ball, or did he ever?....but there's one great coach, in my opinion..


I've seen him play in Dasma pick up games, after we'd play..... he wasn't a great player but he sure was a heckuva competitor. But, of course that was like in the mid 80s ;)

nel
12-28-2006, 08:12 AM
Some have attributed Alaska's surprising performance (or lack of) in the current PBA conference to their predictability. Tim Cone is probably the longest tenured coach in the PBA, and over the years, he's probably developed a style of coaching that other discerning mentors have learned to read. Maybe that's why Alaska was able to pull out a win a couple of weeks ago when Cone left the coaching chores to his assistants after halftime. While Cone was coaching in the first half, Alaska trailed by a big margin, but came back in the 2nd half to pull out the win after he turned over the reins to the assistant coaches.

AFAIK, Cone has not coached competitively in any other league (except for a stint as national team coach), and this may be limiting him in terms of exposure to different situations, environments, and styles.

Jeep
12-29-2006, 12:08 PM
stumbled upon this article on the internet just this morning. thought it just right to have it included in this thread:

Best recruiter? No. Best coach? Yes

By Michael Rosenberg (Special to FOXSports.com)

So many things have been said about Bob Knight over the last three decades. Much of it has been critical, and a lot of that criticism has been accurate. But as Knight stands on the verge of breaking Dean Smith's all-time victory record, let's step back and say what hasn't been said enough:

Pound for pound, talent for talent, Bob Knight is the best college basketball coach ever.

As a wise man once said of Bear Bryant, "He can take his'n and beat your'n, and he can take your'n and beat his'n." I have no clue what all those n's mean. But this applies to Knight as well.

Too many college basketball coaches are really just street hustlers with a whistle. They recruit the best players they can find/buy, roll out the balls, then leave to recruit some more. Knight is different.

He has always been a coach who happens to recruit. He has never had the most talented team in the country.
In his long career, do you know how many NBA All-Stars Bob Knight has coached?

One. Isiah Thomas. That's it.

This is not meant, in any way, as a knock on the following men, but ... Dean Smith had two Hall of Famers on his 1982 national championship team (Michael Jordan and James Worthy). John Wooden had two of the most dominant players of their era (Kareem in his Lew Alcindor days and Bill Walton).

Obviously both men were exceptional coaches. But Knight won with less. Knight plugged good players into his motion offense and created great teams.

Knight won three national championships at Indiana, made two other Final Fours and had the Hoosiers among the national elite for most of his time there. His 1976 champs went undefeated, the last Division I team to do so. They were a juggernaut, often considered one of the dominant teams of all-time, and for good reason.

Yet we often forget two important facts about that team. First, the stars of that team were Quinn Buckner, Kent Benson and Scott May — excellent college players, but hardly the breathtaking talents we normally associate with all-time great teams.

And second: that team should have been undefeated two straight years. They were unbeaten in late February 1975 when May broke his arm against Purdue. They eventually lost to Kentucky, 92-90, in the NCAA tournament.
That 1975 team should have won the title. So, probably, should have the 1993 team, which was the best in the land before Alan Henderson got hurt. Those Hoosiers were basically Calbert Cheaney, Henderson and some talented role players. Yet they beat Michigan's more talented Fab Five twice that season, won the loaded Big Ten and probably should have won Knight's fourth national title.

That was Knight's last true national title contender. Since 1993, most of what we have heard about Bob Knight has been criticism. And, again, a good chunk of it is deserved. But why should the man's dark side be the only side we see? College basketball is the seediest major sport in America, even if you count pro wrestling and national politics. In a sea of extra benefits, recruiting inducements and grade fixes, is Bob Knight's temper really so terrible that we should dismiss his remarkable ability to do his job?

If I had a son, would I want him to play for Bob Knight? Depends on the kid. Knight is obviously not for everybody. What has amazed me in the last 15 years is that after all the newspaper space, cyberspace and talk-radio airtime devoted to Knight's antics, there were actually some recruits who acted like they didn't know what they were getting into.

There I go, talking about the man's temper when I intended to stick to his skills. For some reason, when it comes to Bob Knight, we are so fascinated by what he isn't — calm, media-friendly, humble — that we forget what he is: the best molder of college basketball talent ever.

Detroit Free Press columnist Michael Rosenberg is a frequent contributor to FOXSports.com.

=============

locally, coach baby d. has my vote any old day! happy new year sa inyong lahat!

john_paul_manahan
12-29-2006, 06:28 PM
speaking of coach knight....

his quest for win number 880 was delayed with unlv beating texas tech.

MVBA
02-03-2007, 02:39 AM
* * *Here is a listing of head coaches, including those who coached on an interim or acting capacity, during the two-conference first season of the Mindanao Visayas Basketball Association in 2006:

Raul ALCOSEBA - M. Lhuillier Kwarta Padala-Cebu City (1, 2)
Jerry JARANILLA - Toyota-Iloilo Turbos (2)
Leoncio TAN - Cebu Landmaster-Toledo (1), Cebu Landmaster-Mantawi (2)
Dennis TUMAYAN - West Negros College (1)
John TROMPETA - Toyota-Iloilo Warriors (1)
Catalino YBANEZ - Mantawi Traders (1), Talisay Aquastars (2)

Eduardo ARUGAY - Iligan Archangels (2)
Flordelito CAGAMPANG - Montana Pawnshop-Davao (1)
Edgardo DACOCO - Cagayan de Oro (1)
Rembrandt Lawrence PASTRANO - Cagayan de Oro (1)
Jesus Ramon PIDO - PacMan-GenSan (1), MP Warriors-GenSan (2)
Pancrancio PONTILLAS - Lanao Royals (2)
Angelito QUIDLAT - Lanao Royals (2)
Rex SALVANA - Holcim Pryce Pharma-MisOr (1, 2)
Nelson TATE - Iligan Archangels (1)

gameface_one
12-27-2009, 03:27 AM
Happy birthday, coach Ron
SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) Updated December 27, 2009 12:00 AM

The man who revolutionized Philippine basketball during a legendary coaching career turns 67 today. Ron Jacobs has spent the best years of his life in the country and is probably more Filipino than a lot of Filipinos we know.

Jacobs came to Manila in 1980, fresh from being named the West Coast Athletic Association Coach of the Year for piloting Loyola Marymount University to the NCAA Tournament in a dramatic one-season turnaround after taking over the varsity reins.

It was love at first sight for Jacobs who left everything behind in Los Angeles to start a new life in a new country. He fell in love with the Philippines, settled here and developed friendships with Filipinos whom he considered to be the warmest people in the world. San Miguel Corp. chairman Eduardo (Danding) Cojuangco brought Jacobs to the country and their close relationship has endured through the years.

Jacobs’ achievements in Philippine basketball history are monumental. He piloted the Philippines to a 74-63 win over powerhouse China for the Asian Youth title before an overflow crowd of over 30,000 fans at the Araneta Coliseum in 1982. Among his players were Hector Calma, Ginebra San Miguel coach Joseph Uichico and former PBA coaches Derick Pumaren and Leo Austria.

In 1985, Jacobs brought more honor to the Philippines as he steered San Miguel to the Jones Cup crown in Taipei, defeating heavy favorite USA, 108-100, in overtime. Calma, Samboy Lim, Allan Caidic, Franz Pumaren, Yves Dignadice and Tonichi Yturri were some of his players in that historic feat. Chip Engelland, Jeff Moore and Dennis Still were Jacobs’ American recruits. The US was coached by Purdue’s Gene Keady and the roster was studded with future NBA cagers Kenny Gattison, Harold Pressley, Joe Wolf and Kevin Henderson.

That same year, Jacobs took Northern Consolidated, an amateur guest club, to the PBA Third Conference championship. And in 1986, Jacobs brought the Philippines back on the Asian throne as the national squad scuttled China, 82-72, for the FIBA-Asia championship in Kuala Lumpur. His players included Calma, Caidic, Lim, Franz Pumaren, Elmer Reyes, Yves Dignadice, Still and Moore.

Without a doubt, Jacobs’ imprint on Philippine basketball is a legacy that will live forever.

* * * *

On Dec. 23, 2001, Jacobs suffered a stroke while driving home to his Pasig apartment. He had just been renamed national coach and was on the verge of laying the groundwork for the country’s big comeback as an Asian cage power.

That day, Jacobs had lunch with Ambassador Cojuangco’s brother Henry and son Kit, Uichico and wife Cathy, Allan and wife Milotte, assistant coach Binky Favis and wife Ella and his wife Menen at Le Souffle on Ortigas Avenue.

It’s been eight years since and Jacobs is still confined to a wheelchair, unable to speak and walk. But his mind remains alert. He communicates with his fingers and eyes. He smiles to show his appreciation for those who care. Menen has been a wonderful rock for Jacobs. Ambassador Cojuangco and his family continue to provide for his every need. And the millions whose lives have been touched by Jacobs in one way or another pray for his recovery and today, wish him a happy birthday.

There is a reason why God has kept Jacobs alive and it is faith that makes him strong to stay alive. On his birthday, let us thank the Lord for giving us life, for giving us coach Ron and for giving us hope that someday soon, he will be like before – walking, talking and making us better persons by his example.

We asked Uichico, Lim, Caidic and Calma for their birthday wishes and here is what they said:

Uichico: “We’ve been together through a lot of ups and downs, through thick and thin and had our share of fun and laughter. As a mentor, he demanded excellence and after every loss, he would ask me why I did this and why I did that. And I realized later on that it wasn’t what I did. It was the reason why I did things that he wanted to find out, whether it was wrong or right. And when he saw me lax, he always said, ‘the harder you work, the luckier you get’ which I carry to this day. As a father and friend, he will defend you until the end but will also tell you like he sees it. I miss the encouraging moments that I see in his eyes, joy in success and sadness in failure. When we won my first championship as head coach, I went to the stands to greet him, both of us teary-eyed. He asked ‘which is sweeter, this or the other one?’ I answered ‘this one’ and we hugged. So many stories, so many heartwarming, fond memories. I could go on and on but you won’t have enough space. To coach Ron, I can’t thank you enough for the knowledge and the time that you’ve shared with me. Happy birthday, coach. The memory lives on. It’s nice reminiscing and I can be emotional doing this. Coach Ron gave me his cap, the one he used at practice. I am humbled. There will only be one great teacher. And it is an honor being his student. Happy, blessed Christmas and may 2010 be another grace-filled year for all of us.”

****

Lim: “Happy birthday, coach Ron. Thank you so much for giving me the privilege to play for your team. I will treasure everything I learned from you and all the memories of our glory days. Merry Christmas, coach, and get well soon.”

Caidic: “Coach Ron is like my second father. I owe him a lot. I missed his presence during games. My most memorable moment with coach Ron was winning over the US for the Jones Cup title in 1985. Happy birthday, coach Ron, and God bless you.”

Calma: “Coach Ron was more than just my basketball coach. He was my best friend and a father who put importance to my well-being. He is the one most responsible for setting me up for a successful basketball career. He was a great mentor and motivator and I was amazed at how he was able to unite all of us in the Northern Cement team not only as a solid team but as one big family. Today, we still remain friends and until now, I still haven’t seen another team as bonded as ours. In my personal affairs that meant so much to me, he was always present like when I got my award as Most Outstanding Kapampangan and when he stood as our ninong. He was always there for us. His home was open to me anytime of day and night and as we shared stories, I enjoyed having a pizza with him. It’s been eight years since Ron and I have not been able to chat because of his disability but I always remember our good days fondly and miss him very much when he cannot be present in the highlights of my life. I always pray that he could be better and especially, hope that he has peace in his heart. On his birthday, I wish for God to keep him in comfort and hope that one day, he can walk and talk again so we can share stories and a pizza like old times.”

To a basketball legend, a dear friend and a man of substance, happy birthday. It’s an honor to know someone like coach Ron.

pepman
01-03-2010, 01:38 PM
i've always wondered where tim cone played ball, or did he ever?....but there's one great coach, in my opinion..


I saw his Facebook account and guess what? He's a former varsity player of Internation School Manila.

maroonmartian
06-05-2010, 12:09 PM
Have to share you this.

Legendary John Wooden dead at 99

http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/basketball/news?slug=ys-woodenobit060410

One of the best collegiate coach (or maybe the BEST) in the US NCAA. Good thing he had a good life aside from basketball. I am sure some of his former players will pay tribute (which are too many)

Toto Battung
06-06-2010, 11:47 PM
The best basketball coach ever. Not so much about winning but making players a better person in life.
" A life not live for others is not a life." So much to learn from John Wooden, we call him, Coach.