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Hoops McCann
08-17-2006, 08:57 AM
‘Globalization’ good for NBA, says commissioner
Agence France-Presse

GUANGZHOU, China -- The globalization of basketball is threatening US domination of the American-made sport, but for National Basketball Association Commissioner David Stern nothing could be better. On the eve of the August 19-September 3 World Basketball Championships in Japan, Stern said the traditional US dominance will eventually be a thing of the past -- if it is not already -- as more elite players appear the world over.

"Better competition can contribute to the American game ... that is what is going to be good for basketball," Stern told Agence France-Presse in an interview.

"We don't think that it is good for the game if there are no elite athletes playing basketball in other places," Stern said.

At this month's World Championships, a record number of non-American NBA stars will be representing their national teams, including Dirk Nowitzki of Germany, Tony Parker from France, Pau Gasol of Spain, and Yao Ming from China.

"The French team that is going to appear at the World Championships is going to start five NBA players, that is a cause of competitive concern for the US team and of celebration for the NBA," said Stern, who is in Guangzhou to watch Team USA play warm-up games against China and Brazil. "We really think that that's terrific."

China, which has already sent three players to the NBA, will be a constant provider of players for the league in the future, he said.

This was largely due to its rapidly developing economy, but also because the world's most populous nation has 300 million registered basketball players.

"I hope that by the summer of 2008 [Beijing Olympics], the Chinese team will have five NBA players," Stern said. "That would be a success for the NBA, a success for Chinese basketball and a competitive issue for Team USA."

Stern, 63, has headed the NBA since 1984 and is credited with turning the league from a loss-making entity saddled with alcoholism and drug problems into one of the world's most respected. Now his sights are clearly set on the world.

"We view our mission as to grow the game of basketball. If we grow the game of basketball, the NBA and all leagues will prosper," he said.

The model of growth, he added, is to emulate World Cup football, where top players on different national teams result in the world's most watched sporting event.

"To have competition where a team like Argentina with two NBA players and a team like Brazil with three NBA players, to see that kind of competition, this is a model that has made football the number one sport in the world," Stern said.

But unlike the four-yearly World Cup, basketball would be better served to have an international championship every two years, he said.

"Every two years we will have an international competition that will involve national teams," he said.

With continued growth of the global game, it was only a matter of time when Olympic basketball will overshadow the NBA finals as the world's most popular and definitive tournament, he argued.

“The NBA finals is still viewed as the crowning ultimate basketball championship, but I think the Olympics are going to get to that point,” said Stern.

"It is that way because the Olympics is going to become more widely viewed than the NBA finals and as basketball becomes a premier Olympic sport," he said.

Basketball has long-been an Olympic sport, but it was only in 1992 that NBA players were allowed to take part.

Since then the US has won every Olympic basketball gold medal, except for in the 2004 when they took bronze and Argentina won gold.

Signs that US domination was on the decline came two years earlier when they placed a disappointing sixth at the World Championships in Indianapolis won by Serbia and Montenegro.

"Over time, typically, [world competition] must become equal and it will become equal as the game becomes more popular," the commissioner said.

"Over time, basketball is not going to be different than any other enterprise -- automobiles, trucks, medicine, you name it -- in the age of globalization and the movement of labor, I don't think any one nation is going to be able to claim dominance," Stern said.

======
guys, what do you think? is this a win-win situation, or a zero-sum scenario for the NBA? what about its repercussions in the PBA? discuss here.

bigfreeze_bibby
08-17-2006, 02:05 PM
Globalization is definitely good for the NBA since at least the Americans will realize that they are not the best in the business and they will continuously strive for their own development on the sport and the foreign players really change the way the game is played comparing it to the years of Magic, Bird, Thomas, Jordan, and up to this point, malaki na pinagbago ng style of play sa NBA.

Puede natin siguro ito i-apply sa PBA by letting guest foreign teams play every conference. Maybe different Asian teams can come over to our country and play against the PBA teams in one conference. Another thing na naiisip ko is that if it is possible to have a Champions' League format in the Asian region wherein champion teams of pro leagues across Asia will face each other as soon as all pro basketball league season ends in various Asian countries.

Wang-Bu
08-17-2006, 08:56 PM
Baka hanggang NBA lang 'yan Sir McCann.

Sa'tin kasi sa PBA tila yata nung dumating ang mga sinasabing Fil-Am sandamakmak naman palang Fil-Sham.

Baka hindi alam ng mga Atenista, si John Dumont, 6-5 na forward na sumubok pumasok sa Ateneo nung panahon ni Long-I, ay tinanong ng harap-harapan "Do you have Filipino blood?" Sagot nung Dumont "Not a drop..." OK lang sana, kasi pwede naman ang foreign student na maglaro sa UAAP. Kaya nga lang mukhang nagkaayawan din. Kamukat-mukat ko nakita ko na si Dumont sa Pasig-Rizal Pirates ni Joel Banal sa MBA na naglalaro bilang Fil-Am, samantalang sa kanya mismo galing na wala siyang dugong Pinoy.

Diyan sa isang PBA team may isang dambuhalang "Fil-Am" na dinaan lang sa "pakilala" system ng Management nila. Dinala si "Fil-Am" sa isang bayan sa Leyte (o Samar yata) tapos pinakilala nung isang manager sa lahat ng masalubong, "Ay si ano nga pala, pinsan ito ni___, pamangkin bale ni Mang___, tagariyan s may kabilang kanto..." Mga ilang linggo din nilang ginawa ito para mapakilalang tubo sa lugar na iyon si "Fil-Am". Awa ni bathala nung nag-background check ang PBA e di siempre puro positive ang sagot ng mga nakausap.

Buti pa si Andy Siegle Pinoy na Pinoy, as in stainless owner-type jeep pa ang sasakyan niya.

Kid Cubao
08-18-2006, 05:59 AM
as basketball becomes the leading indoor team sport in the world, no doubt it acquires regional flavors that make international players hot commodities in the NBA. the european club system, for instance.

players that go through the european club system are practically locked in to study and develop basic basketball skills on a daily basis. they spend hours and hours in shooting practice, moving without the ball, learning the basic cuts, and setting proper picks and screens. they also study in classroom settings--in addiition to regular schoolwork, they are taught a wide variety of offensive and defensive sets used by different coaches around the world. in this setting, they learn how to learn basketball.

the club system has its flaws, no doubt, but its advantages is creating a buzz in the world of basketball. the NBA and PBA have adopted some key features of the club system: establish a pool of talent from which to draw the members of the national team, master the skills necessary to succeed internationally, and establish a clear-cut system on offense and defense understood by all players.

Bennie Bangag
08-18-2006, 10:35 AM
What globalization has done is make the NBA job market even tighter for native-born American ballers. Internationalists who have game are the ones who have roster spots in NBA teams, while those American players they displaced will find opportunities to play in countries where the said internationalists originally came from.

time1513
08-22-2006, 06:11 PM
Globalization is definitely good for the NBA since at least the Americans will realize that they are not the best in the business and they will continuously strive for their own development on the sport and the foreign players really change the way the game is played comparing it to the years of Magic, Bird, Thomas, Jordan, and up to this point, malaki na pinagbago ng style of play sa NBA.

Puede natin siguro ito i-apply sa PBA by letting guest foreign teams play every conference. Maybe different Asian teams can come over to our country and play against the PBA teams in one conference. Another thing na naiisip ko is that if it is possible to have a Champions' League format in the Asian region wherein champion teams of pro leagues across Asia will face each other as soon as all pro basketball league season ends in various Asian countries.


thats a good idea ah champions league for all the asian teams, i think they did that before eh pero i dont know they called it parang mcdonalds open pero nde lng asian teams lahat tlaga so pati bulls dati kasama.. thats a really good idea kaso lng mahirap kasi mdyo.. iba iba yta ang skeds nila eh ... pero ok yun tell commish heheh ;D

john_paul_manahan
08-24-2006, 04:32 PM
that was the mcdonald's championships mid 90s pa yun

i knew that the european champion, the nba champion, the aussie champion participated...

the rockets and bulls came to mind then...

oca
08-25-2006, 10:07 AM
First, allow me to set time line here. I consider basketball becoming trully global starting with the 1992 Barcelona Olympics when NBA players were first allowed to play.

Since then talagang sumikat na ang basketball sa buong mundo.

Simula rin nu'n or a few years immediately after that, napansin ko madalang na magkaraoon ng "tunay na magaling na import ang PBA".

Players that people come to see play. Bibili ka ng ticket para mapanood sila kahit di mo team ang nilalaruan niya. When watching the games live is worth every peso you spend. Kahit hirap mag commute or maghanap ng parking space. Wala nang mga ganitong klaseng import.

Obvious naman ang dahilan, mas malaki ang pa-sweldo sa Europa at South America. "Mercenaries" nga silang naturingan, saan pa ba maglalaro ang mga iyan kundi duon sa may malaking bigayan. (It does not help that the PBA has set a ceiling as to how much a team can pay for its imports.)

Kung babanggitin ko pa kung sino yung mga magagaling na import bago ang globalization, hahaba lang itong post ko at malamang katamaran ng basahin ng karamihan.

But my observation is stated clearly, wala ng tayong nasisilayang primera klaseng mga import since the sport became global.

Kung sino man yung mga magagaling na dumayo rito sa mga nagdaang taon, if you have a name in mind, an import who fans fans really come to see, sabihin mo kung anong taon siya naglaro dito, malamang before globalization.

Gumawa ka ng listahan ng mga magagaling na import. Malamang karamihan naglaro rito before globalization, before 1992.

In response to the question by the thread starter--

Globalization has not been good for the PBA, in terms of getting "good" imports that will bring in the fans.

Wang-Bu
10-12-2006, 03:43 PM
Global na ang laro panahon pa lang nung mga McDonald's pocket tournaments. Marami na ding mga international player na pwede na sanang mag-NBA dati pa gaya nina Dino Meneghin ng Italy, Arvydas Sabonis ng USSR at Oscar Schmidt ng Brazil. May punto din naman si Sir Oca, tila naging "official" ang pagiging global ng larong basketball sa level ng NBA nung panahon ng totoo at nag-iisang Dream Team nung 1992 Olympics. Duon nakita ng buong daigdig na kakayanin din pala nilang maglaro ng basketball sabay ng mga NBA superstar.

Joescoundrel
11-16-2006, 03:35 PM
Agence France-Presse
Last updated 02:06pm (Mla time) 11/16/2006

BEIJING -- China's basketball chiefs have vowed to crackdown on "age fraud" after admitting that over-aged players represented their country in international youth matches, state press said Thursday.

"I'm sorry to say that some of our past results from international youth games were not real as we had some over-aged players in the squads," the China Daily quoted Zhang Xiong, a China Basketball Association (CBA) training director, as saying.

"Age fraud is the cancer of the development of our youth teams, we will start a war against age fraud as we have against doping."

Zhang did not identify the players who had cheated, or which international tournaments they had played at.

To combat the scourge, the CBA will introduce "bone age detecting machines" for domestic youth tournaments and require all players to present official proof of age documentation, the report said.

Players lying about their age will be banned and their teams fined up to 10,000 yuan ($1,270 dollars), it added.

I posted this in the General Discussion Forum but it may also stick here. Is this China's way of saying we're going fully global now and thus want to play the global game following the global rules?

Sam Miguel
12-11-2006, 09:06 PM
"Staying centered on Ming hype

A basketball nation turns its lonely eyes to Shaquille O'Neal.

Where have you and all of the other centers gone, Shaq? Well, Shaq's been on another tour of the injured list. And even when he returns to the Miami Heat, his aging physique could remain the prisoner of an inability to finish those commercials for Nestle and Burger King in anything near one take.

Into O'Neal's considerable wake steps Yao Ming.

Yao, now a spry 26-year-old, generally is considered the top center in basketball (at least until Ohio State's first game under the courtside analysis of Dick Vitale). Shaq forfeited the crown by providing a relatively pedestrian 20 points and 9.2 rebounds per game last year ... a championship year.

While leading the Houston Rockets to 11 victories in 16 games, Yao has demonstrated across-the-board improvement that would suggest his worthiness. But before the coronation, some NBA watchdogs are wondering if he's reached center stage by default.

Due to semantics, challengers to the throne may include Sacramento's post-avoiding Brad Miller and Utah's number-producing Mehmet Okur. Forward tags have eliminated San Antonio superstar Tim Duncan, who's really been playing the center position his entire career. Orlando Magic 20-year-old Dwight Howard also is referred to as a power forward, but generally lines up in the middle.

Among card-carrying centers, the top rank has been bestowed upon Yao, whose rise is marked by swell numbers - 25.6 points and 9.8 rebounds per game on 52.8-percent shooting.

"He really has taken his game to the next level," said a cliche-flipping assistant coach currently employed by another Western Conference team. "Yao's always been a solid scorer in the paint and facing up, but I think his strength, focus and understanding of the NBA game are reasons for the improvement."

Yao, now listed at 7-foot-6 and a sturdy 310 pounds, has turned this added strength and stamina into increased productivity in the fourth quarter.

"In the old days, you could count on him to fade down the stretch in big games," said our first coach.

Our second coaching witness is here to offer critical balance.

"Sure, he's really good, but Yao needs to show consistency over a period of time before I'll call him great," said assistant coach No. 2.

OK, where are the consistency issues?

"The Rockets live and die on his scoring. He gives 'em 27 in the wins and 22 in the losses. This shows he's their MVP, but also shows that he needs to raise his level in every game.

"And he seems in better condition, but his scoring drops six points on the second night of a back-to-back situation. Now that's an average over a small sample of games, but great players get it done in those deals."

A review of Tim Duncan's numbers, for example, shows the superSpur has averaged more points and a higher field-goal percentage in Game 2 of his team's first five back-to-back challenges.

In addition to consistency of production in back-to-back situations, coach No. 2 has other Yao nits to pick.

"He still needs to improve his passing out of the double team. Yao's improved his timing at shot blocks, but Houston's defensive improvement is more because they now have (Shane) Battier.

"Yao also needs to rebound better than about 10. That numbers sounds good, but the guy is 7-6 with a really strong lower body. He's been really outstanding on the boards in some games and not so hot in others. He also may never be great on screen-roll defense, but he needs to be able to recover on the boards after showing hard on the pick."

Let's see ... better passing, increased stamina, more defensive tenacity. Do these lessening liabilities add up to a player coach No. 2 would prefer not having on his side?

"Of course not. What am I, an idiot? Hey, the guy has been a force, is a force and will be a force. If there's some anti-Yao thing out there, it may be because he's not flashy, not because he's Chinese. He doesn't have many highlight dunks.

"Remember, the best low-post guy in the league for a while has been Duncan. And he doesn't get nearly enough props."

A little something I picked from Fox Sports, written by the veteran NBA pundit Randy Hill

Sam Miguel
12-11-2006, 09:21 PM
As per the above...^^^

I would like to think that while Shaquille O'Neal's best days are behind him - and of course the continuing globalization of the great game of basketball - that there will indeed come a time when the most dominating player in the best league in the world, the NBA of course, will NOT be an American. For now however, that claim still cannot be staked by Yao Ming. As good as his numbers are he is still not the "force" the abovequoted coach thinks he is. For all of the good things Yao does he is still too much of an underachiever at this stage of his career.

As I recall Shaq was not only an All Star but an NBA scoring champion as well as a gold medalist in the Worlds and the Olympics on or before his 26th birthday. Yao has yet to even be a league leader in any of the statistical categories traditionally dominated by superstar centers: scoring, rebounding and shotblocking. He has not gotten his homeland China even into the semifinals of the Worlds or the Olympics.

One may even argue that at the same stage of their careers Shaq was much stronger, much faster, much nastier than Yao; he was, in fact, truly the most dominant center in the NBA at age 26. And considering further that he was in an NBA that still had other superstar centers at that time - Hakeem Olajuwon, Patrick Ewing, David Robinson and even Alonzo Mourning - Shaq's development was truly outstanding. Yao on the other hand has not come anywhere near the numbers and accomplishments of Shaq in what must be admitted as a watered down NBA at least as far as superstar centers go.

So, yes, if Yao is now the best center in the NBA it is mainly be default.

Sam Miguel
12-11-2006, 10:20 PM
I believe the best non-American center to ever play in the MBA would still be Arvydas Sabonis, the 7'3" Lithuanian giant with the deft passing touch and a masterful technician of the pick-and-pop with Sarunas Marciulonis. Sabonis, when he was still with the USSR team, led a masterful demolition of David Robinson and the last all-college US Olympic team in the 1988 Seoul Games. Sabonis's only sin was that he came to the NBA at the ripe old age of 30-something with the asylum known as the Portland Trailblazers. He had already lost a step or two no thanks to fluid in both knees and was not the dominator he was in international competition. While the passing, the toughness and the perimeter touch were still there he was clearly no match for the likes of Shaquille O'Neal and a by then much stronger and smarter David Robinson.

Had he come even just two or three years after being drafted by the Blazers in 1986 (?) he could have been the difference maker for the Clyde Drexler Blazers of the late 1980's to early 1990's. Heck, he may have been enough extra talent to help the Blazers beat the Pistons in 1990, and maybe even the Bulls of Michael Jordan in 1992, giving the Glide two rings and no reason to go to Houston anymore in 1995.

oca
12-12-2006, 12:24 PM
During that "no-zone defense" era, Sabonis, IMO, would have been the greatest big man ever to play in the NBA. Aside from those skills mentioned by Sam earlier, may tira sa labas si Sabonis. At kung kailangan niyang i-dribble ang bola 3 to 4 bounces just to get to spot he wants, he can do it and you feel secure that it will not be picked or swiped. All that will definitely create opportunities for his teammates.

May dribble, may pasa, may tira, may gulang. Matangkad, may katawan.

Paano mo dedepensahan yan?

Sayang at matanda na ng maglaro sa NBA.

But, he still would have made a "significant presence in the NBA", kaya lang, he arrived at Portland when it was due to implode. So, whatever contribution he can make, is of little value, taken in the context of how problematic Portland was then.

Sayang talaga.

Wang-Bu
12-12-2006, 01:47 PM
Pagdating sa globalisasyon ng larong busluan na pinakamamahal nating lahat dito sa gameface.ph mayroong isang katanungan na mistulang talangka sa aking isipan: Ano ba ibig nating sabihin sa globalisasyon ng basketball? Ang ibig bang sabihin nito ay ang umiibayong pagsikat nito bilang isang natatanging laro sa buong daigdig gaya ng mabanggit ni Sir Cubao? O ang pagkasiksat na ng mga alamat gaya nina Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Michael Jordan at Shaquille O'Neal sa buong daigdig at hindi lamang sa larangan ng busluan gaya na din ng nabanggit ng isa pa nating katoto? O ang pagdami ng mga hindi Amerikano na ngayo'y nagpapakitang gilas sa pandaigdigang mga liga at torneo?

Sa akin kasi nung mismong oras na naglaro na ng basketball ang mga taga-ibang bansa (mga hindi Kano) naging pandaigdigan na talaga ang larong busluan. Maaring naging "official" ang pagiging pandaigdigan ng basketball nung nilampaso ng totoo at nag-iisang US Dream Team ang lahat ng kalaban nila nuong 1992 Barcelona Olympics gaya na nga ng nabanggit ng isa nating matoto. Ngunit bago pa nung makasaysayang kaganapang yaon ay naging pandaigdigan na talaga ang basketball, lalo ng nung isa pang Olympics kung saan nanalo ng gintong medalya sa kontrobersiyal na paraan ang mga Ruso kontra mga Amerikano. Hanggang ngayon nasa isang kaha de yero pa sa bansang Suisso ang mga pilak na medalya na hindi tinanggap ng mga natalong Amerikano. Ganun na katindi ang pagiging global ng basketball.

MonL
12-12-2006, 02:53 PM
Ngunit bago pa nung makasaysayang kaganapang yaon ay naging pandaigdigan na talaga ang basketball, lalo ng nung isa pang Olympics kung saan nanalo ng gintong medalya sa kontrobersiyal na paraan ang mga Ruso kontra mga Amerikano. Hanggang ngayon nasa isang kaha de yero pa sa bansang Suisso ang mga pilak na medalya na hindi tinanggap ng mga natalong Amerikano. Ganun na katindi ang pagiging global ng basketball.


Pareng Wang-Bu,

Lihis ng konti sa usapin: Ang kasunduan sa pagtanggap ng mga Kano ng kanilang medalyang pilak ay: dapat tanggapin nilang LAHAT na manlalarong Kano ang kanilang medalya. May tumutol lang na isa, mananatiling nasa kaha de yero ang kanilang medalya. Makaraan ng ilang dekada, at humilom na ang masakit na sugat ng larong iyon sa Munich nung 1972, mayroong ilan na sa koponang Kanong iyon na gustong nang tanggapin ang kanilang medalya alang-alang sa kasaysayan at sa mga kamaganak nila, ngunit ang pinahayag ni Kevin Joyce (na binundol ni Alexander Belov nung ginawa niya ang nakapanalong tira para sa Ruso) ay: hanggang sa mamatay siya, hindi niya tatanggapin ang medalya niya dahil dinaya daw sila.

Ang bukod tanging manlalaro nung koponanang Amerikanong iyon na nanalo ng kampeonatong NBA ay si Bobby Jones na kasama sa Philadelphia 76ers nung 1983 pagkatapos ng ilang taon paghirap, kaya siguro umiral ang sentimiyento ng ilan sa kanila na tanggapin na ang kanilang medalyang pilak pagkatapos ng pagkahabahabang panahon... :)

Kid Cubao
12-12-2006, 06:31 PM
I believe the best non-American center to ever play in the MBA would still be Arvydas Sabonis, the 7'3" Lithuanian giant with the deft passing touch and a masterful technician of the pick-and-pop with Sarunas Marciulonis.

there's the rub, sam. he can't be the best non-american center to play in the NBA because his best days were already far behind him. there's no telling how he would have fared on a daily basis against the likes of patrick ewing, hakeem olajuwon, robert parish, david robinson, and even kareem had he entered in his prime in the mid-80s. all we know is that he played on rickety knees yet was ale to display flashes of his old brilliance as a post operator. for me, the best non-american center (at least he was until he got naturalized) is still hakeem.

MonL
12-13-2006, 07:59 AM
I believe the best non-American center to ever play in the MBA would still be Arvydas Sabonis, the 7'3" Lithuanian giant with the deft passing touch and a masterful technician of the pick-and-pop with Sarunas Marciulonis.

there's the rub, sam. he can't be the best non-american center to play in the NBA because his best days were already far behind him. there's no telling how he would have fared on a daily basis against the likes of patrick ewing, hakeem olajuwon, robert parish, david robinson, and even kareem had he entered in his prime in the mid-80s. all we know is that he played on rickety knees yet was ale to display flashes of his old brilliance as a post operator. for me, the best non-american center (at least he was until he got naturalized) is still hakeem.


I wonder what would have happened if the standout Soviet or Eastern Bloc players were allowed to play in the pros under an "open basketball" concept ten or twenty years before it actually happened? The 70s had a number of such players who stood a chance of being NBA pioneers: Alexander and Sergei Belov, 7-2 Alexander Belostennyi, 7-3 man-mountain Valdimir Tkatchengko, from the Soviet Union;* 6-7 forward Drazen Dalipagic, guard Zoran Slavnic and Dragan Kicanovic from Yugoslavia, and possibly forward Kamil Brabenec from Czechoslovakia. But political and language barriers stood in the way. The late Red Auerbach said then that he could have used Dalipagic "had he learned a little English."

Drazen Petrovic made the most of his chance in the NBA as he came in in his prime. Alexander Volkov made a decent show in his brief stint with the Atlanta Hawks. The list goes on. But Sabonis would be the greatest "what could have been" from the Eastern Bloc. Sayang.* *

Wang-Bu
07-19-2007, 10:38 AM
Tila yata sinisibak ng malas si Yi JianLian. Inalat na nga nung Summer League mukhang hindi pa yata matutuloy na makapaglaro sa Milwaukee.

JonarSabilano
07-19-2007, 11:03 AM
Naaawa ako kay Yi, actually. Mukhang binibraso ng CBA at ng Guangdong ang Milwaukee na i-trade siya. Kung magkataon, baka hindi pa makatuntong ang bata sa NBA.

In other news, pinapagalitan ng CBA si Yao Ming dahil sa non-participation niya sa mga practice ng NT nila.

Uncle Toots
07-19-2007, 11:23 AM
di rin ako naniniwalang ayaw ni yi sa milwaukee. he's never been to the united states, hasn't lived there for any prolonged period of time, so i don't believe he's in any position to tell the difference between the asian communities in the east and west coasts and why he'll be in better shape signing with a western conference ballclub.

BigBlue
07-19-2007, 12:44 PM
how about on the aspect of his development as a basketball player? they claim that his growth would be affected by playing in milwaukee, since he'll be playing behind two other young and talented big men, Bogut and Villanueva. Isn't that a valid point for Yi and his handlers to make?

Wang-Bu
07-19-2007, 05:52 PM
^^^ Kung ako naman mas welcome na sa akin na meron akong makakaensayong Bogut at Villanueva araw-araw. Kung hindi ka pa naman gumaling niyan na may ganyan kang ka-ensayo sa araw-araw ewan ko na lang. Tsaka kung magpipilit sila sa West Coast sino naman kaya ang pwedeng ipang-trade sa kanya?

Teka... pakawalan kaya ng Lakers si Lamar Odom para sa isang Yi Jian Lian? Malabo ano? Kasi nga naman gusto ng maka-champion muli ni Ku--- este Kobe Bryant. Mahirap nga naman kung isang Yi Jian Lian lang ang kabakas niya sa ganung alituntunin.

john_paul_manahan
07-19-2007, 06:33 PM
it would presupposing that the chinese government would want to have him play in an area where there is a vibrant Chinese community. then again, he does not really have a leverage in choosing where he is to play since he entered the nba draft. (to put it simply: he wants to pick where he wants to play)

the most prudent thing would be for david stern to do something about it. i doubt though given the emerging chinese $$$....

as for yao ming. can't the chinese government give him a break.... especially now given that there is not really much size in h-town (although scola will help here)

Bennie Bangag
07-19-2007, 07:19 PM
how about on the aspect of his development as a basketball player? they claim that his growth would be affected by playing in milwaukee, since he'll be playing behind two other young and talented big men, Bogut and Villanueva. Isn't that a valid point for Yi and his handlers to make?

iba naman ang laro ni yi kina andrew bogut at charlie villanueva. both guys are better off with their backs behind the basket, while yi is an overgrown small forward more used to facing the basket. if i were coach, i'd waste no time putting them all together to form my new front three. i-trade na nila si gadzuric ;D

Sam Miguel
08-07-2007, 05:05 PM
Villanueva in the middle, Bogut at the 4 and Yi at the 3 would be an intriguing and BIG combination.

But something tells me Yi Jianlian will eventually be headed elsewhere even if the Bucks do somehow sign him. The lure of the Western Conference with its big Chinese and overall Asian populace sounds too good to pass up.

Slightly off-topic, if the SBP folks are still looking for a 7-foot rebounder maybe they should look into the patrimony of Charlie Villanueva, perhaps spin it so that it turns out he is ENRICO Villanueva's cousin thrice removed... ;D

gb3934
08-21-2007, 11:23 PM
Globalization for the NBA is very good idea. Stern is only following the model of Major League Baseball in the US. If you look at the MLB stars today many are foreign, I would even venture to guess that most high profile stars are foreign or foreign born. Dominicans, Japanese, Venezuelans, even Chinese. Not too many from Europe though because those boys can't do anything with their hands other than basketball. MLB has been very active developing camps and teaching facilities in other countries and has also established relationships with professional leagues in Japan and Korea. Of course in the end they want all the best players to come to the US to play. Good strategy though.

gameface_one
08-22-2007, 09:13 AM
NBA eyes regular season games, franchises in Europe



Agence France-Presse
Last updated 09:21am (Mla time) 08/21/2007


LONDON -- Franchises based in Europe remain the long-term goal of the NBA and regular season games in Europe between NBA teams are being discussed, the head of the league's new London office told Agence France-Presse.

Sophie Goldschmidt, the NBA's Vice-President of Marketing Partnerships and Business Development for Europe, said Europe, and Britain in particular, held a great deal of potential for the league and the sport.

Asked whether National Basketball Association franchises in Europe remained a prospect for fans of the league here, Goldschmidt said: "I think it's a long-term goal. It's definitely something we're open to have some sort of research done on.

"Ultimately, down the road, that could well be an option."

Goldschmidt noted, however, that there was no timeline on the expansion of the NBA into Europe.

She added that regular season games -- following on from pre-season games that four NBA teams will be participating in across Europe in October -- were an idea that had been "thrown out there and discussed, but there isn't a set timeline on that."

"At the moment, we're just focused on building the sport further in all the different markets ... really spread the game and try and grow the sport," she said in a telephone conversation following the opening of the NBA's London office earlier this month.

Expansion into Europe, aside from the NBA's own long-term views, remains a difficult proposition, as prospective owners would have to build NBA-size indoor arenas -- of which NBA officials have said there are only a handful -- and would have to overcome concerns over travel, among other struggles.

For now, the NBA's plan to expand into Britain, where basketball has a limited foothold, is to focus on the grassroots, and try and grow the league's brand with the help of new local stars such as Chicago Bulls forward and Great Britain international Luol Deng.

"We thought it made sense to have an increased presence in the UK, also leading up to 2012 and the Olympics, and seeing an opportunity in the lead up to that," Goldschmidt said.

"When you can have that local relevance, it makes your story much stronger and more relevant to the local people... we do have some good local talent, highlighted by Luol Deng, who is only really now beginning to get significant attention in the UK.

"Having a player like that to really associate the sport with, we feel can make a big impact."

The London office, which has only a handful of staff but is looking to expand, joins a long list of foreign bases for the NBA, with Paris, Hong Kong, and Shanghai among others.

It is planning to run several events in the coming months, the first one dubbed "NBA Madness", set for the first week of September in southeast London's O2 Arena -- the site of an October 28 pre-season game between Boston Celtics and Minnesota Timberwolves, a game which Goldschmidt said sold out before marketing even got under way.

"We were very pleasantly surprised ourselves, and that really underlined the potential of even the popularity that's already here that people aren't aware of," she said.

"This is a long-term commitment... we're committed to the future, we believe in the European region. With all the players coming out of the different European markets, we feel that gives us a real basis and foundation to grow the game and the NBA overall."